Tag Archive | "Bridgehampton"

Sand Mine Expansion in Noyac Draws Critics

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“Sand Land” has submitted an application to the DEC to increase its 50-acre site by 4.9 acres and deepen it by an additional 40 feet. The floor of the mine is currently 65 feet below the original grade, at 175 feet elevation. Photography by Mara Certic.

By Mara Certic

Environmentalists and civic leaders are calling on the State Department of Environmental Conservation to deny an application to expand an existing sand mining operation in Noyac.

“It was almost 40 years ago that the State of New York said agencies cannot simply act on their own, the environment is too complex. And they passed the law called the State Environmental Quality Review Act,” said Bob DeLuca, president of the Group for the East End, at a press conference held by his organization on Monday at the Old Noyac School House to discuss the potential 20-percent expansion of Sand Land Corp., which is owned and operated by Wainscott Sand and Gravel.

“Going back to the 1980s, the area that we’re talking about was designated by the town as a critical environmental area because of water quality protection concerns,” he continued.

“The site is located within the Town of Southampton Aquifer Protection Overlay District, a zoning overlay with regulatory provisions for clearing, fertilization and housing density, intended to protect the quality of the ground water aquifer below the overlay district,” Kyle Collins, the town’s  planning and development director, wrote in a letter to the DEC dated Thursday, August 14. The area is also in a New York State designated Special Groundwater Protection Area. The aquifer is the sole source of drinking water for much of the East End.

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Bob DeLuca, executive director of the Group for the East End, discussed his concerns about the expansion of Sand Land at a press conference in Noyac on Monday.

Monday’s press conference came after the 60-day public comment period for the sand mine expansion ended on Friday. The DEC has already issued a “negative declaration” for the project, which means the agency has determined  it will not have a negative impact on the environment and will, thus, not require an environmental impact statement.

Letters from environmental organizations, Southampton Town and Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr., have all asked the state to rescind the ruling and require that a full environmental impact statement be required before the application is approved.

Agencies have also asked that the DEC deny the application for expansion. The sand mine is a pre-existing, non-conforming land use in a residential zone. Mr. Collins wrote the mine “should be allowed to continue and operate under the parameters of the current mining permit with ongoing reclamation as mining is completed in mined areas.”

“To date, this parcel has been in use for sand mining and other industrial activities for more than 50 years,” said executive director of the Citizens Campaign for the Environment Adrienne Esposito. She said the DEC reported in 2006 the site was coming to an end of its life as a sand mine. “And here we are, in the year 2014, and they’re requesting another 25 years,” she said on Monday.

“Allowing mining facilities to continue operating in perpetuity does not adequately fulfill DEC’s obligation to protect public health and the environment,” she wrote in a letter to the DEC.

Mr. Thiele has introduced legislation, which authorizes local agencies to require water quality testing at mining operations within counties with a population of 1 million or more where the primary source of drinking water is a designated sole source aquifer.

The Noyac Civic Council collected 150 signatures on a petition calling for the DEC to install test wells in order to monitor how the operations are affecting the groundwater quality.

When asked about the installation of groundwater monitoring wells, John Tintle, owner of Wainscott Sand & Gravel, said on Wednesday, “There’s no link between sand and gravel mining and groundwater contamination.”

One of the main concerns that the environmental advocates had about water quality, was the possibility that the facility’s composting and mulching operations could affect the drinking water. “We know for a fact, according to a New York State DEC Report that was released in 2013, that these types of facilities that have compost material on them and mulching materials cause ‘significant groundwater contamination in the form of heavy metals, manganese and thorium, as well as increased radiation including alpha and beta radiation levels,’” Ms. Esposito said at Monday’s press conference. “This area has never been tested despite our calls for doing so.”

Mr. Tintle said on Wednesday that he had personally conducted water quality testing at his facility and that he had passed along that data to both the DEC and the town. A town representative said on Wednesday evening that Southampton Town was not aware of any submission of groundwater monitoring by Sand Land in the past two-to-three years, but did say an independent third party should be responsible for conducting the water quality testing.

Groundwater monitoring wells test the water at various levels, as well, which some other techniques do not.  “The Town of Southampton requires this for new gold courses, whether over our aquifer or not, and the same should be expected for existing and expanded sand mines,” Mr. Collins wrote.

The Bridge golf course, which neighbors Sand Land, is one such course where water quality monitoring has proved to be successful. There have also been complaints, and even a lawsuit, from neighbors about increased traffic, dust, noise and a fowl odor emanating from Sand Land. Greg Stanley, the superintendent at the Bridge, said that on many days golfers are treated to a strong smell of manure from the neighboring mulching, mining and composting operation.

An application from Sand Land was going to be discussed at tonight’s meeting of the Zoning Board of Appeals but has been postponed indefinitely, according to ZBA secretary Kandice Cowell.

 

 

Bridgehampton School District to Appoint New Athletic Director Wednesday

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Bridgehampton's Tylik Furman going up for two of his game-high 30 points against Knox in January. Photo by Michael Heller.

Bridgehampton’s Tylik Furman going up for two of his game-high 30 points against Knox in January. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Tessa Raebeck

Eric Bramoff will fill the position as Bridgehampton School's athletic director. Photo courtesy Lil' Kickers of Syracuse.

Eric Bramoff will fill the position as Bridgehampton School’s athletic director. Photo courtesy Lil’ Kickers of Syracuse.

The Bridgehampton School District was expected to appoint Eric Bramoff as its new athletic director when it met Wednesday, August 27.

A Sag Harbor native and graduate of Pierson High School, Mr. Bramoff will fill the position left open by longtime physical education teacher and athletics director Mary Anne Jules, who retired in June. Bridgehampton Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre confirmed the appointment on August 20.

The full-time position will be split up between two roles; Mr. Bramoff will be a physical education teacher for 80 percent of the school day and athletic director for the remaining 20 percent of his day, effective July 1.

While at Pierson, Mr. Bramoff was an all-county soccer and baseball player. He was a three-year starter on the football team at SUNY Cortland, where he earned a bachelor’s degree in physical education. He also has a master’s degree in education and is currently working towards his degree in educational administration at Le Moyne College in Syracuse.

Mr. Bramoff, who has coached football, baseball, basketball and soccer at many levels, is leaving his post as a physical education teacher at the Syracuse City School District. He also coaches at Sport Center 481 in East Syracuse and is the chief ocean lifeguard for the Village of East Hampton, as well as a champion in national lifeguard competitions.

He and his wife Brooke have two young children, Ethan and Dylan.

As both physical education teacher and athletic director, Ms. Jules was a staple on the sidelines of Bridgehampton School’s athletic contests for 32 years. Like Mr. Bramoff, she too attended SUNY Cortland and taught briefly in Syracuse.

Planners Take a First Look at Bridgehampton CVS Proposal

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A plan to build a CVS pharmacy at this site in Bridgehampton, now before the Southampton Town Planning Board, has drawn opposition from residents because of traffic concerns. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

The Southampton Town Planning Board last Thursday, August 14, took its first look at a proposed plan to build a CVS pharmacy on a vacant parcel on Montauk Highway and the Sag Harbor-Bridgehampton Turnpike.

The applicant, BNB Ventures IV and CVS Caremark, is seeking a special exception permit to allow it to use an already approved two-story, 9,030-square-foot building for a pharmacy. A special exception permit is required because the nearly quarter-acre corner lot is in a Village Business zone, where individual retail uses are limited to 5,000 square feet.

Since it was revealed late year that CVS was considering building a store at the site—at the busiest intersection in Bridgehampton—residents have rallied against the plan, arguing that a store there would create a traffic and parking nightmare.

At last week’s meeting, the planning board simply started the process by which it will be determined whether it or the Suffolk County Department of Health Services will be the “lead agency” during the processing of the application under the State Environmental Quality Review Act.

According to Kyle Collins, Southampton Town’s planning and development administrator, the county health department has until September 14, to weigh in on the application, although it could respond sooner. Typically, the county cedes that authority to the town government.

Under SEQRA, applications are considered Type I, which presumes an environmental impact statement must be completed; Type II, for which an EIS cannot be required; and “unlisted,” which means the planning board will have the final say in determining whether an EIS should be required.

Mr. Collins, responding to questions by email, said the earliest a public hearing could be held on the application is October 10. However, if the board were to require an environmental impact statement, that time could be extended for several months.

Members of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee and other residents have been up in arms over the thought of a CVS being built at the corner since last winter.

A spin-off organization, Save Bridgehampton Main Street, was created largely to oppose the plan. It has hired an attorney commissioned a traffic study of the kind of impact a CVS would have.

In May, Bridgehampton residents converged on a town board meeting to demand that the board intervene to prevent the project from moving forward, but Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst told the crowd that the town board had no power to interfere with the planning board’s process.

Since that time, Bridgehampton residents have called on the town to negotiate with the property’s owner, BNB Ventures IV, to buy the parcel as a possible corner park.

And earlier this summer, residents holding signs and shouting slogans, gathered at the site for a pair of protests.

Furnishing Coastal Homes on the East End

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Furniture and art available at Coastal Home on Bridgehampton’s Main Street. Photo by Mara Certic.

By Mara Certic

Patricia McGrath believes that everything she sells in her store has a potentially perfect home. Coastal Home on Bridgehampton’s Main Street sells new and vintage art, furniture and home finishings to Hamptonites looking for that coastal, homey feel.

For years, Ms. McGrath has worked as an interior designer on the East End. “The store was an offshoot of my interior design business,” she said on Monday, “but I think of them as completely separate entities.”

“A lot of people come in here and say, ‘Can I just move in here?’” she said. Her Main Street store boasts a varied selection of furniture, art, crockery and light fixtures to accessorize any East End abode. She aims to create a calming haven, a “nice, relaxing place” that people want to escape to, she said.

Coastal Home has several different rooms, each showcasing different large items of furniture: a bed in the backroom, a sofa and a coffee table in the front. The selection of artwork and vintage pieces make the shop feel lived in, and give potential clients a feeling of what their houses could be like. She said that it is not uncommon for people to come in and buy an entire tabletop display, saying they want the whole thing.  “Sometimes it’s just the convenience of coming in and seeing how the candles can be displayed,” she said.

Ms. McGrath strives for perfection as an interior designer, but also as a storeowner. “I love finding things that are different and figuring out how to do something great,” she said. She added that she loves selling an array of art. “I try to get original art from artists. It’s nice for people to come in and not see the same sort of thing all the time,” she said.

The usual atmosphere her clients strive for out here, she said is beachy “with a little bit of glam thrown in.” In a window last week she leaned toward a shabby chic vibe by pairing an updated, reupholstered old rocking chair with a mirror made of silver shells. “That was a little bit more shabby chic looking,” she said.

Ms. McGrath likes finding older, vintage pieces and “making them wonderful again.” A piece of driftwood had a bulb installed in it and the lamp was sold instantly, she said.

“And I just love to have art,” she said. Beach and ocean photography have proven to be particularly popular in the past few years, she said, but the store also offers well-priced prints. Ms. McGrath also sells decorative, vintage surfboards that customers often lean against their homes. If customers decide to take down their mantel-topping boards to go catch some waves, all the better, she said. “I like the real deal. I like handmade things. There’s a guy who makes miniature surfboards for us,” she said. “We have something for everybody.”

They certainly have the dog-owner covered; not only are charcoal drawings of dachshunds and Labradors for sale, but through Coastal Home you can also get a portrait done of your own pet. Send in a picture of the canine in question; choose a background color and size and voilà, your very own Vincent van Dog.

And the pooch portraits are just one example of how Coastal Home goes that extra mile to deliver their customers exactly what they want.  “If we don’t have what you want there, there’s a good chance we can get it,” she said. At the home store you can get customized window treatments, slipcovers, upholstery, even made-to-order tables in a range of different finishings.

From candles and throw pillows to beds and crockery, Coastal Home caters to the eclectic and diverse residents of the East End, and wants to help everyone make their house a home. Ms. McGrath’s number-one piece of advice to all homeowners: “if you see something you love, you really love, you probably should get it.”

UPDATE: Armed Suspect of Violent Bridgehampton Home Invasion Sought

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By Tessa Raebeck

Southampton Town Police, in pursuit of an armed suspect from an earlier home invasion, sealed off the Huntington Crossway and the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike on Tuesday evening at about 7:30 p.m., according to multiple reports from witnesses.

Sag Harbor Village Police Clerk Gigi Oberlander confirmed Wednesday that the Southampton Town Police Department had called Sag Harbor police to the scene as backup, asking them to maintain the perimeter because a suspect was at large.

Sag Harbor police assisted in searching several properties, but the suspect could not be found, and the investigation remains with the Southampton Town Police, who declined to comment Wednesday.

Tuesday evening, a Bridgehampton resident told the Sag Harbor Express that police officers were on the Huntington Crossway armed with automatic weapons. Several minutes later, another passerby told the Express they were driving by the scene and saw cops with shotguns. A police helicopter arrived shortly thereafter, other residents said.

Another Bridgehampton resident was notified by a friend in the police department that police were searching for a male suspect armed with a firearm in the neighborhood.

A Sag Harbor police officer, speaking anonymously, said Southampton Town Police were called to a home invasion by an armed man on the Huntington Crossway on Tuesday afternoon. Police could not find the man at that time but were called back several hours later after receiving word that the suspect had returned to the neighborhood.

UPDATE: In a press release issued late Wednesday, Southampton Town Police confirmed they had received a call of a “burglary in progress” at a residence on Sag Harbor Turnpike in Bridgehampton on Tuesday at approximately 11:31 a.m. Upon arrival, officers were told there was a 26-year-old male upstairs who was a victim of violence. Once the scene was secured, the man was transported by ambulance to Southampton Hospital, where he was treated for non life-threatening injuries.

An initial investigation of the site revealed to police that a man possessing a handgun had forced entry into the residence by violently shoving a 51-year-old woman when she answered the door. After entering the house, the armed man went upstairs and demanded that the 26-year-old victim give him money. The robber then hit the man repeatedly with the handgun and stole multiple electronic devices from the home, before fleeing on foot.

With the assistance of Sag Harbor Village Police and the Suffolk County Sheriff’s K-9 Unit, Southampton Town Police searched the area but were unable to find the armed man. The Southampton Town Police Detective Unit is undergoing an investigation into the incident. They have ascertained that the residence was not selected randomly, but targeted for the crime.

Homeless in the Hamptons: An Invisible Community Struggles to Survive

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Bill watches as two women kayak by at Lazy Point in Amagansett on Tuesday, August 12. He recently lost his six-figure job, wife and home due largely to his struggle with bipolar disorder, and now lives and works where he can across the East End. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

Bill, 56, watches as two women kayak by at Lazy Point in Amagansett on Tuesday, August 12. He recently lost his six-figure job, wife and home due largely to his struggle with bipolar disorder, and now lives and works where he can across the East End. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

To Bill, the two most important things are his feet and his socks, followed closely by matches and plastic bags. The matches keep him warm, the plastic bags keep his things dry, and the feet and socks keep him going.

Bill, 56, has a college degree in economics and a minor in business administration from SUNY Oswego. He is kind, articulate and witty. Like thousands of people across the East End, he is also homeless.

Ten years ago, the Suffolk County Department of Social Services counted 435 homeless families and 222 homeless singles countywide. Those figures—which increased drastically in the economic downturn since—only account for those who meet the official criteria and choose to apply for help. In reality, the numbers are much higher.

It is no secret to locals that the image much of the world conjures up of “The Hamptons” is far from the realities of daily life on the East End, but for the countless homeless residents of these hamlets, that image is a blatant farce.

“How can you miss us?” Bill asked, staring out at the sailboats docked at Lazy Point in Amagansett as two women in a kayak paddled by. Scores of homeless people live here, but, in part due to their own security concerns, they remain largely invisible.

If you look closely, however, you can see the faint paths used by homeless people off wooded trails, under bridges and sometimes right in town. A man who lives behind a popular business in Montauk leaves before dawn each morning, but his footprints have worn down a path to his campsite. Born and raised in Sag Harbor, Andy, a friend of Bill’s, lives hidden in the center of the village. An expert on Southampton history, a man called Mahoney holds fort at a park in the village, regularly entertaining tourists who have no idea he lives where they stand.

At a clearing off Route 27 in Wainscott, local homeowners leave food for the homeless people who camp in the woods nearby. If neighbors buy a sandwich and only end up eating half of it, they’ll leave the rest on one of the lids of two garbage cans stationed at the clearing in an unspoken act of charity.

According to a 2013 report compiled by the federal government, New York State, with 13 percent of the nation’s documented homeless population, is one of only three states in which homeless people account for more than 6 percent of the population (the others being Florida and California). With over 77,000 reported cases in 2013, the number of documented instances of homelessness in New York jumped by nearly 8,000 people between 2012 and 2013. New York’s homeless population has increased by 24 percent since 2007, the largest increase by far in the country—and the numbers are far from the actual figures.

On a single night in January 2013, an estimated 610,042 people were homeless in the United States. Over one-third of those people, about 215,000 of them, live in unsheltered locations, such as under bridges, in cars or in abandoned buildings.

To Bill, living in a car does not make you homeless; there’s a roof over your head and a place you can count on.

Born in Jamaica, Queens, and a graduate of Hauppauge High School, Bill has suffered from bi-polar disorder his whole life, but was not diagnosed till he “was old.” He came to the East End when he was 17 because he was drawn to the service industry.

“I like the whole premise of restaurant business: Helping people, service, making people happy, learning to deal with difficult people,” he said. “I thought—and I still think—I’m good at it.”

The “extracurricular” affairs of the restaurant industry—namely, drugs and drinking—became too much for Bill, who, like many who suffer from bipolar disorder, also struggled with addiction. After years of drinking to excess, Bill is now a recovering alcoholic who said he hasn’t had a drink since the early 90’s when his son was three.

“I think in extremes, everything…you’re either super happy or ready to commit suicide,” he explained.

Struggling with his condition and unable to find balance between complete bliss and extreme grief, Bill lost his six-figure job and his wife left him. He briefly lived up-island with family, but returned to East Hampton, where he has spent the past year searching for shelter, food and friendly faces.

He takes “top half of body” showers in public restrooms and jumps in the ocean to stay clean, a feat that, like most conditions of homelessness, becomes much harder in the cold winter months.

Although Bill doesn’t like to ask for help, when he’s especially down on his luck he goes to Maureen’s Haven in Riverhead.

Funded solely through donations, grants and funding from all the eastern townships, Maureen’s Haven offers shelter, support and “compassionate services” to homeless adults on the East End. There is a crisis hotline and a day center that provides opportunities like AA meetings, ESL and GED classes to help people find work and permanent housing.

From November 1 to April 1, the center transports homeless people from the North and South Forks and takes them to one of 18 host houses of worship between Greenport and Montauk. They are given a hot dinner and a bed to sleep in and are taken back to where they were picked up, be it a bus stop or a side-of-the-road clearing, at 7 a.m.

Since its 2002 inception, Maureen’s Haven has sheltered over 2,500 individuals. In the 2013-14 winter season, the program served 337 adults and was able to secure employment for 40 percent and place 52 percent in permanent housing.

Although a lot of homelessness “has to do with disability, incarceration, drug use, alcohol abuse and job loss,” Program Development Director Tara Murphy said, there are “a number of different issues and each case is different.”

One woman, Mary, arrived at Maureen’s Haven “terrified and desperate,” the center said, after fleeing an abusive relationship. She began the healing process at the center and is now living independently with support from a local domestic violence agency.

A 77-year-old man suffering from dementia with no family nor support system, James had been living disoriented on the streets. The center secured supportive housing for him in a program specializing in the treatment of Alzheimer’s disease.

“It’s not about homelessness, it’s not about tough times, it’s not about addictions,” Bill said of the stigmatization of the homeless. “We all wear the same clothes…what I’m saying is, if we have two different socks on, who cares?”

To volunteer at Maureen’s Haven, call (631) 727-6836, email info@maureenshaven.org or visit their website.

Bridgehampton School Board Yet to Hire New Athletic Director

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By Tessa Raebeck

The Bridgehampton School is yet to settle on a plan for a new athletics administrator and physical education teacher following Mary Anne Jules’ retirement from her long-held post as athletic director last month.

At the Bridgehampton Board of Education’s regular meeting on Wednesday, July 30, new board member Jeffrey Mansfield questioned the cost of hiring a full-term athletic director.

“We’re going to talk about that and delineate it in executive session tonight,” replied Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre, adding they would “talk about the different options, so that I’m clear on what you want me to do.”

School Business Administrator Robert Hauser and several board members, including President Ronald White, were on vacation and did not attend the meeting.

The board weighed the cost effectiveness of hiring both a part-time athletic director and part-time physical education teacher after the small district pierced the 2-percent budget cap this spring. Ms. Jules was with the district for 32 years and served as the full-time athletic director for 23 of those years.

Dr. Favre said Monday, August 4, that the board had interviewed candidates on Friday, August 1, but no decision has been made. The administrators are waiting for information from the East Hampton and Sag Harbor school districts, she said.

“We need a part-time physical education teacher and a part-time athletic director,” Dr. Favre said in an email. “We are trying to determine the most cost-efficient way to move forward, and considering if it is feasible to share the administrative piece, and assure that the needs of our students are effectively met.”

Also at last week’s meeting, board member Douglas DeGroot said it would be cheaper and more practical for the school district to put do temporary repairs to a blacktop basketball court rather than redoing the asphalt altogether. Completely repaving the surface is “kind of like a zero investment,” Mr. DeGroot said.

“If it’s not a full-size basketball court now and it won’t be, who knows if we can get a master plan of various things—maybe we can turn it into a bigger basketball court…you wouldn’t want to put money in and then two years later want to turn [it into a] bigger court,” he continued.

The school board’s vice president, Lillian Tyree-Johnson, expressed her agreement and the other board members nodded in approval.

The board’s next meeting is Wednesday, August 27, at 7 p.m. in the school cafeteria.

Wright To Head Hospital Board

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Southampton Hospital’s board of directors on July 12 elected Kenneth B. Wright its chairman.  He succeeds Peter Larsen who was a member of the board for 15 years and served 10 years as chairman.

A hospital board member since 2004, Mr. Wright was previously co-vice chairman along with attorney Richard J. Hiegel. He serves on the board’s executive, facilities and properties, finance and budget, and public affairs committees.

Born at Southampton Hospital, Mr. Wright is the son of the late Dr. Kenneth B. Wright, who at one time served as the hospital’s chief of surgery.

Mr. Wright is a resident of Southampton and is the founder of Wright & Company Construction Inc. in Bridgehampton.

Lighted Crosswalk Proposed in Bridgehampton

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The existing crosswalk in front of the Hampton Library. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

Southampton Town is looking to install warning lights at what many say is a dangerous crosswalk on Bridgehampton’s Main Street.

Christine Fetten, the town’s director of municipal works, and Tom Neely, its public transportation and safety director, sought out community opinions at Monday’s Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee meting regarding the installation of the lights in front of the Hampton Library.

Library Director Kelly Harris approached Senator Kenneth P. LaValle for a grant for a lighted crosswalk system, they said, which the senator has secured.

The town had initially looked at in-ground lights, similar to those used on East Hampton Village’s Main Street, but it now has its eye set on Rapid Flashing Beacons. These solar-powered lights that flash to warn oncoming drivers when sensors detect a pedestrian, or when they are activated by pushing a button from the sidewalk.

There are some troubling visibility issues at the existing crosswalk, officials said. On the south side of the street, there is a very large linden tree that blocks visibility for eastbound motorists. Also, Ms. Fetten noted that the crossing is right next to the exit of a municipal parking lot.

According to Ms. Fetten, Bartlett Tree Experts examined the tree and determined that it was “not in very good condition.” CAC members unanimously agreed that they would be in favor of the removal of the tree if it were replaced with a more street-friendly tree.

They also said that they would support the installation of the rapid flashing beacons. Members of the CAC also suggested that Bridgehampton could benefit from more traffic cops during the summer who could help direct traffic.

Pharmacy Giant Files for Special Exemption Permit on Busy Bridgehampton Corner

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This week, CVS filed for a special exemption permit for a 9,500 square-foot store at a busy intersection on Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Mara Certic

After months of grumbling, hand-wringing and even a pair of protest marches, Bridgehampton residents’ fears that CVS Pharmacy would try to shoehorn a store into the busiest corner in the hamlet took a step closer to being realized this week.

According to Kyle Collins, Southampton Town’s planning and development administrator, Bridgehampton BNB IV Ventures, the company that owns the property at the northwest corner of Montauk Highway and the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike, has applied for a special exception permit from the Southampton Town Planning Board to open a 9,500-square-foot store at the site.

“At 3:30 this afternoon I got an e-mail from Kyle Collins telling me that BNB IV Ventures has applied for the special exception before the planning board,” Nancy Walter Yvertes solemnly announced to members of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee on Monday, July 28. Mr. Collins is the town’s planning and development administrator.

For months, the CAC, and a spin off group, Save Bridgehampton Main Street, has been fighting the proposed CVS through letter-writing campaigns, distributing petitions and even protesting.

Site plan approval has already been granted for a two-story building with 9,500 square feet of space at the site, but in the Village Business zoning district, businesses are limited to 5,000 square feet. Larger businesses are allowed only if a special exception permit is granted.

Members of the CAC and Save Bridgehampton Main Street have been writing letters to CVS executives for months but have not received any satisfactory response, they said.

“Now that the planning board has the file, we have the right to correspond with Dennis Finnerty and all of the people on the planning board,” Ms. Walter Yvertes told the other members of the CAC.  Mr. Finnerty is the board’s chairman.

Ms. Walter Yvertes also announced that Steven Schneider, an engineer conducting a traffic study for Save Bridgehampton Main Street, had agreed to analyze the turning movements at both driveways to the site. There is a driveway on Montauk Highway and one at the end of Lumber Lane at the turnpike. The analysis would add $1,800 to the cost of the traffic study, she said.

“Originally, I did not think it was necessary, but rethinking it, it very well could be. It may lead us, for example, to recommending restrictions on vehicles entering and exiting the driveways because of the traffic flow and the geometrics of the closeness of those driveways to the major intersection,” Mr. Schneider wrote in an e-mail to Ms. Walter Yvertes on Friday, July 25.

Ms. Walter Yvertes commented that it should really be the town conducting the study and that town officials should be “encouraged to do their jobs.”

CAC member Julie Burmeister also announced that a videographer had been chosen to film the busy intersection as part of the study. She explained that for some reason, the traffic is at its heaviest at that spot at around 10:30 a.m., and so they will be filming the flow of cars, trucks and bicycles at that hectic time of day in an effort to prove that the already dangerous corner will likely become unbearable if the CVS plan is approved.

Many of the members of the CAC also sit on Save Bridgehampton Main Street, which has hired attorney Vince Messina to fight the CVS application. The Islip-based lawyer was recommended to the organization by Southampton Town Justice Deborah Kooperstein, a resident of Bridgehampton.

When members asked why a local lawyer had not been chosen, CAC-member Peter Wilson responded, “I think she picked him because she’s had experience with him and feels that he’s a top performing litigator and he also has a pretty formidable reputation in Suffolk County.”

Ms. Water Yvertes added that when she told Jeff Murphree, the town’s former planning and development administrator, who has been helping his in-laws fight the CVS application, of their choice of lawyer “his eyes started twinkling and he said ‘Oh, he’s very strong.’”

CAC members s found several parts of the special exception use standards that they believe the proposed CVS would not be able to comply with. One provision states that there must be sufficient off-street parking and truck loading spaces for the anticipated number of employees, patrons and visitors and that “the layout of the spaces and driveways is convenient and conducive to safe operation.”

Jim Olson asked the assembled members of the CAC if they thought that their efforts would prevail; they replied that it would probably come down to the other lawyer, Wayne Bruyn.

They anticipated that he would try to time the hearing for the wintertime, when fewer Bridgehampton homeowners are in town to voice their opinions.

According to an email from Mr. Collins, of the town’s Department of Land Management, the absolute earliest date that a public hearing would take place would be on November 13.

Ms. Walter Yvertes said that she thought it was unlikely that it would qualify for a special exception permit “unless Wayne Bruyn’s a magician.”

On Wednesday, Mr. Bruyn said that he was not involved with the application. He said it was not BNB IV Ventures, but CVS itself, which had filed the permit application. He said he does not represent the pharmacy company and has not prepared an application for it nor reviewed it at this time.

Mr. Messina was not available for comment by the time of this paper’s publication.