Tag Archive | "Bridgehampton"

Calendar, October 25 Through October 31

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Halloween Happenings

FRI OCT 24

CMEE Halloween Bash, 4 to 6 p.m., Children’s Museum of the East End, 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton, $10 for non-members; free for members. (631) 537-8250 or cmee.org.

Teen Pumpkin Carving, 4 to 5 p.m., Rogers Memorial Library, 91 Coopers Farm Road, Southampton, for grades six through 12. (631) 283-0774 or myrml.org.

Haunted Path/Sports & Rec Night, 7 p.m. to 10 p.m., Southampton Youth Services (SYS), 1370A Majors Path, Southampton, fifth grade and up, $5, $2 round-trip transportation available. (631) 702-2425 or sysinc.org.

Groundworks Trail of Terror, 7 to 10 p.m., also on Saturday October 25, Thursday, October 30 and Friday, October 31, Groundworks Landscaping, 530 Montauk Highway, Amagansett, not recommended for children under 13, free. (631) 324-7373 or groundworkslandscaping.com.

Stages: Frankenstein Follies, 7:30 p.m., also Saturday and Sunday at 2:30 p.m., Bay Street Theater, 1 Bay Street, Sag Harbor, $15. (631) 725-9500 or stagesworkshop.org.

SAT OCT 25

Halloween Parade, 10 a.m., Hampton Library, 2478 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton, all ages, free. (631) 537-0015 or hamptonlibrary.org.

Halloween Party, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, all ages, free, no registration required. (631) 725-0049 or johnjermain.org.

Pumpkin Decorating Workshop, 11 a.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, ages four to 11. (631) 324-0806 or guildhall.org.

Halloween Happenings Trunk or Treat, 1 p.m. to 3 p.m. Southampton Youth Services (SYS), 1370A Majors Path, Southampton, free. (631) 283-1511 or sysinc.org.

Little Lucy’s Halloween Pet Parade, 1 p.m., Little Lucy’s, 91 Jobs Lane, Southampton, $10 registration to benefit the Southampton Animal Shelter Foundation. (631) 287-2352.

Halloween Ghost Walking Tour with Annette Hinkle and Tony Garro, 5 to 7 p.m., Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Mueseum, 200 Main Street, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-0770, sagharborwhalingmuseum.org.

Family Fun: Nature’s Halloween Trail, 5 to 6:30 p.m., Mashomack Preserve, 79 South Ferry Road, Shelter Island, allow 30 minutes to complete the trail. (631) 749-1001.

Sag Harbor Wailing Museum Halloween Costume Party, 7 to 9 p.m., Sag Harbor Whaling Museum, 200 Main Street Sag Harbor, children must be accompanied by an adult. (631) 725-0770 or sagharborwhalingmuseum.org.

Southampton Arts Center Halloween Party & Spooktacular Haunted House, 7 p.m., Southampton Arts Center, 25 Jobs Lane, Southampton, $70. (631) 283-0967 or southamptonartscenter.org.

SUN OCT 26

Sag Harbor Rag a Muffin Parade, 1 p.m., beginning at Nassau Street next to the Sag Harbor Laundromat on Main Street and ending at The Custom House. For more information, visit sagharborchamber.org.

23 Annual Southampton Rag a Muffin Parade & Pumpkin Trail, 1 p.m., beginning at Agawam Park in Southampton Village. (631) 283-0402 or southamptonchamber.com.

Great Pumpkin Blaze Family Pumpkin Carving Event, 4 to 7:30 p.m., Mulford Farm, 10 James Lane, East Hampton, free, children under 16 must be accompanied by an adult. (631) 324-6850.

AJB Grunge Pop Zombie Party, 5 to 7 p.m., Hampton Ballet Theatre School, 213 Butter Lane, Unit J, Bridgehampton, all ages, $5. (631) 921-6406.

MON OCT 27

Bridgehampton Lions Club Carving Contest, 5 p.m., cash awards between $20 and $250, Bridgehampton Community House, 843 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. Bridgehamptonlions.org.

THURS OCT 30

Shadows of the Paranormal, with paranormal investigators from Long Island, 7 to 8:30 p.m., Hampton Library, 2478 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton. (631) 537-0015 or hamptonlibrary.org.

FRI OCT 31

Halloween at the Long Island Aquarium & Exhibition Center, all day, anyone dressed in costume receives 50-percent off regular admission prices, Long Island Aquarium & Exhibition Center, 431 East Main Street, Riverhead. (631) 208-9200 or longislandaquarium.com.

Rocky Horror Picture Show Screening & Halloween After-Party, 8 p.m. The Suffolk Theater, 118 East Main Street, Riverhead, $20 bar/restaurant minimum. (631) 727-4343 or SuffolkTheater.com.

SAT NOV 1

Family Pumpkin Carving Workshop, sponsored by East End Arts, The Town of Riverhead and the Riverhead Business Improvement District, 1 to 3 p.m., East End Arts, 133 East Main Street, Riverhead, $5 per family. (631) 369-2171 or eastendarts.org.

                                                                                                     Outdoors

FRI OCT 24

After School Nature: Fall Flurry, 3 to 4:30 p.m., Mashomack Preserve, 79 South Ferry Road, Shelter Island, free, requires registration. (631) 749-1001.

SAT OCT 25

The History & Ecology of The Walking Dunes of Napeague, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., two day course continues Sunday with instructor Mike Bottini, $190, meet at Hither Hills State Park, Montauk. (631) 267- 5228 or mikebottini.com.

Foster & Paumanock Paths, 10 a.m. East Hampton Trails Preservation Society as a part of South Fork Trails Day, featuring East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell, former planning chair Debra Foster and former planning board attorney Rick Whalen who will speak about the creation and preservation of more than 200 miles of trails in East Hampton, includes two mile hike and five mile loop, meet at Two Holes of Water Road at Chatfield’s Hole, East Hampton. Leader: Lee Dion, (631) 375-2339 and Jim Zajac, (212) 769-4311.

Flanders Meander to Camp Tekawitha, Southampton Trails Preservation Society as a part of South Fork Trails Day, 10 a.m., meet at the parking lot of Red Creek Path on Old Riverhead Road, Hampton Bays, 4.5 miles. Leader: Jim Crawford, (631) 369-2341.

TUE OCT 28

Walk Your Talk! 10 a.m., met at the John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, 1 or 2-mile route, free, no advanced registration required. (631) 725-0049.

WED OCT 29

Big Reed Harvest Hike, East Hampton Trails Preservation Society, meet at the Nature Trails site off East Lake Drive, Montauk. Leader: Eva Moore, (631) 238-5134.

SAT NOV 1

Downs Farm Preserve, Southampton Trails Preservation Society, 10 a.m. to noon, meet at 23800 Main Road in Cutchogue on the south side of the road after Elijah’s Lane, 4-mile hike. Leader: Liz Karpin, (631) 728-6492.

 

For the Kids

 

THU OCT 23

Tot Art, Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre, 4 Hampton Street, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-4193.

Stories, Songs & Playtime, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free. (631) 725-0049.

SAT OCT 25

Backpack Adventures: Exploring Vineyard Field, 10 a.m., South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo), 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, for children ages 8 to 12. (631) 537-9735 or sofo.org.

Mixed Media with Artist Lori Colavito, 2 to 4 p.m., The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $120 for members for the four-week class; $150 for non-members. (631) 283-2118.

SUN OCT 26

Finger Knitting, 1:30 p.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, ages 7 to 12, free, please register in advance. (631) 725-0049.

WED OCT 29

Mommy & Me Yoga (or Daddy or Nanny), 9:15 to 10 a.m., Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre, 4 Hampton Street, Sag Harbor, ages 1 to 3. (631) 725-4193.

ADHD Parent Support Group, 9:30 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free, no registration required. (631) 725-0049.

THU OCT 30

Tot Art, Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre, 4 Hampton Street, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-4193.

Stories, Songs & Playtime, 10:30 to 11:15 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free. (631) 725-0049.

SAT NOV 1

Mixed Media with Artist Lori Colavito, 2 to 4 p.m., The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $120 for members for the four-week class; $150 for non-members. (631) 283-2118.

 

Stage and Screen

THURS OCT 23

The Hampton Theatre Company Presents: Harvey, 7 p.m., also Friday, 7 p.m., Saturday, 8 p.m., and Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Quogue Community Hall, 125 Jessup Avenue, Quogue, $25, $23 for seniors, $10 students under 21. hamptontheatre.org or (631) 653-8955.

The World Goes ‘Round’, a musical revue, 7:30 p.m., also Friday and Saturday, 8 p.m., Sunday, 2:30 p.m. Southampton Cultural Center, 25 Pond Lane, Southampton, $25, $12 students under 12. scc-arts.org. (631) 287-4377.

FRI OCT 24

National Theatre Live presents “Skylight”, 8 p.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, $18, $16 members. (631) 324-4050.

SAT OCT 25

The Met: Live in HD – Verdi’s  Encore, 1 p.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, $22, $20 members, $15 students. (631) 324-4050.

Stages 20th Anniversary Alumni Performance and Benefit Reception, 7:30 p.m., Bay Street Theater, 1 Bay Street, Sag Harbor, $35; $25 for students. (631) 725-9500 or stagesworkshop.org.

TUE OCT 28

John Drew Theater Lab: Orphans by Lyle Kessler, 7:30 p.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, free. (631) 324-4050.

THURS OCT 30

The Hampton Theatre Company Presents: Harvey, 7 p.m., also Friday, 7 p.m., Saturday, 8 p.m., and Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Quogue Community Hall, 125 Jessup Avenue, Quogue, $25, $23 for seniors, $10 students under 21. hamptontheatre.org or (631) 653-8955.

The World Goes ‘Round’, a musical revue, 7:30 p.m., also Saturday and Sunday, 8 p.m., Sunday, 2:30 p.m., Southampton Cultural Center, 25 Pond Lane, Southampton, $25, $12 students under 12. scc-arts.org. (631) 287-4377.

SAT NOV 1

The Met: Live in HD – Bizet’s Carmen, 1 p.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, $22, $20 members, $15 students. (631) 324-4050.

WHBPAC Finest in World Cinema: Tracks, 4 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., also on Sunday, 4 p.m., Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach. (631) 288-1500 or whbpac.org.

Comedy Show Featuring Mark Lundhom, to benefit “Dr. Bob’s House,” 7 to 9 p.m., Southampton High School Auditorium, 141 Narrow Lane, Southampton, $25. (631) 566-6397.

 

Art & Museums

FRI OCT 24

Front & Back: Glass Paintings by Gabriele Raacke, opening reception 5 to 8 p.m., on view through Sunday, Ashawagh Hall, 780 Springs Fireplace Road, East Hampton. (631) 605-1190 or raacke.us.

SAT OCT 25

Mary Ellen Bartley, Guild Hall Museum Permanent Collection New Works: 2010-2014 Opening Reception, 4 to 6 p.m., Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton, $7. (631) 324-4050.

SUN OCT 26

Steven and William Ladd: Mary Queen of the Universe Exhibit Opening, 11 a.m., on view through January 19, 2015, Parrish Art Musem, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill. (631) 283-2118.

Temple Adas Israel Fall/Holiday Exhibit: Common Themes, opening wine and cheese reception 4 to 6 p.m., Temple Adas Israel, 30 Atlantic Avenue, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-0904 or templeadasisrael.org.

Alan Shields: In Motion Exhibit Opening, on view through January 19, 2015, Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill. (631) 283-2118 or parrishart.org.

SAT NOV 1

Poetics of Space: Michael Chiarello and Jonathan Beer, opening reception 5 p.m. to 7 p.m., Tripoli Gallery, 30A Jobs Lane, Southampton. (631) 377-3715 or tripoligallery.com.

Life in the Abstract, opening reception 5 to 8 p.m., on view through November 10, Ille Arts, 216e Main Street, Amagansett. (631) 905-9894.

Alan Shields: In Motion, reception 5:30 p.m., on view through January 19, 2015, Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill. (631) 283-2118 or parrishart.org.

 

 

Music & Night Life

 

THURS OCT 23

Glenn Tilbrook, 8 p.m. The Suffolk Theater, 118 East Main Street, Riverhead, $40. (631) 727-4343 or SuffolkTheater.com.

FRI OCT 24

Candlelight Fridays at Wölffer Estate Vineyards: Lily-Anne Merat, 5 to 8 p.m., Wölffer Estate Vineyards, 139 Sagg Road, Sagaponack. (631) 537-5106.

Salon Series: Andrew Staupe, 6 p.m. The Parrish Art Museum Lichtenstein Theater, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $20, $10 for Parrish members. (631) 283-2118.

Jettykoon, a benefit for the Surfrider Foundation, 7:30 to 10 p.m., The Stephen Talkhouse, 161 Main Street, Amagansett. (631) 921-1842 or jettykoon.com.

Hamptons Music Festival: Duncan Sheik, 8 p.m., Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach, $55 to $65. (631) 288-2350.

Bad Girls … A Disco Tribute to Donna Summer, 8 p.m., The Suffolk Theater, 118 East Main Street, Riverhead, $35. (631) 727-4343 or SuffolkTheater.com.

SAT OCT 25

Salon Series: Andrew Staupe 2 p.m. The Parrish Art Museum Lichtenstein Theater, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $20, $10 for Parrish members. (631) 283-2118.

Hamptons Music Festival: Natalie Merchant, 8 p.m., Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach, $95 to $150. (631) 288-2350.

SUN OCT 26

East Meets West – The Best Music from Montauk to Patchogue, 12:30 to 8 p.m., Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach, $39 all-access pass. (631) 288-2350.

FRI OCT 31

Candlelight Fridays at Wölffer Estate Vineyards: Iris Ornig, 5 to 8 p.m., Wölffer Estate Vineyards, 139 Sagg Road, Sagaponack. (631) 537-5106.

Salon Series: Sandro Russo, 6 p.m. The Parrish Art Museum Lichtenstein Theater, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $20, $10 for Parrish members. (631) 283-2118.

SAT NOV 1

Salon Series: Sandro Russo, 2:30 p.m. The Parrish Art Museum Lichtenstein Theater, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $20, $10 for Parrish members. (631) 283-2118.

Perlman Music Program Alumni Recital: Michelle Ross, violin, 5 p.m. Clarks Art Center, 73 Shore Road, Shelter Island, $25. (212) 721-8769 or perlmanmusicprogram.org.

Suzanne Vega, 8 p.m., Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, 76 Main Street, Westhampton Beach, $30 to $50. (631) 288-2350.

 

Readings, Lectures & Classes

FRI OCT 24

Materials & Methods with Abstract Artist Eric Dever, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $120 for members for month long class, $150 for non-members. (631) 283-2118.

Making the Most of Your iPhone, 10:30 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free, advanced registration required, limit 16. (631) 725-0049.

SAT OCT 25

Camellia Group, moderated by Bridget DeCandido, Horticultural Library in the ground floor of the Bridgehampton Community House, 843 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton, free. (631) 537-2223.

The Year-Round Garden, 10:30 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free, advanced registration required, limit 12. (631) 725-0049.

Readings from “Italoamericana: The Literature of the Great Migration, 1880-1943, with Robert Viscusi and others, 4 p.m. Canio’s Books, 290 Main Street, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-4926.

MON OCT 27

Come Knit with Us, 1 p.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, no registration necessary. (631) 725-0049.

TUE OCT 28

Long Island On-Farm Compost Workshop and Compost Facility Tour, 9 a.m. to 4 p.m., Cornell Cooperative Extension of Suffolk County, First Floor Meeting Room, 423 Griffing Avenue, Riverhead, $30 for the workshop. (631) 852-3289.

English Conversation Classes/Clases de Conversación en Inglés, 5 p.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free, no advanced registration required. (631) 725-0049.

American Heart Association Community Heartsaver CPR-AED Course, 6:30 to 9 p.m., Pierson High School, 200 Jermain Avenue, Sag Harbor, $35 includes manual and certification card. sdenis@sagharborschools.org.

WED OCT 29

East Hampton Cemetery Tour, 6:30 p.m., East Hampton Historical Society, meet at 14 James Lane, East Hampton, $15, reservations required. (631) 324-6850.

Writers Speak Wednesdays: Julia Fierro, 7 p.m., Radio Lounge, Chancellors Hall, Stony Brook-Southampton, 239 Montauk Highway, Southampton. (631) 632-5030.

FRI OCT 31

Materials & Methods with Abstract Artist Eric Dever, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., The Parrish Art Museum, 279 Montauk Highway, Water Mill, $120 for members for month long class, $150 for non-members. (631) 283-2118.

Apps for Your iPad, 10:30 a.m., John Jermain Memorial Library, 34 West Water Street, Sag Harbor, free, advanced registration required, limit 12. (631) 725-0049.

SAT NOV 1

Radical Descent: The Cultivation of American Revolutionary, a reading by author Linda Coleman, 5 p.m., Canio’s Books, 290 Main Street, Sag Harbor. (631) 725-4926.

 

Events, Workshops & Meetings

 

FRI OCT 24

The Night Sky – Celestial Viewing with the Custer Institute, 7 p.m., co-sponsored by the South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo) and the Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt, SoFo, 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. (631) 537-9735 or sofo.org.

SAT OCT 25

Sag Harbor Farmers’ Market, 9 a.m. to 1 p.m., Saturdays through October 25, corner of Bay and Burke Streets, Sag Harbor.

Groundworks Fall Festival Weekend, 9 a.m. featuring Sue Wee Flying Pig Races at 10 a.m., noon, 2 p.m. and 4 p.m., also on Sunday, Groundworks Landscaping, 530 Montauk Highway, Amagansett, free. (631) 324-7373.

Farming’s Future on the East End, with Scott Chaskey, of Quail Hill Farm, David Falkowski of Open Minded Organics, Mary Woltz of Bees Needs & others, 2 p.m., Bridgehampton Museum Archives, 2539A Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton. (631) 537-1088 or bhmuseum.org.

WED OCT 29

College Fair at Pierson High School, 6:30 to 8:30 p.m., Pierson High School Gymnasium, 200 Jermain Avenue, Sag Harbor. Over 100 colleges will be in attendance. For students grades 8 through 12. For more information, visit sagharborschools.org.

Balancing Screen Time with Green Time, a special program for parents and educators, 7 p.m., South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo), 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. (631) 537-9735 or sofo.org.

Ladies Night Out, a benefit for The Retreat hosted by White’s Apothecary, 5 to 7 p.m., White’s Apothecary, 81 Main Street, East Hampton. $50 (includes a $25 giftcard to White’s Pharmacy). (631) 329-4398.

SAT NOV 1

Marine Meadows Workshop, 10 a.m. to noon, South Fork Natural History Museum (SoFo), 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton, (631) 537-9735.

 

If you would have a calendar item that you would like to see printed in the Sag Harbor Express or online at sagharboronline.com please email assistant@sagharboronline.com.

 

 

 

 

Bridgehampton Lions Club Carving Contest Next Monday, October 27

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lionsclubcarvingcontest

The Bridgehampton Lions Club will host its annual pumpkin carving contest on Monday, October 27 at 5 p.m. at the Bridgehampton Community House, 843 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, Bridgehampton. Cash awards between $20 and $250 will be awarded in a variety of categories including Area 51, Mythic Monstrosity, Poultrygeist, Sea Screecher and Classic Jack. For more information, visit bridgehamptonlions.org.

Southampton School Closed as Precaution After Enterovirus Case Confirmed

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By Tessa Raebeck

Southampton Elementary School closed its doors Wednesday to be disinfected after a student was found to have an enterovirus infection, Superintendent Scott Farina said in an alert issued Tuesday.

The district said the strain found in the student, who is out of school and seeking treatment, is not the EV-D68 strain of the virus that has had a nationwide outbreak, resulting in cases of severe respiratory illness in both children and adults throughout the country.

According to the federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, non-polio enteroviruses are “very common viruses,” which cause about 10 million to 15 million infections in the United States each year, with tens of thousands of hospitalizations for illnesses caused by enteroviruses. EV-D68 is one of more than 100 non-polio enteroviruses. Although small numbers of D68 have been reported regularly to the CDC since 1987, the number of people with confirmed EV-D68 infection has been “much greater” in 2014, the CDC said on its website.

It is unclear which strand of enterovirus the Southampton student is infected with, although the district confirmed it is not EV-D68. A mix of enteroviruses generally circulates throughout the United States each year, with different strands causing more illnesses in different years.

“Most people who get infected with non-polio enteroviruses do not get sick. Or, they may have mild illness, like the common cold. But some people can get very sick and have infection of their heart or brain or even become paralyzed,” the CDC website states.

Infections can spread through close contact with an infected person or by touching objects or surfaces that have the virus on them before touching your mouth, nose or eyes.

Mr. Farina said the Southampton Elementary School, as well as the entire bus fleet, would undergo a “thorough cleaning” by an outside company on Wednesday and reopen today, Thursday, October 16.

“The company will disinfect the entire building and apply an antibacterial product to further prevent the spread of germs,” he said.

Although local schools always step up their health-minded measures going into flu season, which is also the most common time for enterovirus infections, on Wednesday the Sag Harbor and Bridgehampton school districts said they are taking extra precautions in response to the infection in Southampton.

“We disinfected classrooms last night and will do so regularly as a precautionary measure, and have reminded students and staff to wash hands, avoid close contact, cover coughs and sneezes and to stay home when sick,” said Bridgehampton Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre.

Sag Harbor Superintendent Katy Graves said the district applies a virucide to surfaces every night year-round during after-school cleaning, “but we’ve expanded that more to virtually every surface to make sure that it kills all viruses. So we’re vigilant, but we’ve become even more vigilant,” she said.

The virucide, which the state has approved for use around children, is now being used on more surfaces and throughout the day, rather than just at night. The district is also continuing its regular instruction on healthy habits.

“It’s a good wake-up call for us to always be heightened and aware,” said Ms. Graves. “We have a pretty fragile population—our little ones—so we take care of them and make sure it’s safe.”

Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork to Celebrate 30th Anniversary

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Unitarians

Members of the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork will celebrate its 30th anniversary on Sunday. Pictured are, seated from left to right, the Reverend Nancy Arnold, interim minister, Martha Potter, and Mark Potter; standing, Mark Ewald and John Andrews. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

This weekend, the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork will celebrate its 30th anniversary with a “Homecoming” service on Sunday at its meetinghouse on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike in Bridgehampton.

Longtime member, Mildred Granitz, 94, of East Hampton, remembers well the congregation’s humble beginnings on the East End.

“A second homeowner ran an ad in The East Hampton Star, in the late ’60s or early ’70s, stating an interest in Unitarian Universalism and asking if there were others who shared it,” she said this week.

The result was the formation of the East End Unitarian Universalist Fellowship, an effort that disbanded after a decade because of a lack of full-time residents who were members, she said.

But within a few short years, the fellowship was replaced by the South Fork Unitarian Universalist Society, whose members started to meet in the Water Mill home of Paul and Kathy Rogers, two founding members, in 1984.

“That’s about when I got involved,” said another long-time member, Jeanne Wisner, who moved east from Freeport, where she and her husband had been involved with the local congregation.

“I remember sitting in the grass—it was summer—and were always sitting outside with a topic to talk about. We always had conversations about concerns about ethics, social concerns, civil rights,” she said.

A commitment to progressive ideals remains today, Ms. Wisner said, pointing out that a number of congregants had attended a recent march to raise awareness about climate change.

The Reverend Nancy Arnold, the congregation’s interim minister, who has served since the Reverend Alison Cornish moved to Philadelphia, said the congregation has “sent personal invitations to some of those who were here in the past with the hope that they will come and celebrate with us.”

The regular Sunday service, which takes place at 10:30 a.m., will include a photo-video presentation set to music of the congregation’s history. It will be followed by lunch and a hospitality hour.  The night before, the congregation will present a concert by Valerie DiLorenzo at the meetinghouse at 7 p.m.

Within a year of its formation, the society had obtained its charter from the national Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations and moved into rental space at the Hampton Day School. From there, it moved to the Water Mill Community House, before building its own meetinghouse on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, which was dedicated in 2006, and making yet another name change—to the Unitarian Universalist Congregation of the South Fork.

“Owning property for our own meetinghouse is a quote miracle,” said Ms. Wisner. The congregation bought its 2.25-acre Bridgehampton property, which is next to the Long Pond Greenbelt, for only $100,000 in 1999, just before real estate prices skyrocketed.  The meetinghouse, which cost about $900,000 to build and furnish, was dedicated in 2006.

Since that time, the congregation has provided space for the non-profit prekindergarten and nursery school, The Rainbow School, as well as the Conservative Synagogue of the Hamptons, a Jewish congregation. In November, it will also be home to the zendo, which used to meet at the Sagaponack home of the writer Peter Matthiessen.

Being inclusive and tolerant are two of the traits about Unitarian Universalism that has drawn Ms. Wisner to the faith.

“One of the things that makes it really important for me is that everybody is expected to have different religious backgrounds and beliefs,” she said. “Everybody in our congregation—I’m absolutely certain of this—has different beliefs about God, spirituality, about no God. Those are personal thought and beliefs, and people’s personal beliefs are held sacred to each of them. Everyone is welcome here, with whatever their religious beliefs are.”

Environmental Impact Study Ordered for Potential CVS in Bridgehampton

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CVS

The Southampton Town Planning Board ruled last Thurday it will require an environmental impact study for CVS at the corner of Montauk Highway and the Bridgehampton Turnpike. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Mara Certic

At the end of a three-hour meeting on Thursday afternoon, the Southampton Town Planning Board ruled that it would require an environmental impact study for CVS pharmacy that has been proposed for a busy intersection in Bridgehampton.

Southampton Town Planner Claire Vail presented her recommendation to the board on Thursday after she discussed the standards of the State Environmental Quality Review Act. The application is considered “unlisted,” which means the planning board has the final say in whether or not an EIS is required.

CVS Caremark filed for a special exception permit in July to allow the pharmacy giant to occupy a 9,030-square-foot-building at the intersection of Montauk Highway, the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike and Lumber Lane.

Ms. Vail said on Thursday the proposed pharmacy could have significant potential adverse effects on both traffic and the community character, which lead the board to adopt what is called a “positive declaration,” requiring the environmental study.

In 2011, the planning board approved plans by BNB Ventures IV—the company that owns the land—to demolish the Bridgehampton Beverage store in order to put in its place a two-story Greek revival building. When approved in 2011, the planning board had determined the building would not have any adverse impact on its surroundings.

It was initially proposed the building would have a couple of retail spaces with offices or apartments upstairs, but the entire building was zoned for retail uses, which allows CVS to seek to merge the different retail spaces together to make one large store. But the town code requires developers seeking to build retail spaces larger than 5,000 square feet in the village business district to apply for a special exception permit, although the use is not prohibited outright.

News of CVS potentially taking over the busy corner caused outcry from members of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee, who in turn created the offshoot organization Save Bridgehampton Main Street in an effort to raise money to fund a potential legal battle.

A few dozen people showed up to Thursday afternoon’s planning board meeting, many of them sporting anti-CVS pins in their lapels, to listen to Ms. Vail discuss the board’s determination. Although members of the CAC had tried to make arguments that there might be impacts on the historic district or nature of the lot, which is the site of a historic tavern, Ms. Vail determined it unlikely the CVS would affect the historical character of the area.

“That triangle has some historic importance, but you already approved a building there,” said John Bennett, who is representing CVS Caremark.

Ms. Vail did, however, say that an almost 10,000-square-foot pharmacy on the busy corner would have a significant negative effect on the community character of Bridgehampton’s Main Street. Ms. Vail used copies of the Bridgehampton Hamlet Study and plans for the hamlet center as criteria, all of which named maintaining the community character as the village’s primary goal.

Ms. Vail also found there to be a significant potential negative impact on traffic in the area, thus requiring a traffic study.

Questions remain about how many parking spots there should be, as well as the scope of any traffic study. Mr. Bennett appeared to be frustrated following Ms. Vail’s presentation to the planning board.

He told the board the developers had already hired BHB Engineering to do a traffic study. “The first thing I insisted upon was a traffic impact statement,” he said. “You cannot under any guise use the traffic concerns here because that ship has sailed.”

Members of Save Bridgehampton Main Street also hired an engineer for their own traffic study, which will be read into the record at one of the upcoming public hearings on the application. Following the adoption of the positive declaration, a third traffic study will likely be conducted on the busy corner.

Mr. Bennett told the board this move was “textbook arbitrary action,” and warned the planning board to use only substantiated facts and expert testimony when making its decisions.  Mr. Bennett several times made reference to appealing the board’s decision. At one point, he said, “I guess a court will have to decide that.”

Wayne Bruyn, who is representing BNB Ventures IV, accused the board of standing alone with its staff on “a twisted interpretation of the code.”

The two attorneys spent approximately 45 minutes responding to Ms. Vail’s presentation and accused the board of acting illegally.

“I know you’re under a lot of political pressure, I ask you to consider what you said, I don’t see how you have the authority to do anything you’re doing today,” Mr. Bennett said.

When the board asked the lawyers for an adjournment in order to consider its reply, Mr. Bennett flatly refused and said “You’re going to do what you’re going to do.”

“You’ve had more than enough time” to prepare, Mr. Bennett added.  “You should have anticipated what I was going to say, you should have known it all along.”

The six members of the board present voted unanimously to accept the positive declaration. Public hearings and further environmental review will take place in the coming weeks.

 

Century-Old Raceabout To Highlight Bridgehampton Road Rally

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Cars lined up for the Bridgehampton Museum Road Rally. Photo Courtesy Brigehampton Historical Society.

Cars lined up at the Bridgehampton Museum. Photo courtesy Bridgehampton Historical Society.

By Tessa Raebeck 

After first racing in Bridgehampton 100 years ago, the 1913 Mercer Raceabout is returning to the hamlet.

At this year’s Vintage Automobile Poker Rally hosted by The Bridgehampton Museum, Silas Hiscock will bring his legendary speedster back to Bridgehampton for a leisurely tour around the roads it once raced.

An expected 60 to 75 cars will be on display on the grounds of The Bridgehampton Museum on Saturday for the vintage automobile show and poker rally, an annual event held in honor of the hamlet’s rich racing history.

The oldest car will be Mr. Hiscock’s 1913 Mercer, which “was actually raced on the streets of Bridgehampton in the early 1900’s,” according to Earl Gandel, a Bridgehampton resident well-versed in the hamlet’s automobile history.

“It was his father’s car,” Mr. Gandel said of Mr. Hiscock. The car was passed down to the family, but then sold in the 1950’s.

“I guess it made the rounds and it was in somebody’s collection and then it came back to auction [many years later until Silas Hiscock] heard about it and he went to California and bought it,” Mr. Gandel said of the Mercer, which recently returned to Bridgehampton.

The famed car is an icon of early films, in which drivers in bucket seats seem to be sitting atop the vehicle, bouncing along turns at almost alarming speeds. In 1911, the first year the Raceabouts were made, Mercer entered its new cars in six major events—and the Raceabout earned the top spot in five of them.

Bridgehampton’s car contests started when firemen began to sponsor street races on a three-mile course around the hamlet in 1915 as a way to liven up their summer carnival. Drivers, going up to 50 mph, began on Main Street and made a rectangular loop, turning left onto Halsey Lane, left onto Paul’s Lane, left onto Ocean Road and finally another left to return to Main Street.

The firemen’s circuit ended in 1921, but in 1949 Bruce Stevenson revived Bridgehampton’s road races, and mostly European cars dashed around a four-and-a-half-mile course at speeds of over 100 mph. From 1949 to 1953, the circuit ran directly to the east of the first course, starting on Ocean Road and going clockwise, cutting right down Sagaponack Road, turning right onto Sagg Main Street, and taking a right onto Bridge Lane to return to Ocean Road.

The 25-lap Bridgehampton circuit, one of the first permanent road racing venues in the United States, was considered an excellent high-speed road course, further enhanced by the natural beauty of Bridgehampton’s ponds, farms and sand dunes. The course joined the SCCA National Sports Car Championship in 1951, the year it was created, and hosted many major international events, such as Can-Am, NASCAR Grand National and the World Sportscar Championship.

The races ended tragically in May 1953 when a driver was killed during practice and an accident stopped a race on the ninth lap, when spectators flooded the course after one driver and three spectators were injured. The Mecox Trophy Race, Hamptons Cup and others were cut short and New York State banned racing on public roads shortly thereafter.

In 1957, the course was revived once again when the Bridgehampton Race Circuit opened on 500 acres just north of the village, where The Bridge Golf Club is now located.

“Racing on the streets was banned in New York State, so the track was built,” said Mr. Gandel, who once managed the track, which closed its doors in 1998 after over 35 years of car and motorcycle races.

Photo courtesy Bridgehampton Historical Society.

Photo courtesy Bridgehampton Historical Society.

In homage to the hamlet’s connection to cars, Jeffrey Vogel and the Bridgehampton Historical Society started the first Vintage Sports Car Road Rally in 1993.

“The rally started 21 years ago because Bridgehampton has a very rich racing history compared to a lot of places where rallies are run,” said Mr. Gandel. “We have a reason to do it and I think people appreciate that.”

All the cars participating in Saturday’s show and road rally, which includes Mustangs, Corvettes and Cabriolets, to name a few, were made before 1960. The tour still enjoys the natural beauty of Bridgehampton, but at much safer speeds.

Drivers start out with a parade around the “old course,” said Mr. Gandel, following the exact same four-mile route along public roads as their early 20th-century predecessors. Following the parade, cars start on the main course with a map and an instruction book, stopping at four checkpoints along the way to collect poker cards. After all of the drivers finish at the museum’s Main Street location, the car with the winning poker hand wins in a game of sheer luck. Other awards are given for going the exact mileage and taking the “ideal time,” Mr. Gandel said, adding that both of those winning amounts are unknown to drivers prior to the finish line.

“A lot of rallies are very technical and they take a lot of navigation and equipment, but we don’t do that,” Mr. Gandel said. ”It’s a fun rally.”

The Bridgehampton Museum’s 2014 Vintage Automobile Poker Rally is Saturday, October 11, at The Bridgehampton Museum, located at 2368 Main Street in Bridgehampton. Gates open to auto exhibitors at 9 a.m., with a $10 fee to show cars. At 10 a.m. gates are open to the public with free admission. The rally begins at noon and has a $100 entry fee for participants. For more information, call (631) 537-4225 or visit bridgehamptonrally.org.

Plein Air Peconic Celebrates Land, Sea, Sky

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Hendrickson Farm by Kathryn Szoka.

Hendrickson Farm by Kathryn Szoka.

“Land, Sea, Sky,” Plein Air Peconic’s Ninth Annual Show, will debut with an artists reception this Saturday, October 11 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Ashawagh Hall, 780 Springs Fireplace Road in East Hampton. The show will be on view throughout Columbus Day weekend.

“Land, Sea, Sky” celebrates art inspired by direct observation of the East End’s cherished local farmlands, wildflower fields, salt marshes, and beaches in an exhibition and sale by the artists of Plein Air Peconic.  Many landscapes that have been conserved by Peconic Land Trust will be included.  Plein Air Peconic includes painters Casey Chalem Anderson, Susan D’Alessio, Aubrey Grainger, Anita Kusick, Keith Mantell, Michele Margit, Joanne Rosko, and photographers Tom Steele, Kathryn Szoka.  Plein Air Peconic has announced that two guest painters, Ty Stroudsburg and Gail Kern, will be exhibiting as well.

The show will partially benefit the Peconic Land Trust. To learn more about the artists of Plein Air Peconic visit PleinAirPeconic.com.

 

BNB Announces Quarterly Dividend

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Bridge Bancorp, Inc., the holding company for The Bridgehampton National Bank, announced the declaration of a quarterly dividend of $0.23 per share. The dividend will be payable on October 31 to shareholders of record as of October 17.  The company continues its trend of uninterrupted dividends.

Bridge Bancorp, Inc. is a bank holding company engaged in commercial banking and financial services through its wholly owned subsidiary, The Bridgehampton National Bank (BNB).  Established in 1910, BNB, with assets of approximately $2.2 billion, and a primary market area of Suffolk and Southern Nassau Counties, Long Island, operates 27 retail branch locations.

For more information, visit bridgenb.com. 

Bridgehampton Test Scores Fall in Wake of Common Core

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By Tessa Raebeck

Following the implementation of the Common Core Learning Standards last year and the immediate alignment of student assessments to the new curriculum, Bridgehampton School saw its scores on standardized tests drop across the board.

The Common Core, which according to its philosophy, aims to enhance learning essentially by teaching students to be thinkers rather than memorizers, was largely criticized last year for its implementation, which many educators, parents and students said was haphazard and too fast.

“There’s a difference between pre-Common Core and post-Common Core,” Bridgehampton Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre told the school board at its monthly meeting on Wednesday, September 24.

“By all measures that we have here our kids are growing,” she said, adding that 96 percent of Bridgehampton students met local growth targets, which are measured by where students are in September “to where we expect they will be at the end of the year.”

For English Language Arts (ELA) tests in grades 3 to 5, less than half of students scored the higher scores of a 3 or a 4 on the new state assessments. Dr. Favre said what needs to happen now is for the district “to understand better what the state tests are asking,” adding “that’s the training that the teachers are going through now.”

“This year is the first year that the state is actually releasing some questions, so we finally have an idea of what the test looks like,” Dr. Favre said.

Dr. Favre said Bridgehampton’s numbers tend to appear worse than they actually are, because the school’s small class sizes make for more extreme percentages. If two students fail in a class of eight, for example, the pass rate goes from 100 percent to 75 percent, whereas those same two students failing in a larger class would have a much less significant effect.

The superintendent said in moving forward, a primary goal of the district is to look at vocabulary development and to “change strategies we use to teach so that kids start to think in a different way.”

“I couldn’t understand why they would change standards and the test at the same time,” Dr. Favre said of the New York State Department of Education, saying she would have preferred to “watch our kids grow on the tests we’re familiar with.”

Students performed better on the math assessments, which the district had made an “area of focus,” the superintendent said.

Dr. Favre announced her intention to team up with other small schools, such as the Amagansett School District in East Hampton, so that teachers have colleagues to strategize with. Many Bridgehampton teachers are the only instructors in their subjects at their grade level and she believes they would benefit from a relationship with others experiencing the same challenges. Dr. Favre is in talks with Amagansett Superintendent Eleanor Tritt to make such an alliance happen.

Despite the poor showing on many primary tests, Bridgehampton did “beautifully” on high school exams, she said.

“That’s why I have every faith we have a great curriculum. We have great teachers, it’s just a matter of getting to know this test,” Dr. Favre said of the Common Core assessments.

In an effort to address weaknesses, the district has established data teams, groups of teachers that will meet for two hours every month to “really talk about these things” and plan curriculum alignment across the board.

Sag Harbor and Bridgehampton Voters Approve Library Budgets, Elect New Members

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Jermain-Library-5-10-13-701-2985-586x586

By Stephen J. Kotz

Sag Harbor voters overwhelming approved the John Jermain Memorial Library’s $2.4 million budget by a 198-32 margin on Monday.

Two incumbent library board members were also re-elected to three-year terms on the board. Ann Lieber received 154 votes, and Jacqueline Brody received 129 votes. Newcomer Ann Sutphen, who received 144 votes, was also elected to a three-year-term.

Also running were Susan Sabin, who received 127 votes; Robert Hooke, who received 84 votes; and Caleb Kercheval, who received 71 votes. Trustee Toby Spitz did not seek another term.

“The staff and board are just so grateful for the community support of the library,” said library director Catherine Creedon on Tuesday.

The budget pierces the state-mandated 2-percent spending cap. It carries a 5.8-percent spending increase of $111,367, which Ms. Creedon said was largely tied to the library’s eventual move back to its building at the corner of Main and Union streets.

She said the budget covered increases for things like utilities, the need for more custodial hours, given that the building is four times larger than the library’s temporary quarters on Long Island Avenue, as well as the need to bring back two part-time positions that were eliminated through attrition at the start of the renovation project.

“This place has been a real gift,” Ms. Creedon said of the library’s temporary home. “Our door count, the number of patrons who have come in, has actually increased in the temporary space.” She said she thought that might because the temporary space is now closer to the business district.

Ms. Creedon said she still did not have a firm answer for when the library would be able to move back to its permanent home, saying it would be late winter at the earliest.

Hampton Library Results

Bridgehampton and Sagaponack voters on Saturday approved the Hampton Library’s proposed operating budget for 2015 and elected five trustees to the library board.

Dr. Louise Collins, Tom House and Jackie Poole, all of whom ran unopposed, were reelected to three-year terms on the board of trustees. John Vendetti ran unopposed for his first term and was voted in by 42 Bridgehampton votes. Sagaponack voters elected Matthew Rojano for his first term as library trustee.

After serving four three-year terms, board president Elizabeth Whelan Kotz stepped down because of term limits, and Trustee Sarah Jaffe Turnbull did not seek re-election.

The five trustees were sworn in on Wednesday, October 1.

The budget, which was proposed at $1,551,700 passed easily. In Bridgehampton, voters approved the budget 38 to 6. In Sagaponack, all nine voters passed the budget unanimously.

“We really appreciate the support of our patrons and voters,” said library director Kelly Harris. “And we thank the people who took time out from a very busy weekend to come out and vote.”