Tag Archive | "comedy"

Curing Monday Blues: Carlos Mencia at Baystreet

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Carlos Mencia will perform at the Bay Street Theater. Photo courtesy of the Bay Street Theatre

 

The Bay Street Theater Comedy Club is giving fans of laughter a chance to beat the Monday blues with a performance by stand-up comic Carlos Mencia on Monday, August 4.

Originally from Honduras, Mr. Mencia grew up in California and began his career doing stand-up on Amateur Night at the Laugh Factory, a world-renowned comedy club in Los Angeles. Soon after, he was headlining comedy tours with Freddy Soto and Pablo Francisco and starring in his own series on Comedy Central, “Mind of Mencia.” His Comedy Central stand-up special DVD, “Carlos Mencia: No Strings Attached,” was the first such release to achieve Platinum sales status.

After embarking on several USO Tours to entertain the troops serving oversees, Mr. Mencia decided to focus on more intimate audiences at comedy venues and is currently on his “C 4 Urself Tour.”

The Sag Harbor show starts at 8 p.m. Bay Street Theater is at the corner of Bay Street and Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. Tickets range in price from $69 to $89. For more information or to buy tickets, call the box office at (631) 725-9500 or visit baystreet.org.

East End Weekend: Highlights of What to Do August 1 to 3

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"Reclining Blue" by Christine Matthäi is on view at the Monika Olko Gallery In Sag Harbor.

“Reclining Blue” by Christine Matthäi is on view at the Monika Olko Gallery In Sag Harbor.

By Tessa Raebeck

The roads are clogged, the beaches are packed and somehow August has arrived. You know what that means? There’s even more to do this weekend! Have some highlights on us:

 

The Neo-Political Cowgirls latest performance “VOYEUR” opened Thursday, July 31, and will run performances August 1, 2, 7, 8 and 9. An inside/out theatre installation on-site at Parsons Blacksmith Shop in Springs, “VOYEUR” examines friendship, womanhood and the boundaries of theatre. Click here for the full story and here for more information and tickets.

"SPLASH" by Kia Andrea Pedersen.

“SPLASH” by Kia Andrea Pedersen.

 

Saturday at the Monika Olko Gallery in Sag Harbor, friends, Shelter Island residents and fellow artists Christine Matthäi and Kia Andrea Pederson will showcase their latest work. Originally from Germany, Ms. Matthäi specializes in abstract photography. Ms. Pederson uses more earthy mediums. In the exhibition, “The Call of the Sea,” their work is joined together by its shared celebration of the ocean.

An opening reception will be held at the gallery, located at 95 Main Street in Sag Harbor, on Saturday, August 2, from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibit will be on view through August 22.

 

East Hampton welcomes David Sedaris, widely considered to be one of his generation’s best writers,
who will be hosting an evening at Guild Hall on Sunday, August 3. The humorist authored such bestsellers as “Naked,” “Dress Your Family in Corduroy and Denim,” and “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls.”

For more information, click here.

The evening starts at 8 p.m. and will be followed by a book signing. Guild Hall is located at 158 Main Street in East Hampton. Click here for tickets.

 

The Peconic Land Trust’s major event, Through Farms and Fields, is Sunday, August 3. The benefit features a country supper at hte property of Peconic Land Trust board member Richard Hogan and Carron Sherry, on historic Ward’s Point on Shelter Island. It will honor the conservation philanthropy of Barbara J. Slifka. There is an online auction, as well as a silent auction that will be held the night of the event.

East End Weekend: Highlights of What to Do July 25 to 27

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The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

By Tessa Raebeck

From fast-growing local bands to slow food snail suppers, there’s plenty to do on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

The Montauk Project is playing at Swallow East in the band’s hometown of Montauk Saturday, July 26 at 8 p.m. The local beach grunge rockers, who were born and bred on the island and are steadily gaining more recognition by music critics and enthusiasts alike, released their first full-length album, “Belly of the Beast,” in March. The band, which consists of East Hampton’s Chris Wood and Jack Marshall, Sag Harbor’s Mark Schiavoni and Jasper Conroy of Montauk, will be joined by hip hop/rock hybrid PUSHMETHOD, who were voted the best New York City hip hop group of 2013 by The Deli magazine.

Eastern Surf Magazine said of the East End group, “The Montauk Project is far tighter than every other surf-inspired East Coast rock band to come before it.” Swallow East is located at 474 West Lake Drive in Montauk. For more information, call (631) 668-8344.

 

Also on Saturday, People Say NY presents an open mic and art show at the Hayground School in Bridgehampton, starting at 8 p.m. In addition to featured grunge pop artist Adam Baranello and featured performer Danny Matos, who specializes in spoken word and hip hop, performers of all ages are encouraged to participate.

According to its mission statement, People Say NY “brings art back to the fundamentals, so we can remind ourselves why artists and art lovers alike do what we do.”

The night of music, comedy and poetry has a sign-up and $10 cover and is at the Hayground School, located at 151 Mitchell Lane in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit peoplesayny.com or check out @PeopleSayNY on Twitter and Facebook.

 

In celebration of the release of the “Delicious Nutritious FoodBook” by the Edible School Garden Group of the East End, Slow Food East End hosts a Snail Supper at the home of Judiann Carmack-Fayyaz, located at 39 Peconic Hills Drive in Southampton. The supper will be held Friday, July 25, at 6 p.m.

Guests are asked to bring a potluck dish to share that serves six to eight people and aligns with the slow food mission, as well as local beverages. Capacity is limited to 50 and tickets are $20 for Slow Food East End members and $25 for non-members. The price includes a copy of the new cookbook. Proceeds from the evening will be shared between Slow Food East End and Edible School Gardens, Ltd. Click here to RSVP.

 

Some one hundred historians will converge upon Sag Harbor to enjoy the Eastville Community Historical Society’s luncheon and walking tour of Eastville and Sag Harbor.

The day-long event starts at 8:30 a.m. with a welcome at the Old Whalers Church, located at 44 Union Street in Sag Harbor, followed by a walking tour at 9:30 a.m. to the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum, the Sag Harbor Custom House and the Sag Harbor Historical Society, which is located at Nancy Wiley’s home. A shuttle bus is available for those needing assistance.

From 11:15 a.m. to noon, guests will visit the Eastville Community Historical Society Complex to see the quilt exhibit “Warmth” at the St. David AME Zion Church and Cemetery. A luncheon catered by Page follows from 12:30 to 2:30 p.m. at the Old Whalers Church in Sag Harbor.

 

The Hilton Brothers, "Andy Dandy 5," 2007, 36 x 48 inches, pigment print. Image courtesy Peter Marcelle Project.

The Hilton Brothers, “Andy Dandy 5,” 2007, 36 x 48 inches, pigment print. Image courtesy Peter Marcelle Project.

The Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton will exhibit the Hilton Brothers, an artistic identity that emerged from a series of collaborations by artists Christopher Makos and Paul Solberg, from July 26 to August 5.

Their latest collaboration, “Andy Dandy,” is a portfolio of 20 digital pigment prints. The diptychs combine Mr. Makos’ “Altered Image” portraits of Andy Warhol with images of flowers from Mr. Solberg’s “Bloom” series.

“Andy wasn’t the kind of dandy to wear a flower in his lapel, but as ‘Andy Dandy’ demonstrates, sometimes by just altering the image of one’s work or oneself, a new beauty blooms,” the gallery said in a press release.

The gallery is open Friday through Sunday from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. or by appointment.

After 40 Years in Comedy, Richard Lewis is Still Insane

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Comedian Richard Lewis will perform at Bay Street Theater Saturday, June 21.

Comedian Richard Lewis will perform at Bay Street Theater Saturday, June 21.

By Tessa Raebeck

Richard Lewis’s inflection never changes. He doesn’t stray from his monotone; whether the topic is murder or birthday cake, he rambles on in the same raspy, somewhat disengaged tone. Yet everything he says is hilarious.

A veteran comic best known for his role playing his somewhat disengaged self alongside his longtime friend Larry David on HBO’s “Curb Your Enthusiasm,” Mr. Lewis is returning to Sag Harbor on Saturday, June 21, to perform his stand-up comedy act at Bay Street Theater.

“It’s really lovely,” Mr. Lewis said of Bay Street in a phone interview Thursday, June 12. “It’s like a little theater. It’s almost like if Carnegie Hall gave birth to a child—it sort of popped out.”

Mr. Lewis has been recognized by Comedy Central as one of the top 50 stand-up comedians of all time and made it on GQ Magazine’s list of the “20th Century’s Most Influential Humorists.”

Within minutes, he’ll go from speaking about working with Jennifer Aniston to his lifetime love/hate friendship with Larry David to a story of how his acquaintance Bruce Springsteen sent him a letter telling him how he would stay in bed with his wife and watch an entire season of a show in one sitting.

In the four decades since Mr. Lewis began performing comedy in the early 1970s, his show has evolved into a nightly ad-libbed, off-the-cuff masterpiece.

“People should know that I don’t even know what’s going to happen when I get out there, so I think I need a couple of mercy laughs the first few minutes to bolster my confidence,” he said. “It’s pathetic, I know. I’m a pathetic human being.”

“But I’m looking forward to coming up there, it’s so beautiful up there,” he said of Sag Harbor. “Even though I live in LA, I’m a New Yorker, so it’s good to come back East.”

Like all good artists, Mr. Lewis is comfortable with his insanity.

He recently wrapped production on “Squirrels To The Nuts,” a movie directed by Peter Bogdanovich set to be released in 2015, in which he acts alongside Jennifer Aniston, Owen Wilson, Imogen Poots and Cybil Shepherd, to name a few members of the star-studded cast.unnamed-7

Mr. Lewis got a call from Mr. Bogdanovich some six months ago, asking him to be in the film alongside “a whole load of A-List actors.” The script was great, he said, but he had just three days to get to New York to film.

He immediately flew East with just four pairs of black underwear, four black socks and four presumably black shirts.  “It didn’t give me much time to get anxious. I got anxious after I finished,” he said.

“I was to play sort of a moronic redneck guy and I thought, Jews can’t be rednecks,” he said. “You know, when you’re walking around in boots and underwear and a cowboy hat, I don’t look like a cantor or a rabbi. So, I’m going to get either high marks for being so different or I’m going to have to quit the business and walk around in a disguise so I don’t embarrass my wife.”

Mr. Lewis has been married since 2005 to Joyce Lapinsky, a board co-chair and program development consultant for Urban Farming, a not-for-profit dedicated to helping people in need create gardens on unused land and space.

The two almost met in the early ’90s, but Ms. Lapinsky’s better judgment got in the way.

A mutual friend told her they could try to fix her up with Mr. Lewis “and she shudders,” the comedian recalled of his now wife. “She says, ‘He’s too nuts for me.’ She’s never even met me and she said that. But actually, I was pretty nuts back then—on a personal level… so I guess it worked out for the best.”

Today, Mr. Lewis is weeks shy of being 20 years sober and the two are happily married.

“But it turned out that I did find the right woman, I fell in love immediately. It’s uh…I recommend it to people,” he said.

Another pivotal person in Mr. Lewis’s life is his longtime friend and collaborator Larry David, who was likewise hesitant to get to know him at first. The two were both born at Brooklyn Jewish Hospital, since closed, in the spring of 1947.

“I was a preemie, so I came out and then he came out a few days later, out of the toaster,” Mr. Lewis said. “We started arguing even then. We didn’t even get along as little babies and then we were at camp together and I didn’t know who he was—I didn’t recognize him from one hour old, but we hated each other then.”

“Hate’s a strong word,” he admitted, adding, “But we discovered once that we were the same teenagers that despised one another at this camp 15 years before. We were only about 12 then and then 12 years later… I mean, you change so much, obviously, from 8 to 9 to whatever the hell age I was, 12 years old to 25.”

His math may be a little off, but he remembers the loathing.

“It really freaked us out in the beginning, but then we realized that we were quite a connection,” he added.

“I had dinner over at his house a couple days ago and it was impossible,” Mr. Lewis said of going over to Mr. David’s to watch the Los Angeles Kings play the New York Rangers in the Stanley Cup finals.

When they were broke kids and got to go to games, Mr. David would be on a constant hunt for better seats, “so we’d always wind up missing the game,” Mr. Lewis said.

“And this time, I go to his beautiful home with a pretty ample size television screen and as soon as the Kings scored a goal, he accused me of hexing the Stanley Cup and he turned off the TV and I left,” he said, before adding, “I love the guy, he’s that eccentric.”

“He’s twisted in the nicest sort of way, that would be the best way to put it,” Mr. Lewis said.

“We had to have been in the same baby ward and I’m sure we were arguing… it’s sort of spooky in a way…I hope it doesn’t turn into a Chucky kind of murder mystery,” he said. “It sounds like a bad Lifetime movie, two guys who always wound up with each other, until one of them turned on the other one. I could probably sell that, that’s how stupid that is.”

If there’s one thing he can always sell, it’s Richard Lewis.

“I mean, I’ve tasted property and I’ve tasted a lot of money and I’ve tasted being in the middle and I’ve tasted frustration and you know, my only goal is to be authentic and just be myself. And they can steal my jokes, but they can’t steal my soul and my personality… I have been really ripped off a lot, but in the end, they can’t think like I do—they’re lucky—they don’t have my wacky brain, so I don’t need an insurance policy on my persona. I dare them to be better than me on a Richard Lewis-like takeoff, I’ll beat them,” he said, adding, “Not that you were asking, but…”

Richard Lewis is performing Saturday, June 21, at 8 p.m. at Bay Street Theater, located on the corner of Bay and Main Streets in Sag Harbor. Tickets are $65 for side seats, $75 for center seats and $125 to see the show and attend a reception with Mr. Lewis beforehand. For tickets and information, call the box office at (631) 725-9500 or visit baystreet.org.

Guild Hall’s John Drew Theater Lab Presents The April Fool’s Show

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By Tessa Raebeck

The John Drew Theater Lab hosts The April Fool’s Show, an evening of staged readings from a range of comedic plays, some new work, music and performances.

Chloe Dirksen will direct the readings, featuring Ms. Dirksen, Alan Ceppos, Peter Connolly, Lydia Franco-Hodges, Josh Gladstone, Kate Mueth. Bobby Peterson will play piano and Liz Joyce of Goat on a Boat Puppet Theatre will give a “very special racy performance,” according to the theater lab.

The April Fool’s Show is Tuesday, April 1 at 7:30 p.m. at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street in East Hampton. For more information, call 324-0806 or visit guildhall.org.

Water’s Edge Radio Hour to Air Fifth Episode in Bridgehampton

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web Waters Edge Radio Hour @ Wolffer 11-9-13_1804

Patrons watch (and listen) to the inaugural Water’s Edge Radio Hour in the tasting room at Wolffer Estate Vineyards on November 9, 2013. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Tessa Raebeck

Water’s Edge Radio Hour returns this Sunday, March 2, for the fifth installment of the local variety show. Hosted at the Bridge, the stage of the Bridgehampton Community House, the radio sketch comedy hour will be broadcast live on WPPB, 88.3 FM.

The show features “locally grown comedy and insight” by actors standing at microphones. It has skits of local characters, such as deer ticks and summer tourists, in funny, universal situations, as well as several essays.

“Language is the most powerful thing we have. Good writing is compelling. We can transport people there with just a few words or sound effects and their imagination follows the rest of it,” says show host Josh Perl, who created Water’s Edge along with John Landes and Peter Zablotsky. Mr. Zablotsky and Mr. Perl are partners in the Naked Stage Theatre Company and HITfest, the Hamptons Independent Theatre Festival.

Telly Karoussos and Brad Penuel of the local band Hopefully Forgiven will perform full songs and musical interludes throughout the show.

The fifth episode of Water’s Edge Radio Hour will be broadcast live Sunday, March 2 from 4 to 5:30 p.m. from the Bridgehampton Community House, 843 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike. The show will also air on WPPB, 88.3 FM. Tickets are $15 each and can be purchased at the door or online.

Keeping Them Laughing One More Weekend

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by Raphael Odell Shapiro

 Caroline’s. The Improv. The Laugh Factory. Bay Street? For five summers now the Bay Street Theatre on the Long Wharf in Sag Harbor has transformed itself into a comedy club a few nights a week. The theater has brought in major stand-up acts from around the country to perform on their stage at 11 p.m. on weekends, after their Mainstage performances, or on Monday nights at 8 p.m., a traditionally “dark” night.

The comedians are often bemused (or befuddled) by their backdrops. Naturally, the Mainstage sets remain up for the Comedy Club acts, often leading to some degree of hilarious incongruity. Lewis Black, a famously enraged comic often featured on “The Daily Show with John Stewart,” once delivered jokes from King Charlemagne’s throne on the set of “Pippin.” This summer, comedian Greg Proops was confused by the revolving set of “Beyond Therapy,” which he said looked like it might have been designed by Escher.

This weekend marks the end of Bay Street’s summer season. Three comics will round out the Comedy Club lineup, and will have to contend with the Harlem apartment set of “Ain’t Misbehavin’.”

First to perform will be Jeffrey Ross. Ross is a regular at the Friar’s Club “roasts,” and was dubbed by New York Magazine the “Meanest Man in Comedy.” He is a co-host on ABC’s “Jimmy Kimmel Live.” Possibly most impressive on Ross’s resume, however, is his role as filmmaker.

In the fall of 2003, Ross was invited by friend Drew Carey to join him on a USO tour to Iraq. Ross brought along his newly purchased camcorder, and realized quickly into his five day trip that the footage he was capturing could be more important than just a home movie. In 2005 he released and edited a movie entitled “Patriot Act: A Jeffrey Ross Home Movie,” an honest documentary of the state of American occupation, but with still comedic commentary from Ross and the other comics on the tour. The film was screened at the Hamptons International Film Festival. Ross will be at Bay Street this Saturday, August 30 at 11 p.m.

Next will be Jamie Kennedy, who is well known for his television series “The Jamie Kennedy Experiment,” and for such films as “Malibu’s Most Wanted” and “Kickin’ It Old Skool.” He has been on tour for three weeks, promoting the DVD release of his documentary, called “Heckler,” which will come out September 9. Kennedy spoke to the Express from Iowa, where he had played a show the night before. As he roamed the streets in search of an open food vendor, he described his stand up act.

“I do characters from my show, impressions, stories from my life…you know like the first time I had sex,” he explained. “And funny things that happen to me in Hollywood.”

Kennedy went on to talk about the difficulties of stand up comedy, and the misconceptions thereof.

“It’s an indefinable thing, you know? To make someone laugh. Most people watch and think, oh, that’s not so hard,” he said. “But it’s like, I watch the Olympic gymnastics and say yeah, I can bend down and touch my toes, but I can’t do a flip.”

“I like to mix it up in my shows though. I mean in Iowa, there’s no food after five o’clock but the crowds like to have fun.” He continued, “If people want to come to have a good time, they will.” Kennedy will take the Bay Street stage on Sunday, August 31 at 11 p.m.

The final act is Brian Posehn, who has most recently been seen on Comedy Central’s show “The Sarah Silverman Program,” as well as numerous sitcoms such as “Seinfeld,” “Everbody Loves Raymond” and “Friends.” He will perform on Monday, September 1 at 8 p.m.

All Comedy Club tickets are $50. For more information call the Bay Street box office at 725-9500 or visit the website at www.baystreet.org.