Tag Archive | "Bridgehampton School"

Stepping Around Snow, the Bridgehampton School Prepares its Gardens for Spring

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Justin LaPointe waters a seedbed during a spring cleaning of the Bridgehampton School's greenhouse on Saturday, March 7. Photo by Michael Heller.

Justin LaPointe waters a seedbed during a spring cleaning of the Bridgehampton School’s greenhouse on Saturday, March 7. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Tessa Raebeck

Despite the snow piles, the potholes, and the threat of more 30-degree weather on the horizon, spring is on its way—at least at the Bridgehampton School.

A group of parents, teachers, and students came to school on Saturday, March 7, to clean up the school’s greenhouse before spring and prepare for the coming season.

For the past five years, the Bridgehampton School has been planting a garden on its grounds, primarily tended by the students and led by teacher Judiann Carmack-Fayyaz, who is also the chair of Slow Food East End, with help from a few other teachers. It evolved into a community garden about two years ago, and production is increasing this year, as a committed group of Bridgehampton parents has joined in, coming each Monday to work in the greenhouse.

Philippe Cheng, a parent at the school, redesigned the greenhouse layout this year to make more room—and grow more lettuce. The goal is to increase production and bring more fresh produce into the school’s cafeteria, while educating the students and community about the importance of slow food.

As part of its commitment to community-minded farming, healthy, mindful eating and sustainable, farm-to-table production practices, Slow Food East End funds master farmers for local school gardens. Zachary Johnson, a farmer at Sylvester Manor on Shelter Island, has been supervising and lending a hand in Bridgehampton.

Working together with Mr. Johnson and the school’s cafeteria staff, this season the gardeners will be producing different varieties of lettuce and snap peas, and in the long run onions, potatoes, butternut squash, spaghetti squash, and plenty of beets and carrots.

“We really hope to supply all of the lettuce that the cafeteria uses for the week, and to at least provide a vegetable throughout the year, that would be our goal,” said Ms. Carmack-Fayyaz.

Coursework aligns with the garden’s mission. There is a botany and agricultural production elective for Bridgehampton students to learn about growing food and the nutrition and culinary arts elective teaches them how to prepare and eat it.

“It’s very much about those principles of eating good, clean and fair food,” said Ms. Carmack-Fayyaz, who teaches the nutrition and culinary arts elective. Using the garden, students can learn about the creativity behind cooking.

While the students have been involved since the beginning through in-school electives and after-school clubs, two years ago Bridgehampton started the community garden with the goal of involving more people outside the school. The greenhouse now has 13 raised beds, 8-by 4-feet each, that members of the community can take over and use to grow whatever they please in exchange for helping out in the garden.

“That brought more people in, but it’s really the fact that the parents have come in [this year] and so now we have parents, faculty, and students, so we have the whole package—and an extremely supportive administration,” said Ms. Carmack-Fayyaz. “Everything is in place and—it’s just very exciting.”

As the school community has become more involved, so has the greater Bridgehampton community surrounding it. Local farmer Jenn Halsey Dupree will be coming to the school to help the gardeners plant some apple trees. There is already a small strawberry patch and blueberry bushes, and new raspberry bushes will soon be planted.

“Children are all excited about the fruit, they just love it,” Ms. Carmack-Fayyaz said.

On Saturday, the group made plans for future expansion and even greater involvement. Mr. Cheng came up with the concept of modeling the project off of a “field of dreams,” where you build it and they will come.

“I just loved that concept, because we’ve been working on that, but if we reach out and really get more and more people involved and have them have ownership in the garden, that could only make the project grow,” she said, adding the concept could potentially be brought to all the local school gardens.

The Bridgehampton garden team will be building two raised beds in the greenhouse using a grant received from Slow Food East End, and the ultimate goal is to raise enough funds for six more.

“Our idea is, well, let’s build them, we’ll build the two and people will see what it’s like and get excited and be part of the growth going forward, so that we can carry on building them and get community support for them,” she said.

Encouraging anyone who’s interested to stop by and become involved in any way they can, the gardeners at Bridgehampton School hope to continually raise community involvement not just to expand the raised beds in the greenhouse, but also the mission behind them; to raise awareness about what real food is, where it comes from, what to eat and how to eat it.

Sorry Kids, Sag Harbor Spring Break Affected by Snow Days Again this Year

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As his friends look on, Philip Miller catches air on Pierson Hill following the Blizzard of 2015 on Tuesday, 1/27/15

Making the best of the biggest blizzard in years, Philip Miller shreds a buried bench on Pierson Hill as his friends look on on Tuesday, January 27. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Tessa Raebeck

After Sag Harbor students enjoyed their fourth snow day off this school year on Thursday, March 5, Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves announced they would have to make up for the loss of one day of instructional time. As a result, students will lose the last week day of their scheduled spring break and will be required to attend school on Friday, April 10.

“We encourage you to have your children come to school on April 10, but we are understanding if your family has made other plans. Our parents are our children’s finest teachers; time spent with your children is never wasted,” Ms. Graves said in an email to the school community.

Required by law to have 180 full days of instruction each year, school districts are faced with the tricky task of balancing breaks with preparation for inclement weather, which has become a more pressing concern with the extreme storms and conditions in recent years. Extra snow days cut into the scheduled spring break last year, as did Hurricane Sandy the year before.

“I am hopeful that the adage is true that when March comes in like a lion, it goes out like a lamb,” Ms. Graves said in her email. “We certainly have seen March’s winter claws, but we have also enjoyed the beauty of Pierson Hill deep in snow.”

Dr. Lois Favre, the superintendent of the Bridgehampton School District, said it had 180 school days scheduled and would not have to make up any lost days unless school is canceled again.

Ms. Graves said on Tuesday that if the district were to need another snow day, which could occur along with the forecasts of inclement weather for this coming weekend, “we’ll continue to carve away at that vacation time, but we’re really hoping that that’s not going to be the case.”

The next vacation day to be turned into a school day would be Thursday, April 9, also during the spring recess.

In its contract with the Teachers Association of Sag Harbor (TASH), the district pledged to never start school before Labor Day, “which is good for our families and our district and it works also for our teachers… we have to respect that,” Ms. Graves said.

The provision is intended to protect members of the community and staff who work second jobs during the summer months and rent their homes out during Sag Harbor’s busy resort season.

Planning for the upcoming 2015-16 school year poses extra challenges because Labor Day is late this year, falling on Monday, September 7. That means the window for the school year is narrower than it normal is. Because Labor Day is always celebrated on the first Monday in September, the district faces such a situation once every seven years.

“We’re adopting a calendar that right now only has two snow days built in, so we’re probably going to have to continue to be thoughtful about this,” said Ms. Graves. “We’re going to have to continue sitting down with our teachers association, PTA [Parent Teachers Association] and the Board of Education and probably coming up with a contingency plan.”

One option she mentioned is adding flex dates during the summer, when children have a day off but faculty and staff come in for training.

“I don’t know what those other options look like right now, but the New York State Department of Education gives us just a tiny little bit of latitude and that’s what we might need to bring to the table—is just a little bit of latitude and to see what we can do for next year,” Ms. Graves said.

Bridgehampton School Teachers Update Board on Evolving Pedagogy

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By Tessa Raebeck 

Bridgehampton School teachers updated the Board of Education Wednesday, February 25, on their teaching methods and PBIS, the school’s Positive Behavior Intervention System.

Special education science and math teacher Jeff Neubauer showed videos and shared the science and thinking behind “these new ways of approaching education.” Bridgehampton teachers Judiann Carmack-Fayyaz, who teaches environmental design and runs the up-and-coming robotics program, and Helen Wolfe, a math and science teacher, were also there in support of Mr. Neubauer.

In drafting this philosophy, the teachers took their academic experiences in a special education classroom and transferred those lessons to apply the methods to the larger student body.

The three core tenets of the philosophy, which was fostered by a handful of Bridgehampton teachers with help from Superintendent Dr. Lois Favre, is a diversity of instruction methods and teaching styles, a focus on rewards rather than punishment in terms of student behavior, and a focus on transition, or accurately preparing students for work in a modern world through programs like robotics and coding, Mr. Neubauer said.

Special education teachers, Mr. Neubauer told the board, are able to work together in the classroom and thus, “we get to see a myriad of teaching styles.”

“The real thing we came to,” he said of he and his colleagues, “was that diversifying instruction and motivation really became the pillars of what we wanted [education at Bridgehampton] to be.”

The Positive Behavior Intervention System, or PBIS, focuses on rewarding good behavior in students, rather than punishing bad behavior. Originating in the district about five years ago, the system was designed to provide good behavior with rewards in a consistent fashion across grade levels and classrooms.

Good behavior in the classroom, Mr. Neubauer said, allows for a safer environment, where students can feel comfortable learning, asking questions, and expressing their creativity. With the slogan that ease of use equals implementation, the teachers created a Bridgehampton PBIS website. The platform, which uses technology to streamline the process, has earned recognition at the local, state and regional levels.

All behavioral actions are logged onto the PBIS website by teachers, producing a vast display of data on behavior trends in Bridgehampton.

Teachers can use the extensive data to make informed decisions on how best to deal with behavioral issues. They can track, for instance, that most of the negative write-ups for a student occurred during first period, then see that they were predominately for tardiness. The data allows teachers to “isolate the problem and try to solve it,” Mr. Neubauer said.

“We want to make school a place where you don’t have behavior issues, so every kid can learn and be able to be creative and have this freedom,” he added.

In other school board news, the board decided to pursue a budget that will not pierce the state-mandated property tax cap, which it expects to adopt at its meeting on April 22.

The annual community forum on the budget will be held Wednesday, March 11, at 7 p.m. in the school gymnasium. The next meeting of the school board is March 25 at 7 p.m. in the cafeteria.

Bridgehampton Teachers Get Hair Buzzed to Benefit Local Family

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Bridgehampton School seniors Jada Pinckney, Daniel Denton and Hayley Lund were some of the lucky students whose names were drawn to shave the head of Bridgehampton School social studies teacher John Reilly as part of an annual fund-raising effort that was held this year in their gymnasium on Friday, 2/13/15

Bridgehampton School seniors Jada Pinckney, Daniel Denton and Hayley Lund were called up to finish history teacher John Reilly’s new ‘do as part of a fundraising event for a family in the district. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Mara Certic

The last day of school before vacation tends to be an exciting one, as academics take a backseat to fun activities in most classrooms for the last few hours before that week of freedom. That was the case on Friday, February 13, at the Bridgehampton School where students prepared themselves for the chance of a lifetime—the opportunity to shave a teacher’s head.

In an effort to raise money for a family in the school district, Bridgehampton High School History teacher John Reilly decided that it was once again time to give schoolchildren the opportunity to pay money for the chance to shave his flowing locks in front of the entire school.

Mr. Reilly has previously allowed his students to give him a buzz, and this year, when he heard that the father of a first grader was battling cancer and unable to work, he didn’t hesitate to offer up his coiffed ‘do in order to raise some money.

“My hair is less important than their need,” Mr. Reilly said on Friday afternoon, shortly after he had been shorn.

The history teacher, whose mane looked like it belonged on the head of a Romantic poet, mysteriously went “missing” moments before he was scheduled to sit for his hair cut. Eric Bramoff, the school’s athletic director, asked the gathered students call out to Mr. Reilly to try to find him.

“I saw him in the hallway, maybe he’s nervous,” one second-grader shouted over the screams of “Mr. Reilly” punctuated by rhythmic claps that echoed throughout the gymnasium.

A mysterious character with long, flowing blonde locks ran in at one point and sat in the designated barber’s chair, much to the confusion of some of the children. It was not a golden-haired maiden, as some had believed, but in fact music teacher David Elliot, who had donned the shining wig.

After more chanting from the students, a reluctant Mr. Reilly emerged from another room.

“There’s just not enough money in the pot,” he said as he explained he had cold feet and was second-guessing his decision.

Just as disappointed groans started to become audible throughout the gym, Mr. Bramoff made an offer he couldn’t refuse.

Would he change his mind if the new athletic director bought another ticket for every student in the gym? Could that $175 sway his decision?

Apparently so, as Mr. Reilly sat down and lucky students were called up to begin buzzing his hair.

Charles Manning Jr., Janatan Braia, Franky Bonilla, Melissa Villa and Michael Smith were all called up to begin the trimming process.

The school’s three senior classmen were also called upon to participate in the haircut, which raised a total of $760.

A Ronkonkoma law firm, Campolo, Middleton & McCormick, which has an office in Bridgehampton, donated $100 when it heard of Mr. Reilly’s plans.

In a shock last-minute decision, just as students were starting to file out of the room, Mr. Bramoff announced he was going to let his girls JV basketball team shave his head too, in order to get the total up to an even $1000.

The team, which is new this season, gleefully took up the challenge and quickly gave their basketball coach a haircut that might just as well be known as the “Reilly” at Bridgehampton School.

Bridgehampton School to Look Into Competitive Cheerleading

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By Tessa Raebeck

Bridgehampton High School could become a local powerhouse in competitive cheerleading, if Athletic Director Eric Bramoff gets his wish. With its history of strong basketball and traditional cheerleading programs, the school may pursue hosting a competitive team on which girls would perform flips, mounts and other coordinated gymnastics-style moves on mats against other teams.

Contending in a division based on school size, the team would compete in four meets across Long Island throughout the school year. The current cheerleading team, which Mr. Bramoff said is in favor of switching from traditional to competitive cheer, would also continue to support the boys’ basketball program, cheering the Killer Bees on at home and away games, Mr. Bramoff told the Board of Education when pitching the idea at its meeting on December 17.

“I feel like if we really put our eggs into being the best cheerleading program out here, I think our girls—our high school and our modified-level girls—will have something they can hang their hats on,” said Mr. Bramoff. Modified-level refers to the middle school team of seventh and eighth grade athletes. Although it’s anticipated the team would primarily consist of girls, boys would be welcome to join as well.

The distinction between traditional and competitive cheerleading is measured by its intensity. In competitive cheerleading, the girls leave the mat, vaulting into the air with athletic flips and tricks, while in traditional cheering, other than the occasional lift, their feet remain on the ground. Competitive cheerleading is a modernized version of the sport in which girls’ athleticism and teamwork come first.

Bridgehampton, a prekindergarten through grade 12 school with an enrollment of less than 200, depends heavily on shared sports services with neighboring districts in Sag Harbor and East Hampton. A competitive cheerleading team, Mr. Bramoff said, would draw in girls from those schools, which do not have their own programs, and give Bridgehampton a new point of pride.

Sag Harbor has already expressed interest in a combined team, said Mr. Bramoff, who told the school board that although the girls from Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor would compete together at their cheerleading meets, they would still do traditional cheerleading on the sidelines at their respective schools separately.

Mr. Bramoff asked the board to support his idea by including “some resources for turning our cheerleading team into a competitive cheerleading team” in the budget for the next school year, 2015-16. The exact cost is yet to be determined.

Section XI, the governing body for school sports in Suffolk County, is looking into how to define a cheerleading team and make it a certified competitive sport on Eastern Long Island. Several questions asked by the board last week have yet to be answered by Section XI, such as the specific costs and whether the team’s season would extend through the whole school year or be separated by different seasons, like fall or winter cheer.

“There are a lot of questions out there and the reason that I want to do this…our girls need something,” said Mr. Bramoff, adding, “We’ve had great cheerleading teams here forever and we’ve put resources into it and I think, as everybody else adapts, I think it would be advantageous for us to say, you know what, we still have the best cheerleading team and we’re going to hang the banners on the wall.”

Mr. Bramoff does not think it’s possible to maintain both a competitive cheerleading program and a girls basketball program, but said, “obviously, if we have [girls] that would like to play basketball, we still have that relationship with Sag Harbor.”

The board gave Mr. Bramoff the go-ahead to further explore the creation of a team.

The next meeting of the school board will be on January 28, 2015, in the Bridgehampton School cafeteria.

Celebration Planned to Honor Mary Anne Jules’s Long Career at Bridgehampton School

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By Tessa Raebeck

Mary Anne Jules enjoying her retirement. Courtesy Mary Anne Jules.

Mary Anne Jules enjoying her retirement. Courtesy Mary Anne Jules.

To honor her 32 years of service to the Bridgehampton School, its students and athletics programs, the Bridgehampton Teacher Association will host a celebration of Mary Anne Jules’s retirement at Almond Restaurant in Bridgehampton on Monday, November 10.

Just a year out of college, Ms. Jules started at the Bridgehampton School as a physical education teacher in 1983. She earned her master’s degree and administration degree while teaching and became athletic director for the district in 1991, while still teaching physical education. From 2010 to 2012, Ms. Jules served as president of Section XI, the governing body of high school sports in Suffolk County.

The evening will include cocktails, presentations and stories about Ms. Jules’s long career, with dinner to follow.

“It is to celebrate her over 30 years of service to us as a staff, Section XI and the Bridgehampton community as a whole,” said Jeff Hand, a Bridgehampton teacher who has helped organize the evening.

“A true testament to Mary Anne the person is the number of friends, former students, Section XI colleagues and family members who be attending,” Mr. Hand said, adding that as many as 40 people who are not part of the BTA are coming to show Ms. Jules their support and gratitude.

Although she is enjoying the rest since hanging up her whistle last summer, Ms. Jules has stayed connected to the district—and busy—by mentoring its new athletic director Eric Bramoff.

“He was a good choice for the job,” she said on Tuesday, adding she had yet to return to Bridgehampton’s sidelines as a fan in order to “Let Eric do his thing; he’s doing a great job.”

Ms. Jules said she won’t be able to stay away much longer, however. “I’ll definitely be at some basketball games, ’cause they should do very well this year,” she said, adding she had been following the papers intently for reports from the fall season.

Lillian Tyree-Johnson, a member of the school board and lifelong Bridgehampton resident, has known Ms. Jules as the face of Bridgehampton athletics for over 20 years. Her husband, Carl, was Bridgehampton’s junior high coach when they first started dating and later became head coach.

“Mary Anne has been a mentor to my husband and a wonderful friend to both of us for many years,” Ms. Tyree-Johnson said in an email Monday. “Her love for Bridgehampton is unquestioned and I will miss her very much, but wish her all the best in retirement.”

“She was a great example to her students as well,” she added. “Her work in bringing shared sports to Bridgehampton is, I think, her most important contribution. She opened doors for so many student athletes and created and sustained an amazing program.”

In her newfound free time, Ms. Jules has done exactly what she intended to do: watch her nieces and nephews play sports. She has been up to Sienna College to watch her nephew play lacrosse almost every weekend this fall and often travels to Westchester to watch another nephew play high school football. “And that’s only a few out of the 16,” she said of her total count of nieces, nephews and requisite games.

Ms. Jules is also taking yoga classes once a week and doing “the things that I never had time to do before,” she said. “I’m not rushing around, but I do miss the kids.”

Her fellow teachers organized the evening at Almond Restaurant to celebrate Ms. Jules’s long career in Bridgehampton.

“I’m looking forward to seeing all of them,” she said of her former co-workers. “It’s great people I work with and I miss them, so I am looking forward to a few laughs and seeing all them—some of my families—coming out.”

The cost to attend the evening is $50 per person with checks payable to “Bridgehampton BTA.” The party is from 5 to 8 p.m. For more information, contact Steve Meyers at smeyers@bridgehampton.k12.ny.us.

Bridgehampton Teachers Urge School Board to Move Forward with Contract

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By Tessa Raebeck 

Twenty Bridgehampton School teachers showed up at the district’s Board of Education meeting on Wednesday, October 22, to prompt administrators to move forward with their contract negotiations.

“We are all here tonight because we as a union are not happy with the negotiation process; it seems to have stalled,” Bridgehampton Teacher’s Association (BTA) President Helen Wolfe told the board. “We have come to tell you that we’re not happy with the process.”

The district is in its second year of negotiations with the teachers’ union. Superintendent Dr. Lois Favre said Tuesday she could not comment on the negotiations because they are ongoing.

Ronnie White, president of the school board, said the board is following the standard procedures under the Taylor Law, the 1967 New York State law that established a government agency to mediate contract disputes, and allows public employees to organize and elect union representatives, while prohibiting them from going on strike.

“We are negotiating, we believe that we will eventually come up with something that makes sense,” Mr. White said Tuesday. “At this point in time, it’s a process, and we believe that that process will see the light at the end of the tunnel at some point, but both sides have been working diligently to come up with something that makes sense.”

“There are definitely some things that are up for negotiation and we’re seeing if we can come to a compromise,” he added.

Although Mr. White said he cannot guarantee that compromise will have been reached by the time next year’s budget is adopted, he said he is “confident and hopeful that we will be if not there, then extremely close.”

For the 2012-13 school year, the first year Governor Andrew Cuomo’s 2-percent tax levy limit on school districts and municipalities affected Bridgehampton’s budget, the school’s teachers agreed to a hard freeze on their salaries. The teachers forfeited all raises, including step increases, saving the district about $93,000 and making it possible for the school to meet the state-mandated tax cap.

The board adopted a budget that pierced the tax cap for the 2014-15 school year. It did not get the required 60-percent supermajority on the district’s first try in May, but residents approved the budget in a second vote in June. Several positions were cut, and from 2013-14 to 2014-15, the total increase in salaries for teachers in grades pre-kindergarten through 12 increased by $26,997.

Over the past two years, the district has not replaced a principal, a part-time technology teacher, a business teacher, a guidance director, a head custodian and a main office secretary in order to cut costs and preserve other programs.

Bridgehampton Test Scores Fall in Wake of Common Core

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By Tessa Raebeck

Following the implementation of the Common Core Learning Standards last year and the immediate alignment of student assessments to the new curriculum, Bridgehampton School saw its scores on standardized tests drop across the board.

The Common Core, which according to its philosophy, aims to enhance learning essentially by teaching students to be thinkers rather than memorizers, was largely criticized last year for its implementation, which many educators, parents and students said was haphazard and too fast.

“There’s a difference between pre-Common Core and post-Common Core,” Bridgehampton Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre told the school board at its monthly meeting on Wednesday, September 24.

“By all measures that we have here our kids are growing,” she said, adding that 96 percent of Bridgehampton students met local growth targets, which are measured by where students are in September “to where we expect they will be at the end of the year.”

For English Language Arts (ELA) tests in grades 3 to 5, less than half of students scored the higher scores of a 3 or a 4 on the new state assessments. Dr. Favre said what needs to happen now is for the district “to understand better what the state tests are asking,” adding “that’s the training that the teachers are going through now.”

“This year is the first year that the state is actually releasing some questions, so we finally have an idea of what the test looks like,” Dr. Favre said.

Dr. Favre said Bridgehampton’s numbers tend to appear worse than they actually are, because the school’s small class sizes make for more extreme percentages. If two students fail in a class of eight, for example, the pass rate goes from 100 percent to 75 percent, whereas those same two students failing in a larger class would have a much less significant effect.

The superintendent said in moving forward, a primary goal of the district is to look at vocabulary development and to “change strategies we use to teach so that kids start to think in a different way.”

“I couldn’t understand why they would change standards and the test at the same time,” Dr. Favre said of the New York State Department of Education, saying she would have preferred to “watch our kids grow on the tests we’re familiar with.”

Students performed better on the math assessments, which the district had made an “area of focus,” the superintendent said.

Dr. Favre announced her intention to team up with other small schools, such as the Amagansett School District in East Hampton, so that teachers have colleagues to strategize with. Many Bridgehampton teachers are the only instructors in their subjects at their grade level and she believes they would benefit from a relationship with others experiencing the same challenges. Dr. Favre is in talks with Amagansett Superintendent Eleanor Tritt to make such an alliance happen.

Despite the poor showing on many primary tests, Bridgehampton did “beautifully” on high school exams, she said.

“That’s why I have every faith we have a great curriculum. We have great teachers, it’s just a matter of getting to know this test,” Dr. Favre said of the Common Core assessments.

In an effort to address weaknesses, the district has established data teams, groups of teachers that will meet for two hours every month to “really talk about these things” and plan curriculum alignment across the board.

Bridgehampton School District to Appoint New Athletic Director Wednesday

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Bridgehampton's Tylik Furman going up for two of his game-high 30 points against Knox in January. Photo by Michael Heller.

Bridgehampton’s Tylik Furman going up for two of his game-high 30 points against Knox in January. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Tessa Raebeck

Eric Bramoff will fill the position as Bridgehampton School's athletic director. Photo courtesy Lil' Kickers of Syracuse.

Eric Bramoff will fill the position as Bridgehampton School’s athletic director. Photo courtesy Lil’ Kickers of Syracuse.

The Bridgehampton School District was expected to appoint Eric Bramoff as its new athletic director when it met Wednesday, August 27.

A Sag Harbor native and graduate of Pierson High School, Mr. Bramoff will fill the position left open by longtime physical education teacher and athletics director Mary Anne Jules, who retired in June. Bridgehampton Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre confirmed the appointment on August 20.

The full-time position will be split up between two roles; Mr. Bramoff will be a physical education teacher for 80 percent of the school day and athletic director for the remaining 20 percent of his day, effective July 1.

While at Pierson, Mr. Bramoff was an all-county soccer and baseball player. He was a three-year starter on the football team at SUNY Cortland, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education. He also has a master’s degree in education and is currently working towards his degree in educational administration at Le Moyne College in Syracuse.

Mr. Bramoff, who has coached football, baseball, basketball and soccer at many levels, is leaving his post as a physical education teacher at the Syracuse City School District. He also coaches at Sport Center 481 in East Syracuse and is the chief ocean lifeguard for the Village of East Hampton, as well as a champion in national lifeguard competitions.

He and his wife Brooke have two young children, Ethan and Dylan.

As both physical education teacher and athletic director, Ms. Jules was a staple on the sidelines of Bridgehampton School’s athletic contests for 32 years. Like Mr. Bramoff, she too attended SUNY Cortland and taught briefly in Syracuse.

Bridgehampton School Board Yet to Hire New Athletic Director

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By Tessa Raebeck

The Bridgehampton School is yet to settle on a plan for a new athletics administrator and physical education teacher following Mary Anne Jules’ retirement from her long-held post as athletic director last month.

At the Bridgehampton Board of Education’s regular meeting on Wednesday, July 30, new board member Jeffrey Mansfield questioned the cost of hiring a full-term athletic director.

“We’re going to talk about that and delineate it in executive session tonight,” replied Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre, adding they would “talk about the different options, so that I’m clear on what you want me to do.”

School Business Administrator Robert Hauser and several board members, including President Ronald White, were on vacation and did not attend the meeting.

The board weighed the cost effectiveness of hiring both a part-time athletic director and part-time physical education teacher after the small district pierced the 2-percent budget cap this spring. Ms. Jules was with the district for 32 years and served as the full-time athletic director for 23 of those years.

Dr. Favre said Monday, August 4, that the board had interviewed candidates on Friday, August 1, but no decision has been made. The administrators are waiting for information from the East Hampton and Sag Harbor school districts, she said.

“We need a part-time physical education teacher and a part-time athletic director,” Dr. Favre said in an email. “We are trying to determine the most cost-efficient way to move forward, and considering if it is feasible to share the administrative piece, and assure that the needs of our students are effectively met.”

Also at last week’s meeting, board member Douglas DeGroot said it would be cheaper and more practical for the school district to put do temporary repairs to a blacktop basketball court rather than redoing the asphalt altogether. Completely repaving the surface is “kind of like a zero investment,” Mr. DeGroot said.

“If it’s not a full-size basketball court now and it won’t be, who knows if we can get a master plan of various things—maybe we can turn it into a bigger basketball court…you wouldn’t want to put money in and then two years later want to turn [it into a] bigger court,” he continued.

The school board’s vice president, Lillian Tyree-Johnson, expressed her agreement and the other board members nodded in approval.

The board’s next meeting is Wednesday, August 27, at 7 p.m. in the school cafeteria.