Tag Archive | "art"

Sara Nightingale Gallery Presents Fourth Edition of #Blinddates/MusicLab

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Ryan Messina on trumpet, Will Jhun on tenor sax and Nick Lyons on alto sax will perform improvisational music together at the Sara Nightingale Gallery Thursday. Photo courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Inspired only by each other and the energy around them, tonight three friends will present an evening of improvisational music at the Sara Nightingale Gallery.

"Drumming Circle" by Gus Yero, acrylic on canvas. Photo courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

“Drumming Circle” by Gus Yero, acrylic on canvas. Photo courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

The show, MusicLab edition #4, is part of the #Blinddates series that pairs two musicians—and strangers—together for a concert. Tonight’s performance gives the evening a new take; the artists are all friends, having met in Brooklyn through a shared connection, pianist Connie Crothers.

Playing his trumpet, Ryan Messina will be joined by saxophonists Will Jhun on tenor sax and Nick Lyons on alto sax. The trio will feed off each other, developing the performance as it goes along.

While listening to the show, guests can view the gallery’s exhibition, including works by Malin Abrahamsson, Bill Armstrong, Eric Dever, Cara Enteles, Glenn Fischer, Brian O’Leary, William Pagano, Ross Watts and Gus Yero.

Refreshments will be served at the event, Thursday, April 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sara Nightingale Gallery, 688 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call 793-2256 or visit saranightingale.com.

Fish Eye View Highlights Long Island’s Life Underwater

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A photo of a seahorse by Chris Paparo.

A photo of a seahorse by Chris Paparo.

By Stephen J. Kotz

From the surface, the teeming ecosystem of an East End bay reveals itself in glimpses: a bluefish breaking the surface; a school of silversides darting through the shallows; or a spider crab moving slowly along the edge of the eelgrass.

But for Chris Paparo, who has been taking underwater photographs for more than 25 years and is better known as the Fish Guy, the view is decidedly more detailed.

This Saturday, Mr. Paparo will present a free slide show and lecture, featuring his underwater photography, “An Underwater Journey of Long Island Through the Eyes of a Fishing Biologist,” at the office of the Concerned Citizens of Montauk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

CCOM executive director Jeremy Samuelson said he first learned about Mr. Paparo from his Facebook page, Fish Guy Photos, and was eventually intrigued enough to invite him to speak as part of CCOM’s environmental education outreach efforts.

“We all suffer a bit from this National Geographic thing in that we think the only beautiful things worth saving are halfway round the world,” said Mr. Samuelson, “but his photographs show you find them right here in our backyard.”

By day, Mr. Paparo, who received a degree in marine biology from Southampton College, manages the marine sciences center at the Stony Brook Southampton campus. “It’s exciting to have gone to school here as an undergrad and be back here for the next phase of the college’s life,” he said. Besides overseeing the facility’s operations, Mr. Paparo leads tours and field trips for visitors to the marine science center from local schools, museums and other community groups.

Before joining the university’s staff, he worked for four years at the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation and another 13 years at the Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center in Riverhead as its educational coordinator and one of its rescue techs.

“The reason I went into marine science is my dad took me fishing when I was six, and I’ve been hooked ever since,” he said.

Besides giving lectures on his underwater photography, Mr. Paparo finds time to write a naturalist column for On the Water magazine and contribute to Fisherman magazine.

Mr. Paparo, who said he was certified as a scuba diver in 1993, first took up underwater photography as hobby. In recent years, “it’s snowballed a bit” with the advent of first the internet and later Facebook. Today, he said, every chance he gets he grabs his scuba gear and his Canon underwater camera rig, to explore beneath the surface of local bays.

Those who attend his lecture will see photographs of fluke, striped bass, porgies, puffers, winter flounder, sea bass and many other fish species. “Now you are going to see it from their point of view,” he said.

“I start with all the important game catch and then show the by catch, the crabs, snails, clams and end with the exotics, the tropical fish that come up in the summer time,” he continued.

Over the years, Mr. Paparo has photographed everything from tiny seahorses, which frequent the bays—“you have to know where to look for them,” he said—to sharks out in the ocean, although the latter he photographs from the safety of a boat.

“I haven’t seen any sharks diving, but I haven’t ventured out in the ocean to do any ocean diving,” he said. But he goes out with a friend and they tag and release sharks. “One of the makos we tagged off Shinnecock in 2012 was found 2,200 miles across the Atlantic,” he said. “It’s neat when you get a recapture like that.”

But Mr. Paparo said he has seen his share of sharks close to shore. “They are very abundant around here,” he said. “I’ve seen makos in the inlet. It’s just a matter of being out there and if you are out there the amount of time I am your chances of seeing them go up.”

Last year, Mr. Paparo said he was thrilled to see a string ray he estimated at 3-feet in diameter swimming around Ponquogue Bridge in Hamptons Bays. Although he was unable to photograph the fish, he caught it on video.

“I still get excited when I find an octopus,” said Mr. Paparo, who added that he has never seen one while diving, because they are very elusive creatures. “We collected two last fall, little guys,” he said. One was in a net, another came up with the anchor. “The first one was about the size of a gum ball, and the other one was even smaller, about the size of my pinky nail. If you didn’t know what you were looking for you would have missed them.”

Mr. Paparo said many amateur photographers fail to recognize how much work goes into capturing images of wildlife. “If you only go once, you won’t necessarily get the chance,” he said. “You never know what you are going to come across. And just because you saw it doesn’t mean you are going to get the picture.”

Mr. Paparo’s talk takes place at CCOM’s office at 6 S. Elmwood Avenue in Montauk. Admission is free and reservations are not required. For more information, call CCOM at (631) 238-5720.

 

Surfrider Foundation to Host Paddle-Building Workshop with Master Craftsman Barry Walz in East Hampton

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A canoe and paddle crafted by Barry Walz. Courtesy of Mr. Walz.

A canoe and paddle crafted by Barry Walz. Photo courtesy of Mr. Walz.

By Tessa Raebeck

For one week last fall, Barry Walz navigated the rivers and streams of the Canadian wilderness, with only his dog, his canoe and his paddle for company.

“It was a bit lonely at times, I found myself talking to myself—but I didn’t answer,” he joked about his first solo canoe trip.

Not only did Mr. Walz manage the trip on his own, it was also entirely self-supported: He built his canoe and paddle by hand.

A master craftsman on the East End for nearly 30 years, Mr. Walz will teach a paddle-building workshop this spring at his East Hampton shop in conjunction with Surfrider Foundation.

“Barry has many years’ experience building beautiful and functional paddles and canoes, and is an excellent teacher,” said event organizer Mike Bottini, chair of the Eastern Long Island Chapter of Surfrider Foundation.

After coming to Shelter Island in 1985 to remodel the house of his brother, internationally known designer Kevin Walz, Mr. Walz decided to stay, making a name for himself on Shelter Island first in general construction. Later, after finding himself happiest doing detail work, he began to focus primarily on cabinetry and custom furniture. He moved Walz Woodworks to East Hampton in 2013.IMG_0022 paddle

The Walz brothers share two lines of furniture, as well as a patent for a technology that enables them to build graceful, lightweight, but very strong, furniture.

“It’s just a way to put things together so it can be very, very light, but very, very strong,” explained Mr. Walz. “We made a chair that weighs about two pounds—pretty cool.”

“I like being able to put things together so they fit well and they make sense to me,” continued Mr. Walz. “When you build cabinets or furniture, you have to be able to see things in three dimensions, so as they go together, you kind of anticipate certain joinery. I just like the way things fit. It’s like putting a jigsaw puzzle together, but you’re actually creating the pieces.”

After seeing Mr. Walz’s work, Mr. Bottini decided to pursue a collaboration between the craftsman and Surfrider Foundation, coming up with the idea for a paddle workshop. Participants in the workshop will be able to choose between canoe, kayak, and stand-up paddleboard paddle designs. Mr. Walz, who will guide each participant through the entire process of constructing their custom-made paddle, will provide all materials.

An avid adventurer, Mr. Walz started building paddles in the late 1980s for his own use. “I was doing research, development so to speak,” he said. “I would take them down the rivers and say, ‘Oh this works’ or ‘This doesn’t work.’” He sent his paddles to experts to have them critiqued and took lessons to fine tune his craft, all the while using friends and his own wilderness canoe trips to test out his creations on the water.

“The first thing is function and then the next thing is the beauty of it,” he said. “Wood is a gorgeous way to build things. It talks to me, I guess, a little bit. That’s where you get a choice—to have it talk to the individual that’s designing it. Whether it’s the blade design or the key grip, it’s all custom; it’s all shaped to the individual hand and the person, so, really, the individual’s going to get a completely custom paddle that they like and talks to them.”

“There is a bit of a science and there’s a balance in everything,” he added. “Some people are talented in one way and you lean toward that and other people are the opposite. But there’s a science and that’s half the fun of it all—the functionality and the beauty of it all—being able to put something together and make it very functional and beautiful.”

People have been calling Mr. Walz’s work “functional art,” he said, but the craftsman is always focused on function first. He gets frustrated when he visits a client’s house to find one of his paddles hanging on a wall, rather than lying outside next to the canoe. “Although they’re very beautiful, I make them to be used. You can always refinish them and make it look pretty again if it gets scratched up,” he said.

The function sustains his love for his craft, as creating a paddle or canoe is a way for Mr. Walz to experience his true passion, wilderness canoeing, from home. “When I’m building a paddle, it kind of takes me there. I’m in the back of my mind as I’m constructing a blade; it kind of brings me back to that spot I love so much,” he said.paddle pics-0

In his younger days, he would do 100-mile loops through northern Minnesota and Canada. “It’s a million acres of anywhere you want to go,” he said of the region, called the Arrowhead. Today, his custom-made canoe has over 1,600 wilderness miles on it and will earn even more this fall, when he guides six novices on a trip up north.

Throughout it all, he always has his dog, his canoe and his paddle. He hopes to share that connection with others through the workshop, creating paddles that are “a special thing for them—something that means something to them,” he said.

With times and dates to be arranged with Mr. Walz, the workshop is limited to five participants and will be held evenings at Walz Woodworks, 216 Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton. The fee is $400 for Surfrider Foundation members and $425 for non-members, with a one-year membership included. For more information, contact Barry Walz at 767-8838 or bwcanoe@gmail.com.

Multi-media Artist Jayoung Chung in Residence at the Watermill Center

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"Drawing YOU," 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing YOU,” 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

“Like the Moon, I am constant. My work, however, keeps changing like the moonshape which is changing all the time,” says Jayoung Chung, the newest artist in residence at the Watermill Center in Water Mill.

Starting her residency this week, Ms. Chung will be at the Watermill Center through April 6 working on her visual and performance art piece “Performing with You,” which incorporates drawing, music and technology into a performance. Primarily a visual artist, Ms. Chung is also a musician, animator, filmmaker and storyteller and most of her work is multi-media. A native of South Korea, she has exhibited her work in both solo and group shows worldwide.

In “Performing with You,” Ms. Chung has embedded 12 strings made of conductive wire, paint and tape within a sheet of paper. The artist creates a multi-dimensional portrait of an individual in the drawing performance. As she draws with charcoal, the instrument touches the stings, generating sounds in real time through a computer program. The act of drawing creates the sounds and the sounds in turn affect digitized, moving images projected on screens. The drawing, words and sounds all interact with one another to create a multi-dimensional portrait.

"Drawing, as composing and performance," 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing, as composing and performance,” 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

During her six weeks in residency at the Watermill Center, Ms. Chung hopes to create and record a series of 40 performance portraits.

“Above all, I want my art to be yours,” the artist explains in her bio, “I want it to be a sweet whisper, a consolation and happiness for you. I want your story to be revealed beautifully through my sensitivities, and approach you as nature’s wonder. For you.”

Southampton Students Show at Creative Partners Exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum

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By Tessa Raebeck

Featuring this year’s work from its longstanding collaboration with the Southampton and Tuckahoe Schools, the Parrish Art Museum will present the Creative Partners Exhibition, on view from Saturday, March 8 through April 14.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is “This Is Us,” a photo-documentary created by the Parrish Art Club, the Southampton High School’s after-school group, taught by Southampton art teacher Gail Altomare with help from Cara Conklin Wingfield, education director at the Parrish. Being shown in the gallery through video projection and also via an interactive website, the film is a digital portrait image-and-text exploration of the community at Southampton High School, including students, teachers and staff. Inspired by the Humans of New York project in New York City, the photo-documentary provides a candid view of the everyday lives of Southampton students through the unique, individual portraits they shaped of the people in their world.

The Creative Partners exhibition will also feature work by the schools’ pre-kindergarten, fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, including relief sculptures reflective of an art history curriculum focused on ancient Egypt and paintings inspired by the master landscapes of the museum’s permanent collection.

For more information, call 283-2118 x121 or visit parrishart.org.

The Tonic Artspace Presents: Phenomena

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Christine Lidrbauch. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

Christine Lidrbauch. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

By Tessa Raebeck

From remembrances of death and celebrations of love, industrial sculptures to cartoonish monsters, the crisp lines of houses to the blurred hues of sunsets, “Phenomena” is showcasing the variety of talent on the East End through the works of six emerging artists.

“Phenomena,” which opened on Saturday at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Bridgehampton, is the latest installation from the Tonic Artspace.

Springs-raised Grant Haffner and his twin sister Carly Haffner are the co-founders of the Bonac Tonic Art Collective, a group established in 2005 for young, local artists on the East End. The Tonic Artspace, Mr. Haffner said, “is the next phase in the collective’s metamorphosis to hopefully more pop-up gallery type situations.”

Print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

Print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

“An undefined, forever evolving, pop-up art promoting machine that understands no boundaries,” the Tonic Artspace’s show features the work of both Haffners, Arrex, Scott Gibbons, Christine Lidrbauch and Maeve D’Arcy.

Mr. Haffner, who has grown steadily in popularity since emerging on the East End art scene, has several pieces in the show, including a print of a colorful sunset, vibrant with oranges, reds, pinks and yellows, with a two-lane road stretching into the abyss beneath it. The scene is recognizably on the East End, although the exact location is unknown—and perhaps unnecessary. When looking at the painting, it is as if the viewer is looking out the dashboard of their car or truck, driving through the colors and into the horizon.

“When I drive I feel completely alive,” writes Mr. Haffner. “For a small moment, in between this place and that, I am free from reality. My truck and I become a motion of blurred color, barreling through space and time. I like to keep my window open to listen to the sounds that traveling makes, to enjoy the smell of the landscape. Every trip is a new one, not one sunset is the same. On the road I am a part of the painting. I am movement, color, sound, adventure and emotions. This is my landscape.”

Carly Haffner has shown her work in New York City, San Francisco and Richmond, Virginia. In one painting, a tree in the foreground has a date and heart carved into it, allowing the viewer to devise their own story of what “Nov. 4th 1993” means. A house stands alone in the background, perhaps owned by the couple who carved the heart, perhaps unrelated. The apparent simplicity of her paintings gives them depth, sending the viewer’s eyes in multiple directions with tree shadows that aren’t quite natural and colored leaves that aren’t quite formed.

The Haffners’ creativity can be traced back to their father, Phil, who passed away February 6. “His passionate and creative spirit will never leave us,” the collective wrote in a press release issued to announce the show’s opening. A 1974 portrait of Phil Haffner completed by San Francisco artist Lori Weiss is displayed in his honor as a part of the show.

Arrex. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

Arrex. Courtesy of Tonic Artspace.

A core artist of the collective, Scott Gibbons of East Hampton is also showing in “Phenomena.” Gibbons’ art comes from the worlds he creates in his own head, which are filled with interesting creatures and strange characters of his imagination that he materializes through sculpture. “To put it simply, he is a creator of worlds unbeknown to conventional art circles in that he manipulates textiles to his bidding in order to convey his cartoonish and childlike whims,” the press release announcing the show stated.

Artist Christine Lidrbauch often uses found materials and discarded items to show the “melding of male and female cultures.” In one piece, a viewer far away sees a simple red and yellow flower against a pretty pink backdrop. Upon closer examination, they find the lines of the petals are in fact missiles.

Maeve D’Arcy, a visual artist from Queens, works on social justice and visual art simultaneously, with her focus on painting, drawing and sculpture. “The patterns accumulate into an urban/rural map of abstract geometric porous land masses and aerial views of real and imagined spaces,” she says.

Arrex, “a very cool up and coming street artist to keep your eyes on,” according to Mr. Haffner, created his work in the show after dealing with multiple deaths in his family and discovering that he had a tumor.

Skulls, from the same base photograph, adorn his color prints in the street art style of overlapping figures, strong black lines and mixed images. “My skulls serve as a small reminder of our mortality and the fragility that is life,” said Arrex. “The fun I have with them reflects that while life is serious business … it should also be fun.”

“Phenomena” is on view Saturday and Sunday from 1 to 6 p.m. and Monday through Friday by appointment at the Kathryn Markel Gallery, 2418 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit haffnervision.com.

Back by Popular Demand, the Jackson Pollock Studio Croc

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Jackson Pollock Studio Crocs on the studio floor. Photo crocs.com.

Jackson Pollock Studio Crocs on the studio floor. Photo crocs.com.

By Tessa Raebeck

After selling out shortly following their introduction last summer, the Jackson Pollock Studio Croc is back at the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center in Springs. The shoes’ design is derived from a photo taken of Mr. Pollock’s studio floor during the “drip period” between 1947 and 1950, when he created his most famous abstract expressionist paintings. Along with wife Lee Krasner, Jackson Pollock painted in his local studio up until his death in Springs in August 1956.

With a dark base colorfully splattered with blues, reds, greens and yellows, the clogs have a recognizable Jackson Pollock design. The strap reads, “Jackson Pollock Studios” using the artist’s signature for his name’s typeface. Prompted by “rave reviews and customer demand,” according to the center, Crocs reissued the artsy shoes in limited edition, with just 5,000 pairs available for purchase.

Crocs collaborated with the Stony Brook Foundation, which supports the center, to create the design. The Jackson Pollock Studio Clog can be purchased for $39.99 at crocs.com.

Open from May to October, the Pollock-Krasner House and Study Center is located at 830 Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton. For more information, visit here or call 631.324.4929.

There’s Romance and Passion in Water Mill

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By Tessa Raebeck 

Red legs entwine on a stained surface, locked together in a sensual embrace. There are no faces or genitalia or obvious genders; those details are irrelevant, the figures blend together defined only by a clear purpose: love.

"Ex. 2 The Importance of Flesh" red industrial enamel paint on stained plywood by Melissa Mapes.

“Ex. 2 The Importance of Flesh” red industrial enamel paint on stained plywood by Melissa Mapes.

At the ninth annual “Love and Passion: Walk on the Wild Side” group show, opening this Saturday, February 15, in Water Mill, artist Melissa Mapes will feature her red legs paintings alongside the works of over 60 other artists in an adventurous celebration of music, art, love and the emotions that bind them together.

Originally organized by Karyn Mannix of karyn mannix contemporary and the late Vito Sisti, the show, traditionally held at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, is an open call “to get the community out,” Ms. Mannix said. This year, the show travels to Water Mill, where visitors will “walk on the wild side” between two galleries, Hampton Hang and the Sara Nightingale Gallery.

During the opening reception, host Sara Nightingale’s “Blind Date” Music Lab series will bring live music to a space between the two galleries. In the series, two musicians who have never met are brought together to perform, “though anyone who shows up with an instrument is welcome to play,” said Ms. Nightingale.

Held around Valentine’s Day each year, the show’s over arching theme has always been “Love and Passion.” Artists are  encouraged to use their own, subjective interpretations to create art that in turn elicits viewers’ own, subjective interpretations.

“Love and art have a lot in common,” explained Ms. Nightingale. “Both are elusive concepts designed by humans. We crave and need them both, yet neither is necessary for actual survival. Some art is very expressive and emotional, while other art is more intellectual, dry or subtle. Love has these disparate manifestations as well.”

“Additionally,” she added, “what one viewer experiences while looking at a work of art may differ completely [from] another viewer, who brings his own history and prejudices to his viewpoint. Fortunately, this is also true in love. For every lover scorned, there is somewhere another potential mate.”

Each year, a secondary theme further inspires the artists. This year’s “Walk on the Wild Side” is a double entendre honoring the late Lou Reed—who died last summer at his Springs home—and symbolizing the walk between the galleries, Ms. Mannix said.

“We are all in agreement on the tone being adventurous,” added Ms. Nightingale. “We want viewers to experience the thrill/trepidation they might feel on their way to a first date with someone they have been flirting with online.”

In “Grape Eater,” a nude female figure feeds herself grapes. As the viewer’s eyes move down the canvas, emotions can change with each color block: first a vibrant orange, then a royal blue and finally, a deep, rich red.

“I find art a constructive tool for most anything,” said the artist, Abby Abrams, a Springs resident who has two paintings of “fantasy nudes” in the show.

The show’s broad topic and open call format allows artists to submit works in various mediums and with diverse subject matter; the common theme serves to show the unity of the pieces—and the unifying power of love—while also representing the diversity of individual experience and interpretation. One artist in the show expresses a passion for surfing, while others use warm color palettes of red, pink and orange to show the evocative powers of love.

“Love and Passion is a beautiful theme because it resonates within us all,” said Ms. Mapes, whose paintings “Ex. 1: The Importance of Flesh” and “Ex. 2: The Importance of Flesh” are featured in the show.

An East Hampton native, Ms. Mapes began working on the series of “abstracted sensual flesh-morphing legs and buttocks forms” when her fiancé joined the military.

"Grape Eater" acrylic on canvas by Abby Abrams.

“Grape Eater” acrylic on canvas by Abby Abrams.

“We spent much time apart passionately longing for each other’s company,” she said. “It taught me how significant love and passion really is. We fought, and we still fight for our love, and we work for it all with a deep passion. It’s not easy, but it is worth every minute, as we both patiently pass the days waiting to feel that flesh-to-flesh contact once again.”

“Everybody can relate,” the artist continued. “Flesh is a primal necessity. To consume flesh, to feel flesh and to create flesh are crucial animalistic traits that are driven by a powerful energy force that feeds the will to survive for all animals.”

The figures in her paintings are cut off at the waist, allowing the intertwined legs and buttocks to “create a language of primitive symbols that express this dire necessity for flesh-to-flesh contact,” she said.

“I want the viewer to sense the emotion in the form and the line,” said Ms. Mapes. “I do not want a four-page essay neatly typed and placed next to the painting to ‘explain’ it. Art speaks for itself.”

“Love and Passion: Walk on the Wild Side” will be on view February 15 through February 22. The opening reception is Saturday from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Sara Nightingale Gallery and Hampton Hang Gallery, 688 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call 329.2811 or contact karynmannix@optonline.net.

“Winter of Content” Group Show at Ashawagh Hall in Springs

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By Tessa Raebeck

Starting Saturday, February 15 through Monday, February 17, Ashawagh Hall in Springs is hosting “Winter of Content,” an art show featuring the photography and painting of four East End artists, Kirsten Benfield, Rich Mothes, Jennifer Satinsky and Jerry Schwab.

A native of New Zealand, Kirsten Benfield now resides on the East End, where she uses the environment as inspiration for her local landscapes and season still lifes.

Rich Mothes grew up in East Hampton, leaving for college only to return to Southampton College for graduate studies. After 22 years in the tennis business, Mothes is now focusing solely on his artwork, experimenting with various styles and materials.

With a background in family portraiture, Jennifer Satinsky of Satin Sky Photo is now focusing her talent on fine art boudoir, with the goal of empowering clients to love their bodies through realistic yet classic photographs.

Painting “for the eyes and the soul,” Jerry Schwabe’s work primarily features serene beach scenes from local shores. A painter, photographer and sculptor, Schwabe has displayed his award-winning work in countless group shows and solo exhibitions, but “Winter of Content” marks the first time he will unveil his photography.

“Winter of Content” will be open from 10 a.m. to 8 p.m. on Saturday, February 15, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Sunday, February 16 and 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, February 17, with an opening reception Saturday from 4 to 8 p.m. at Ashawagh Hall, 780 Springs-Fireplace Road in Springs.

Susan Levin Celebrates Life in “Season of Love” at Sotheby’s in Sag Harbor

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“Rooftops,” digital photograph by Susan Levin.

“Rooftops,” digital photograph by Susan Levin.

By Tessa Raebeck

Opening February 13, Sotheby’s International Realty in Sag Harbor is hosting “Season of Love: An Exhibition of Original Abstract Expressionist Paintings and Digital Photographs Celebrating Love,” a solo exhibition by artist Susan Levin.

Colorful and vibrant, Levin’s paintings and digital photographs are inspired by her love for all forms of life.

“As with fine wine or a delicious meal,” says the artist, “I want my work to evoke emotion; to take you on a sentimental, intoxicating journey, as I was on creating each piece.”

Levin is delighted to display her work on the East End, the birthplace of the abstract expressionist movement.

On view from February 7 through May 11, the exhibition will be at Sotheby’s International Realty at 7 Spring Street in Sag Harbor. The opening reception is Thursday, February 13 from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. For more information, contact Lisa Freedman at lisa@theartmarketer.com or 914.907.9842.