Tag Archive | "Childrens Museum of the East End"

East End Weekend: Highlights of July 18 to 20

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"Calabrone" by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

“Calabrone” by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Summer is in full swing and there’s plenty to choose from to do on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

 

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception for Ramiro’s Solo Show on Saturday, July 19, from 6 to 8 p.m.

“Ramiro solo show this year steps forward into a more mystical and hopeful realm,” owner Laura Grenning wrote in a press release.

“Anchoring the exhibit is a suite of four substantial figurative works, with each painting representing a season of the soul.  Although well known for his expert likenesses in portraiture and grand figurative work, Ramiro’s distinguishing characteristic is, ironically, his ability to let go of the discreet reality of the eyes when necessary.  With this, he infuses his narrative compositions with mystery that allows the paintings to endure the critical test of time,” added Ms. Grenning.

The Grenning Gallery is located at 17 Washington Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-8469.

 

Water Mill’s  Parrish Art Museum is hosting its second edition of Gesture Jam, an adult figure drawing class in which artists sketch live models in a high-energy environment, Friday, July 18 at 6 p.m.

Facilitated by local artist and educator Andrea Cote, this year’s Gesture Jam will be held outdoors on the museum’s terrace and include live musicians Nicolas Letman-Burtanovic on bass and Sean Sonderegger on saxaphone. Local dancers Adam and Gail Baranello are the models.

“Imagine going home with drawings that look like you’ve been to some sort of psychedelic cabaret, and feeling that way too. Andrea Cote’s Gesture Jam classes have just that effect,” Parrish Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover said in a press release.

The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call (631) 283-2118.

 

Celebrities are coming to Bridgehampton for CMEE’s 6th Annual Family Fair on Saturday, July 19 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Children’s Museum of the East End‘s largest fundraiser, this year the fair will have a magical theme.

George Stephanopoulos, Dan Abrams, Jane Krakowski, Joy Behar, Julie Bowen, Molly Sims and Tiffani Thiessen (of Saved by the Bell fame) are some of the CMEE supporters expected to be in attendance.

Children and their families can enjoy magical arts and crafts, water slides, games and entertainment, music, food, and CMEE’s brand new nine-hole miniature golf course.

CMEE is located at 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike on the Bridgehampton side. For more information, call (631) 537-8250.

 

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is hosting its fourth Haitian Art & Handcraft Sale all weekend, July 18 to 20, to benefit the village of Chermaître in partnership with the Vassar Haiti Project.

An opening reception will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and the sale will continue in the Upper Parish Hall on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Two hundred original paintings and a large assortment of unique and affordable gifts, including silk scarves, jewely and iron sculpture, will be on sale.

Many women in the village, Chermaître in northwestern Haiti, are struggling to start small businesses to support their families by selling the crafts they create and the coffee they grow. Proceeds from the church sale will go toward building a community center in the village to support those women.

For more information on the charity, call (970) 946-7614 or visit haitiproject.org. The Christ Episcopal Church is located at the corner of East Union and Hampton Street (Route 114) in Sag Harbor. For more information, call the church at (631) 725-0128.

 

The gallery at Sag Harbor’s Canio Books is hosting artists Ron Focarino and Jeanelle Myers, with her latest assemblage series, Plains Reverie, with an opening reception Friday, July 18 from 5 to 7 p.m.

“Myers work reflects the influence of her Nebraska roots, echoing the work of Wright Morris and Joseph Cornell,” the gallery said in a press release. “Myers incorporates a diverse array of found objects including old letters, metals, writing implements, fabric and many other materials into her compelling assemblages.”

"Golden Scarab" enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio's Books.

“Golden Scarab” enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio’s Books.

Artist Ron Focarino will also be exhibiting, showing his “creature creations, delightful enamel sculptures of insects, including a dragonfly, crane fly, scarab and others,” according to Canio’s.

The exhibit runs July 11 through August 5 at Canio’s Books, 290 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-4926.

The Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor presents the artwork of Anna De Mauro and Thomas Condon, with an opening reception Saturday, July 19 from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Sculptor and painter Anna De Mauro is a figurative artist working from the live model.

“Her work process includes observation from life to record instinctual responses to the subject, passage of time and impressions of the metaphysical and the human condition,” the gallery said in a press release.

Thomas Condon lives part-time in East Hampton and focuses on the local landscape here on the East End, as well as the urban scenes of New York City.

The show runs July 17 through August 7 at the Romany Kramoris Gallery, 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-2499.

CMEE Unveils Bridgehampton’s First Miniature Golf Course

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An aerial view of the new miniature golf course at CMEE in Bridgehampton, which will open this Saturday, May 24. Photo courtesy CMEE.

An aerial view of the new miniature golf course at CMEE in Bridgehampton, which will open this Saturday, May 24. Photo courtesy CMEE.

By Tessa Raebeck

Children must be accompanied by adults—and adults must be accompanied by children.

This is the principle at the new miniature golf course at the Children’s Museum of the East End in Bridgehampton, where a collection of nine bright and colorful holes opens Saturday in the museum’s backyard on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike.

Bridgehampton’s first miniature golf course is a far, but welcome, cry from the traditional theme park courses of pirates, dinosaurs and waterfalls. The holes are laid out in designs that are best described as wacky, with blue, orange and red adornments complementing the putting greens.

Players move through the nine holes in a clockwise motion, starting with an optional practice green. One hole has a loop de loop, another dots that chime with music when struck. Each has a distinct look—and a distinct lesson.

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Photo courtesy CMEE.

“Each hole teaches something different about math and physics,” said Paul Johnson, marketing assistant at the museum.

Keeping with the mission of CMEE, an organization at the forefront of combining play with learning on the East End, the mini golf course incorporates interactive play with the basic principles of physics.

Rather than studying a flash card, kids can learn Newton’s Law of Inertia (an object at rest will remain at rest unless acted on by an unbalanced force) by hitting a ball. Newton’s Second Law (force equals mass times acceleration) can be understood by catapulting that ball through the loop de loop.

In planning the course, CMEE surveyed 7-to-10-year-olds to find out what their favorite mini golf holes were. Once the most popular designs were established, they worked with science teachers at the Ross School’s Innovation Lab and other local schools to figure out how to incorporate learning.

At every hole, a descriptive panel explains how to make the shot and what to learn while doing it.

The first hole, “What’s Your Angle?” teaches players how various degrees will affect their putt.  In the corner of the L-shaped hole, a blue fan attached to a pole directs, “Move Me!” It can be positioned at different angles to reflect a player’s putt toward the hole—or away from it as the case may be.

The sign marking the hole asks several questions, such as whether the angle is acute, right or obtuse, for children to figure out as they play.

Rather than your standard score card, each player gets a folder complete with both the scoring reports and further explanation of the respective lessons and challenges of each obstacle.

After the first hole, players wrap their way around the “whimsical” course, playing through a green with ridged hills, another with parallel loops of different sizes, and various slopes, angles, rocks and other obstacles, learning as they go.

The miniature golf course is the first exhibit realized by the museum’s capital campaign, now in its second year. CMEE is more than halfway toward a fundraising goal of $2 million, which it hopes to reach by the end of the summer.

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Photo courtesy CMEE.

“This is kind of the first fruit of that labor,” Mr. Johnson said.

In addition to paying down the existing mortgage, establishing an endowment and helping to cover costs of the museum’s day-to-day operations, the campaign will also fund the expansion of museum exhibits and several new additions, including a room dedicated to energy and electricity, a redesigned ship exhibit and a new pizza oven for the play kitchen.

“Energy: Wind, Water & Solar” will allow children to experiment with the forces of nature while learning about conservation and the environment.

In the four-level pirate ship, children will be able to navigate the seas with climbing tubes and ladders, hoist the sales and clamber up ropes to a 25-foot-high crow’s nest. Six simple machines at the ship will teach the foundations of engineering.

All the projects, like the miniature golf course, will include bilingual signs for Spanish and English-speaking visitors. The mini golf course is entirely wheelchair accessible.

CMEE’s course will be unveiled in an invite-only ribbon-cutting ceremony at 10 a.m. Saturday, May 24. Executive Director Stephen Long and Board President Amy Tarr, as well as elected officials and museum supporters, will be on hand to give remarks. Coffee from Java Nation and SweetTauk lemonade will be served. In addition to playing the course, guests can take golf clinics led by Kate Tempesta of Urban Golf Academy.

Following the event at noon, the course will officially open to the public, with games at just $5 a head for groups of up to five players.

In the future, CMEE hopes to use the course after hours for mixers and other private events.

Visitors will find the ninth and final hole is the most challenging, but also the most rewarding.

“It works almost like a pinball machine,” Mr. Johnson said, adding that although the course incorporates learning, it is designed, above all else, to be fun.

Struck into a corridor on the green’s right side, the ball hit the top of the green and ricocheted back towards the hole, knocking green, silver, blue, red and orange pin balls with a satisfying chime after every hit.

“Isn’t that fun?” asked Mr. Johnson. It was.

Ciencia@CMEE Celebrates Science

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George and Mia Castiblanco attend a fiesta in celebration of Ciencia@CMEE (Science at CMEE), an afterschool program designed for families whose first language is Spanish, on April 12. Developed and taught by educators Leah Oppenheimer and Barbara Blaisdell, the program, which grew out of suggestions made to CMEE’s Latino Parents Advisory Council, is underwritten by the Long Island Community Foundation.

CMEE Challenges Families with Second Annual Egg Drop

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By Tessa Raebeck

Can your family construct a container that will help an egg survive a drop? Find out Saturday, at CMEE’s (Children’s Museum of the East End) 2nd Annual Egg Drop Challenge, sponsored by Macaroni Kid Hamptons.CMEEEggDropFamilies can bring containers from home or come to a hands-on workshop from 10 to 11:30 a.m. to design and construct a protective capsule with all materials, including eggs, provided by CMEE. At noon, each container will be put to the test in CMEE Square.

The egg drop challenge has several guidelines: Participants must be able to insert an egg in the container just prior to the challenge. Designs cannot involve glass, liquids, helium or other gasses lighter than air. The container’s weight cannot exceed one pound and the egg compartment cannot exceed one foot in length or width. Use of parachutes is allowed, but the chute must deploy itself after the container is dropped.

Admission to the Egg Drop Challenge is free for members and $10 for non-members. The optional design workshop is $2 for members and $4 for non-members. Workshop space is limited. For reservations, call the museum at 537-8250.

Kids Groups Get Creative With Fundraising

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web tumblebus

While big ticket benefits with cocktails and sit down dinners have become a de rigueur part of the summer social season out here, there are two local non-profits taking a different tack with fundraising efforts this summer.

This weekend, both the Children’s Museum of the East End (CMEE) and Stages, A Children’s Theatre Workshop, Inc. will host benefits while the sun is still high in the sky. And don’t worry about a babysitter — this time around, kids are encouraged to attend.

“CMEE’s Under The Sea” family fair is Saturday, July 25 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. and comes on the heels of last year’s traditional adults only gala which was held for the first time at the museum itself.

“People said, ‘What a gorgeous space, why not always do it here?’” notes Stephen Long, CMEE’s executive director. “The gala had always been instrumental in raising awareness of the museum, people said, ‘Here’s a chance to show what you’ve done.’”

“Since it’s an institution devoted to kids, the fundraiser should include them as well,” adds Long. “I had a lot of parents say even when money is tight, they’ll still spend money on their kids. We wanted a fundraiser that featured the kinds of things we do on a day-to-day basis. There will be art activities, pony rides, petting zoo, bouncy castles, carnival games, magicians, face painters and a balloonologist.”

Also premiering at the event will be the Hamptons TumbleBus, a brand new kids-centered business started by two local moms. From the outside, it’s a regular school bus, but inside, it’s another story. The seats have been removed to make way for a fully equipped gym for tiny tumblers ages 2 to 8, complete with padded floor, rings, a trampoline, balance beam and more. TumbleBus owners — Bridgehampton residents Cathy Wallick and Michelle Kennedy — plan to bring tumbling programs to youngsters all over the East End through schools, libraries and non-profit groups like CMEE.

And like CMEE, which was founded by a group of moms, Wallick and Kennedy, who have five children between them, started Hamptons TumbleBus as a way to address what they saw as a need in the community.

“With the national obesity problem, we wanted to help children by starting them at a young age to develop self confidence, motor skills and a love of fitness that will continue throughout their life,” says Kennedy. “With this program, we can come to people who may not have this kind of thing available. We’re two local moms and we want to develop something for people here, make it affordable and help children.”

“At a young age structure is so important,” adds Wallick. “We do a warm up, sing songs, stretch, then do the circuit followed by a cool down, and the parachute or something else fun. By then, they’re feeling confident and know exactly what they’re doing. You can see it in their faces when they get it — and they keep moving — they’re not sitting around.”

Also not sitting around are the young actors of Stages — founder Helene Leonard has long made sure of that. The acting program has trained legions of East End children, and on Sunday, July 26, five of Leonard’s teenage actresses will transform into fairy tale princesses for an afternoon of tea and face time with little fans ages 3 and up at the first annual “Princess Party” from 2:30 to 5:30 p.m. at Grenning, Gallery, 17 Washington Street in Sag Harbor.

“It’s by kids, for kids,” says Leonard. “It came out of ‘Beauty and the Beast’ and the way the little girls reacted to the characters. It’s so wonderful. This is how powerful theater can be.”

Princesses will be stationed throughout the space and little girls will have a chance to talk to them and have their photos taken. There will also be a performance and an auction with the types of items little girls love. The party also features goodie bags, cake, a chocolate fountain and, of course, a place to buy tiaras and wands. If all goes well, next year Leonard hopes to include a pirate component to satisfy all the little boys as well.

“We thought how nice to make it an event that would be different and you’d want to take your children to,” says Leonard. “It’s not standing around at a cocktail party, writing a check and going home. It’s unusual to be able to include your children in a benefit situation. I think people are looking for something different to do.”

“Dads are welcome to come too,” adds Leonard. “Princesses need their escorts.”

Stages’ princess party is $60 for an adult and child. Additional children are $35 each. No reservations are required and princess attire is recommended.

CMEE’s family fun fair is $500 for a family of four. Individual tickets are $125 ($90 for children). CMEE is located at 376 Bridgehampton Sag Harbor Turnpike. Call 537-8250 to reserve.

CMEE Cash Crunch May Force Downsize

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The Children’s Museum of the East End is in “cash crisis” according to board treasure Adeline Neubert.
“We have been doing quite well living hand to mouth, but now that the sales are down for the summer event,” said Neubert, “it’s definitely a serious cash crisis. We’re still paying off a $3.8 million mortgage.”
Neubert said CMEE’s goal is to raise $500,000 by the end of summer. If that goal is not met, at best CMEE could be looking at having to downsize and at worst, closing their doors altogether.
Neubert said the museum normally counts on the “CMEE Under the Stars” annual benefit to get them through the summer and well into the fall. The event usually raises $300,000 on average and last year, the benefit sold roughly 400 tickets. This year, only 170 tickets were sold prior to the event. The benefit was originally to be held Friday, July 11 under a tent at Ludlow Farm in Sagaponack. Instead, the decision was made to hold the event on the museum’s grounds on the Sag Harbor/Bridgehampton Turnpike.
“As we were planning the event it became evident to us that we needed to downsize it,” said CMEE’s new executive director Steve Long. “We are certainly struggling. We thought instead of spending all kinds of money to put on a huge party, we wanted to be fiscally responsible and maximize the number of dollars going to support the museum.”
Long said though the economic crunch is evident, he did not want to characterize this as a “make or break fundraiser.” He said it was not like the museum would be closing their doors on Saturday if they didn’t raise $500,000 on Friday.
Long said the museum was pulling out all of the stops to try and focus on fundraising and to keep the worst from happening. He said they are looking at new opportunities for earned income, additional grant writing and reaching out to new donors Neubert said the latter, reaching out to donors, is critical.
“There is a misperception that our donors are all wealthy New Yorkers,” she said. “In fact, we have a very dedicated but small group of supporters and donors and the base at large is quite small.”
She said the focus now is to reach out to new donors who hopefully see the importance of CMEE as a local, educational and cultural resource.
Long said, “There is a real need for a hub for children and we want to be that hub, that cultural crossroads where people of different kinds of backgrounds come and learn together,” said Long. “And if we’re not doing it, then who is going to?”
“We’re the only museum out here that puts the needs of children first. That’s what makes the institution so special,” he continued. “A lot of museums around the area and the country put their collections first and for us it’s not about the collection, it’s about the kids.”
Long said in his short tenure as director, only about two and half weeks, he feels one of the community’s concerns is that the museum does not provide enough educational opportunities for older children.
“We’re interested in hearing from the community how we can serve the needs of as many children as possible,” he said. “That’s our mission.”

Above: Dancers at CMME Under the Stars fundraiser on Friday July, 11. Photo by Mike Heller.