Tag Archive | "Bits & Banter"

Sag Harbor’s April Gornik Will Sign Latest Book in New York City

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"Radiant Light," 2013, 78” x 90”, oil on linen by April Gornik. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Radiant Light,” 2013, 78” x 90”, oil on linen by April Gornik. Photo courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

Sag Harbor’s artist-in-residence April Gornik travels to New York City Thursday, May 29, for a reading and book signing of her latest book, “April Gornik: Drawings.”

Published by FigureGround Press and distributed by ARTBOOK D.A.P. the book celebrates Ms. Gornik’s charcoal drawings done since 1984.

“Lush and wide-ranging in scope and subject, these landscapes call out the wild and the cultivated, from the desert to the forest to the sea, and show both the progress and consistency in her evocative approach to drawing,” according to synopsis of the book.

“April Gornik: Drawings” includes essays by Steve Martin and Archie Rand, as well as an interview with Lawrence Weschler and a downloadable composition for piano and cello by Bruce Wolosoff.

Ms. Gornik’s book signing is Thursday, May 29, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the Danese/Corey Gallery, 511 West 22nd Street in New York City. A solo show by the artist is running at the gallery until Saturday, May 31.

Reggae and Steel Drum Music at the Parrish Art Museum

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The Next Level Band will perform at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill Friday, June 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

The Next Level Band will perform at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill Friday, June 6 from 6 to 8 p.m.

By Tessa Raebeck

As part of its ongoing Sounds of Summer series of live music on the outdoor terrace, the Parrish Art Museum presents the five-piece reggae and steel drum group The Next Level Band Friday, June 6, from 6 to 8 p.m.

The band is an eclectic group of American, Caribbean and European musicians, playing authentic reggae favorites and their own calypso-infused arrangements of classic songs. Tyrone Parris of Barbados is on the guitar and steel drums while his wife, La Dawn Parris, who has performed with Anita Baker and the Temptations, among others, sings.

“Our summer music program brings together performers of diverse musical persuasions and encourages all ages to dance, dine, socialize or just enjoy the fresh air,” said event organizers Andrea Grover, curator of special projects at the museum, and Amy Kirwin, visitor services and museum programs manager.

Guests are invited to bring lawn chairs and blankets to the show, which costs $10 or is free with museum admission. The Sounds of Summer series continues with Mambo Loco on July 4 and Edith and Bennett on August 1. For more information, visit parrishart.org.

Wine Spectator Recognizes Long Island’s Rising Tide of Great Wines

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Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider. Photo courtesy Wölffer Estate Vineyard.

Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider. Photo courtesy Wölffer Estate Vineyard.

By Tessa Raebeck

After years of falling by the wayside in conversations about great American wine, the coastal vineyards of Long Island are finally getting the recognition they deserve.

In the June 15 issue of Wine Spectator, Ben O’Donnell writes of “Long Island’s Rising Tide,” focusing on three local wineries, the Wölffer Estate Vineyard in Sagaponack, and McCall Wines and Bedell Cellars in Cutchogue.

“It’s an exciting time for Long Island wine,” writes Mr. O’Donnell.

Winemaker Roman Roth created Wölffer’s signature rosé in the 1990s, when neither the wine nor the region were as well known. Today, the vineyard sells 17,000 cases of rosé a year—usually selling out by August—and 37,500 cases overall. It recently delved into the hard cider market with “Wölffer No. 139” dry rosé and dry white ciders.

With sustainable farming, organic cattle raising and credit as the first vineyard to erect an energy-generating windmill, McCall Wines in Cutchogue is at the forefront of modern agriculture. A relatively new winery, the first vintage bottled in 2007, McCall’s Bordeaux blend is a Merlot-dominated cuvee with a measure of Cabernet Franc and splashes of Petit Verdot and Cabernet Sauvignon.

A huge force in popularizing Merlot in the region, Bedell Cellars, also in Cutchogue, produces 12,000 to 15,000 cases a year. Bedell bottles are decorated by artists, a creative addition of owner Michael Lynne, who is also president of New Line Cinema.

“These exemplars,” writes Mr. O’Donnell, “are pushing themselves, and each other, to capture the best possible wines from what the land—and the sea—gives them.”

Sag Harbor’s Joe Pintauro’s Photographs On View at the Peter Marcelle Project

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“The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road” C-print, 60 x 50 inches by Joe Pintauro.

“The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road” C-print, 60 x 50 inches by Joe Pintauro.

By Tessa Raebeck

Inspired in part by John Milton’s “Paradise Lost,” Joe Pintauro is showing a selection of photographs in “Arcadia,” named after “the bucolic world of nature under the pressures of time,” according to the Peter Marcelle Project, which is hosting the exhibit.

The exhibit captures the rapid changes of the environment and architecture on the East End. In “The Tree, Its Shadow and the Hill on Ocean Road,” Mr. Pintauro captured a tree on a hill, with its shadow stretching into the green landscape beyond. Taken five years ago, the scene in the photograph is hard to recreate today, as the landscape is almost unrecognizable.

“Nature, art and time often collaborate to uncover a deeper, unexpected truth, a new metaphysical profile to objects and places. Time humbles material things, including mankind and his works, making for opposing notions as to what nature gives to art and what it takes away,” Mr. Pintauro wrote in his description of the show.

“Arcadia” opens Saturday, May 31, at Peter Marcelle Project, 4 North Main Street in Southampton. For more information, call (631) 613-6170 or email cmccormick@petermarcellegallery.com.

Singers Showcase at the Southampton Cultural Center

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By Tessa Raebeck

The Southampton Cultural Center is hosting a Singers Showcase Friday, an evening of song featuring the talents of East End residents.

Singers from the Center’s Center Stage Singing Program taught by Valerie diLorenzo and Peter Pece will be on hand. Songs from Broadway, pop music and the Great American Songbook will be performed by local singers John Balzer, Bethany DellaPolla, Jillian Lyons, Joan Lyons, Jenna Mate, Nancy Picone, Mitchell Robin, Mary Sabo, Emily Selyukova, Robert Stafford, John Tusa, Susan Wojcik and more.

The evening will be hosted by Valerie diLorenzo with piano accompaniment by Peter Pece.

The Singers Showcase is May 16 at 7:30 p.m. on the stage of the Levitas Center for the Arts, 25 Pond Lane in Southampton. Tickets are $5 and available at the door. For reservations and information, call the Southampton Cultural Center at 287-4377.

Sing-Along in Memory of Pete and Toshi Seeger at Rogers Memorial Library

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By Tessa Raebeck

In memory of American folk singer, activist and prolific songwriter Pete Seeger and his wife, filmmaker, producer and environmental activist Toshi Aline Seeger, a sing-along will be held in the Rogers Memorial Library in Southampton tonight.

The “musical suspects” leading the sing-a-long are Bill and Ben Chaleff, Dan Koontz and Terry Sullivan.

The sing-a-long is Thursday, May 15 at 6 p.m. in the Morris Meeting Room at Rogers Memorial Library, 91 Coopers Farm Road in Southampton. Reservations are appreciated and made by visiting myrml.org or calling 283-0774 ext. 523.

Here Comes the Sun at East End Arts

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"Luncheon Al Fresco," 24 x 36 oil painting by Leo Revi of East Hampton. Photo courtesy East End Arts.

“Luncheon Al Fresco,” 24 x 36 oil painting by Leo Revi of East Hampton.

By Tessa Raebeck

This weekend at the Remsenburg Academy, East End Arts will celebrate the long-awaited arrival of summer with an invitational art show featuring five artists from the East End.

Leo Revi of East Hampton, a self-described painter of light, captures the effects of sunlight in his paintings, drawing inspiration from impressionist painters such as Claude Monet and Winslow Homer.

Also using the area’s unique light quality, Riverhead’s Michael McLaughlin, a research analyst by trade, turned to photography when he found the East End and felt compelled to capture its natural beauty.

Sag Harbor’s Linda Capello, a figurative painter, will also show her work, which focuses on the body’s natural movement.

“What I am drawn to—what I draw—is the lyrical, sensual form; the body as icon of power and grace. I try to capture the body in that split second as movement stops—the turn of the head, flex of the arm, movement for the sake of movement, line for the sake of line,” Ms. Capello said.

A sculptor and mixed media artist out of East Quogue, Jonathan Pearlman transforms everyday objects into a new, imaginative form in his sculptures, with the goal that the viewer will discover the intrinsic beauty in the mundane.

Lucille Berril Paulsen of Water Mill will share her figurative paintings, which aim to create visual personality and capture “the attitude behind the face,” she said in a statement.

Here Comes the Sun will open on Friday, May 16 and run through Sunday, June 1. An artists’ reception is Friday, May 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.

Parrish Art Museum Curator Andrea Grover Wins Prestigious Exhibition Award

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The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

The Waterpod Project at Brooklyn Bridge Park Pier 5. By artist Mary Mattingly, 2009, slated to participate in Radical Seafaring at the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Nagle.

By Tessa Raebeck

In recognition of her innovation and experimentation, Andrea Grover, artist, writer and Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish Art Museum, was awarded a 2014 Emily Hall Tremaine Exhibition Award to realize the upcoming exhibition, Radical Seafaring.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Andrea Grover, Curator of Special Projects for the Parrish Art Museum. Photo by Mike Pintauro.

Scheduled to be on view at the Parrish from April through July 2016, Radical Seafaring was one of only three exhibitions to receive the prestigious biennial award, granted by the Emily Hall Tremaine Foundation. The award provides the museum with a $150,000 grant, as well as a living artist stipend for artists whose existing work will be included in the exhibition.

Established in 1998 to honor the artistic vision of Ms. Tremaine, an art collector, the Exhibition Award is intended “to give life to thematic exhibitions of contemporary art that are fresh and experimental in nature,” according to the Tremaine Foundation’s website.

Featuring about 25 artists, with works ranging from artist-made vessels to designs for alternative sea communities, Radical Seafaring will survey the practice of artist-initiated projects on the water “from its roots in conceptual and performance art of the 1960s and 70s, to an abundance of recent phenomenological research and site-specific works that involve relocating the studio, the laboratory, or the performance space to the water,” according to a press release.

A large part of the exhibition involves public programs, such as on- and off-site commissions, boat trips and artist-led excursions around East End waterways.

“The Museum Board of Trustees and I are extremely proud of Andrea for her highly original concept for the exhibition,” said Parrish Director Terrie Sultan. “Radical Seafaring is a perfect example of how the Parrish Art Museum’s programming responds to the natural setting and artistic life of Long Island’s East End in its commitment to illuminating the creative process.”

Since joining the Parrish’s curatorial team in 2011, Ms. Grover has been the recipient of various grants and fellowships. In addition to curating a variety of exploratory projects and programs, she initiates new models for temporary and off-site exhibitions through the museum’s Platform and Parrish Road Show series.

“Paws & Reflect” at RJD Gallery to Benefit Southampton Animal Shelter

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Margo Selski, “Finding Alice,” oil & beeswax on canvas. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

Margo Selski, “Finding Alice,” oil & beeswax on canvas. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

In a benefit for the Southampton Animal Shelter, RJD Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting “Paws & Reflect,” a compilation of artwork celebrating the connection between humans and animals.

Rose Freymuth-Frazier, “The Duchess with Duke," oil on linen. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

Rose Freymuth-Frazier, “The Duchess with Duke,” oil on linen. Courtesy RJD Gallery.

From a woman and her bulldog to Alice being dwarfed by bunny rabbits, the exhibition explores the appreciation and fascination of people for their pets.

The show aims to raise awareness and funds for the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation.

The opening reception for “Paws & Reflect” is May 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the RJD Gallery, 90 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, visit RJDgallery.com, email art@RJDgallery.com or call 725-1161.

Spring Preview at the Tulla Booth Gallery in Sag Harbor

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Daniel Jones, “Flying Point Beach Impressions” photo. Courtesy Tulla Booth Gallery.

Daniel Jones, “Flying Point Beach Impressions” photo. Courtesy Tulla Booth Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Presenting a special “Spring Preview” of this summer’s exhibitions, Sag Harbor’s Tulla Booth Gallery will show new and classic work by seven photographers.

Tulla Booth, Herb Friedman, Daniel Jones, Karine Laval, Eric Meola, Blair Seagram and Stephen Wilkes will show their photographs, many featuring familiar East End landscapes.

An opening reception will be held Saturday, May 10 from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit is on view starting May 2 and through May 28 during gallery hours, 12:30 to 7 p.m. Friday through Sunday. For more information, visit tullaboothgallery.com or email tboothgallery@aol.com.