Tag Archive | "Amagansett"

Ceremony Planned At Amagansett Lifesaving Station

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East Hampton town officials and the Amagansett Life Saving and Coast Guard Station Committee have invited the public to attend a ceremony at noon on May 3 to commemorate a new flagpole on the grounds of the Amagansett Life Saving Station at Atlantic Avenue Beach.

The Amagansett Life Saving Station was built in 1902 and operated by the U.S. Life Saving Service until 1915, when it was taken over by the U.S. Coast Guard, which operated it until the mid-1940s.

In 1966 Joel Carmichael saved the building by moving it to Bluff Road and converting it to a home for his family. Forty years later, the building was given back to the town by the Carmichaels. It was lifted off its foundation at their property and moved down the road back to its original site where it is now being restored.

Bridgehampton National Bank Donates $25,000 to Local Food Pantries

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The Bridgehampton National Bank (bridgenb.com) Annual Apple Campaign, which was started in 2011 to provide contributions to local food pantries, culminated Monday with the distribution of $1,000 checks to each of 23 food pantries from Montauk to Greenport to Deer Park and Melville. At a presentation and reception at the BNB Bridgehampton office, pantry representatives Bridgehampton, East Hampton, Southampton, Springs and Sag Harbor were on-hand to accept the funds.   Maureen’s Haven, which helps the homeless on the East End, also received a check for $2,000. This is only part of the $25,000 donated by bank customers, employees and the company itself.

“This is one of the community programs we are most proud,” said Kevin M. O’Connor, president and CEO of Bridgehampton National Bank.  “It is a true collaboration between the bank, its customers and employees, working together to help those most in need in our communities. It is the essence of what it means to be a community bank.”

The Apple program began nearly five years ago with a conversation initiated by the East Hampton Food Pantry. They suggested the “apple” as a means of recognizing donations. With 26 branches across Suffolk and Nassau Counties, BNB took its Apples bank wide. The program is an annual holiday tradition which runs through the end of January.  In lieu of a holiday gift, BNB donates in the name of its employees, customers enthusiastically participate and BNB matches donations and fills in any gaps to reach the goal and fund one pantry in each of its markets. In addition to the financial gift, branch staff collected non- perishable foods during the months of November, December and January, which are also distributed to local pantries.

Daniel Schoenheimer and Mellisa Hin at the Crazy Monkey Gallery

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"Cotton Candy Sky - Sunset at Sands Point" by Mellisa Hin.

“Cotton Candy Sky – Sunset at Sands Point” by Mellisa Hin.

By Tessa Raebeck

The Crazy Monkey Gallery in Amagansett will display the work of two of its member artists, Daniel Schoenheimer and Mellisa Hin, on view April 4 through May 4. The show at the Co-op gallery will present landscapes from the American West to Long Island.

With her emphasis on “exploring the expression of emotion,” Ms. Hin said, the artist will show a collection of her large landscape paintings, many of them inspired by the Long Island landscape.

A resident of Miller Place, Ms. Hin instructs at two galleries, “combining my love of people and my love of art,” she says, and serves as a Brookhaven Arts and Humanities Council Board Member and is President of the North Shore Art Guild.

Assistant Director of the Crazy Monkey Gallery, Daniel Schoenheimer will show his new series of digital photographs, highlighting the diverse landscapes from Arizona to the East End.

"Shadmoor II" by Daniel Schoenheimer.

“Shadmoor II” by Daniel Schoenheimer.

“The Arizona desert provides the perfect counterpoint to Montauk,” Mr. Schoenheimer said of his series of photographs, “where rolling hills and the blues of the Atlantic give way to rocky canyons, spiky plants and dusty browns. Every once in a while the desert blooms – an unexpected festival of flowering that gives rise to tiny petals, giant cactus and an abundance of fauna. This is what I seek to capture.”

From up close, detailed photos to “sweeping desert landscapes” and panoramas, Mr. Schoenheimer hopes to show “the vast range of desert life in an ‘uninhabited’ environment.”

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held Saturday, April 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. at The Crazy Monkey Gallery, 136 Main Street in Amagansett. For more information, call 267-3627.

State Education Aid Increases by $1.1 Billion

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. announced Monday that the 2014-15 state budget will increase state aid to education by $1.1 billion to more than $22 billion.

“The State Legislature has improved the governor’s 2014 state budget proposal by increasing school aid from a proposed 3.9 percent to 5.3 percent across the state,” said Assemblyman Thiele. “Suffolk County’s share of aid also would increase by 5.3 percent. Suffolk had gotten its fair share of this year’s school aid increase.”

A major part of the school aid increase was the reduction of the Gap Elimination Adjustment by $602 million. The GEA was originally enacted to close a state budget deficit back in 2008-09.

Mr. Thiele said the final state budget also includes the governor’s $2 Billion Smart School Bond initiative to improve classroom technology and construct pre-kindergarten classroom space. He expressed support for the governor’s Smart School Bond Act, which must be approved by voters in November.

“The focus on improving quality education is a goal I fully support,” said Mr. Thiele. “This state aid proposal accomplishes that goal for Long Island and New York State.”

“Superintendents in my district conveyed that their priority for this year’s budget was the reduction of the GEA—a budget-balancing fiasco imposed by the Democrats in 2010 when they controlled all three branches of government.” said Senator Kenneth P. LaValle. “This year, we were successful in restoring $602 Million of the GEA money to local school districts. The state’s commitment to education is now well over $22 billion. This budget meets the needs of New York State’s children while at the same time providing property tax relief to residents who help underwrite the costs. I am pleased to have obtained increases for each school district in my area.”

Under the state budget, the Sag Harbor School District will receive $1,637,585, a 5.92-percent increase in state aid. The Bridgehampton School District will receive $656,377, a 10.9-percent increase. The East Hampton School District is set to receive $2.76 million in state aid, a 4.15-percent increase, and the Southampton School District will get $2.6 million, a 9.9-percent increase.

Schneiderman Elected Deputy Presiding Officer of the Suffolk County Legislature

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The Suffolk County Legislature’s majority caucus, which holds 12 out of 18 seats, voted unanimously to select Legislator DuWayne Gregory (D-Amityville; pictured standing left) as Presiding Officer and Legislator Jay Schneiderman (I-Montauk; pictured, standing right) as the next Deputy Presiding Officer at its meeting on Friday December 20.

The 12-member caucus met to decide on a replacement for former Presiding Officer Wayne Horsley of Babylon, who has left the legislature to become the regional director of Long Island State Parks. The final vote for these leadership positions took place at the Suffolk County Legislature’s Organizational Meeting on January 2, 2014.

Among the many powers and duties of the presiding officer, the officer chairs all meetings of the full legislature, preserves order and determines when to recess meetings. The presiding officer also establishes independent committees, boards and commissions and designates a chairperson to a specific committee. In the event of an absence from a legislative meeting of the presiding officer, the deputy presiding officer assumes those powers and duties.

Legislator Schneiderman will be the first member of the Independence Party to hold a leadership position at the county level.

“I would like to thank my colleagues for this great opportunity,” said Schneiderman. “I look forward to working with Presiding Officer DuWayne Gregory and the County Executive towards a proactive agenda and to be a strong voice for Suffolk County.”

Schneiderman said he plans to work on mental health issues, poverty, public transportation and the fiscal issues facing Suffolk County’s budget as he enters his final term on the legislature. Schneiderman also plans to move forward with environmental issues such as improving water quality and reducing the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

 

South Fork Gas Prices Drop

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr.  announced late last week his most recent survey of gasoline prices. According to that survey, South Fork prices have declined $0.08 since the last survey late in October.

Long Island prices have increased by $0.09 cents during the same period. South Fork prices are now $0.03 cents above the state and Long Island average. South Fork gas prices were $0.20 cents higher than the Long Island average in October. That differential has decreased by $0.17 cents since October when it was $0.20 cents.

The Automobile Association of America (AAA) provides for a regional survey on New York State gasoline prices. However, there is no survey solely for the South Fork. Thiele’s survey also includes prices in western Southampton along Montauk Highway.

“The average price for East Hampton and Southampton along Montauk Highway excluding Amagansett and Montauk is now $3.69,” said Thiele.  “The average price for Amagansett and Montauk is $4.09. A gallon of gas on the North Fork is now about $3.59. The LI average is $3.66 and the State average is $3.66.”

555 Amagansett Requests Adjournment

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The applicants behind 555 Amagansett, a project that entails the rezoning of acreage on Montauk Highway in Amagansett, requested in advance of Thursday night’s East Hampton Town Board meeting, that the board table its request for new zoning to a later date yet to be determined. The current application would create a senior housing overlay district for the creation of a market-rate senior housing community.

The project has taken heat in recent months, with critics contending the application was being fast tracked by the East Hampton Town Board before a new majority takes office in January.

“We have heard various concerns of the community and agree that allowing more time to meet with members of the community, as well as the newly elected officials of the East Hampton Town Board, will allow a more constructive dialogue regarding the future of the 555 property,” said the developers, Putnam Bridge, in a statement issued last week.

Sag Harbor Village Board: Ambulance Corps Looks Towards Paid Help

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By Kathryn G. Menu

For Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps President Ed Downes each passing year is a record breaker, as emergency service calls increase and volunteers scramble to ensure the community has an ambulance corps it not only can count on, but one it can be proud of.

And they are certainly not alone.

Since last spring, the East End Ambulance Coalition — a group of representatives from volunteer ambulance companies from Sag Harbor, Bridgehampton, Amagansett, East Hampton, Springs and Montauk — have been working together towards a paid first responder program, which they hope will launch in the summer of 2014.

Starting this past June, the Montauk Fire District Board of Fire Commissioners approved a pilot program for this past summer, providing for one paid EMT 24 hours a day, seven days a week through mid-September.

Many departments on Long Island, including Southampton, have moved towards having at least partially paid paramedics and first responders who work with local volunteers, improving response times as a result.

During a Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees meeting last Wednesday, trustee Ed Deyermond noted with the increase in call volumes, considering a paid emergency medical technician (EMT) is something that should be considered within Sag Harbor’s fire district.

According to Downes, the company will likely seek to work cooperatively with the East End Ambulance Coalition, which was set to meet again Friday, towards a regional paid first responder program before seeking to fund a program for Sag Harbor alone.

Downes said if implemented, the coalition would have a team of three to as many as five paid responders on duty, available to respond along with one of the coalition companies to any emergency service situation from Bridgehampton to Montauk.

“The biggest problem is funding,” said Downes of the coalition’s efforts. Working with both East Hampton and Southampton towns for funding is being considered, he added, with the coalition waiting for newly elected town boards to take office before making any formal proposals.

No matter what program is implemented, Downes said all the fire districts will still rely heavily on volunteers. Working together, for example through the implementation of a daytime duty crew — a program established by coalition companies this July — is critical, he added. Downes said he expects the daytime duty crew is something the coalition will continue next summer.

A duty crew made up a volunteers from one of the coalition companies was on call Monday through Saturday to respond to any ambulance call, along with the home company the call originated from. The program gave the all-volunteer ambulance companies a back-up team to rely on.

For Downes, and the 29 members of the Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps, while having paid first responders on-call in a regional capacity would be a welcome help as calls continue to increase, the volunteer force will always be essential.

“Everyone gives what they can and all that they can,” he said.

In other emergency service news, last Wednesday Deyermond once again brought up the need for a helipad for medevac purposes in Sag Harbor. Last month, Deyermond suggested it could be something constructed near Havens Beach. Last Wednesday, he noted it would have to support a 24 ton military helicopter.

“Maybe we can get a ballpark figure and see if this is going to fly,” said Deyermond.

The village board also passed a resolution made by Deyermond to purchase 16 new air packs for the Sag Harbor Volunteer Fire Department at a cost not to exceed more than $70,000 out of the excess budget available through the fire department, and the remainder to be funded through the village’s contingency fund.

Deyermond said the village was also looking at the cost of purchasing two new dry suits for the Sag Harbor Volunteer Fire Department Dive Team.

Last month, the fire department reported that 17 of its 60 air packs had to be replaced with newer models as they were now rated as “substandard.” Two of the dive team’s three dry suits, critical for water rescues, have been in and out of repairs.

In other village news, the board introduced two new local laws last Wednesday that will be up for public hearing at its January 14 meeting.

First is a local law amending the zoning code to require a certificate of appropriateness from the Sag Harbor Historic Preservation & Architectural Review Board (ARB) for any exterior “alteration, restoration, construction, reconstruction, demolition or material change in the appearance of such a property that is visible from an adjacent street or adjacent property.” A certificate of appropriateness would not be required for interior renovations alone.

The board will also hold a public hearing for a change to the building code, requiring sediment control during the course of a building project to protect natural vegetation and topography by requiring a project-limiting fence, mesh, straw bales, or similar devices during construction and any clearing or grading of land.

“First of all, this is usually done as a matter of course in most projects anyway but this will give the building inspector the right to enforce it,” said village attorney Fred W. Thiele, Jr.

The board was also unanimous in renewing its agreement with the Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club, which will be able to continue its program at Cove Park, a small public park near Redwood Causeway.

The not-for-profit Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club has been rowing off Cove Park since its founding in 2008. In addition to competitive rowing for middle and high school students, the organization also has adult programming and camp offerings in the summer. For more information, visit rowsagharbor.org.

The board did table a request by Martin Monteith to run a sailboat charter from outside the breakwater for the 2014 summer season. Monteith was asking the board for permission to load and unload passengers from the village docks.

Thiele cautioned the board that if it was going to allow the use of its dock space it would have to charge a fee.

The board asked Harbor Master Bob Bori to weigh in on the matter before making a decision.

The board also denied a request by Susan Mead of the not for profit Serve Sag Harbor to host a fundraising event on Long Wharf June 28 and June 29.

“I am happy to entertain it at a different venue or on a different day, but it’s just that this is Long Wharf we are talking about,” said board member Robby Stein.

Petition Against Zone Change in Amagansett Emerges

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The East Hampton Town Board and the East Hampton Town Planning Board have been named in a petition — STOP 555 — seeking to prevent a zone change that would reclassify a 23.5 acre piece of farmland at 555 Montauk Highway in Amagansett as senior citizen housing overlay district. Opponents charge the development will contain luxury condominiums on what is currently agricultural land.

A petition urging both boards not to support the re-zoning has already been signed by over 400 people and can be viewed on the petition hosting site change.org.

The East Hampton Town Board is holding a public hearing on the zone change on Thursday, December 19.

Split East Hampton Town Board Adopts Airport Capital Improvement Plan

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By Kathryn G. Menu

The East Hampton Town Board adopted a capital improvement plan for the East Hampton Airport during a work session Tuesday — a roadmap for $5.26 million in repairs and improvements consultants suggest be made to airport facilities over the course of the next five years.

Originally, the capital improvement plan (CIP) — unveiled just before a November 21 public hearing on the proposals — called for $10.45 million in airport repairs and projects over a five-year period. The adopted CIP was cut to $5.26 million with 15 proposed projects removed from the plan as they were not a part of the town board approved Airport Master Plan or Airport Layout Plan, both of which were vetted through environmental review.

The CIP was approved by the outgoing Republican majority of the town board. Airport liaison Dominick Stanzione, Supervisor Bill Wilkinson and Councilwoman Theresa Quigley voted in support of the plan, with Democrats Sylvia Overby and Peter Van Scoyoc voting against adopting the CIP.

East Hampton Airport manager Jim Brundige said the CIP is meant to highlight what projects are necessary at the airport. Quigley also noted that approving the CIP does not mean the board is approving any of the projects laid out in plan, or how has made a decision about how they will be funded. Rather she called the approval a “first step” in moving towards improvements at the airport first identified in the town’s airport master plan.

However, both Overby and Van Scoyoc expressed concerns about a footnote in the document that references Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding. The CIP, according to testimony given by town aviation consultant Dennis Yap at the November 21 public hearing on the plan, will be submitted to the FAA. Van Scoyoc said he was concerned submitting the plan to the FAA was the first step towards securing additional grants from that agency for airport projects.

“It’s not a necessary step for us to send it to the FAA unless we are pursuing funding from the FAA,” he said.

For several years now, a number of residents and members of the Quiet Skies Coalition have encouraged the town board not to accept FAA funding as they believe when grant assurances expire in December of 2014 the town has the ability to gain greater control of the airport, including the potential to impose curfews or restrict certain aircraft.