Tag Archive | "Arts"

Sag Harbor’s Joe Pintauro’s Photographs On View at the Peter Marcelle Project

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“The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road” C-print, 60 x 50 inches by Joe Pintauro.

“The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road” C-print, 60 x 50 inches by Joe Pintauro.

By Tessa Raebeck

Inspired in part by John Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” Joe Pintauro is showing a selection of photographs in “Arcadia,” named after “the bucolic world of nature under the pressures of time,” according to the Peter Marcelle Project, which is hosting the exhibit.

The exhibit captures the rapid changes of the environment and architecture on the East End. In “The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road,” Mr. Pintauro captured a tree on a hill, with its shadow stretching into the green landscape beyond. Taken five years ago, the scene in the photograph is hard to recreate today, as the landscape is almost unrecognizable.

“Nature, art and time often collaborate to uncover a deeper, unexpected truth, a new metaphysical profile to objects and places. Time humbles material things, including mankind and his works, making for opposing notions as to what nature gives to art and what it takes away,” Mr. Pintauro wrote in his description of the show.

“Arcadia” opens Saturday, May 31, at Peter Marcelle Project, 4 North Main Street in Southampton. For more information, call (631) 613-6170 or email cmccormick@petermarcellegallery.com.

Sounds of Summer Series Kicks off at the Parrish Art Museum with the HooDoo Loungers

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The HooDoo Loungers. Photo courtesy Joe Lauro.

The HooDoo Loungers will perform at the Parrish Art Museum Friday, May 23. Photo courtesy Joe Lauro.

By Stephen J. Kotz

The Parrish Art Museum’s second annual Sounds of Summer series will get off to a decidedly, if unseasonably, Mardi Gras theme when the HooDoo Loungers take to the stage on the museum’s covered terrace on Friday, May 23.

“It’s all New Orleans-inspired stuff. It’s all in that vein,” said bassist Joe Lauro, the co-founder of the nine-piece ensemble and a self-described aficionado of American roots music. “We started off doing covers, but now we do about half originals. It’s a stompin’ band.”

The concert, which takes place at 6 p.m., is the first in a series of five that have been scheduled over the next three months. Also appearing in the series will be the Next Level Band, which performs steel drum and reggae, on June 6; Mambo Loco, which performs Latin-inspired jazz, on July 4; Edith and Bennett, who perform old-time folk music, on August 1; and the Ebony Hillbillies, a bluegrass band whose performance will include a barbecue for attendees, on September 5.

The concerts are free with museum admission, which is $10 for adults, $8 for seniors and free for children under 18 or students with an identification card.

“On Friday nights we are open late and we have this beautiful, west facing terrace …that can be used for live music, films, that sort of thing,” said Andrea Grover, the Parrish’s curator for special projects. “This program is really geared toward reveling. It’s the kind of music that is intended to get people up and dancing. Or, if you like, you can go out on the lawn with your kids and let them run around and jump up and down.”

Mr. Lauro is well known among Sag Harborites for the occasional music film series he hosts at Bay Street Theatre, using footage owned by his company, Historic Films, as well with his past, and still occasional, performances with the Lone Sharks, Gene Casey’s rhythm and blues-based band.

Besides Mr. Lauro, the Loungers’ lineup includes a pair of vocalists, Dawnette Darden and Marvin Joshua (who recently joined the band), David Dietch, on keyboards and accordion, Michael Schiano on guitar, Dave Giacone on drums and a three-member horn section made of Brian Sears on tenor and baritone sax, Ed Leone on trombone and Gary Henderson on trumpet that, Mr. Lauro said, handle the majority of the solos.

“Every band out there—all they have is guitars,” he said. “We said, ‘Let’s do something different!’”

Mr. Lauro said that Mr. Dietch handles the group’s arrangements and tries to keep fresh the classics the group plays as well as provide an authentic New Orleans feel to its original songs. “We write to the theme,” he said.

A documentary filmmaker who branched into the world of film archiving, amassing an incredible collection of vintage music footage, from Billie Holiday and Charlie Parker, through Elvis Presley, the Beatles and later rock groups, Mr. Lauro said he was bitten by the music bug at an early age.

“The Beatles,” he responded when asked his inspiration for taking up the bass. “But I had two lives as a kid. I also had this secret life of loving vaudeville singers like Al Jolson and Eddie Kantor. So I was listening to that and completely loving the Beatles and all the stuff that was coming up.”

Thanks to groups like the Beatles that covered ’50s R&B and rockabilly, Mr. Lauro said he learned about the likes of Carl Perkins, Fats Domino and Little Richard by working his way backward. “Eventually you learned that Paul McCartney could scream, but not like Little Richard.”

After moving east more than 30 years ago, Mr. Lauro hooked up with an old high school bandmate, Mr. Schiano, in the Moondogs. Later, he joined Mr. Casey’s Lone Sharks for several years.

He and Mr. Dietch formed the HooDoo Loungers about four years ago. “When I left the Lone Sharks, I wanted to do a New Orleans project. But I thought we’d be more of a show band, and do a whole retrospective show for corporate parties and that sort of thing. Pretty soon we started doing original stuff, but we still do lots and lots of old New Orleans stuff.”

Mr. Lauro said he hoped that some of the infectious joy that imbues the spirit of life in New Orleans comes through in the band’s playing.

“Partying isn’t something they do on Saturday night. They live that the whole year,” he said. “They celebrate joy through music. That kind of works for me.”

For more information about Sounds of Summer and other Parrish events, call 631-283-21118 or visit parrishart.org.

 

Jazz en Plein Air Series at the Parrish

The Parrish Art Museum will also once again hold its Jazz en Plein Air series, on the first Friday of each month from May through August.

The series starts on Friday, May 30, at 6 p.m. with an appearance by jazz drummer Eliot Zigmund, who has played behind the likes of Chet Baker and Bill Evans. The series continues with Nilson Matta on June 27, Iris Ornig on July 25, and an act to be announced for August 29.

Seating is limited and reserved for guests ordering food and beverages from the museum café. However, guests are encouraged to bring their own lawn chairs and blankets to enjoy the music from the terrace and lawn.

World Premiere of “Conviction” Opens Bay Street’s Mainstage Season in Sag Harbor

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Rehearsal for "Conviction" in New York City. From left to right: Director Scott Schwartz, playwright Carey Crim and the cast, Brian Hutchison, Sarah Paulson, Daniel Burns, Elizabeth Reaser and Garret Dillahunt. Photo by Barry Gordin.

Rehearsal for “Conviction” in New York City. From left to right: Director Scott Schwartz, playwright Carey Crim and the cast, Brian Hutchison, Sarah Paulson, Daniel Burns, Elizabeth Reaser and Garret Dillahunt at the New 42nd Street Studio in New York City. Photo by Barry Gordin.

By Tessa Raebeck

You can grow up with your friends, live with them, even marry them, but can you ever truly know them?

This is one of many questions, perhaps unanswerable, in “Conviction,” a new play by Carey Crim that will have its world premiere Tuesday, May 27, opening the Bay Street Theatre Mainstage Season.

“In relationships, be they spouse or parent-child or friends, there is always a limit to how much we can know about another person,” said Bay Street’s new artistic director Scott Schwartz, who is directing the play.

That limit is clear in “Conviction,” the story of Tom Hodges, a beloved teacher at his local high school, who, early on in the play, is accused and convicted of having sexual relations with an underage female student.

“Conviction” stars Garret Dillahunt (“12 Years a Slave,” “Raising Hope”) as Tom Hodges. His wife Leigh is played by Sarah Paulson (“12 Years a Slave,” “American Horror Story”) and Daniel Burns (“Twelfth Night,” “Shipwrecked!”) portrays their 17-year-old son.

Brian Hutchison (“Man and Boy,” “Looped”) and Elizabeth Reaser (“Twilight” films, “Grey’s Anatomy”) play a married couple, Tom and Leigh’s longtime best friends.

“These five actors are all powerhouses,” said Mr. Schwartz. “I feel so lucky to both just be in a room with them, but also to have the opportunity to bring them to Bay Street and to share their amazing talent.”

“Conviction” explores the aftermath of Tom’s fall from grace and how his wife, son and best friends struggle with whether or not they believe his claim of innocence—and how to reconcile those beliefs with their love for Tom.

“This play,” said Mr. Dillahunt, who plays Tom, “examines the possibility of relationships of all sorts surviving where there is even a kernel of doubt and distrust.”

The cast of "Conviction:" Sarah Paulson, Brian Hutchison, Daniel Burns, Elizabeth Reaser and Garret Dillahunt. Photo by Barry Gordin.

The cast of “Conviction:” Sarah Paulson, Brian Hutchison, Daniel Burns, Elizabeth Reaser and Garret Dillahunt at the New 42nd Street Studio, New York City.

Photo by Barry Gordin.

 

“There are things that we individuals can just never know about the people we are with, so all we can do is live with conviction…and have belief about who they are deep inside them,” Mr. Schwartz said. “And when that conviction is challenged, when you’re forced to realize that there are things that you cannot know about the people you are in or choose to be in a relationship with, what does that do? How do you navigate that? How do you live your life—and is it possible for your relationship to survive?”

Ms. Crim came up with the idea for “Conviction” after a month of seemingly constant headlines involving inappropriate relationships between children and those in positions of authority culminated in a gig as a camp counselor, during which staff were directed against hugging campers or taking them to the bathroom without another witness present.

Although the rules made sense, she recalled her own experience as a camper climbing into her counselor’s bunk to hear ghost stories.

“Although I completely understood why we did it, it also made me a little bit sad for a more innocent time,” Ms. Crim said. “I started thinking about, putting those two things together, what has led us here?”

“I wanted to look at what it does to family and friends, who can never truly know…we can never, no matter how much we love someone, no matter if we live with that person, can we ever really truly know another human being,” she added.

Throughout the play, the viewer’s opinion on Tom can change multiple times. Ms. Crim said even her own “very strong” opinion when she began writing the play became less clear as she continued.

“Tom is the only one that really knows the truth,” explained Ms. Crim. “So, the audience is kind of in the shoes of the rest of the characters on stage, in terms of what information they get and don’t get. So, they have to take that journey—it is left up for them to decide.”

Also struggling with that decision are the actors, who remain loyal to the perceived convictions of their characters.

“I do believe that Leigh believes he is innocent,” said Ms. Paulson, adding she agrees. “But, I think part of her pragmatism lends itself to her believing what she wants to believe…She loves her husband very much and she wants to keep her family together.”

While Leigh appears loyal to her husband’s claim of innocence—and Ms. Paulson true to her character’s opinion—Ms. Reaser’s character, Jane, is burdened with doubt.

Ms. Reaser said although she is still figuring it out, she, like her character, thinks Tom is guilty.

“It’s kind of this thing that haunts her and it’s haunted her for years,” she said. “Is he guilty? Is he not guilty? And how do I reconcile that with this incredible man that I’ve always known him to be?”

“Some people can really live a duality and I find that very impressive. I think it’s important that we do know how to live a duality, because not everything is black and white,” she added. “But in Jane’s case, she really can’t straddle that line.”

“There is no template for a family on how to deal with something like this,” said Mr. Dillahunt. “Everyone is flying blind and doing the best they can. It’s a story of survival and, in the end, sometimes, things you hold dear must be sacrificed.”

Tom’s conviction comes down to he said, she said, with only the two parties involved definitively knowing the truth.

“There’s no evidence beyond that, beyond testimony—and that’s really a fascinating, scary thing about the world that we live in,” said Ms. Reaser.

“Conviction” premieres Tuesday, May 27 at 7 p.m. and runs through June 15, showing at 8 p.m. A special “Pay What You Can” ticket offer for the opening show has a limited amount of tickets available at the Box Office after 2 p.m. that day. For other tickets, visit baystreet.org or call 631-725-9500.

Rothko on Stage: ‘Red’ to Open at Guild Hall in East Hampton

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Left: Victor Slezak as Mark Rothko and Christian Scheider as his assistant Ken. Photo by Brian Leaver.

Left: Victor Slezak as Mark Rothko and Christian Scheider as his assistant Ken. Photo by Brian Leaver.

By Tessa Raebeck

The job of the artist assistant is to stretch canvases, mix paint, grab coffee and, in many cases, serve as the sounding board and mellowing counterpart to the boss’ eccentricity.

Such is the case in “Red,” a Tony-Award winning two-man play by John Logan centered on the relationship between the renowned postwar American artist Mark Rothko and his young assistant, Ken. Produced by Guild Hall in association with Ellen J. Myers, the play, which premiered in 2009, will open on the John Drew Theatre stage Wednesday, May 21.

Directed by Sag Harbor’s Stephen Hamilton, noted for his recent shows at the John Drew Theatre including Martin McDonough’s “The Cripple of Inishmann” and Anton Chekhov’s “Uncle Vanda,” “Red” stars Victor Slezak as Rothko and Christian Scheider as Ken.

Victor Slezak as Mark Rothko. Photo by Brian Leaver.

Victor Slezak as Mark Rothko. Photo by Brian Leaver.

“The discussion that takes place between them, the action between them is a debate about commerce and art, about humanity,” Mr. Hamilton said of the main characters. “It’s about art and humanity, it’s about the importance and meaning of art in our life.”

Of Russian Jewish descent, Rothko, unlike many other artists, rose to prominence during his own lifetime and was at the apex of his career during the play’s two-year span, from 1958 to 1959.

At the time his inventive young assistant Ken comes to work with him, Rothko has just received an unheard of public commission for $35,000, the equivalent of about $2 million in today’s market, from the Four Seasons Restaurant to create murals, now known as the Seagram murals. The entire play takes place in the studio at 222 Bowery in New York City where the murals were created.

Although he himself rejected the term, Rothko was classified alongside his contemporaries Willem de Kooning and Jackson Pollock as “one of the most famous abstract expressionists in the New York school,” according to Mr. Hamilton.

Pop artists such as Roy Lichtenstein, Robert Rauschenberg and Jasper Johns were just coming into prominence in the late 1950s, much to the chagrin of Rothko.

“All of these artists are just starting to get recognized and that whole movement—it was a big shift between the expressionists and this time,” said Mr. Hamilton. “And its reaction to that—Mark Rothko is a bigger than life character, whose impressions and whose very deep feeling about the meaning of art in the world comes to stark contrast with what he thinks is the complete sort of obliteration of that psyche.”

“There is no such thing as good painting about nothing,” Rothko once said.

Pop artists were critiquing the art world of Rothko, essentially making fun of its gravity.

“It’s on the theme of seriousness,” said Mr. Scheider, a Sagaponack native and a young up-and-coming actor who plays the role of Ken. “Seriousness in art, seriousness in what you say, seriousness in what you live. Meaning Rothko was very much somebody who felt himself to be an outsider in American culture for a long time—until, of course, he became sort of a pillar of that culture, but that happened later—and so, throughout his whole life he dealt with this—I’m not going to say insecurity, because in fact he had a lot of security in himself—but a doubt as to whether there were people that could look at his paintings. He didn’t know if people were going to be moved by them.”

“So, much of what Ken does in the play is through the course of it, he sort of proves it possible that one can develop an appreciation for an abstract painting as a lay person,” he added. “So in a way he’s kind of a foil, but Ken in his own way is an artist.”

Although Ken is a painter, he’s not making art when he works with Rothko. He’s supporting the artist by grabbing food and cigarettes and doing the busy work. Throughout the play, he complements Rothko’s long-winded monologues with one-word, monosyllabic answers.

“What do you see?” Rothko will often ask.

“Red,” replies Ken.

Rothko will rage, stomping around the room, slinging packets of paint at his assistant, who will, in turn, pick up the packets, toss the artist a cigarette and clean up after his rage.

“Rothko’s right at the height of his powers right now, 1958-59, there’s nobody painting like him. He has achieved his mature style that you recognize from Rothko and yet he knows that that energy, that life force—right around the corner is the diminution of that force. He’s not in the greatest health and he knows that he’s right at the apex of his career, there’s nowhere else to go,” said Mr. Hamilton.

The youthful energy of Ken collides with the threat of dead-end maturity felt by Rothko, setting off their conflict in moments of both humorous dialogue and pure tension.

“One of the central questions in the play is, ‘What do you see?” Mr. Scheider said. “Which, of course, is whatever you see, I mean there’s no right answer… but for Rothko, he was trying to make people weep, which is hard to do with blocks of color, but somehow he managed.”

Mr. Scheider said the mentorship, intentional or not, of Rothko on Ken correlates to his own experience working with Mr. Slezak, a veteran actor who has been performing regularly on stage, films and television for 40 years.

“He’s a seasoned actor and is bringing a kind of gravitas to this role that is really impressive and inspiring because he’s the kind of actor who can live a character,” said Mr. Hamilton, adding, “He can really bring this character to life and same with Christian [Scheider], they’re both doing a fantastic job.”

“For me, as a young actor working with a much more experienced actor, there’s a lot of overlap between the rehearsal process and the play, it’s actually very useful,” said Mr. Scheider. “As a young person, [I am] honored to be given this responsibility.”

“Ken, over the course of the play, becomes a better artist by having just been with him.” Mr. Scheider said. “They have very different intentions in their work and yet Rothko instilled in him a kind of fearlessness…to take himself seriously.”

In Rothko’s words: “Art to me is an anecdote of the spirit, and the only means of making concrete the purpose of its varied quickness and stillness.”

“Red” runs from Wednesdays through Sundays from May 21, through June 8 at 8 p.m. at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street in East Hampton. Tickets are $35 for general admission, $33 for members and $10 for students. For more information or to purchase tickets, call 324-4050 or visit guildhall.org.

An “Explosion” of Outdoor Furnishings Comes to East Hampton’s LongHouse Reserve in ‘exteriors’

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Lips loveseat by Colin Selig. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

Lips love seat by Colin Selig. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

By Tessa Raebeck

Whether you prefer sitting on leather or repurposed propane tanks, the exteriors exhibit of outdoor furnishings at LongHouse Reserve—the largest exhibit in the foundation’s history—aims to inspire designers and homeowners of every taste.

Opening Saturday, exteriors will display dozens of pieces across the grounds of the 16-acre East Hampton campus from 60 artists and designers both local and international.

“Prices vary widely, so do styles,” said Jack Lenor Larsen, the textile designer, author, collector, owner of LongHouse, founder of the foundation and co-curator of the exhibit. Wendy Van Deusen, Sherri Donghia and Elizabeth Lear are also curating.

R & Company, "Calunga" Chaise, Designer: Hugo Franca. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

R & Company, “Calunga” Chaise, Designer: Hugo Franca. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

“We hope viewers will begin to collect art and furnishings for their exteriors—not suites of matching pieces but those which will, above all, personalize their spaces—encouraging users to be more themselves,” Mr. Larsen added.

A number of furnishings, but not all, will be available for purchase after the show and sources such as Design Within Reach, Mecox Gardens and other participants have pieces available in their “great Hamptons showrooms,” Mr. Larsen said.

Globally sourced, the exhibit will display all aspects of outdoor living, with shelters, fabrics, lighting and other furnishings on view.

Local designers like Silas Marder of Springs and Sag Harbor’s Nico Yektai will show pieces, as will international designers and manufacturers from as far away as Colombia, France, Italy and Sweden.

Through exteriors, LongHouse hopes to show all the opportunities for outdoor living, instilling the idea that the backyard, patio or garden can become rooms in and of themselves, natural extensions of the home.

The exhibit is sponsored by Sunbrella, a design firm that encourages customers to channel the style and palette of the nearest indoor room when planning their outdoor space, in order to ensure the transition from indoors to outside is a smooth one, but not be afraid to make bold choices in design.

One such bold choice is the lounger “Fortune Cookie,” shaped like the crescent cookie lying on its side, made by Johnny Swing. The lounger, thick on one side and thin on the other, is made entirely from quarters welded together with stainless steel legs. An attention-grabbing bright red loveseat by California artist Colin Selig is in the shape of lips, with the arm rests making the curve of the mouth. The pouty love seat is made of repurposed propane tanks, but appears comfortable nonetheless.

"Fortune Cookie" by Johnny Swing. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

“Fortune Cookie” by Johnny Swing. Photo courtesy LongHouse Reserve.

Fitting for the springtime, the furnishings at exteriors allow one to be closer to nature and spend time within it, while still maintaining the comfort and style of the indoors. The outdoor furniture relates to the environment surrounding it, enhancing its natural beauty and allowing the viewer to enjoy nature without disrupting it.

One way the pieces relate to and work with the nature surrounding them is through “fire and water,” Mr. Larsen said. Items like fountains, showers, stoves and outdoor bonfires and fire pits recreate the natural elements without overshadowing them.

The “bench place” on site has up to 20 benches and there will be a dozen sun beds to choose from at the “lap pool.” There will be 12 sites at the exhibit, each with a distinctive style. Two of the rooms, the garden rooms, are under cover.

LongHouse encourages visitors to design their outdoor space at “a fraction of the cost” of furnishing an indoor room—or to splurge.

“There are such blockbuster pieces as a giant leather and steel hammock from Ralph Pucci for a tasteful 1-percenter,” Mr. Larsen said.

Lounge pieces from Brazil, which Mr. Larsen called “heroic,” are carved from heavy hardwood roots. Dozens of Pet Lamps, colorful, woven lampshades, will also be on display. Always unique, Pet Lamps are created by artisans in Colombia, Spain and Chile, complemented by cylindrical adornments made of mechanized iron and colorful textile cables designed by Alvaro Catalán de Ocón. From the American branch of the Italian design company Moroso, two dozen “wildly flamboyant” chairs will adorn one of the LongHouse lawns, Mr. Larsen said.

Likewise wild, the quartet SOUNDWALL will play during the opening reception. An extension of the sonic architecture company of the same name created by artist/musicians John Houshmand and Edward Potokar, the musicians play on inventions that are “sound architecture,” essentially pieces of furniture that function as instruments.

The SOUNDWALL drum wall is a wooden partition with 11 tuned drums of various shapes and styles incorporated into it. A triangular harp coffee table of cherry wood and steel also functions as a three-person stringed electric instrument, and psychedelic “thunder panels” made of aluminum and Mylar serve as a percussion room divider.

The exteriors exhibit opens Saturday, May 17, and runs through October 11. The LongHouse Reserve at 133 Hands Creek Road in East Hampton is open Wednesdays and Saturdays from 2 to 5 p.m. Admission is $10 per person. For more information, call 329-3568, or visit longhouse.org.

Art and War: Alexander Russo Shares His Experience as a World War II Combat Artist

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“Combat Artist: A Journal of Love and War” by Alexander Russo cover.

“Combat Artist: A Journal of Love and War” by Alexander Russo cover.

By Tessa Raebeck

Art and combat don’t often go hand in hand, but for Alexander Russo they are forever linked.

Mr. Russo will visit Guild Hall Saturday to sign and read from his book, “Combat Artist: A Journal of Love and War,” a straightforward account of his time spent in the Naval Reserve, serving with Naval Intelligence as a combat artist during World War II.

The first and youngest personnel to volunteer and engage in the Naval landings in Sicily and Normandy, Mr. Russo is now Professor Emeritus at Hood College in Maryland and is the former Dean of the Corcoran School of Art in Washington, D.C.

The graphic results of Mr. Russo’s time spent in combat form part of the navy’s Historical Records of World War II. In the book, the veteran also explores the growth of the artist following the war, in his struggle to continue a career in fine arts.

A reception with the author is Saturday, May 17 at 1:30 p.m., followed by a reading and book signing from 2 to 3 p.m. at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street in East Hampton. For more information, call 324-0806 or visit guildhall.org.

Singers Showcase at the Southampton Cultural Center

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By Tessa Raebeck

The Southampton Cultural Center is hosting a Singers Showcase Friday, an evening of song featuring the talents of East End residents.

Singers from the Center’s Center Stage Singing Program taught by Valerie diLorenzo and Peter Pece will be on hand. Songs from Broadway, pop music and the Great American Songbook will be performed by local singers John Balzer, Bethany DellaPolla, Jillian Lyons, Joan Lyons, Jenna Mate, Nancy Picone, Mitchell Robin, Mary Sabo, Emily Selyukova, Robert Stafford, John Tusa, Susan Wojcik and more.

The evening will be hosted by Valerie diLorenzo with piano accompaniment by Peter Pece.

The Singers Showcase is May 16 at 7:30 p.m. on the stage of the Levitas Center for the Arts, 25 Pond Lane in Southampton. Tickets are $5 and available at the door. For reservations and information, call the Southampton Cultural Center at 287-4377.

Sing-Along in Memory of Pete and Toshi Seeger at Rogers Memorial Library

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By Tessa Raebeck

In memory of American folk singer, activist and prolific songwriter Pete Seeger and his wife, filmmaker, producer and environmental activist Toshi Aline Seeger, a sing-along will be held in the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton tonight.

The “musical suspects” leading the sing-a-long are Bill and Ben Chaleff, Dan Koontz and Terry Sullivan.

The sing-a-long is Thursday, May 15 at 6 p.m. in the Morris Meeting Room at Rogers Memorial Library, 91 Coopers Farm Road in Southampton. Reservations are appreciated and made by visiting myrml.org or calling 283-0774 ext. 523.

Parrish Art Museum Curator Andrea Grover Wins Prestigious Exhibition Award

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The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

By Tessa Raebeck

In recognition of her innovation and experimentation, Andrea Grover, artist, writer and Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish Art Museum, was awarded a 2014 Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award to realize the upcoming exhibition, Radical Seafaring.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Scheduled to be on view at the Parrish from April through July 2016, Radical Seafaring was one of only three exhibitions to receive the prestigious biennial award, granted by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The award provides the museum with a $150,000 grant, as well as a living artist stipend for artists whose existing work will be included in the exhibition.

Established in 1998 to honor the artistic vision of Ms. Tremaine, an art collector, the Exhibition Award is intended “to give life to thematic exhibitions of contemporary art that are fresh and experimental in nature,” according to the Tremaine Foundation’s website.

Featuring about 25 artists, with works ranging from artist-made vessels to designs for alternative sea communities, Radical Seafaring will survey the practice of artist-initiated projects on the water “from its roots in conceptual and performance art of the 1960s and 70s, to an abundance of recent phenomenological research and site-specific works that involve relocating the studio, the laboratory, or the performance space to the water,” according to a press release.

A large part of the exhibition involves public programs, such as on- and off-site commissions, boat trips and artist-led excursions around East End waterways.

“The Museum Board of Trustees and I are extremely proud of Andrea for her highly original concept for the exhibition,” said Parrish Director Terrie Sultan. “Radical Seafaring is a perfect example of how the Parrish Art Museum’s programming responds to the natural setting and artistic life of Long Island’s East End in its commitment to illuminating the creative process.”

Since joining the Parrish’s curatorial team in 2011, Ms. Grover has been the recipient of various grants and fellowships. In addition to curating a variety of exploratory projects and programs, she initiates new models for temporary and off-site exhibitions through the museum’s Platform and Parrish Road Show series.

“Paws & Reflect” at RJD Gallery to Benefit Southampton Animal Shelter

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Margo Selski, “Finding Alice,” oil & beeswax on canvas. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

Margo Selski, “Finding Alice,” oil & beeswax on canvas. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

In a benefit for the Southampton Animal Shelter, RJD Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting “Paws & Reflect,” a compilation of artwork celebrating the connection between humans and animals.

Rose Freymuth-Frazier, “The Duchess with Duke," oil on linen. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

Rose Freymuth-Frazier, “The Duchess with Duke,” oil on linen. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

From a woman and her bulldog to Alice being dwarfed by bunny rabbits, the exhibition explores the appreciation and fascination of people for their pets.

The show aims to raise awareness and funds for the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation.

The opening reception for “Paws & Reflect” is May 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the RJD Gallery, 90 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, visit RJDgallery.com, email art@RJDgallery.com or call 725-1161.