Truck Stop

Posted on 13 April 2012

There are few who would argue with the fact that there is a problem on Noyac Road.

A sliver of roadway once created for commuters to get between Southampton and Sag Harbor, the road has become much more significant for cars regularly traveling the length of the East End. It is often used as a zippy alternative to Montauk Highway, meaning speeding autos and commercial truck traffic are regular fixtures on this bayside artery.

For years residents have complained of increased traffic. Noyac Road, the main thruway for a relatively small community primarily comprised of homes, has become a by-way for an influx of vehicles, large and small. It’s annoying and dangerous to residents. And it’s also physically damaging to that road.

The road was not designed for incessant truck traffic. The noise is obnoxiously close to many residences, sure, but the weight of those vehicles digs into the pavement and causes more unnecessary cracks and blisters than the highway department can regularly keep up with.

We’re happy to hear Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst has been proactive in putting forth legislation that would ban commercial truck traffic on Noyac Road. The proposed legislation would prohibit trucks over 10,000 pounds — except those vehicles with reason to be there, like school buses or delivery trucks making stops on or near Noyac Road — and subject any violators to traffic fines.

This is a measure that’s been talked about for years, and it’s something that should have been enacted a long time ago, as Noyac Road traffic is nothing new. Southampton Town will hold a public hearing on the matter on Tuesday, April 24 and we hope to hear many voices in support of this plan.

However, we urge the Southampton Town Board not to lose sight of the bigger issue at hand. There is a real problem with the curve in front of Cromer’s Market and the Whalebone Gift Shop. We believe the ban on trucks on Noyac Road is a great way of addressing part of the problem, but it is in no way a silver bullet.

We’re pleased to see the town responded favorably to the wishes of Noyac residents at a community meeting two weeks ago and proceeded to back away from the extensive plan to totally transform the road in that area. (The handful of concrete medians, including a “loading zone” that blocks direct access to Bay Avenue, were a little too excessive.) And we’re eager to see more immediate measures being taken. Striping and/or rumble strips are a great way to initiate small steps toward change that the community, and the town at large, can begin to respond to.

At the same time, residents need to understand that anything the town does is going to change something. The hamlet is going to evolve whether residents want it to or not, and they have to be participants to help manage that change as best as possible.

What we really should be doing is making that road more pedestrian friendly, with bike lanes and sidewalks. Ultimately, we should not only work to ease the dangers that are so prevalent on that stretch of roadway, we should work to make Noyac Road even better than convention. But, that’s not possible without us first committing to some sort of change.

Again, there are few who would argue with the fact there is a problem on Noyac Road. ?But, it’s not going to get any better until we take decisive steps toward making that change.

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