Tag Archive | "Bridgehampton"

Sag Harbor 7-Eleven Employee Arrested for Stealing on the Job

Tags: , , , , , , ,


Bernard Cooks

Bernard Cooks, 33, was arrested Friday on charges of grand larceny for allegedly stealing from the Sag Harbor 7-Eleven while working there.

By Tessa Raebeck

Sag Harbor Village Police arrested Bernard T. Cooks, 33, of Bridgehampton on Friday, September 5, at 2:42 p.m. on charges of grand larceny in the fourth degree, a felony.

While working at the 7-Eleven in Sag Harbor on August 10, Mr. Cooks allegedly stole $1,085.76 from the register he was manning.

The store manager told police Mr. Cooks took money out of the register and put it in a plastic bag, which he placed in the garbage before returning to retrieve the cash. This occurred at least twice between 6:55 and 7:55 p.m., the manager told police. At the end of Mr. Cooks’s shift, the register was $1,085.76 short, police said.

Mr. Cooks, who is currently on parole for previous offenses, was arrested and transported to police headquarters before being arraigned in Sag Harbor Village Justice Court on Friday at 4 p.m.. He was transferred to Suffolk County Jail in Riverhead to await a later court appearance.

Southampton Town Police arrested Mr. Cooks in January 2011 as part of an investigation into crack-cocaine dealing at a house in North Sea. He was convicted of felony charges of criminal possession of a controlled substance. He was released from prison in May 2012 after serving less than a year.

The Suffolk County District Attorney’s office dropped all charges against him due to an ongoing investigation into the alleged misconduct of a Southampton Town Police officer in the Street Crimes Unit that had conducted the initial drug raids on Mr. Cooks’s house.

Latin American Film Festival Returns to the Parrish

Tags: , , , , , , ,


A094_C002_0101MY.0001354F

 

Sergio Hernández (Rodolfo) and Paulina García (Gloria) in Sebastián Lelio’s “Gloria,” which will be screened at 3 p.m. on Sunday, September 14.

By Mara Certic

Seven boxes, a fisherman and a middle-aged Chilean woman will be featured in films screened next weekend during the 11th annual OLA Film Festival at the Parrish Art Museum.

The Organización Latino-Americana of Eastern Long Island (OLA) is a local outreach nonprofit that promotes the Latino community’s cultural, economic, social and educational development in the towns of East Hampton and Southampton. Isabel Sepulveda, one of the founders of OLA, started the film festival back in 2003 and for the past six years, the Parrish Art Museum has hosted the Spanish-language weekend.

“Isabel Sepulveda has been with it from the beginning. She has the vision each year,” said Andrea Grover, curator of special projects at the Parrish, who added that Ms. Sepulveda is “essential” to the festival. Ms. Grover said she always enjoys the OLA film festival and “it is something that people anticipate and are enthusiastic about seeing.”

“In 2001, we founded OLA. Part of the mission was to do advocacy work. We thought we could reach more people doing cultural events,” Ms. Sepulveda said on Monday. “Through an annual film festival we can bring the two communities together.”

It is a fun change of theme for the Parrish, which usually screens films on the subject of art. “This is a little bit of a different tact for us. It’s something that we find really valuable,” Ms. Grover said in a phone interview on Saturday.

There is no theme to the festival, no connection to art, as such, except that each of these films are critically acclaimed and highly anticipated. According to Ms. Grover, Ms. Sepulveda “is trying to reach as broad as an audience as possible” with her choices for the festival. Documentaries, dramas and comedies have all made it to the big screen at the OLA film festival, even shorts, but Ms. Grover said the curator “is looking for quality.”

The OLA film festival features recently released, critically acclaimed movies from different Latin American countries, according to Ms. Grover. The festival kicks off on Friday, September 12, at 5:30 p.m. with “Pescador” (“Fisherman”).

“Pescador” was co-written and directed by Ecuadoran filmmaker Sebastián Cordero in 2011. It tells the story of 30-year-old Blanquito (played by Andrés Crespo), who lives with his mother in a small fishing village where he never really felt he belonged. One day, Blanquito discovers a box filled with bricks of cocaine and he finds a way to get out of his 30-year rut. He is determined to sell the cocaine back to the cartel for top prices and to use that money to leave the small village and change his life.

He falls for a woman named Lorna, with whom he spends the rest of the 96-minute film on a dangerous adventure. “Pescador” won awards for best director and best actor at the 2012 Guadalajara Mexican Film Festival, and Mr. Crespo won another award for best actor at the Cartagena Film Festival in Colombia.

Following the screening of “Pescador,” Afro-Cuban and Puerto Rican band Mambo Loco will perform on the Mildred C. Brinn Terrace at the Parrish at 7 p.m. “It’s something we plan to develop further,” Ms. Grover said of expanding the festival’s offerings.

The next day at 3 p.m., the Parrish will show a Paraguayan film, “7 Cajas” (“7 Boxes”).  The PG-13 film directed by Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schémbori is the story of the lure and dangers of money.  Victor, a 17-year-old wheelbarrow operator, accepts $100 to transport seven boxes of unknown content through an eight-block journey in the busy municipal market. Drama and danger ensue in the action-thriller, which won five awards at various film festivals, including the Audience Award at the Miami Film Festival.

The last film to be screened over the weekend will be on Sunday at 3 p.m. The film is “Gloria,” the story of a rebirth for a middle-aged divorcée living in Santiago. “It’s one I’ve wanted to see because it depicts a woman in her mid-life and it’s a depiction of a real life scenario done with kindness,” Ms. Grover said. “It’s subject matter not frequently featured,” she said, adding that Ms. Sepulveda has been eager to feature the Chilean movie since its release.

The R-rated tale won a total of 17 awards at festivals all around the world, including the main competition at the Berlin International Film Festival and several best actress awards for Paulina Garcia, who plays the title role.

Ms. Sepulveda said there are many high-quality films coming out of Latin America. “I wish we could have a longer festival, like two weeks. It takes a lot to put it together, especially when everyone’s volunteering their time. It’s not easy,” she said.

Tickets for each film are $10; admission is free for museum members, students and children. The musical performance by Mambo Loco is free with museum admission. The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org

 

 

 

For the Love of Roses

Tags: , , , , , ,


web roses

By Emily J. Weitz

“She cast her fragrance and her radiance over me. I ought never to have run away from her… Flowers are so inconsistent! But I was too young to know how to love her…” 

~Antoine de St. Exupery, The Little Prince

As the little prince knew too well, to love a rose takes effort, patience, and thought. Even when they have a wild look about them, with their thorns and brambles all tangled across a gate, roses require a great deal of care.

Rick Bogusch, who manages the grounds at Bridge Gardens, has nurtured the rose garden since he started there six years ago. Every winter, he tucks them in to beds of mulch 12 to 18 inches deep, and every spring, he prunes them delicately and watches them come back to life.

The Southampton Rose Society will present a lecture by Mr. Bogusch at Bridge Gardens on Saturday, September 13, from 10:30 am to 12:30 pm. Many of the most striking specimens in the garden, Mr. Bogusch said, will still be in bloom.

The rose garden was installed by the property’s previous owners, Jim and Harry Kilpatrick, and Mr. Bogusch spent his first year at Bridge Gardens learning about the unique demands of these flowers. They were selected for the hardiness and their ability to endure the long winters, but still they need to be attended to. Last winter, which was particularly cold and long, Mr. Bogusch brought one of the rose plants inside and nursed it through the roughest patches, and now it has sprung back.

“Roses are very demanding,” said Mr. Bogusch. “They demand a lot of attention and resources and consistency of care. Time, energy, man hours, money: You really have to be willing to put that into them.”

Along with mulching and pruning, roses need to receive about 2 inches of water every week. Mr. Bogusch also fertilizes them regularly throughout the season to keep them vigorous.

Perhaps it is the effort that they require that makes roses so precious. Throughout history, they have been used in ceremonies and by royalty to mark special occasions. They are prized for their aesthetic value and their pungent fragrance. Mr. Bogusch says the rose garden, even though it is just one of several impressive gardens at Bridge Gardens, is a major draw for people.

“It’s a big attraction,” said Mr. Bogusch, “because everybody loves roses. When people find out there’s a rose garden here, they want to see it.”

The garden itself is round, with brick pathways throughout that separate the beds. The beds are organized by color, so that the rose garden resembles a giant color wheel. One bed spills with red roses. A path separates it from a pink bed, a yellow bed, and so on. There are eight beds in all.

Walking through the rose garden, one is taken not only by the aesthetic beauty, but the pungency of the air.

“Some of the roses in our garden are very fragrant,” said Mr. Bogusch. For example, there’s a white hybrid rose that blooms in the classic form called Pope John Paul II.

“That’s one of the most fragrant roses of all time,” he said.

Mr. Bogusch just planted Pope John Paul II this past spring, and already it is growing vigorously. Another plant, which is original to the garden, is called About Face.

“It’s large and strong and old,” said Mr. Bogusch. “And it’s so beautiful that you do an about-face when you walk by it.”

“You start to see blooms in late May, and June is the first peak,” said Mr. Bogusch. “Then there’s another peak in September.”

This year the roses have bloomed continually, which Mr. Bogusch attributes a temperate summer when the thermometer didn’t climb into the 90s.

“Our garden,” he explained, “has brick, and can get very hot and humid, which roses don’t like.”

Because of the relatively cool summer, this year’s stroll through the rose garden should be particularly rewarding.

To register for the lecture and tour, go to the Rose Society web site at southamptonrose.org or call (631) 740-4732. Bridge Gardens is located at 36 Mitchell Lane in Bridgehampton.

Firefighters Battle House Fire in Bridgehampton

Tags: , , , , ,


DSC_0972

Fire Department believe the house fire on Bridge Hill Lane on Sunday morning may have been caused by lightning. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Mara Certic

Members of the Bridgehampton Fire Department and neighboring departments spent several hours battling a house fire on Bridge Lane in Bridgehampton early Sunday morning, according to Chief Gary Horsburgh.

The chief said the department responded from an automatic fire alarm at the house on 10 Bridge Hill Lane at 1:52 a.m. Responders smelled smoke when they arrived and immediately requested assistance, he said.

The fire began in the basement and burned through the first floor, causing serious damage to the kitchen and the western side of the house, Chief Horsburgh said on Sunday morning. He added that heat and humidity made firefighting particularly taxing and tiring, and fire departments from Sag Harbor, East Hampton, Springs, North Sea, Hampton Bays and Southampton Village were all called in for mutual aid.

According to Chief Horsburgh the house is “still standing” but the western side is “pretty much gone.” No one was in the house when the fire began, Chief Horsburgh said, and there were no injuries.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation by the Southampton Town Fire Marshal, but Chief Horsburgh said he thought it could have been caused by lightning, as thunderstorms swept through the area that night.

Southampton Town Fire Marshal Brian Williams said on Wednesday that the investigation is ongoing.

 

Proposal to Teach Spanish in Early Grades in Bridgehampton

Tags: ,


By Tessa Raebeck

In its last meeting before the school year begins, the Bridgehampton Board of Education on August 27 floated ideas of how to align Bridgehampton School programs, curriculum and policies with the requirements of 2014.

Citing the large Spanish speaking population in both the Bridgehampton community and the country as a whole, new board member Jeffrey Mansfield floated the concept of an elementary-level Spanish class, saying a parent had come to him with the idea.

He suggested that, if there was enough interest among the school’s youngest students and a teacher available, the class could meet “maybe once a week” and students who attended “would pay a stipend and would pay for the instruction.”

Mr. Mansfield offered to, “with the board’s blessing,” move forward with Superintendent/Principal Dr. Lois Favre’s help to look into whether it is a viable option.

“I guess all parents feel that way,” said board member Douglas DeGroot, adding the school had tried a Spanish class for younger students in the past. “It’s like, we know you learn languages easier when you’re younger, why are we waiting till seventh grade to teach languages when it’s harder? You should do it when you’re younger.”

He said when the issue was brought up by parents several years ago, a handful of foreign language teachers volunteered to teach during their off periods. The school currently has one French teacher and one Spanish teacher.

Dr. Favre suggested using an enrichment period for the class, so that students would have six straight weeks of Spanish during the school year before moving onto a different subject.

“We have that period in the schedule…and I have teachers,” said Dr. Favre. “We could make it happen, absolutely.”

Also at last week’s meeting, School Business Administrator Robert Hauser told the board, “Today, we actually had to borrow $3.9 million.”

In a typical move for a school district this time of year, the school took out a Tax Anticipation Note, or TAN. The district borrowed funds with the intent of returning them after residents pay their tax bills. Typically, residents pay half of their tax bill in December or January and the second half in May or June.

“When they make that second half payment in May and June, that’s when we pay back the TAN,” Mr. Hauser said. “We actually were pretty successful; because of our good credit rating, we were able to borrow this money at .36, so less than a percent.”

The Bridgehampton School District’s Moody’s rating is AA.

The school also announced new software that allows parents to see the last 30 days of their child’s in-school purchasing activity, “the dollars and the last items they purchased” on the district website, Mr. Hauser said.

The board granted Mary Anne Jules, the district’s recently retired athletic director and physical education teacher, $62,330.80 from the reserve fund for compensated absences due to unused sick days as required by her contract.

“We don’t spend big money lightly, she was due that money and we’re paying it to her,” explained Mr. DeGroot.

The Art of Seaweed

Tags: , , , , , , ,


halosiphonsp

Samples of seaweed from Lake Montauk pressed and preserved by Dr. Larry Liddle. 

By Mara Certic

Dr. Larry Liddle initially didn’t intend for it to be art; it was science, another method for him to learn more about and document his findings. But some 50 years later, Dr. Liddle has found the beauty in seaweed by pressing the plants onto paper and turning them into works of art.

Dr. Liddle, who has studied algae for the better part of the last few decades, will give a demonstration of seaweed mounting at 2 p.m. on Saturday at the South Fork Natural History Museum in Bridgehampton.

In 1963, when Dr. Liddle was not quite a doctor yet, but a young man working on his master’s degree at the University of Chicago, he took a summer course in marine botany at Woods Hole in Massachusetts. The course involved field trips where students waded and snorkeled to collect various specimens. There, he learned how to press algae to document his trips.

The organisms had not been highly studied at that point, Dr. Liddle said in a phone interview on Friday. ascophyllumnodosum

“It was that summer; that was the reason that I got very interested in algae, and specifically seaweed, and also learned to press algae in the best way, and I’ve been doing it ever since,” he said. “So I enquired about going to graduate school for a Ph.D. to look into marine botany,” he explained.

And the rest is history. Dr. Liddle moved to Santa Barbara to continue his studies and eventually became a professor of phycology, the study of algae, at Southampton College, where he is now professor emeritus.

Dr. Liddle has collected seaweed from the Mediterranean, Japan and Thailand, to name a few of the places he has visited, and has pressed hundreds of different seaweeds from all over the world. Pressing seaweed, rather than preserving it chemically, allows scientists to test its DNA and perform species-level taxonomy. But it also creates a unique work of art.

“I like art and design quite a bit, informally,” Dr. Liddle said, “I had taken a lot of art courses in college, and so the idea of aesthetics was important to me.” He explained that in the field of biology, “how you present things is often aesthetically pleasing, in concert with being scientifically useful.”

Dr. Liddle has gone wading, snorkeling and even scuba diving to find seaweed to press, he said, but now he usually sticks to wading through water for his algal extractions. The process of pressing seaweed is lengthy but if done well, the finished product can last for decades, Dr. Liddle said.

It is important, he explained, to keep the seaweed hydrated and to give it oxygen. Dr. Liddle often brings seaweed back from the beach damp, rather than immersed but he brings fresh seawater along with him too. If the water is changed every few hours the specimens will last two or three days, but “the best thing is to start pressing them right away,” he said.

“It’s good to clean them off in the field, get rid of all the silt, and so on,” he explained. “Float them out in clean water, work them as much as you have to.” The real beauty in seaweed pressing is looking at the branching and the shapes of the plants—what in water looks like a slimy green blob can look just like a tree when pressed.

Dr. Liddle spreads seaweed out onto paper with his fingers, as much as possible, before he uses tools, which are more likely to damage delicate pieces of algae. Sometimes, he said, he doesn’t know what he has until he floats it in water, when he gets home. At a seaweed demonstration in Montauk last month, Dr. Liddle had a “green glob” that he was floating in water. “As I floated it out, it turned out it was attached to another seaweed,” he said.Dasyapedicellata

In 2010, Dr. Liddle helped create a seaweed collection for East Hampton Town’s Natural Resources Department. He retrieved all of the types of seaweed he could find in Lake Montauk and pressed them for the department; scanned versions are available on the town’s website.

More recently, Dr. Liddle took samples from Georgica Cove. “There’s an enormous floating mass of seaweed there,” he said, “it’s 25 to 40 meters wide.” Dr. Liddle said that it is green algae and “it is undoubtedly due to the run off of lawns, of nitrates and phosphates.” Dr. Liddle pressed those samples and gave one to the town for its archives. Another has been sent off for DNA testing.

Dr. Liddle has traveled the world, collected some unbelievably rare samples and preserved them for science. But, he said, “some of the most ordinary ones are just as beautiful.”

 Dr. Liddle will demonstrate seaweed mounting at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 6, at the South Fork Natural History located at 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike in Bridgehampton. For more information visit sofo.org.

YA Author Comes to Hampton Library to Share Malala’s Story

Tags: , ,


patty-mccormick

Author Patricia McCormick collaborated with Malala Yosafzai to write the young reader’s edition of “I am Malala.”

By Gianna Volpe

Nobel Peace Prize nominee Malala Yousafzai first began to receive books written by young adult author Patricia McCormick while the Pakistani teenager was recovering after she’d been shot in the head in October 2012 by a member of the Taliban, who boarded her school bus and tried to assassinate her for championing girls’ rights to education.

Following the release of her internationally best-selling memoir, “I Am Malala: The Girl Who Stood Up for Education and Was Shot by the Taliban,” Ms. Yousafzai ultimately collaborated with Ms. McCormick—the critically-acclaimed author of such novels as “Never Fall Down,” “Purple Heart,” “Sold,” “My Brother’s Keeper” and “Cut”—to create a young reader’s edition that would make her memoir more accessible to her peers.

“Because of the types of books Patricia writes, it was a natural fit,” said Kim Zettwoch, young adult librarian at the Hampton Library in Bridgehampton. “She has this finesse for writing young adult books and can deal with this type of subject matter in a way that teens can get into it and get something out of it.”

This Saturday at 2 p.m., Ms. McCormick will speak at the library and sign copies of “I Am Malala,” which will be sold at the event.

Ms. McCormick “was so humble, saying, ‘I’m not Malala. I don’t know who will really be interested,” Ms. Zettwoch said of the response when she asked Ms. McCormick to appear at the library. “We had another young adult author here in the spring, so we’re going to continue to try to have young adult authors come here to speak.”Yousafzai_IAmMalala

For Ms. McCormick, these type of events offer her the most rewarding experiences as a writer. “Whenever I give a speech, there’s always one girl who comes up and says, ‘You told my story’ and it’s so gratifying—I cry every time,” the author said. “When you’re writing, you’re lonely; you’re all by yourself, so you have no idea how your work is going to affect somebody…. you touch people you’ll never know.”

She said these type of experiences are common for someone who writes for developing minds.

“Young adult readers are terrific,” said Ms. McCormick. “They don’t put up with phonies, and they don’t put up with long, unnecessary passages, but if they connect with you, they read very deeply into the books.”

Ms. McCormick’s collaboration with Ms. Yousafzai is the author’s latest endeavor in telling stories of teenagers’ lives amid unspeakable tragedies. Her work has taken her as far as India, where she visited bordellos involved in child trafficking for her novel, “Sold,” which was recently adapted into a film that is being shown at national and international film festivals. ?“I had a sense that it was not an issue that was well or widely understood,” Ms. McCormick said. “There had been some journalism about it, but nobody had written about it from the girl’s point of view. So I did that and then I met this young man from Cambodia and I think that’s kinda what led to the Malala project.”

The young Cambodian man, Arn Chorn-Pond, a survivor of imprisonment by the Khmer Rouge, is the central figure in Ms. McCormick’s “Never Fall Down,” which tells the story of Cambodian genocide from the perspective of a child forced into slavery and military service after the invasion of his village.

Though he and Ms. Yousafzai are vastly different from one another, Ms. McCormick said she was struck by the commonality of their experiences.

Take Malala Yousafzai, for example. “She is exactly what she appears to be. She’s really bright, she’s very principled, she’s really fearless, and she’s also a regular 17-year-old girl,” said Ms. McCormick. “She cares if she’s in a fight with her best friend, she worries about how did she do on her physics test, she wonders if her glasses look funny; she’s this amazing combination of extraordinary and regular.”

“I Am Malala” is perhaps the ultimate embodiment of a message threaded throughout Ms. McCormick’s books: To persevere in the face of adversity.

According to Ms. McCormick, though Ms. Yousafzai has been shot in the head for what she believes in, the Pakistani youth forgives her aggressors, whose actions have only strengthened her dedication to the struggle to obtain educational rights for girls in Pakistan.

“She really does forgive them and only wants them to have the benefit of the education that she had,” said Ms. McCormick. “She thinks that will change everything. There’s a line in the book that says that if she met one of the Taliban—she had gotten a death threat—and she said, ‘What will I do if I see one? Oh, I’ll hit him with my shoe,’ and then she said, ‘No, no, that would make me aggressive. I’ll just tell him that all I want is the right to go to school and for your sister or your daughter to go to school.’ She said she thought [the Taliban] would silence her but they actually gave her the biggest megaphone imaginable.”

Ms. Zettwoch said she hopes Ms. McCormick’s visit to the Hampton Library this Saturday will open the eyes of young, local readers to issues other teenagers face that they needn’t, but added Saturday’s free event is not age-restricted.

“Anyone who is interested can come,” said Ms. Zettwoch. “All are welcome and can get something out of it.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Babington Dries Off to Win Hampton Classic Grand Prix

Tags: , ,


Kevin Babington, atop his mount Shorapur, won the $250,000 Grand Prix at the 2014 Hampton Classic in Bridgehampton on Sunday.

Kevin Babington, atop his mount Shorapur, won the $250,000 Grand Prix at the 2014 Hampton Classic in Bridgehampton on Sunday.

By Gavin Menu; photography by Michael Heller

Kevin Babington went from blue water to a blue ribbon Sunday at the 39th Annual Hampton Classic, recovering from a wet and wild morning to claim victory in the $250,000 Grand Prix, the Bridgehampton horse show’s signature event.

Babington, an Irishman, rode his nine year-old Hanoverian mare Shorapur to the fastest fault-free jump-off with a time of 39.16 seconds to claim his first-ever Classic Grand Prix victory over three other riders. His triumph came just hours after falling from a different horse and landing in the water jump in the 7/8-Year-Old Jumper Championships.

Brianne Goutal, 25, the lone American rider in the jump-off, also rode fault-free but finished in 40.34 seconds to finish second.

An estimated 15,000 fans packed the grandstands, VIP Tent and luxury chalets Sunday to watch 32 riders compete for the Classic’s grand prize. In the end, four riders, including Babington, Goutal, Richie Moloney and Ramiro Quintana, an Argentinian with roots in Sagaponack, qualified for the jump-off by finishing clean on designer Guilherme Jorge’s course, which proved to be considerably challenging over the course of the afternoon.

Babington said Sunday was the first grand prix for Shorapur with fences set at 1.6 meters (5.25 feet), and that he decided to enter her instead of another horse only after an impressive ride in a $10,000 class in the same ring on Friday.

“I thought she felt a little too brave,” Babington said about Shorapur’s performance on Friday, in which she knocked down two rails. “So I though, okay, you’re ready to step up to the plate now. She won a grand prix recently in Silver Oak and coming off a grand prix I thought she would be confident. I underestimated how confident she would be. She felt fantastic today.”

Moloney, another Irishman who is now based on Long Island, rode first in the jump-off and led his gelding Freestyle De Muze through the course with one rail down and four faults. Quintana, who began his U.S. riding career nearly 20 years ago at Sag Pond Farm in Sagaponack, rode second aboard his Dutch warmblood mare Whitney, but finished with two rails down and eight faults. Babington and Goutal, aboard her stallion Nice De Prissey, both rode clean with the win going to Babington based on time.

Babington’s share of the purse was $82,500, while Goutal earned $50,000, Maloney $37,500 and Quintana $25,000. Michael Hughes, Todd Minikus, Devin Ryan, Karen Polle, Cara Raether, Charles Jacobs, Callan Solem and Liubov Kochetova rounded out the top 12 to earn a portion of the winnings as well.

Moloney’s third-placed finish was more than enough to put him on top in the $30,000 Longines Leading Rider Challenge for the second consecutive year, earning 300 points from the week’s 10 open jumper classes. Fellow Irishman Darragh Kenny held on to the runner-up spot with 283 points, even though he left on Saturday night for the Alltech FEI World Equestrian Games in France. Quintana finished third with 195 points and Shane Sweetnam of Ireland finished fourth with 177.5.

“It was a week that seemed every single day what we were hearing was Ireland, Ireland, Ireland,” said Marty Bauman, the classic’s longtime press chief.

In the previous 38 years only twice has a rider representing a country other than the United States won the Classic Grand Prix, with Tim Grubb of Great Britain winning in 1996 and Darragh Kerins of Ireland in 2004. Goutal was hoping for another American win on Sunday, but was just over a second short of Babington’s finishing time.

“I wanted to play it safe, and I played it a little bit too safe,” Goutal said afterwards when asked about her approach to the jump-off. “For me this is one of our best shows in the summer, if not the best, and it’s always an honor and a privilege to be on that field.”

Babington, who rides out of Gwynedd Valley, Pennsylvania, became the Classic Grand Prix’s third foreign-born champion aboard an unproven young mare and just hours after drying himself after his early morning spill on Grand Prix Sunday.

“That’s the sport of show jumping,” Babington said late Sunday. “It’s a very humbling sport. You can be on top of the world one minute and be in the water the next.”

Ramiro Quintana, who spent years riding at Sag Pond in Sagaponack, atop his mount Whitney at the 2014 Hampton Classic on Sunday.

Ramiro Quintana, who spent years riding at Sag Pond in Sagaponack, atop his mount Whitney at the 2014 Hampton Classic on Sunday.

Howard University Gospel Choir in Bridgehampton

Tags: ,


The pews of the Bridgehampton Presbyterian Church will be alive with music on Saturday, September 6, when the Howard Gospel Choir of Howard University visits Bridgehampton.

The concert  is sponsored by the Bridgehampton Child Care and Recreational Center. The choir is known for inspiring through song and dance—and it’s pretty much guaranteed the crowd will be on its feet, rocking and swaying to the gospel music with the performers.

The concert begins at 4:30 p.m. The Bridgehampton Presbyterian Church is located at 2429 Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton. Advanced reserved seats are $50 and donations of $25 in advance and $30 at the door are requested. For more information, call (631) 537-0616 or visit bhccrc.com.

Over 300 Show Up to Discuss Aircraft Noise in East Hampton

Tags: , , , , , ,


helicopters

Helicopters at the East Hampton Airport on Wednesday evening, just down the road from where over 300 residents gathered to discuss the aircraft noise problem. Photo by Mara Certic.

By Mara Certic

More than 325 people from all over the East End turned up to a special meeting on Wednesday evening to discuss the East Hampton Airport.

For almost three hours, residents from East Hampton, Southampton, Noyac, North Haven, Shelter Island and the North Fork told the board their concerns, their stories, and their solutions. Councilwoman Kathee Burke-Gonzalez, who acts as the board’s airport liaison made a statement before the public hearing began. She assured the public the town board was committed to do everything they can legally do to address the problem.

She also asked those who had signed up to speak to stay respectful of each other, and the board, and said “I request everyone observe basic rules of civility.”

Ms. Burke-Gonzalez’s wish came true. There was a sense of support and unity among the residents and elected officials who gathered to speak at Wednesday night’s meeting.

Southold, Southampton, Shelter Island, North Haven and Noyac passed memorializing resolutions in the past few weeks, all calling for the East Hampton Town Board to refuse any future grant money from the FAA and then impose regulations on the airport.

Currently, the board is receiving grant assurances from the FAA, which will expire on December 31, 2014. “We implore you to not accept the funding from the FAA,” said Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst at Wednesday’s meeting.

“I can just tell you that from a North Haven standpoint, we’ll do everything to try and support you,” said Jeff Sander, Mayor of North Haven Village. This feeling was repeated throughout the evening, by residents as well as elected officials.

“We’re behind you 100%,” said Shelter Island resident Jim Colligan.  ”Don’t be in fear of those helicopter companies, if we need to rally behind you, we will definitely rally behind you.”

Speakers expressed concern about non-stop noise, which many say goes from as early as 5 a.m. to as late as 2:45 a.m. Frank Dalene, who sits on two of East Hampton’s Airport subcommittees, likened the endless noise to torture. “Will there be satisfaction if you just stop the torture?” he asked. “The only relief is to stop torture. We will not be satisfied until helicopters stop.”

As well as noise, many brought up issues of health and safety. A specialist in animal behaviorism and a Northwest resident explained that the “looming” sound of the helicopters has damaged wild life on the East End, and could be damaging people, too.

Solutions were put forward by the public, as well. Many called for banning helicopters, some called for shutting down all commercial operations in and out of the airport.  Certain residents suggested closing the East Hampton Airport and moving operations to Montauk Airport. This may prove slightly difficult as the 40 acres of the Montauk Airport is less than a tenth of the size of the East Hampton Airport.

“It’s truly a pleasure to listen to th voices on the East End and the conduct at this meeting was exemplary,” Supervisor Cantwell said on Wednesday.