Kidnap Probe In Sag Harbor

Posted on 31 July 2008

A kidnapping case out of Boston made its way to the waters off Sag Harbor after a Coast Guard vessel targeted and then attempted to gain access to a catamaran owned by Sag Harbor resident Kali Moore believing the boat may be related to a Boston Police Department investigation.

On Sunday night Moore said the captain of a nearby sailboat called her frantically on her cell phone, which was turned off at the time, to inform her a Coast Guard vessel was circling her catamaran Serenity, which was moored just past the breakwater. Moore, whose own father was a sailor and who started her own catamaran charter service Sailacat.com in 2004, said the Coast Guard eventually tried to get a closer look, peering in the windows and beating on the hull of the boat.

“They were utterly convinced someone was on board,” said Moore on Wednesday. “Thank God I wasn’t there.”

What sent the Coast Guard to Moore’s catamaran was information that a father who has allegedly kidnapped his seven-year-old daughter may have fled to a 72-foot catamaran he recently purchased named the Serenity. Police had also received a credible tip that the father and daughter may have fled to New York, possibly Long Island.

“Anything that came up with Serenity on it was something they wanted to look into,” said Moore. “And certainly because my boat is a catamaran and nearby, I was the most likely suspect.”

The Coast Guard was aiding the Boston Police Department and the Federal Bureau of Investigations, who are searching for Clark Rockefeller, 48, of Boston and his daughter Reigh Rockefeller. According to a release issued by the Boston Police Department, on Sunday, July 27 at 12:44 p.m. officers in the Back Bay-South End neighborhood of Boston responded to the scene of a custodial kidnapping. Upon arrival, police interviewed a social worker, who was reportedly hired to oversee visitation between Rockefeller and Reigh. She said Rockefeller, who was carrying his daughter at the time, attempted to put the child down between two parked cars on Marlborough Street when a black SUV pulled up and Rockefeller jumped in the vehicle with his daughter in tow. The social worker attempted to hold onto the SUV as it sped away, said police, and was dragged a short distance before letting go.

Police later located the SUV and said they were interviewing the male driver, who was not named. Rockefeller, who is also known as J.P. Clark Rockefeller, James Frederick, Clark Mill Rockefeller and Michael Brown, is facing charges of custodial kidnapping, assault and battery and assault and battery with a dangerous weapon.

Police have received information they said that Rockefeller may be in the New York area, but since Monday have also received a tip that the father and daughter were spotted in Delaware.

On Wednesday, Moore noted that her boat is a 38-foot catamaran as opposed to the suspected 72-foot vessel police believe Rockefeller may have fled on.

“They might not find him until they want to be found,” said Moore. “With 80 percent of the world open water, they could just disappear … I just hope they find that little girl.”

Reigh is described by police as four feet tall, weighing 50 pounds with blue eyes and blond hair. She was wearing a pink and white sundress with red shoes when she was taken, said police, although on Tuesday they released images of two dresses – one blue with red, yellow and blue fish, the other white with green pea pods, which they said they believe was purchased by Rockefeller. Rockefeller is 5’6” and a stocky 170 pounds, according to police, with blonde thinning hair and blue eyes.

Police are asking anyone with information call the Boston Police Department at 617-343-4683 or CrimeStoppers at 1-800-494-TIPS. 

 

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