Categorized | Local Business

They Are Still Lurking …

Posted on 23 September 2013

There is a false impression that the end of the summer season means the end of the threat of ticks. In reality, adult ticks are still in full force during the early fall months.

 

“Ticks are in search of blood meal into mid-November before the winter months arrive,” says Brian Kelly, tick and mosquito control specialist and owner of East End Tick & Mosquito (tickcontrol.com).

East End Tick & Mosquito Control recommends that East Enders continue checking for ticks and taking measures to protect their property even though Labor Day has passed. The fall season is the adult stage of a tick’s life cycle. Despite the cooler weather, adult ticks are able to detect the carbon dioxide being released from warm-blooded animals and humans. After feeding on a host, female adults lay their eggs underneath leaf litter and in the spring and summer the eggs hatch starting a new tick population. Preventative spraying in the fall months will not only kill existing adult ticks, it can limit the new batch of ticks that could potentially hatch at the start of spring 2014.

Experts are expecting an increased presence of ticks this fall. Over the past two years Kelly and his team have noticed an increasing number of Lone Star ticks on the East End and it is during this time of year that the Lone Star Tick larvae are beginning to bite. East End Tick Control offers monthly spray and non-spray applications which battle the constantly emerging tick population living on properties.

However, Kelly also recommends consistent property management to prevent ticks nesting for the fall season. Reducing leaf litter, brush and weeds at the edge of the lawn and around the house; cutting grass short regularly; removing brush and leaves around stonewalls and wood piles; using wood chips to help keep the buffer zone free of plants and to restrict tick migration; and trimming tree branches in to allow for sunlight are all home care tactics Kelly recommends to reduce the number of ticks on your property.

 

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