Category | Danny Peary on Film

A Revealing Chat with Larry Karaszewski, the Cowriter of Big Eyes

Posted on 20 December 2014

One of the most anticipated films of the season, Big Eyes opens nationally on Christmas Day, including at the UA Southampton 4. I suspect that it is on your list of must-see movies. Its stars Amy Adams and Christoph Waltz are doing the talk show circuit and Adams is hosting Saturday Night Live, and it’s likely you’ll hear their names a lot at award shows, but its main drawing card is its celebrated director. Big Eyes is being promoted as a “Tim Burton film,” and surely his fans will attempt to confirm his auteurship by pointing to the twisted story and slightly surreal imagery, hallmarks of Burton’s work. Burton’s influence is undeniable, but in truth Big Eyes is the brainchild of its screenwriters extraordinaire, Scott Alexander and Larry Karaszewski.

It’s a Wonderful Life Is Even More Wonderful on the Big Screen

Posted on 18 December 2014

Sure, you’ve watched or plan to watch It’s a Wonderful Life on television for the fifteenth or twenty-fifth consecutive December. But did you know that that you can also see Frank Capra’s incomparable Christmas classic in 35mm in a theater in New York City? The IFC Center at 323 Avenue of the Americas, off 4th Street, has been showing it several times a day and that will continue through holidays.

Box Set Features Oates in Outstanding Oater

Posted on 08 December 2014

If you’re looking for the perfect stocking stuffer for a friend or yourself, I can confidently recommend Criterion’s new Blu-ray and DVD box-sets of a terrific double feature directed by Monte Hellman, who provides audio commentary. Unique to their genre, The Shooting and Ride in the Whirlwind are exciting and thought-provoking cult westerns that were filmed back-to-back in Utah for only $150,000 combined of penurious producer Roger Corman’s money.

Norah Shapiro and Tenzin Khecheo Find Real Beauty in “Miss Tibet”

Posted on 25 November 2014

By Danny Peary Miss Tibet: Beauty in Exile fits my category Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor.  I expect it to play at various festivals, but the enthusiastic reception it had at a recent sold-out screening at Doc NYC indicates that a smart distributor might snap it up and you’ll be able to see [...]

Sanjay Rawal Shocks and Enlightens Us in Food Chains

Posted on 20 November 2014

By Danny Peary Food Chains fits my category Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor.  This week this important documentary (which is narrated by Forest Whitaker) about the exploitation of farm workers in America, opens nationally, including at the IFC Center and Quad Cinema in New York City.  You may have seen executive producer Eva [...]

Restored and Uncensored, Le Jour Se Lève Plays at the Film Forum

Posted on 13 November 2014

By Danny Peary Le Jour Se Lève [Daybreak] fits my category Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor.  But I’m thankful that the once heavily censored and then banned and then lost 1939 French masterpiece is playing anywhere. I am excited to be able to see “the Unseen Complete Restoration” print that will be showing [...]

Tom O’Brien’s “Manhattan Romance” in the Big Apple

Posted on 06 November 2014

Modern Romance fits my category Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor. It hasn’t had its theatrical release yet but it can be seen Sunday night at the Big Apple Festival at the Tribeca Cinema in New York City. Writer-director-leading man Tom O’Brien’s smart, witty, terrifically-acted follow-up to his critically-acclaimed Fairhaven, about three male high school buddies who have a tumultuous reunion in their Massachusetts town. It is about one lonely outcast who finds himself adrift.

Radcliffe, Temple, and Hill Toot Their “Horns”

Posted on 30 October 2014

Horns, Alexandre Aja’s gender-bending adaptation of Joe Hill’s cult novel, opens theatrically Friday in New York City and elsewhere. You can also see it on VOD. Just as Ben Affleck’s character is wrongly accused of murdering his cold-hearted wife in Gone Girl, a young man, Ig Perrish (Daniel Radcliffe gives still another excellent post-Harry Potter performance), is blamed for the rape and murder of his virtuous long-time girlfriend, Merrin (an appealing Juno Temple). Unlike Affleck’s ineffectual character, Ig grows a pair of horns that have the power of making everyone he comes into contact with reveal their most despicable thoughts and desires.

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Keanu Reeves Talks About Playing “John Wick”

Posted on 23 October 2014

An action-revenge thriller with a high body count, John Wick opens theatrically this Friday, and the advance word is good. For the Australian magazine FilmInk, I went on a set-visit in Brooklyn last winter with five other international journalists. Filming took place outside, in a large parking lot outside an abandoned bank.

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Payman Maadi on the Small but Powerful Camp X-Ray

Posted on 16 October 2014

Camp X-Ray fits my category “Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor.” This Friday Peter Sattler’s beautifully acted, troubling, touching, and important debut feature–which makes it clear why America must close Guantanamo–opens theatrically in New York City and on VOD. The synopsis in the press notes: “A young woman (Kristen Stewart, giving her most mature performance, excels as Amy Cole) joins the military to be part of something bigger than herself and her small town roots, but ends up as a rookie guard at Guantanamo Bay. Her mission is far from black and white, as she is surrounded by hostile jihadists and aggressive male squad mates. When she strikes up an unusual friendship with one of the detainees (Iranian actor Payman Maadi, who follows the Oscar-winning A Separation with another extraordinary performance), both of their worlds are forever shifted.

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