Tag Archive | "charity"

Surfing for Autism in Montauk

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By Tessa Raebeck

With the goal of helping to foster an understanding and acceptance of autism, Surfers Healing uses the “transformative experience of surfing” to both support kids and families living with autism and show others just how much kids with autism are capable of accomplishing.5

A fundraiser for Surfers Healing will be held at Solé East Resort in Montauk on Thursday, September 11, at 6 p.m. A barbecue and live music by the Dan Bailey Tribe will be followed by the screening of “Expencive Porno Movie,” “a delightfully retro 45 minutes of experimental surf film shot entirely on Super 16mm,” according to a press release, and more music from Winston Irie and the Selective Security Band.

There will be a raffle of new gear from Montauk’s homegrown clothing company, Whalebone Creative, with proceeds going to Surfers Healing. Ales from Montauk Brewing Company will supplement the all-you-can-eat barbecue.

Over the last 15 years, Surfers Healing has made a difference in the lives of families and kids living with autism. The organization took 4,500 kids surfing last year and plans to continue growing. The camps are free and Surfers Healing hopes to add sponsorships for families who are unable to afford to travel to camp.

The Backyard at Solé East is located at 90 Second House Road in Montauk. Tickets are $25 per person for the BBQ, but entrance to the event is free. For more information, call Solé East at (631) 668-2105.

iPod Drive Supports Music & Memory Programs to Fight Dementia

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A patient with dementia receives music and memory treatment. Photo courtesy Music & Memory.

A patient with dementia receives music and memory treatment. Photo courtesy Music & Memory.

By Tessa Raebeck

While most of us use our iPods when we’re jogging or mowing the lawn, the devices can be used for a purpose greater than bringing constant One Direction ballads to your preteen: beloved music can renew the memories–and lives–of those suffering from dementia.

Starting August 23, GeekHampton in Sag Harbor, will accept iPod donations for Music & Memory, an organization that uses beloved music to renew lives lost to dementia.

The organization creates personalized playlists for people suffering from Alzheimer’s Disease and other forms of dementia, using the memory of beloved times and past events in their lives to improve their quality of life today.

By visiting the Music & Memory website, you can learn more about how the program works and see videos showing how people’s spirits can be lifted by the music from their past.

The iPod drive runs through September 6 at GeekHampton, located at 34 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 723-3660.

In East Hampton, Box Art Auctioned to Aid East End Hospice

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One of the pieces that will be auctioned off at the Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice next Wednesday.

One of the pieces that will be auctioned off at the Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice next Wednesday.

By Sam Mason-Jones

A 14-year-old tradition continues over the coming weeks with the auction of a number of ornamentally decorated boxes to benefit East End Hospice. In 2000, supporters of the facility gathered the support of about 100 local artists, each of whom was asked to transform a single wine or cigar box into a work of art. The success of the enterprise, both artistically and monetarily, has enabled it to continue as a highlight of the late summer each year since.

This year, the benefit will take place on Saturday, September 6, at the Ross School Center for Well Being on Goodfriend Road in East Hampton, where all of the boxes will be sold in a silent auction beginning at 4:30 p.m. Before the auction, the public will have a chance to see the selection of boxes at viewings at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton on Wednesday, August 27, and Thursday, August 28.

A chance to meet the artists prior to the sale is also available at a preview reception after the first box viewing at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, August 27. Among the 90 contributing artists are Eric Fischl, Connie Fox, Stan Goldberg, April Gornik, James Kennedy, William King, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, Daniel Pollera, Randall Rosenthal and Frank Wimberley.

Another participating artist, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, said, “East End Hospice is one of the most loving organizations when the light dims near the end of living. To help through donating, such as artists do with their work, or through volunteering, is one of the most profound and satisfying acts.”

Tickets for the benefit, which includes wine and hors d’oeuvres, are priced at $75 and are available at eeh.org. All proceeds benefit East End Hospice.

A Paddle for Cancer

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Last year’s paddle race, photo by Michael Blanchard.

The Breast Cancer Research Foundation is hosting the third annual Hamptons Paddle & Party for Pink benefit on August 16.

The multi-skill level paddle-boarding race will begin at 8 a.m. at Havens Beach in Sag Harbor. Skilled paddle boarders can sign up for the 3-mile or the elite 6-mile course. Registration is $100, and 100 percent of all donations will go toward research. Each year, hundreds of paddle boarders and spectators have gathered together to raise money for the foundation.

That evening, Lisa and Richard Perry, along with Maria and Larry Baum, will host a benefit party at the Perry residence in North Haven. All of the proceeds will go to the Breast Cancer Research Foundation. Tickets begin at $1,000.

For more information, or to buy a ticket or support a paddle-boarder, visit hamptonspaddleforpink.org or call (646) 497-2675.

Charity Cycle Ride

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A charity bike ride is taking place in Sag Harbor at 6 p.m. on Friday. August 15. to benefit the Joseph J. Theinert Memorial Foundation. The ride will leave from Fly Wheel, and will be led by John Wellman, who welcomes any level of cycling experience, even total beginners.

The Joseph J. Theinert Memorial Foundation raises money, primarily, for scholarships, with the charity able to provide $15,000 to Sag Harbor, Shelter Island and Mattituck so far this year. It is also working to build a facility in New Mexico, where returning, wounded soldiers can stay with their families and share a healthy life. The facility will be called Strongpoint Theinert, and will be a place for spiritual, mental and physical rehab for returning soldiers and their loved ones.

Visit http www.josephjtheinertmemorialfund.org/events for more information.

 

Fundraiser will Bring Antiques Roadshow to Bridgehampton

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Leonard Davenport of Leonard Davenport Fine Arts, Honorary Chair Pia Lindstrom, Kevin Tierney, Silver Specialist at Sotheby’s, and Terry Wallace of the Wallace Gallery East Hampton. Photo by Dawn Watson.

By Mara Certic

Since its creation 50 years ago, the outreach program at St. Ann’s Episcopal Church in Bridgehampton has raised over $1 million for local charities. A thrift shop was founded on Main Street in the summer of 1923 and although the location has changed, the store continues to operate three days a week. For 46 years, St Ann’s supplemented its charity fundraising work with a successful house tour, according to Elizabeth George.

“It was our primary fundraiser of the year, and we gave it all to charity,” said Ms. George.

In 2012, however, the parish decided to find a new fundraising benefit.

“There was just such a glut of house tours,” explained Ms. George, who is chairing the event. “So we decided to start our own Antiques Roadshow.”

On Saturday, June 14, six professional and expert appraisers will be on hand to evaluate antiques from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m. at the church on Main Street in Bridgehampton.

For a fee of $30, collectors and amateurs alike can bring as many as three keepsakes, antiques, knick-knacks, pieces of jewelry or paintings to the church to be appraised by one of several experts on hand throughout the day.

Marsha Malinowski, known for her appearances on episodes of “Antiques Roadshow,” is the former senior vice president of Sotheby’s Rare Books and Manuscripts Department, a position that she held for over 25 years. Ms. Malinowski has been involved with several important manuscript auctions including the sale in 2008 of the Magna Carta for $21 million. She also supervised the multimillion dollar 1998 sale of Barry Halper’s historic baseball memorabilia collection.

Another expert from the show, Kevin L. Tierney, will be available to answer questions about any and all silver items. Mr. Tierney has been considered an expert in the objects made with the precious metal since he joined Sotheby’s Silver Department in London 50 years ago. Mr. Tierney is responsible for Sotheby’s New York holding the auction record for European and American silver; he supervised sales of a Thomas Germain Parisian tureen for $10.3 million and an 18th century, New York-made bowl for $5.8 million.

The other appraisers are Robert Barker, Leonard Davenport, Terry Wallace and Gary Weinshank, whose expertise ranges from general antique collectibles to diamonds to Asian and Pacific Artwork and 19th and 20th Century American Art.

All of the money raised during the day will benefit three local charities. East End Hospice, whose mission is to bring hope and comfort to the dying and their families and friends, will receive a third of the money raised; so will Maureen’s Haven which provides shelter for the homeless, and the Dominican Sisters Family Health Service, a home visit nursing service.

Ms. George stressed that visitors should call ahead and book appointments with the appropriate specialist. She explained that, although tickets will be available on the day of the show, scheduling an appointment ahead of time will provide a confirmed consultation with one of the experts. Tickets can be purchased by calling the Antique Appraisal Day hotline at (631) 353-1489.

“This is our inaugural event; the first year we are doing it,” said Ms. George. “We hope it will become as popular as the house tour was.” She is excited for the event both in her role as president of the fundraiser and as an antiques owner. Ms. George herself will be asking the experts about two items: her father’s sled from the turn-of-the-century and an arithmetic book that dates back to 1848.

The Antiques Appraisal Day takes place at St. Ann’s Church on Main Street in Bridgehampton on Saturday, June 14, from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. For more information visit antiquetreasureday.com.

Water Mill Philanthropist Joan Hornig to be Honored at Ellis Island

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Joan Hornig of Water Mill will be honored for her philanthropic work at Ellis Island this weekend. 

By Tessa Raebeck

Joan Hornig, a philanthropist, art patron and jewelry designer from Water Mill, will be awarded by the National Ethnic Coalition of Organizations (NECO) with the prestigious Ellis Island Medal of Honor May 10.

According to NECO Chairman Nasser J. Kazeminy, the honorees have the following traits: “The vision of a better world for all; the tenacity to overcome great adversity; the leadership and imagination to blaze their own trail. And most importantly, they have the humility and self-reflection to appreciate the amazing opportunities the America has given them. They inspire me; and we honor them so they can inspire others as well.”

Ms. Hornig is being recognized due to the philanthropic commitment of her jewelry line, which donates 100 percent of its profits from ales to the charity of the consumer’s choice through her Joan B. Hornig Foundation. The foundation has donated to more than 800 charities across the world, aiding causes that include the arts, animal rights, education, environmental protection, medical research and social services.

Sag Harbor Students Lend a Helping Hand – and Mitten

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Students in Susan Raebeck's Kindergarten class stand in front of the Mitten Line.

Students in Susan Raebeck’s Kindergarten class stand in front of the Mitten Line.

By Tessa Raebeck

While her classmates were asking for iPads and Xboxes, there was only one thing on the young girl’s list: a Christmas tree. Her family had never had one.

After making her one-item list in kindergarten last year, the Sag Harbor Elementary School student received lights, a stand and her family’s first tree. This holiday season, they will have their second.

The gifts were made possible through The Mitten Line, a longstanding tradition of the Sag Harbor School District that enables students, families and community members to provide holiday gifts to those in the district who are less fortunate.

School counselor Michelle Grant renamed the custom after a short story she wrote explaining anonymous gift giving and encouraging students to go a step further by taking something off their own wish lists.

“Suddenly,” reads the poem, “I realized how I could show how much I care. I could take something off my wish list and buy a gift instead to share.”

Grant, who colleague Nina Landi calls “the Mother Teresa of Sag Harbor,” runs every aspect of the gift drive, from pinpointing families in need to delivering presents to their homes.

On the wall outside the elementary school gymnasium are hundreds of “mittens,” paper cutouts with descriptions of students and their desired gifts. One mitten asks for Legos for an 8-year-old girl. Another, “Boy, Age 6, Gloves” lies alongside “Girl, Age 16, Skinny jeans.”

Families and faculty members pick mittens from the line, buy the presents and return them to school unwrapped. Grant then delivers them along with wrapping paper, so parents can see the presents and wrap them on their own before giving them to their kids.

With 18 families receiving gifts, a total of 43 kids in grades kindergarten through 12 are represented on the Mitten Line.

Some families are already identified as needing extra financial support, while others come forward during the holidays. All transactions are completely anonymous; only Grant knows which families are involved.

Teachers help identify kids whose families may be in need, although many parents are hesitant to sign up.

School counselor Michelle Grant helps students transport donated gifts.

School counselor Michelle Grant helps students transport donated gifts.

“That’s the hardest part,” says Grant. “There are people who I know [who need help], or I’ll even offer, and they’re like, ‘No, we’re okay.’ And they are okay — for them they’re okay. But we really just want to do something that says, ‘if we can do this, you’ll just have a little extra come January, February, if you need something.’ Some families are hesitant to do that and I understand and we have to respect that; but that’s the hardest part.”

The community will give over 500 gifts this year through the Mitten Line.

Every child receives a stocking with toiletries, books, socks, pajamas, a hat, gloves, a scarf and basic school supplies.

They are also given two or three special gifts, which are determined by lists provided by the family and teachers’ ideas on what their students might like.

Every contribution comes from the teachers and families of Sag Harbor. Grant tries to limit costs to under $20, but she keeps a separate list of more expensive items (bicycles, Kindles, etc.) for when people donate large sums of cash or ask for the opportunity to purchase a larger gift.

Last year, one family was given a full night in New York City, including Jitney tickets, restaurant meals and hotel accommodations.

A fifth grade class has been collecting money all year in preparation for the Mitten Line. With money earned from doing chores and recycling bottles, the class was able to pick its own mitten to fulfill.

In the 16 years she’s been running it, Grant has seen the drive — and the financial disparity between Sag Harbor’s families — grow substantially.

Donating within their own school makes the needs of others — as well as the rewards of giving — more tangible, she said, because students “really know that everything stays for kids in our schools.”

“Our families are so generous,” said Grant. “All the families, not just the families that have a lot, even the families that are on the line — those kids want to help. Everybody wants to help and do something.”

Evelyn Ramunno

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The director of the Sag Harbor Food Pantry on the growing need in the community and how neighbors can help.


What role does the food pantry play in the community?

We are a very substantial part of the Sag Harbor Community. With so many people out of work and with this time of year, the number of families continue to increase dramatically. Seasonal workers no longer have seasonal work. During Thanksgiving week we had 85 families and this past week we had 68. Any family that lives in Sag Harbor can use the food pantry and we try to give them enough food so that each person in their family can have 2 ½ meals.

How do the needs of the food pantry’s patrons change throughout the year?

We serve food and the need for food doesn’t change throughout the year. The people who come here are in need and we are here to help. This year things were so tough that even seasonal workers who could find work during the summer, continue to use the food pantry year round. The people who use our food pantry need us and continue to use us year round.

What type of food is typically donated to the pantry?

We get lots of pasta, canned food and canned soups, and the great thing about that is you can always make a meal out of those items. We also get some really exotic items when people clean out their food pantry when they leave for the winter. We’ve had fancy pastas and rice and this week we’ve had a jar of caviar. But you’d be surprised that there is always someone who knows what the food is and is really excited to have it

What types of donations are most needed?

We are always in need of money, so we can purchase fresh fruits, vegetables, cheese, butter and eggs along with meat items. We do receive bread donations from Panera Bread, The Golden Pear, Starbucks, Bagel Buoy and Cromers Market. In the summer we receive donations from the Country Garden farm stand and the EECO Farm’s food pantry garden. Provisions donates a lot of food too. But we always need more fresh food.

With the upcoming holidays, do you have anything special planned?

We’ll have a Santa come on the 21st and we are handing out stockings to all the children filled with little things like toys, candy and toothbrushes donated by the North Haven Ladies Villages Improvement Society. We’ll also have turkeys and hams and everything they will need to create a lovely meal.

What’s one thing you’d like the community to know about the food pantry that they might otherwise not know?

We are receiving a lot of donations now, it seems to be a time of giving; but our donations tend to fall off after the New Year. We would like people to keep the food pantry in their minds through the year so we can continue to service all the needy families in our area. We try to put out as much publicity as possible in the newspaper and stay involved in many local activities. We just joined the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce and participated in Harborfest and the Halloween Parade this year.

Who is a typical volunteer and how do they get involved?

Well most of them are retired people because they have the time to do it because it’s during the week. They find it very fulfilling and gratifying. They feel like they are doing something special and needy for people who are in need. It gives them something to do and doing something wonderful. All the volunteers are fairly new, they came in the last five years. When directors changed and the hours changed, we got a new group of people.

Why did you take over as director?

I took over about a year ago, around Thanksgiving last year. I had been at the food pantry for a long time and when Lillian resigned, I had worked very closely with her ordering and organizing the food stuffs. I was probably the one that had the most information on what was going on. And I enjoy very much that I do. I love gathering the food and seeing how terrific it all looks on the table and where it all goes. It’s very rewarding. I volunteer about 20 hours a week picking up food, making contacts and ordering. I like doing that part of the job.