Sag Harbor Board of Education to Vote on Taping Meetings, Explores Green Policy

Posted on 12 March 2014

By Tessa Raebeck

 Taping Board Meetings

Before the standard crowd of a few parents, one or two teachers and one community member, the Sag Harbor School Board of Education again discussed taping its meetings to expand access to the public.

Theresa Samot, BOE president, said since its last meeting, the BOE received input from school attorney Thomas Volz and Kathy Beatty, public relations consultant for the district, both of whom did not recommend moving forward.

Ms. Samot said the board would need to be “very conscious” of what’s said during public input because if someone references an individual by name or “says something horrendous about a staff member,” the district would be liable and subject to a libel suit.

Chris Tice, BOE vice president, said in order not to avoid a libel suit, if something offensive were to be said about an individual, the district would likely have to edit that out. “That’s a conflict because as soon as you edit something people are going to wonder why it was edited,” she said.

“From your perspective,” she asked Mr. Fisher, “is that something you and your team could do? Because I’m hoping it doesn’t happen, but we don’t have control over something that happens at the podium or in the audience.”

Mr. Fisher said they could edit it or approve a policy that states, “in the event that something like that happens, that meeting doesn’t [go] for public viewing.”

LTV in East Hampton has been “extremely helpful,” Mr. Fisher said, and has offered to stream the meetings. If the district purchased its own equipment and captured the video itself, they could bring it to LTV, which would then stream the video. Or, for a base cost of $120 each meeting plus $60 per hour, LTV would film the meetings using its own personnel and equipment.

Community member John Battle told the board in February that the Sag Harbor Education Best Practice Group would provide the equipment for a six-month trial period, which he urged the board to implement.

Speaking of libel suit concerns, BOE member David Diskin, who has been a staunch supporter of the initiative, said, “there are risks to this and I would caution anyone who is a supporter of this endeavor not to minimize these risks because I think they’re considerable. That being said, life is replete with risks.”

“I no longer unequivocally endorse the idea, I endorse it with a reasonable measure of concern for the risks,” he said, adding, “I believe the board should proceed with this recording and broadcasting because the benefits outweigh the risks, but it’s cautionary.”

Without BOE members Sandi Kruel and Daniel Hartnett in attendance and no concrete resolution yet drafted, the board decided to craft a resolution in favor of broadcasting meeting with help from its attorney to be voted on at its next meeting, March 25.

 

Green Schools

Also at Monday’s meeting, parents Jocelyn Worrall and Alison Scanlon voiced their support for more green initiatives in the schools, an issue Mr. Diskin brought up at the last meeting.

“We all know that the world is neither sustainable nor harmonious and the only answer to that is to teach innovation,” Ms. Scanlon said, adding she would like to see the district adopt a green goal for next year and allow parents and community members to convene a green committee to present recommendations to the board.

Facilities director Montgomery Granger said since August 2009, the district has been performing 100 percent organic turf maintenance on school grounds and has eliminated all caustic chemicals from the schools. The facilities department is required to use a company that sells green sealed products that are independently confirmed, he said.

“I assure you that we’re as green as we possibly can be with regard to chemicals,” said Mr. Granger.

Ms. Worrall asked the board “if they would consider when our contract is up with our current carter, if they could either negotiate with a carter who does recycle or separate, or ask for a recycling separating to be included in the carter services.”

Recycling, Mr. Granger said, is included in the cost of garbage maintenance. The carter sorts through all trash at the transfer station, separating recyclables.

In terms of electricity, Mr. Granger said the district did a retrofit, adding light sensors and LED bulbs “which have at least a 50,000 hour lifespan.”

Mr. Granger said while he considers making sure the schools are safe and healthy his primary job, his second most important responsibility is saving money and being efficient.

“Maybe it’s not about the money, whether it costs more or costs less,” said BOE member Mary Anne Miller, saying its about educating students on green initiatives and implementing a culture of conservation.

Mr. Diskin suggested the board have administrators look to see if there are immediate steps to be taken, and make green policy a district goal for the 2014-2015 school year. Interim superintendent Dr. Carl Bonuso said an example of what can be done almost immediately would be to deal only with publishers that use recyclable text paper.

Mr. Diskin said he had collected “really great” resources on such green initiatives he would share with administrators, adding that getting recommendations from them “that would fit for our school” should be the next step. Ms. Samot and Ms. Tice agreed.

 

Other School News

Dr. Bonuso said the district is “not happy” with the congestion at the southern entrance to Pierson and is “working in partnership with the village to see whether or not we can talk to such issues as traffic congestion.” He is hopeful some concrete actions will be made in the next few months.

SCOPE recognized Matt Malone, Sag Harbor Elementary School principal, and athletics secretary Jeanne DiSanti as “Shining Stars,” or as Dr. Bonuso put it, “select individuals that have distinguished themselves in the field of education.”

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- who has written 452 posts on The Sag Harbor Express.

Arts Editor and Education Reporter for the Sag Harbor Express. Covering the East End with a focus on arts, education and the police blotter. Twitter: @TessaRaebeck

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4 Responses to “Sag Harbor Board of Education to Vote on Taping Meetings, Explores Green Policy”

  1. LI Duck says:

    In a Ct. school I know of, the meetings are video taped, the audience is not shown, only the board, and the public who speak at the podium. The videos are archived by date on the school’s web site should anyone wish to go back and view a meeting in the past. It is not broadcast on public access TV. In reality these archived meetings might get a total of half a dozen views on the school’s website, but it is a useful tool for anyone who wants to go back and look at a meeting.

  2. Gregg Schiavoni says:

    Isn’t it true to state “if someone references an individual by name or “says something horrendous about a staff member,” the school could be held liable and subject to a law suit even if the meetings aren’t taped? Taping the meetings wouldn’t have any effect on the school’s liability, would it?


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