Tag Archive | "Bridgehampton"

Bridgehampton Board of Education Looks Forward

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By Tessa Raebeck

The Bridgehampton Board of Education reappointed Ron White as president and Lillian Tyree-Johnson as vice president at its annual reorganizational meeting Wednesday, July 2.

“I appreciate the district and the board reelected me,” Mr. White said Wednesday, July 9. “It certainly has been a pleasure to learn and understand the operations of the district; it makes me understand why things are the way that they are.”

Mr. White said the challenge of the upcoming year will be to continue the drive to educate the community about the significance and benefits of Bridgehampton having its own small school. The Bridgehampton School District almost failed to pass a budget this spring, as its first draft—which would have pierced the state-mandated tax cap with a tax levy increase of 8.8-percent—was voted down. After a grassroots get out the vote effort by board members, administrators and school supporters, an identical proposal passed by a slim margin June 17.

“We need to continue the momentum of educating our overall community of this special establishment we have here in our own district,” said Mr. White. “We need to educate, we have to go to all corners of our community and just really educate them on the finances and also how beneficial it is to have a school in your district.

“We need to find a way to invite them in, we’ll have open houses, we’ll have meet the school days where they come on in and see us and even folks that don’t have kids here or [have] kids who are elsewhere, they need to know what their school really entails. I think that’s our challenge as a school district and as a board to try to get these folks in and to see how special and unique our place really is,” he added.

Ms. Tyree-Johnson is optimistic about the coming year now that the budget has passed.

“I’m actually looking forward to this year,” she said Wednesday, July 9. “We’re hoping to continue the good things that are going on there.”

“Because the budget passed, we’re able to continue with the programming that I there and that’s why I’m pretty excited about this year coming up and continuing doing what we do at Bridgehampton,” she added.

Ms. Tyree-Johnson said she is also looking forward to Dr. Lois Favre’s second year as both superintendent and principal.

“I think that she’s done a great job in that dual role,” Ms. Tyree-Johnson said of Dr. Favre. “So, I think that now that she has one year under her belt, things are going to look even better this year.”

Galleries from Sag Harbor to South Korea Converge in Water Mill for 7th Annual ArtHamptons

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"Unnamed IV," 2012-13 by Bob Dylan. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

“Unnamed IV,” 2012-13 by Bob Dylan. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

Touching art is generally frowned upon, but Bob Dylan encourages it. In his sculpture, “Untitled IV, 2012-2013,” welded iron objects, many of them vintage, are configured into a giant sculpture on the wall, complete with wrenches, wheels and a lever viewers are welcome to crank.

The singer-songwriter’s artwork was on display Thursday at the launch celebration of ArtHamptons, which opened with “Bob Dylan: The Drawn Blank Series” at Mark Borghi Fine Art in Bridgehampton.

The show was reflective of the weekend it previewed. It questioned what art is, with the musician’s paintings of naked women and city apartments next to crumpled up sculptures by John Chamberlain. It celebrated lesser known artists and multi-faceted, non-conforming talent, featuring a man well known for his music but relatively unknown for his artwork. And it brought in a crowd of local gallery owners, noted personalities and regulars on the East End’s art scene.

“Dylan’s work is a visual extension of his lyrical genius,” said Mike Pintauro, curatorial assistant at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill. “Esoteric and personal, energetic and slightly deranged.”

ArtHamptons, which takes place at NOVA’s Ark on Millstone Road in Bridgehampton, has been one of the East End’s largest fine art fairs for the past six summers and the seventh edition promises to be the most diverse yet, with art of varied mediums, styles and prices from across the world.

“It’s the largest selection ever,” founder and president Rick Friedman said on Monday, July 7.

Organized by Hamptons Expo Group, ArtHamptons will present more than 80 global art galleries, featuring 2,000 works from some 500 artists.

Although there is considerable international involvement, the fair remains dedicated first and foremost to the local creative talent abundant on the East End. The theme this year is “Escape,” reflective of the idyllic calm that can still be found in some corners of the East End—even in the summertime.

“There’s a lot of local galleries from the Hamptons showing a lot of local artists,” Mr. Friedman said. “We always have a touch of our relationship with the Hamptons art movement of the ’50s, ’60s, ’70s.”

“ArtHamptons is a celebration of the arts in the Hamptons,” said Mr. Friedman. “We’re celebrating that we have such an extraordinarily creative community.”

Local galleries such as RJD Gallery, Bridgehampton Fine Art, Tulla Booth Gallery, Monika Olko Gallery and Chase Edwards Gallery will have booths at the fair.

American representational painter Jane Freilicher, who has a home in Water Mill, and avant-garde theater artist Robert Wilson, founder of the Watermill Center, will be honored.

"IGNAATZ," 1961 painted cut metal by John Chamberlain. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

“IGNAATZ,” 1961 painted cut metal by John Chamberlain. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

Galleries are coming to Water Mill this weekend from as close as Sag Harbor and as far away as Hiroshima; with 12 countries represented, the show is more international this year than ever in the past.

The Villa del Arte Gallery of Catalonia, which has spaces in Barcelona and Amsterdam, is bringing the work of Fernando Adam, Karenina Fabrizzi and Claudia Meyer, among others. In “Hybrid ML2” by Christiaan Lieverse, mixed media, cowhide and resin are combined on canvas to create a streaked gray woman’s face with sharp eyes that are hard to turn away from.

The French Art Gallery is bringing the work of esteemed French artists such as Nanan and Pierre-Francois Grimaldo from its gallery in Kensington, London, to the East End.  Dedicated to exposing the vibrant street art scene in France, the gallery is also bringing innovative artists like Speedy Graphito, a pioneer of the French Street Art movement since the early 1980s.

Envie d’Art Galleries, located in Paris and London, will be on hand with a broad and diverse collection that aims to promote artists on an international scale, with exhibitions in cities like Brussels, Chicago, Milan and, Singapore and now Water Mill.

The 418 Art Gallery from Bucharest, Romania, 308 Arte Contemporaneo of La Habana, Cuba and Art Company MISOOLSIDAE from Seoul, South Korea, will also have booths at the fair.

Several galleries from Korea will be present, which “encourages viewers to experience a not so familiar world in a contemporary setting—opening up the culture to new interpretations while further contextualizing the artists’ ideas,” Mr. Friedman said in a press release.

ArtHamptons is Thursday, July 10, through Sunday, July 13, at the Sculpture Fields of NOVA’s Ark in Bridgehampton, located at 30 Millstone Road in Water Mill. For more information and a complete schedule of events, call (631) 283-5505 or visit arthamptons.com.

East End Weekend: Highlights of July Fourth Weekend

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Casey Evans in a San Lorenzo bikini.

Casey Evans in a San Lorenzo bikini on the beach in East Hampton.

By Tessa Raebeck

Norma Jean Pilates and San Lorenzo Bikinis are hosting a party in Sag Harbor tonight, Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. The event is celebrating the East Coast launch of San Lorenzo Bikinis. Guests can shop for bikinis, enjoy “bikini-friendly bites” and enter contests for “amazing” giveaways from local businesses like Happy Bowls, Flying Point and Wampum. Norma Jean Pilates is located at 52 Main Street in Sag Harbor.

To RSVP to the private party, email Abigail Gawronski at argawronski@gmail.com.

 

Mark Borghi Fine Art in Bridgehampton will showcase Bob Dylan’s work July 4 to July 18. “The Drawn Blank Series” showcases the musician’s colorful paintings and will be celebrated with an opening reception Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Mark Borghi Fine Art, 2426 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information or to RSVP, call (631) 537-7245 or visit borghi.org.

 

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“Art on the Edge” opens at Vered Contemporary in East Hampton SaturdayJuly 5, with an opening reception from 9 to 11 p.m. The expanded exhibition, an annual survey of the contemporary art of new and provocative painters, sculptors and photographers, will be on view July 5 to August 4. Nineteen modern artists will be featured.

The gallery is located at 68 Park Place in East Hampton.For more information, call (631) 324-3303 or visit veredcontemporary.com.

 

“Positivilly Marvillainous” opens at the Eric Firestone Gallery with an opening reception Saturday, July 5, from 6 to 9 p.m.

“Expanding on tradition doesn’t necessarily demand the push towards perfection or a high polish,” the gallery said in a press release. “Rather, it can entail building on established conventions in a particular artist’s unique voice. Today, contemporary artists, knowingly or unknowingly, reference George Herriman’s historically overlooked, unpretentious and universally accessible fantasy, Krazy Kat, a comic strip that ran in American newspapers from 1913 until 1944. The artists in Positivilly Marvillainous embrace tensions, arising from Herriman’s formal qualities in character portrayal, including those between line and shade, humor and drama, human and animal, collage and décollage, marvelous and villainous.”

The Eric Firestone Gallery is located at 4 Newtown Lane in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 604-2386 or visit ericfirestonegallery.com.

Crowd Gathers on Crowded Corner in Bridgehampton to Protest CVS

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Protesters gathered on Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton to oppose a CVS Pharmacy at the corner.

 

 

 

By Stephen J. Kotz

About 50 Bridgehampton residents gathered at the corner of Montauk Highway and the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike on Thursday morning to protest the prospect of a CVS Pharmacy being built on the busy intersection.

Many in the crowd carried signs with the name CVS crossed out or “No Chain on Main.”

They cheered as passing motorists in the slow moving, bumper-to-bumper traffic honked their horns in support.

“I think it’s a great showing, “said Nancy Walter-Yvertes, one of the founders of Save Bridgehampton Main Street, a civic organization that was formed largely to fight the CVS. “None of these people have ever demonstrated before. Ninety percent of these people have never held a sign before.”

Ms. Walter-Yvertes is also the co-chairwoman of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee, which has also opposed the idea of the pharmacy coming to the busy corner.

 

Longtime Bridgehampton Athletic Director Mary Anne Jules Hangs Up Her Whistle

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Mary Anne Jules hugs a graduating student at the Bridgehampton School graduation Sunday, June 29. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

Mary Anne Jules hugs a graduating student at the Bridgehampton School graduation Sunday, June 29. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Tessa Raebeck

For 32 years, Mary Anne Jules has paced the sidelines at Bridgehampton School’s athletic contests, no small feat considering that Bridgehampton students often compete on East Hampton and Sag Harbor teams. After three decades of serving the small, tight-knit district as a physical education teacher and 23 years as its athletic director, Ms. Jules’s retirement was announced at the graduation of the class of 2014 Sunday, June 29.

The school gave Ms. Jules an honorary diploma at graduation and on Tuesday, July 1, she took time from watching the United States play Belgium in the World Cup to confirm her decision.

“I love my career at Bridgehampton,” Ms. Jules said Tuesday. “Believe me, it hasn’t been an easy decision… I’ve loved it there, it’s a great place to work. I’m very fortunate that I had my career there.”

“The district and I are very, very sad for her to go,” said Ronnie White, president of the Bridgehampton School Board. “She put in her time and she was just an extremely integral person, a mentor to our school.”

Ms. Jules’s athletic career extends past her time in Bridgehampton; She played sports her whole life and was a four-sport varsity athlete at Baldwin High School up-island, playing field hockey, volleyball, basketball and softball.

Mary Anne Jules, second from left, smiles as she watches her students graduate from Bridgehampton School Sunday, June 29. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

Mary Anne Jules, second from left, smiles as she watches her students graduate from Bridgehampton School Sunday, June 29. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

“Back then in my day, you could play four varsity sports, that’s changed since then,” said Ms. Jules, adding, “I’ve been pretty active my whole life.”

After shining at Baldwin, a large district in Nassau County, she was invited to play basketball at SUNY-Cortland in upstate New York—and quickly made the lacrosse team, too.

“I didn’t play lacrosse ’til college,” Ms. Jules said. “I just got lucky, I tried out for college lacrosse and I ended up making the team, so I was pretty fortunate.”

Some would argue that, in addition to luck, her athleticism had something to do with it.

After graduating from Cortland, Ms. Jules was a substitute teacher in Syracuse for a year and then took the position as Bridgehampton’s physical education teacher in 1982. While teaching, she got her master’s degree at Southampton College and her administration degree at Dowling College.

“If you’ve been involved in athletics, you know what a difference athletics makes in a kid’s life…I call it the laboratory for life,” she said. “I went to a great phys. ed. program and that’s why I wanted to become a phys. ed. teacher.”

While still acting as the school’s physical education teacher in 1991 Ms. Jules also became athletic director for the district. She also served as president of Section XI, the governing body of Suffolk County high school sports, from 2010 to 2012.

After years of wearing many hats and watching many games, Ms. Jules intends to spend her duly earned free time doing none other than watching games, but under the sole hat of doting aunt.

Three of her nephews play college-level lacrosse and she has several nieces and nephews involved in high school sports, so she will be catching up on watching them play, in addition to continuing to follow the careers of her Bridgehampton students.

“In all the years I’ve been there, they’re good kids,” Ms. Jules said of Bridgehampton. “In a small environment you get so much support, it’s a huge family…I’m just very appreciative and grateful for the career I’ve had and I will miss Bridgehampton School a lot, I really will.”

“It’s such a unique job in that you can teach from 4-year-olds to seniors. As a physical educator, I can teach all those kids. I can watch them grow. After that I go to graduation parties, I go to weddings, you really get to know the kids so well,” she said.

Mr. White said Ms. Jules, who lives in Water Mill, has promised to come back and visit from time to time.

“She will be missed, she is loved,” he said.

“That’s what’s so special about [Bridgehampton],” said Ms. Jules, “kids don’t fall through the cracks there. They get a lot of support and you can really become very close to the students. And you can make a difference, every day you can make a difference in the school.”

After Teaching Multiple Generations of Sag Harbor’s 4-Year-Olds, Sue Daniels Retires

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Sue Daniels with her 1991 class at the Tuller School, many of whom graduated with the Pierson class of 2014. Photo courtesy Sue Daniels.

Sue Daniels with her 2001 class at the Tuller School, many of whom graduated with the Pierson class of 2014. Photo courtesy Sue Daniels.

By Tessa Raebeck

When Sue Daniels’s 4-year-old students grow into adults and have 4-year-olds of their own, they instinctively know where to send their children for preschool: wherever Sue Daniels is.

Ms. Daniels, who has educated Sag Harbor’s prekindergarten students through three different schools, two generations and three decades, saw her last graduation June 13, as she retired from the Rainbow School this month.

Sue Daniels, who has educated generations of Sag Harbor 4-year-olds, in her garden Monday, June 30. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

Sue Daniels, who has educated generations of Sag Harbor 4-year-olds, in her garden Monday, June 30. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

“It hasn’t really sunk in,” she said Monday, June 30, sitting in her Sag Harbor home surrounded by artwork from grandchildren and pictures of past students. One picture changes each year to show Pierson High School’s current graduating class when they were preschoolers with Ms. Daniels.

A Bridgehampton native, Ms. Daniels met her husband Al when she ran his truck off the road when she was just 16. The couple, who celebrated their 45th wedding anniversary last week, have two children, Mark and Kaitlin, and three grandchildren. Teaching runs in their family; Ms. Daniels’s daughter is a high school English teacher and her mother taught at the Bridgehampton School for over 30 years.

Ms. Daniels started teaching at the Hampton Day School, a private school that was in Bridgehampton where the Ross School’s Lower Campus now stands. After taking several years off to be home with her children when they were young, she returned to teaching as director of the Tuller School on the Maycroft estate in North Haven, which she ran for two decades.

When the property was sold in 2004, Ms. Daniels founded the Rainbow Preschool, currently located at the Unitarian Universalist Meeting House on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike. The school offers two sessions, morning and afternoon, for 3- and 4-year-olds. Through all her years and classrooms, Ms. Daniels has stuck with pre-K.

“I just love 4-year-olds,” she said Monday. “I think that’s the most amazing age. They are truly like little sponges—they just absorb everything. It’s just an exciting age…and they can go to the bathroom by themselves, always a bonus.”

Ms. Daniels will stay on as director of the school for at least a year and will remain on the board afterward. Her colleague of 12 years, Donna Cosgrove, who has been teaching the 3-year-olds, will take over the 4-year-old class with assistant Kaitlin Duran. Jessica Spehler, hired by the board, will teach the 3-year-olds.

Now that she is retired, Ms. Daniels plans, first and foremost, to spend more time with her grandchildren, but also to continue teaching piano lessons and get to work on a longstanding idea for a children’s book about a horse with special needs. She will also keep working on the business she shares with Al, Sag Harbor Seashells, combing the beaches looking for beach glass, shells and even fish teeth, which they then fashion into jewelry, beach glass Christmas trees and other custom ware.

Although she is excited to spend more time on the beach and with her grandkids, Ms. Daniels will miss her time in the classroom.

“I’ve taught now second generation,” she said.

Nina Landi, herself a kindergarten teacher at Sag Harbor Elementary School, was in Ms. Daniels’s very first class. When it came time to send her two children, Peter and Daisy, to nursery school, she knew who to call.

“I have very faint memories of doing amazing things back there,” Ms. Landi said Tuesday. “I was little—I was like 3, I think—but I remember when it was time for Peter and Daisy to go to Tuller, [having] an incredible sense of calm knowing that Ms. Daniels was there. She’s the best. She’s a Sag Harbor jewel.”

In the 30-plus years Ms. Daniels has been preparing Sag Harbor’s youngest students for elementary school, teaching has changed considerably.

“It’s just changed so much over the years,” she said, “For example, years ago if I was doing say a unit on dinosaurs, I would go to the library and do the research and get books and all that. And now you just go online and it’s there, so I think that makes it a lot easier for teachers in some ways.”

“In some other ways, I think we’ve lost some things,” she continued. “An example, years ago at Hampton Day School we heard about a whale that had washed ashore, so we put the kids in our car… no written permission slips or anything like that—and we just went to the beach. You can’t do that now.”

Ms. Daniels doesn’t allow computers in her classroom and forbids her grandchildren from bringing their iPads over.

“To me, the pre-school years are about socialization—how to get along with each other, how to talk to each other—and I really believe that there’s really only three things that kids need at this age: they need books, they need blocks, they need balls. That’s it, the three b’s,” she said, adding, “but it’s a different world now.”

Ms. Landi hangs a gold star ornament she made in Ms. Daniels’s class on her Christmas tree each year. Over two decades later, Ms. Daniels took both her children on their first train ride.

“We could not have been more thrilled or happy,” Ms. Landi said of her former teacher teaching her children. “It’s like having a second mom, she really is a great lady.”

“I think preschool is just so important,” Ms. Daniels said, “because it’s the gateway to education for the children. At this level, I think the most important thing is to build their confidence and help them with their communication skills, just so they can get along in this world. I keep telling my classes the most important thing is to be kind to each other, I think that’s just something we don’t always stress enough.”

“They’re going to get the basics,” she continued, “they’re going to understand about the alphabet and how to read and mathematics, but I think the socialization is just so important and I think this is where you start.”

“It’s really a shame that she has to retire, but God she deserves the rest,” Ms. Landi said, adding, “The whole town should throw that woman a retirement party…if you could ever count the kids and families—I always call it the ripples in the pond that she caused—you’d be there all day. It would be like trying to count stars, she’s been with so many families and she’s seen so many kids go all the way up to being married and having their own kids. It’s amazing.”

East End Weekend: Highlights of June 27 – 29 Events

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Marc Dalessio, "Tina Under the Olive Tree" 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Tina Under the Olive Tree” 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

By Tessa Raebeck

Marc Dalessio, "Laundry in the Wind" 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Laundry in the Wind” 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

There’s a lot going on on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for a new solo show of Marc Dalessio, a regular artist at the gallery who spent the last year traveling the world looking for beauty. “Ironically, the most beautiful subject was found right at home,” gallery owner Laura Grenning said in a press release, speaking of “Tina Under the Olive Tree,” a plein air painting of his newly wed wife at his longtime farmhouse in Tuscany.

According to Ms. Grenning, Mr. Dalessio’s “humility, a rare commodity in the art world today, is sincere–just look at the paintings. These ideas, although not articulated at the time, explain my personal choice to leave the world of international finance and move to [the] East End almost 20 years ago.”

“The Grenning Gallery,” she added, “was created to provide a stable exhibition space and steady source of capital for these artists to continue their efforts to seek out and record nature’s beauty for the rest of us.”

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

 

A seal named Ocean will be released by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation Saturday morning at 10 a.m. Ocean the seal will return to his home and namesake following two months of rehabilitation at the foundation after he was found in Montauk suffering from a broken jaw and respiratory condition.

After Oceans of Hope, the foundation’s annual fundraising event Friday, Ocean the seal will be released from under the Ponquogue Bridge in Hampton Bays.

 

 

Design Night Sag Harbor opens high-end stores for charity Saturday in an evening of shopping, wine, and fundraising for at-risk youth. Participating stores are donating 10 percent of sales to Community of Unity, a non-profit that empowers young people at risk to make good choices for their futures.

Ten Sag Harbor boutiques are participating: Urban Zen, Bloom, JanGeorge, Sylvester & Co., La Lampade, Ruby Beets, La Maisonette, Black Swan Antiques, JED and MAX ID NY. Design Night runs from 5 to 8 p.m.

 

Rounding out the weekend Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m. Sylvester & Co. At Home is hosting an opening reception for EJ Camp’s show “Faces of the Sea.” The Amagansett branch of the store, which also has a shop in Sag Harbor, will show the photographer’s photos of the East End sea, from fog over Orient Bay to the tide crashing into the jetty on Georgica Beach in East Hampton.

E.J. Camp, "Trumans Beach Sunset."

E.J. Camp, “Trumans Beach Sunset.”

 

CVS Still Giving Bridgehampton CAC Agita

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By Stephen J. Kotz

The Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee continues to shadow box with a plan—not yet filed—to build a CVS pharmacy at Bridgehampton’s busiest and most problematic intersection.

The proposal occupied the full attention of the CAC during a nearly two-hour-long meeting on Monday, at which Jefferson Murphree, the former director of land management for Southampton, presented an overview of the site that touched on its zoning and the rationale behind it as contained in the town’s comprehensive plan.

Mr. Murphree, who now holds a similar position with Riverhead Town, was at the meeting in a private capacity to represent his in-laws, who live on Lumber Lane, not far from the proposed development.

Members of the CAC and other concerned Bridgehampton residents descended on a Southampton Town Board meeting last month to demand that the board intervene to prevent the CVS from coming into Bridgehampton, but their pleas were deflected by Supervisor Anna Throne Holst who told them the Town Board had no jurisdiction over the matter and that they should take their concerns to the town planning board when, and if, it receives an application for the project.

But Mr. Murphree said the town board could be pulled into the fray, if the CAC is able to make the case that the development, and others similar to it, would cause onerous traffic and parking issues. If that were the case, he said, it could request a moratorium on commercial development in the hamlet.

Committee members agreed that that there simply isn’t enough room at the intersection for vehicles to get safely in and out of the site, pointing out that traffic is routinely backed up toward the turnpike and Lumber Lane.

Mr. Murphree urged committee members to continue to take their concerns to the town board. “You have to be on their radar,” he said, “because they are paying attention to the squeaky wheel.”

CAC members said it is just a matter of time before BNB Ventures, which owns the corner property, will officially apply for a special exception permit for the pharmacy. The company already has planning approval to build a two-story building measuring approximately  9,000 square feet, plus a complete basement with an elevator. The property would include a total of 10 parking spaces, including two for the handicapped, according to Mr. Murphree.

The committee supported the original building design for the site under the assumption that it was gong to be used for a number of small offices or stores with apartments on the second floor.

CAC co-chairwoman Nancy Walter Yvertes, who is also involved with a separate group, Save Bridgehampton Main Street, said the organization has already raised the $6,000 it needs to pay for a traffic study, which, she said, could be used to counter any study the developer submits.

“How can this be considered an independent traffic study?” asked Gay Lynch. “They’re all hired guns,” responded Ms. Walter Yvertes.

Long-time CAC member Fred Cammann suggested the committee should focus its attention on CVS, and not town government. “This is a commercial venture coming in here that is depending on the good will of the community to not go bankrupt,” he said. “Why in the name of God would you want to put a store in the middle of a community that doesn’t want you?”

“We have to be prepared to attack this,” added Dan Shedrick. “As Don King said, this is all about m-o-n-e-y.”

But Leonard Davenport, another CAC member said the group needed to keep its eye on the bigger picture. Even if it succeeds in convincing CVS that it should not come to Bridgehampton, a similar plan will rear its head sometime in the future, he said.

He urged the committee to keep the pressure on the planning board to oppose the project and concurrently encourage the town to make a good-faith effort to buy the property and develop it into a corner park.

Bridgehampton School Board Feeling Better Now That Budget Has Passed

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BHSchoolStockImage

By Tessa Raebeck

The mood was considerably lighter at the monthly meeting of the Bridgehampton School Board on Wednesday, June 18. After months of worry over piercing the state-imposed tax cap, there was relief the day after the community approved the district’s $12.3 million 2014-15 budget on the second try.

“It’s been a great year overall,” said Dr. Lois Favre, who is completing her first year acting as both principal and superintendent for the district. “Despite our budget fight, it’s been a great year. I think it’s a good feel in the building, morale is good.”

The budget, which pierces the state-mandated tax cap by 8.8-percent, failed to gain the required 60-percent supermajority in the first communitywide vote on May 20. After a grassroots get-out-the-vote effort by the board, administrators and other supporters, it passed with 62 percent June 17.

Lillian Tyree-Johnson, a member of the school board, extended her compliments to Dr. Favre, business administrator Robert Hauser, and district clerk Tammy Cavanaugh at last Wednesday’s meeting.

“During this revote process,” she said, “it’s been really grueling and you guys have handled it with incredible grace. It was really a tough time and I commend you all for absolutely answering questions with ease.”

“The transparency is impeccable as well,” added Ronald White, president of the school board. “Any question that you guys were ever given, you guys were able to answer it. It was clear and people totally understood, I understood it.”

Also at the meeting, Mr. Hauser updated the board on facilities improvements around the Bridgehampton campus. The bulk of capital projects take place over the summer, so as not to interfere with instructional time.

New equipment for the playground has been ordered and the renovation should be completed by August 15, several weeks before the start of school.

A Bridgehampton resident donated a playhouse to the school that board members are quite impressed by.

“I was actually thinking about moving my office in there,” Mr. Hauser joked.

East End Weekend: Top Picks for What To Do

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Andrew Wyeth, Sail Loft, 1983, Watercolor on paper, 22 x 29 ½ inches.

Andrew Wyeth, Sail Loft, 1983, Watercolor on paper, 22 x 29 ½ inches.

By Tessa Raebeck

The weather’s supposed to be perfect this weekend, why not end a long day at the beach with a great evening out? Here are some entertainment ideas for this weekend on the East End:

 

Rosé Week at the Wölffer Estate Vineyard

Running Friday, June 20 through Thursday, June 26, the Wölffer Estate Vineyard is celebrating its specialty: Rosé, or “summer in a bottle,” as the vineyard calls it.

Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider.

Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider.

On Friday at 8 p.m. at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, the winery’s famed vintage will be available before the Rufus Wainwright concert. For tickets, visit whbpac.org.

The rosé travels Saturday to the Group for the East End’s “Here Comes the Sun!” benefit, at the vineyard from 6 to 11 p.m. The fairly new and equally delicious No. 139 Rosé Cider will be poured for gala guests. For information and tickets, visit groupfortheeastend.org.

Rounding out the weekend—but not the rosé week, which goes till Wednesday—on Sunday on the lawn of the Wölffer residence, “A Taste of Provence” lunch from 1 to 4 p.m. will give guests not just a taste of rosé, but also of a grand meal prepared by Chef Christian Mir of the Stone Creek Inn. The event is reserved for Wölffer Wine Club Members.

For more information on rosé week, visit wolffer.com.

 

“Under the Influence” at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum

Pairing contemporary artists’ works with those of the artists who have inspired them, “Under the Influence” offers a collection of masters and mentees at the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum.

Curated by local gallery owner Peter J. Marcelle, the exhibition explores the relationship between nine contemporary artists and the greats whose influence got them started.

The pairs, with the contemporary artist first, are: Terry Elkins with Andrew Wyeth, Eric Ernst with William Baziotes, Cornelia Foss with Larry Rivers, Steve Miller with Andy Warhol, Dan Rizzie with Donald Sultan, Stephen Schaub with Alfred Stieglitz, Mike Viera with Eric Fischl and Gavin Zeigler with William Scharf.

An opening reception is Friday, June 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum, located at 200 Main Street in Sag Harbor. All sales benefit the museum. For more information, call (631) 613-6170.

 

Artists Against Abuse to Benefit The Retreat

To benefit The Retreat, the domestic violence services agency in East Hampton, Artists Against Abuse will be held in Bridgehampton Saturday, June 21.

The event, with the theme of Midsummer Night Fever, brings artists, philanthropists and residents from across the East End together in support of The Retreat, eastern Long Island’s only comprehensive domestic violence services organization.

The event will feature Congressman Tim Bishop and actress and social advocate Rachel Grant.

“The World Health Organization reports that in some countries, up to 70 percent of women report having been victims of domestic violence at some stage in their lives,” said Congressman Tim Bishop in a press release. “I have always been a strong advocate for the needs and rights of women. Women play integral roles in the global community and they deserve to be treated with respect by their male counterparts.

The benefit begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Ross School Lower Campus Field House on Butter Lane in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit artistsagainstabuse.com.

 

Shop Til You Drop for Katy’s Courage

Looking for a good reason to shop? Katy’s Courage, a not-for-profit in honor of Katy Stewart, a beloved Sag Harbor resident who passed away at age 12 from a rare form of liver cancer, invites you to shop ‘til you drop for a good cause.

On Saturday from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Sequin in Southampton will be serving cocktails while shoppers browse through designer Gabby Sabharwal’s new swimsuit line, Giejo, and create their own necklaces.

Sequin is located at 20 Jobs Lane in Southampton. For more information, call (631) 353-3137.