Tag Archive | "concert"

Nancy Atlas, Caroline Doctorow & Inda Eaton are Bringing the West to Bay Street in “Way Out East”

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


Inda Eaton, Caroline Doctorow and Nancy Atlas will perform at Bay Street Theatre Saturday.

Inda Eaton, Caroline Doctorow and Nancy Atlas will perform at Bay Street Theatre Saturday. Photo by Grover Gatewood.

By Tessa Raebeck

Like many great ideas, it started at the kitchen table.

Building upon years of dinner conversations, East End singer songwriters Nancy Atlas, Caroline Doctorow and Inda Eaton will come together Saturday at “Way Out East…A Journey in Song,” the second show devoted to the combination of their talents.

After selling out the inaugural “Way Out East” concert at East Hampton’s Guild Hall in October 2012, the trio is reuniting, this time at Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theatre.

“There’s a thing about harmony singing,” said Ms. Doctorow, “and it’s kind of hard to beat three women singing together, because it’s a very appealing sound and situation and it sort of creates one new voice out of the three voices.”

“It seemed like a natural idea to take to the stage for sure, as we all have a certain vocal pocket and timbre that we sing in,” agreed Ms. Atlas. “This definitely grew from pure roots.”

The artists first crossed paths at a songwriter series many years ago, but had never had the chance to get to know each other. That first get-together quickly evolved into regular dinner dates; they have now been meeting at least once a month for the past four years. They’re not unanimous on whose idea or house it originally was, but that doesn’t matter.

“Before we knew it, guitars came out and we were singing at the end of the meals,” said Ms. Atlas, who lives in Montauk and performs with her band, The Nancy Atlas Project.

“Those dinners really feed our souls,” said Ms. Doctorow, who leads Caroline Doctorow and the Steamrollers, “because we talk about everything and it makes you feel—it ’s very comforting to know that other people have felt the same as you.”

“There’s not been one time that I didn’t leave one of these gatherings feeling a bit more inspired,” said Inda Eaton, who lives in Amagansett and lends “a tad bit of maverick energy” to the group with her grassroots band and Western roots.

Between them, the three acts have opened for Blues Traveler, Hootie and the Blowfish, The Band, Alison Krauss, Elvis Costello, Toots and the Maytals, Jimmy Buffett and Crosby, Stills and Nash, just to name a few. Ms. Atlas, Ms. Doctorow and Ms. Eaton, who will be joined Saturday by a few members from each woman’s band, have combined their rock, folk and indie music into a western, distinctly American sound.

With her two friends in tow, Ms. Eaton will return to her home state of Wyoming for a short tour at the end of April.

“This is our hometown show before we go out West,” said Ms. Doctorow, a native New Yorker who lives in Bridgehampton. The set list on Saturday is comprised of “the exact songs we will be playing out on the prairies,” Ms. Atlas added.

Since moving their collaboration from the dinner table to the stage two years ago, the artists have been working together when they can, singing backup at each other’s shows, playing on one another’s records and using each other for inspiration.

“What really helps is the camaraderie,” Ms. Doctorow said. “If one of us is having a problem—the music business is a very tough business—what’s so great is to lean on the experience of the others and the wisdom and the advice.”

“Both Inda and Caroline have given me some of the best advice I’ve ever gotten in this business and I would hope they could say the same about me. We are truly lucky to have found each other,” said Ms. Atlas.

That mutual understanding enables the singer-songwriters to turn their stylistic differences into a harmonious collaboration of their songs for “a lovely, laid back experience,” according to Ms. Atlas.

“Because of the camaraderie, we’re able to bridge our own music styles,” Ms. Eaton said. “Music is its own camaraderie, but there’s an additional camaraderie that goes on that I think comes from the uniqueness of our careers, there’s not too many other women singer-songwriters.”

“To spend time with other women singer-songwriters is very empowering,” she added. “We deal with a lot of the same issues…it’s great to run things past each other and get some of that professional support.”

Each woman also brings distinct skills to the business side of the table. Ms. Eaton is technically savvy—a “multimedia wizard” according to Ms. Doctorow—and can direct the effects and equipment side of a show. Ms. Atlas deals with financial logistics and the people that come with them, negotiating money and ticket prices.

“She’s really a good person to have to go to bat for us if something’s not right with a venue, etc.” said Ms. Doctorow. “She’s very strong in that way.”

Ms. Doctorow covers the “nuts and bolts” of an event, she said, booking the radio, writing the show description and making sure everything is in order to move forward.

“Caroline writes all the time,” said Ms. Eaton. “She’s very prolific and so she’ll put something together and I’ll think, ‘Wow, I didn’t think about that.’ Or Nancy will come up with this real powerhouse song and you walk away thinking, ‘Oh, I didn’t think about that, how inspiring was that?’”

Ms. Doctorow wrote a song for Ms. Atlas, aptly called “Song for Nancy” in 2011 and “My Sunday House,” a song she wrote for Ms. Eaton, is on her latest record.

“What it’s about,” she explained, “is how music becomes your religion when you’re on the road. You live and breathe it and it becomes a vehicle for revival of your spirit.”

“Inda and Caroline understand me in a way that few others do,” Ms. Atlas said, later adding, “We are able to discuss things at a very real and deep level with all the fat cut off. I truly cherish my monthly dinners.”

“You get invited to someone’s kitchen table and that’s where the music sounds the best,” said Ms. Eaton. “That’s the best way to hear music and harmony, just as it comes out of the kitchen table. That’s my hope for the show, is that people get a sense of the authentic essence of a song.”

 “Way Out East…A Journey in Song” is Saturday, April 5, at 8 p.m. at the Bay Street Theatre, 1 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. For tickets and more information, call the box office at 725-9500 or visit baystreet.org.

Injustice as Inspiration: Max Gomez at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center

Tags: , , , , , , ,


Singer-songwriter Max Gomez.

Singer-songwriter Max Gomez. Courtesy of New West Records.

By Tessa Raebeck

From pop charts to dive bars, love songs are rampant. A universal topic, love makes it easy for artists to connect with audiences, but singer-songwriter Max Gomez takes a different path.

“I hate to say this old song-writing cliché, but a little bit of heartbreak will turn you into a songwriter real quick,” explained Mr. Gomez, who will perform at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center on Saturday, March 29.

That heartbreak stems from more than lost love. Mr. Gomez draws inspiration from any form of injustice, from restless girlfriends and the hold of addiction to the misuse of power and widespread violence. His music is soulful and gritty at the same time, balancing mellow rock instrumentation with blues, country and folk influences.

Growing up with four older brothers in the remote hamlet of Taos, the most northern of the New Mexico pueblos, Mr. Gomez first learned about music on an old player piano his family had.

“We used to have a closet full of scrolls and we would get our different scrolls and pump the pedals and the piano would start playing,” he said. “It was just kind of a fun thing to do. I always was into any kind of music, really…I played music ever since I was a little kid.”

When Mr. Gomez was 9, his older brother got a guitar. He quickly usurped control over it, playing it constantly.

“Eventually, I got my own and I’ve never really put it down,” he said. “And now, it’s gotten way out of control.”

At just 15, Mr. Gomez was offered a job to play regularly at “kind of a honky-tonk bar and restaurant” that typically hosted country artists. “It was kind of an unusual thing for a 15-year-old,” he said. “I got a little job playing when I was that age and over the years, I just kind of continued to work at it and study different kind of music and I got different influences.”

Originally listening to and playing only the blues, working at the country venue introduced Mr. Gomez to traveling singer-songwriters and new influences, including writers who worked with John Prine, today a major influence of his, and Mentor Williams, who wrote Dobie Gray’s biggest hit, “Drift Away,” in 1973. The experience helped Mr. Gomez establish himself as a singer-songwriter with diverse influences rather than solely doing a “blues or country kind of thing.”

“The blues has been a major influence, the old recordings of Robert Johnson, which I think kind of started American music in the way that we know it, even today,” he said of the Mississippi Delta blues master, who died in the 1930’s at age 27 after finding little commercial success.

Big Bill Broonzy is another blues influence, “and then in the folk world, I’m big on John Prine, Guy Clark, Townes Van Zandt…to me that music really never gets old, I listen to it a lot.”

With a piano, a mandolin and a banjo at home, Mr. Gomez continues to “dabble on this and that,” but his focus has always been the guitar. Although he remains rooted in blues and folk, the constant in Mr. Gomez’s music is not a melody or an instrument, but thoughtful, intent songwriting.

“Rule the World,” Mr. Gomez’s debut album, was released in January 2013 by New West Records, which represents eclectic artists like The Devil Makes Three, The Replacements, Drive-By Truckers and Steve Earle. Jeff Trott, who has worked with Stevie Nicks and Sheryl Crow, produced the 10-song album.

The album’s first single, “Run From You,” was co-written by Mr. Gomez and Mr. Trott. It begins:

“I was walking around with my old friend, where the pavement ends and the trouble began, it’s true, that’s where I ran into you. White blossoms in raven hair, got a funny feeling and a dead man’s stare, wishing I knew, I should have run from you.”

The “anti-love” lyrics are supported by the heartbreak evident in Mr. Gomez’s relaxing melodies and mellow, crooning vocals. He often co-writes songs, drawing influence from talented friends like singer-songwriter Shawn Mullins, best known for the 1998 hit single “Lullaby.”

“We get together and we just kind of start playing and find something that we like the sound of musically, and then we start writing a little story to it,” he said of collaboration.

“But when I write by myself,” continued Mr. Gomez, “I tend to only write when I feel really strongly about something and it just can come out in a fell swoop and you just make a little music to go with it, which is kind of different.”

That’s where the injustice comes in as inspiration.

“I was writing a lot of real love songs—specifically for somebody, in a certain sense—and when that whole thing didn’t really pan out, I started writing the other kind of love song, which is the anti-love song.”

“Run From You” is a story about meeting someone and later wishing you hadn’t, a feeling to which most who have endured a difficult romance can likely relate. A specific experience prompted the song, yet Mr. Gomez keeps the lyrics broad for others to decode, so the audience’s interpretation can still be open-ended and every story can also belong to the listener.

“Sometimes you write very literally and you just kind of write a story,” he said, “but I often try to keep the story buried inside, so that it’s not really that specific or literal and it’s something that can be interpreted into the way you feel, rather than a certain, exact thing. I think that’s a good key in songwriting, to not tell the listener exactly what is going on, but to let them make that decision themselves.”

For Mr. Gomez, performance is an extension of that creative process. He tries to play at least one brand new song at every show, to see how the crowd reacts to it and gauge how it can be improved. The audience is crucial to his craft; a draft cannot be complete until the song is tested live, he said.

Despite his anti-love tendencies, Mr. Gomez remains a romantic at heart: In “Love Will Find a Way,” he writes, “Take a good look around, you’ve got both feet on the ground. Kiss the pain, and taste the truth, while you hang onto your youth. You can fly far away and dream of yesterday, and pray, pray that love’s gonna find a way.”

Max Gomez will perform Saturday, March 29, as part of the Breakout Artist Series, in partnership with WEHM 92.9 and 96.9 FM at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center at 76 Main Street in Westhampton Beach. For tickets, call the box office at 288-1500 or visit here.

Charlie King Celebrates the Life of Friend and Folk Music Legend Pete Seeger

Tags: , , , , , , , ,



Musician Charlie King (courtesy of Ella Engel-Snow).

By Tessa Raebeck

In honor of his friend and fellow traveler, the late folk music legend and social activist Pete Seeger, Charlie King will perform at a community concert Friday, February 21 at 7 p.m. the Windmill Village in East Hampton.

A musical storyteller and political satirist, King covers folk music from two centuries and four continents. His original music celebrates the extraordinary in the lives of ordinary people. King has recorded well over a dozen albums since he first came onto the scene in 1976.

His music supports peace, human rights and environmental advocacy. He has been honored with several humanitarian awards, including a 1999 Sacco-Vanzetti Social Justice Award following a nomination by Seeger.

“I try to cover a broad emotional landscape in my concerts,” said King. “The stories I collect and the songs I write take the listener on a journey of humor, heartache and hope. What I most value in a song is the way it helps us see an old reality in a totally new light.”

Seeger called King, “one of the best songwriters of our time.”

A spearheading figure of American folk music, Seeger died January 27 in Manhattan at the age of 94. Always using his music to advocate social change, he performed everywhere from labor rallies to the inaugural concert for Barack Obama on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial.

King will perform a community concert Friday, February 21 at Windmill Village II, 219 Accabonac Road in East Hampton. There is a suggested donation of $15 and all proceeds will benefit the Whalebone Village Apartment’s Parenting Program. Complimentary snacks, beverages and wine will be provided.