Tag Archive | "artists"

Understanding the ACA for Artists

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By Tessa Raebeck

East End Arts in Riverhead is hosting a free workshop for artists, “Every Artist Insured: Navigating Healthcare Reform,” at the East End Arts Carriage House on Monday, March 17 from 6 to 8 p.m.

Hoping to provide unbiased counseling on healthcare reform, the workshop will include a question and answer session as well as individual consultations. It is aimed to help artists of all disciplines understand the Affordable Care Act, what it means to them and what options are available for artists.

Questions that will be addressed include: What are the new options? How much will it cost? Am I eligible for a subsidy? Who is eligible for Medicaid? How do I apply? What is the new SHOP Exchange for small businesses? I’m a freelancer – how will this affect me? What are the penalties if I don’t have insurance?

For more information and to register online by the March 16 deadline, visit here and select the March 17 event “Free Workshop: Every Artist Insured – Navigating Healthcare Reform.”

Embroidering the Famous and Infamous at Guild Hall

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Christa Maiwald installation at the Museum at Guild Hall; photo by Gary Mamay.

Christa Maiwald installation at the Museum at Guild Hall; photo by Gary Mamay.

By Tessa Raebeck

What do Courtney Ross, Bernie Madoff and Osama bin Laden have in common? They are all subjects of the political commentary — by way of embroidery — of artist Christa Maiwald, on view now at The Museum at Guild Hall.

In “Short Stories and Other Embroideries,” Maiwald, who was named “Best in Show” at the 73rd annual Guild Hall Members Exhibition in 2011, highlights local artists, world leaders and celebrities through five series of stitched portraits, covering highlights from the last five years of her work.

Maiwald derives her work from her natural reactions to political goings on and personal relationships.

“If you ask me the name of this person, that person,” said Maiwald, “and about policies and really specific stuff, I don’t think I could talk about it. Because it’s more of a gut reaction to a situation — that’s what I work from.”

Maiwald explains that she has used creativity to capture her gut reactions her whole life. Before moving permanently to Springs, she tackled a variety of mediums, ranging from street performance to cooking school in Los Angeles, New York City and even Italy. She has tried her hand at sculpture, photography and video, children’s book illustration and writing screenplays.

“Finally,” she said, “I just decided, that’s it — I’m going back to art.”

Maiwald returned to painting and, following a practical decision brought on by the expense of transporting large canvasses, switched to embroidery.

For the past 13 years, the traditional “women’s work” has been her medium of choice.

She began with “sexy stuff” like body parts to work against embroidery’s classification as “this women’s thing.” After her daughter reached adolescence, she moved away from the sexy and instead focused on capturing the “crazy energy” of the teenagers now filling her house.

“It was a perfect medium to catch that energy,” Maiwald said, adding that the threads lent itself to the vitality of her daughter and her daughter’s friends, capturing the constant movement and unrelenting fervor of adolescence.

Although completely devoted to her art throughout the creative process, Maiwald finds she is often surprised by the outcome. Everything is done by her hand, which dictates the piece as much as her head.

“I just start working,” the artist explained. “I don’t have any preconceived notion of what color to use or stuff like that.”

Cultural commentary is her only constant.

“In most of my artworks,” said Maiwald, “my idea is to always have this kind of subversive quality to them.”

That subversion is prominent throughout “Short Stories and Other Embroideries.”

“Servitude,” a series of French maid aprons with portraits of public figures notorious for mistreating “the help” sewn onto them, portrays the likenesses of people like Ross, Martha Stewart, Thomas Jefferson and Naomi Campbell.

"Servitude" by Christa Maiwald, photo by Gary Mamay

“Servitude” by Christa Maiwald, photo by Gary Mamay

Stewart and Ross have homes on the East End and could very well visit Guild Hall, but Maiwald is not afraid of ruffling any feathers.

In “White Guys,” a selection from her 2008 “Dictators” series, Maiwald stitched portraits of Joseph Stalin, Francisco Franco, Adolf Hitler, Osama bin Laden, Benito Mussolini — and George W. Bush, together.

“Musical Chairs: Economic Crisis in G Minor,” a 2009 series, has portraits on the seats of 13 children’s sized chairs arranged in the fashion of the popular game. The portraits represent prominent figures in the American economic meltdown of 2008.

“I picked musical chairs,” said Maiwald, “because it just felt like everything that was going on was a ‘pass the buck’ kind of thing. I pictured kids — or these economists — moving from one chair to the next and saying, ‘Well, no it wasn’t me — it was him!’”

“As one sort of left or committed suicide or whatever,” she continued, “because of what a mess it was, someone else would always be there to take his seat. And it didn’t seem like it was any better from the other, so it’s roughly that kind of structure that I found appealing.”

There is a portrait of former Secretary of the Treasury Timothy Geithner, a chair with Alan Greenspan shouting and another with Ben Bernanke holding his head in his hands.

Wearing an incognito hat and trench coat, Bernie Madoff is featured twice.

“I have a few facts that I find out before I start something,” said Maiwald, “but it’s more like, the world’s a beautiful place, if only mankind didn’t mess it up….It gets me all riled up—– and then I end up doing a piece.”

“Short Stories and Other Embroideries” is on view at The Museum at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street in East Hampton, through January 5, 2014. For more information call (631) 324-0806 or visit GuildHall.org.

Holiday Show Brings Newcomers and Returning Artists to Grenning Gallery

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"Antique Grasshopper Weathervane" by Sarah Lamb, 2011

“Antique Grasshopper Weathervane” by Sarah Lamb, 2011

By Tessa Raebeck

Some 20 years ago, Maryann Lucas brought her two young toddlers to visit Laura Grenning at the Grenning Gallery, then located next to the Corner Bar on Sag Harbor’s Main Street.

“I’ll never forget,” said Lucas, flanked by materials and colorful oil paintings in her new studio behind the Romany Kramoris Gallery in the Carruthers Alleyway off Main Street. “When I walked into her gallery for the first time and thought, ‘Some day.’”

Over two decades later, ‘some day’ has arrived; Lucas will join seven other artists in the Holiday Show at the Grenning Gallery this Saturday. Celebrating the gallery’s most successful year since its 1997 opening, the Holiday Show features a range of carefully selected artists, coming from as far away as Sweden and as close by as Lucas’ studio. While Lucas is showing her work for the first time, headliner Sarah Lamb is returning to the gallery after years of success.

Grenning gave Lamb her first show in 1998, when the artist was in her early 20s. After showing with Grenning for a little over two years, Lamb entered into an exclusive deal with the Spanierman Gallery in New York City. The Spanierman Gallery, which is still open today and continues to show Lamb’s work, no longer has an exclusive deal with the artist, allowing her to show with Grenning once more.

“I’ve been calling her every six months for five or six years now,” Grenning said Monday. “I have clients that want her work.”

After years of waiting, Grenning is excited to exhibit ten new works by Lamb in the Holiday Show.

“What she’s doing is she does these amazing still lives,” said the gallerist. “She’s very prolific. The thing she spends most of the time on is setting them up and deciding the composition. She’s got an excellent eye for design.”

Lamb puts more time into designing her work through the composition than she does with the actual execution, which Grenning says usually takes just a day or two.

“The irony of the classical realist movement,” says Grenning, “is the classical realists paint but they don’t extract themselves to remember why they’re painting and what they’re painting. They don’t think of the composition too much – the abstract design of the painting.”

Since the early days of the gallery, when Lamb was a recent art school graduate looking for a break, she has grown tremendously as an artist. In her first show at Grenning, her works sold for $6,000 tops. This weekend, they will sell for up to $25,000.

"Wherelwork" by

“Wherelwork” by Joe Altwer, 2013

As evidenced by the Holiday Show line-up, Grenning excels at finding and mentoring new artists. She found Joe Altwer when he was an assistant to Mark Dalessio, one of her gallery’s featured artists.

“He actually came to his first opening here on a skateboard,” she recalls of the young Altwer, adding that his paintings in the show are “very beautiful, very well done, very bright light…It’s all about the light reflecting around the room, it’s not so much about describing the objects in the room.”

"River View" by Daniel Graves

“River View” by Daniel Graves, 2013

In the Holiday Show, Daniel Graves will exhibit four new landscapes “inspired by the most lyrical and relaxed tonalists.” Work by Michael Kotasek, who has been likened to the prominent realist painter Andrew Wyeth but is, according to Grenning, “a lot more refined as a painter,” will also be displayed.

The show will feature a “very beautiful” piece of a glass of beer and a musical instrument by Kevin McEvoy, paintings of farmhouses at twilight and a moonrise by Kevin Sanders and an original nocturne of Sag Harbor by Greg Horwich.

And then, of course, there’s Lucas.

“I didn’t realize all the times I was talking with her that she was an avid artist,” said Grenning. As Lucas’s talent developed, she began bringing her oil paintings to the gallery for Grenning to critique.

“I find when Laura critiques my work,” said Lucas. “I really come away with clarity of how to make it better and at the same time, she makes you feel really good about what’s right – she’s a wonderful mentor.”

"Duck Walk" by Maryann Lucas, 2013

“Duck Walk” by Maryann Lucas, 2013

“I, for whatever reason, tell people exactly what I think of their paintings,” said Grenning. “Unless you’re really open to a serious critique it can be unpleasant. She took every observation that I had and responded like an unbelievable student. She had talent but she kind of reorganized herself aesthetically. It’s kind of exciting and apparently this is a longtime goal for her.”

Apparently. After bringing her work to Grenning last spring, Lucas made some changes, landing herself a spot in the Holiday Show, her first exhibit.

“I used to say to my daughters, we would say, ‘Do you think this painting is Grenning worthy’,” said Lucas. “Being in her gallery, this is my first – I guess it’s like a wish list…I’m thrilled and excited for the opportunity.”

The opening reception for the Holiday Show will be held at the Grenning Gallery, 17 Washington Street, on Saturday, November 23 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 725-8469 or visit Grenning Gallery.