Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Surf Benefit for Disabled

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The crowd at the first annual ONCE surf benefit in memory of Sax Leader. Photo courtesy of Jacqui Leader.

The first annual ONCE surf benefit for the learning disabled was held at Indian Wells Beach in Amagansett on September 6 in memory of Sax Leader, who died nine months ago.

Mr. Leader loved the ocean and  cared very much for people who are mentally challenged, the saxleaderfoundation stated in a release. “We believe he would have loved seeing professional surfers donating their time to take a person with special needs out on a surf board ONCE in their lifetime.”

People donated $30 to sponsor a surfer, and friends and family cheered on the surfers and their students.

All proceeds from the event will go toward sending a person with drug, alcohol or depression issues to counseling at a reputable drug rehabilitation center.

For further information or to help support the effort, visit saxleaderfoundation.com or call (631) 678-7560.

East Hampton Calls for Volunteers for Beach Cleanup

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The East Hampton Town Recycling and Litter Committee announced this week that it will participate in the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup Day this Saturday, September 20.

The program asks volunteers to come out and clean up any local beaches while recording the types of trash found on the beaches, according to a press release from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby on September 16.

“This information will help the Conservancy collect and analyze data that will raise awareness, identify debris hotspots of unusual trash events and can help communities adopt policies that will work towards cleaner oceans,” the release read.

Garbage bags and disposable gloves will be supplied by the town of East Hampton; anyone interested in participating can pick up free bags and gloves and a data collection form from Town Hall through Friday, September 19. Volunteers can leave full trash bags by town garbage cans on Saturday and they will be picked up by the parks department.

Volunteers who document their day of cleanup on Saturday are asked to e-mail them to soverby@ehamptonny.gov so they can put on the town’s website. For more information about the Ocean Conservancy’s Coastal Cleanup Day, visit oceanconservancy.org.

 

North Haven Hunting Injunction Lifted

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By Mara Certic

A temporary restraining order to prevent the issuance of new deer nuisance permits in North Haven has been lifted by Suffolk County Supreme Court Judge W. Gerard Asher in a ruling on Friday, September 12.

The Wildlife Preservation Coalition of Eastern Long Island (WPCELI) filed suit against the Village of North Haven last spring for a preliminary injunction to prevent  the DEC from issuing nuisance permits on the East End, after hearing word of a proposed mass deer cull.

In March 2014, the Supreme Court issued a six-month temporary restraining order that prevented new permits from being issued. According to a press release issued by Wendy Chamberlin, president of WPCELI, the temporary restraining order “effectively, halted the Long Island Farm Bureau and United States Department of Agriculture, Wildlife Services’ planned 2013-2014 cull of, potentially, thousands of deer, which concluded this past spring.”

The WPCELI argued the planned 2013-2014 cull of 3,000 to 5,000 deer “was a substantial increase from previous years and that a cull of this size has not been properly evaluated or studied by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation,” according the release.

According to court records, the wildlife coalition asserted “the DEC’s recent issuance of DDPs involves significant departures from their established and accepted practices of doing so and asserts that a new evaluation of the need and scale of any deer cull program must be done.” They also said, according to the records, “the DEC does not follow its own guidelines.” The DEC countered that it does indeed follow its own guidelines and that there was not a significant departure from past years, noting there are only 12 applications currently pending before the DEC, and that those are for mostly farmland.

“WPCELI is confident that the court will find that DEC has not justified this unprecedented cull and will direct DEC to comply with the law before issuing more permits for the LIFB program,” Ms. Chamberlin said in the release.

According to North Haven Village Mayor Jeff Sander, the lifting of the temporary restraining order will not have much of an immediate impact on North Haven.

“It won’t affect the state-wide hunting season that starts on October 1,” Mr. Sander said on Wednesday morning. “The normal hunting season starts October 1 and goes through the end of the year. The nuisance deer hunting starts on January 1, so it will allow us to continue as we have for many years.”

The North Haven Village Board presented an update of its deer management plan at its regular meeting earlier this month. It discussed the possibility of adding a deer sterilization program as well as plans to plans to deploy in the spring 10 four-poster feeding systems, which apply insecticide to a feeding deer’s neck and shoulders.

The board also discussed a proposed law that would require all hunters in North Haven to apply for special hunting permits from the village, as well as a permit from the DEC. “We just want to be able to control what hunters are in North Haven, what areas they’re hunting in. And they’ll need that permit whether they’re hunting in the normal season starting next month or during January to March for the nuisance deer hunting,” Mr. Sander said.

Mr. Sander said during the village board meeting the primary focus is to reduce the herd. North Haven, however, has no plans to bring in professional firm White Buffalo for a deer cull this year, he added.

East Hampton Management Plan

Andrew Gaites of the Deer Management Committee gave a report at the East Hampton Town Board’s Tuesday morning work session this week and offered options and recommendations to the board.

According to Mr. Gaites, changes in bow-hunting setback laws created an additional 300 acres of town land that can be opened for bow-hunting this year. The law, signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo earlier this year, reduced mandatory setbacks from residences from 500 feet to 150 feet. There is also an additional 174 acres of town land now available for gun hunting as well, he said.

Mr. Gaites said he believes the New York State Parks Department is working to open up more land in Napeague and Montauk for hunting.

The committee did not recommend planning for a professional deer cull this winter, “mostly due to a lawsuit against the DEC and the USDA,” Mr. Gaites said. The committee did suggest the town consider allowing local hunters onto private land during certain hours, “possibly at other times of year using nuisance permits,” as well as the regular hunting season, Mr. Gaites said.

He also suggested the possibility of opening up two landfill sites to hunting on Wednesdays, when they are closed. Mr. Gaites said if this was possible, the properties would only be open on a limited basis and only to a select number of lottery winners. It was also recommended that deer accidents be better documented and that the board consider extending the gun season to include weekends.

East Hampton Will Let Citizens Weigh In

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East Hampton Town announced this week that it would hold a series of informational hearings on hot topics in the coming weeks.

Two public meetings have been scheduled to discuss the town’s comprehensive wastewater management plan. The first will be on Tuesday, September 23, at 10 a.m. in the Emergency Services Building in East Hampton Village. A second will take place during a regularly scheduled town board work session on Tuesday, October 14, at 10 a.m. at the Montauk Firehouse. Each meeting will include an overview of the plan, as well as a detailed discussion of specifics as they relate to the hamlet in which the meeting is held.

The Montauk Beach Stabilization Plan will be the topic of a special meeting at noon on Thursday, September 25, at the Montauk Firehouse. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will present the final details of their downtown Montauk beach stabilization project. Representatives from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Suffolk County Department of Public Works, as well as East Hampton Town, will also attend.

The town’s proposed rental registry law will be the topic at two town board work session, the first on Tuesday, October 21, at 10 a.m. at Town Hall, and the second on Wednesday, November 12, at 10 a.m. at the Montauk Firehouse.

“Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” at Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival

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Anita Hill testifying at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Anita Hill testifying at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

By Tessa Raebeck

Anita Hill, shown speaking candidly for the first time since she testified before Congress in 1991, will open a discussion on gender inequality and sexual harassment at Bay Street Theater on Saturday at the presentation of “Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” by the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival.

In the documentary, Academy Award-winning director Freida Lee Mock examines the experience of Ms. Hill, an attorney and law professor who testified before the U.S. Senate about being sexually harassed by U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Fourteen senators, all male, questioned her for nine hours.

“The challenge for me as a filmmaker is to tell a universal story of transformation and empowerment that is riveting, entertaining and amazing to a generation of women and men too young to know, but who are benefiting by Anita Hill’s courage to speak truth to power,” Ms. Mock said.

A panel discussion following the film includes: Gini Booth, executive director of Literacy Suffolk and radio/TV host for PBS and CBS affiliates; Wini Freund, former board president of the Women’s Fund of Long Island; Deborah Kooperstein, attorney and Southampton Town Justice; and Betty Schlein, past president of the Long Island National Organization of Women.

“Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” will be presented as a preliminary event of the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival. It will be screened on Saturday, September 20, at 4 p.m. at the Bay Street Theater, located at the corner of Bay Street and Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. Tickets are $15 at the door. The festival will run from December 4 to 7. For more information, visit ht2ff.com or call (631) 725-9500.

Governor Cuomo Deafeats Teachout in Democratic Primary

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By Mara Certic

Although New York State Governor Andrew Cuomo decisively won the democratic gubernatorial primary on Tuesday, September 9, his opponent, Zephyr Teachout, led many of the polls on the East End.

Governor Cuomo won the primary with 62.1 percent of the vote, Ms. Teachout, a law professor in New York, received 34.2 percent.

According to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections, in East Hampton Town,  Ms. Teachout received 307 votes, while only 207 East Hamptonites voted for Governor Cuomo. Last week, Betty Mazur, the vice chairwoman of the East Hampton Democratic Committee, sent out an e-mail blast endorsing Ms. Teachout and criticizing Governor Cuomo for his unfulfilled promises and particularly for his lack of response to local problems with PSEG Long Island.

According to the board of elections, Governor Cuomo took Suffolk County with just under 55 percent of the vote, while Ms. Teachout received almost 43 percent. According to the BOE, 16,030 out of 296,315 eligible voters, or 5.4 percent, turned out to vote.

In the Town of Southampton, Governor Cuomo beat out his opponent by just five votes, receiving 450 to Ms. Teachout’s 445. Ms. Teachout also proved popular on Shelter Island, where she received nine more votes than the incumbent governor.

Ms. Teachout, a constitutional and property law professor at Fordham University, announced she was running “to lay out a bold vision and provide a real choice for voters,” according to her website. Her running mate, Tim Wu, is a law professor at Columbia University.

“We are not Albany insiders, but we believe Governor Cuomo and Kathy Hochul can be beat, and must be challenged. We will force Governor Cuomo to defend his record of deep education cuts, his tax cuts for banks and billionaires, his refusal to ban fracking and his failure to lead on the Dream Act,” their website reads.

The 2014 New York gubernatorial election, pitting Governor Cuomo against Republican Rob Astorino, will take place on Tuesday, November 4. For questions about voter registration or polling places in Suffolk County visit suffolkvotes.com or call (631) 852-4500.

Latin American Film Festival Returns to the Parrish

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Sergio Hernández (Rodolfo) and Paulina García (Gloria) in Sebastián Lelio’s “Gloria,” which will be screened at 3 p.m. on Sunday, September 14.

By Mara Certic

Seven boxes, a fisherman and a middle-aged Chilean woman will be featured in films screened next weekend during the 11th annual OLA Film Festival at the Parrish Art Museum.

The Organización Latino-Americana of Eastern Long Island (OLA) is a local outreach nonprofit that promotes the Latino community’s cultural, economic, social and educational development in the towns of East Hampton and Southampton. Isabel Sepulveda, one of the founders of OLA, started the film festival back in 2003 and for the past six years, the Parrish Art Museum has hosted the Spanish-language weekend.

“Isabel Sepulveda has been with it from the beginning. She has the vision each year,” said Andrea Grover, curator of special projects at the Parrish, who added that Ms. Sepulveda is “essential” to the festival. Ms. Grover said she always enjoys the OLA film festival and “it is something that people anticipate and are enthusiastic about seeing.”

“In 2001, we founded OLA. Part of the mission was to do advocacy work. We thought we could reach more people doing cultural events,” Ms. Sepulveda said on Monday. “Through an annual film festival we can bring the two communities together.”

It is a fun change of theme for the Parrish, which usually screens films on the subject of art. “This is a little bit of a different tact for us. It’s something that we find really valuable,” Ms. Grover said in a phone interview on Saturday.

There is no theme to the festival, no connection to art, as such, except that each of these films are critically acclaimed and highly anticipated. According to Ms. Grover, Ms. Sepulveda “is trying to reach as broad as an audience as possible” with her choices for the festival. Documentaries, dramas and comedies have all made it to the big screen at the OLA film festival, even shorts, but Ms. Grover said the curator “is looking for quality.”

The OLA film festival features recently released, critically acclaimed movies from different Latin American countries, according to Ms. Grover. The festival kicks off on Friday, September 12, at 5:30 p.m. with “Pescador” (“Fisherman”).

“Pescador” was co-written and directed by Ecuadoran filmmaker Sebastián Cordero in 2011. It tells the story of 30-year-old Blanquito (played by Andrés Crespo), who lives with his mother in a small fishing village where he never really felt he belonged. One day, Blanquito discovers a box filled with bricks of cocaine and he finds a way to get out of his 30-year rut. He is determined to sell the cocaine back to the cartel for top prices and to use that money to leave the small village and change his life.

He falls for a woman named Lorna, with whom he spends the rest of the 96-minute film on a dangerous adventure. “Pescador” won awards for best director and best actor at the 2012 Guadalajara Mexican Film Festival, and Mr. Crespo won another award for best actor at the Cartagena Film Festival in Colombia.

Following the screening of “Pescador,” Afro-Cuban and Puerto Rican band Mambo Loco will perform on the Mildred C. Brinn Terrace at the Parrish at 7 p.m. “It’s something we plan to develop further,” Ms. Grover said of expanding the festival’s offerings.

The next day at 3 p.m., the Parrish will show a Paraguayan film, “7 Cajas” (“7 Boxes”).  The PG-13 film directed by Juan Carlos Maneglia and Tana Schémbori is the story of the lure and dangers of money.  Victor, a 17-year-old wheelbarrow operator, accepts $100 to transport seven boxes of unknown content through an eight-block journey in the busy municipal market. Drama and danger ensue in the action-thriller, which won five awards at various film festivals, including the Audience Award at the Miami Film Festival.

The last film to be screened over the weekend will be on Sunday at 3 p.m. The film is “Gloria,” the story of a rebirth for a middle-aged divorcée living in Santiago. “It’s one I’ve wanted to see because it depicts a woman in her mid-life and it’s a depiction of a real life scenario done with kindness,” Ms. Grover said. “It’s subject matter not frequently featured,” she said, adding that Ms. Sepulveda has been eager to feature the Chilean movie since its release.

The R-rated tale won a total of 17 awards at festivals all around the world, including the main competition at the Berlin International Film Festival and several best actress awards for Paulina Garcia, who plays the title role.

Ms. Sepulveda said there are many high-quality films coming out of Latin America. “I wish we could have a longer festival, like two weeks. It takes a lot to put it together, especially when everyone’s volunteering their time. It’s not easy,” she said.

Tickets for each film are $10; admission is free for museum members, students and children. The musical performance by Mambo Loco is free with museum admission. The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org

 

 

 

“Viva Los Bastarditos” Premieres at Guild Hall’s John Drew Theater Lab

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bastarditos-thumbBy Tessa Raebeck

Coming out of Guild Hall’s John Drew Theater Lab workshop for up-and-coming East End artists, “Viva Los Bastarditos” is a new musical by Jake Oliver about two villains in Western Massachusetts who use a fake land grant to gain control over the poor citizens and tenants at their mercy.

The New York Times called Mr. Oliver’s past writing “proudly silly and prurient, broadly satirical and filled with sensationalistic gags that would shock your grandmother.”

In a  story of “the little people” rising up to fight “the man,” three rock stars unite, forming Los Bastarditos, “a music-based, costume-wearing People’s Revolution—to fight the would-be dictators and their army of rent collectors,” according to a press release.

“Seamlessly combining elements of golden-age musicals, vaudeville, bedroom farce, B-movie westerns and stream of consciousness surrealism, the show simultaneously honors the dramatic forms of the past while repurposing them into something uniquely modern,” the release added.

The musical is directed by Tony Award nominee Ethan McSweeney and features a cast of Broadway performers.

Free for all audiences, “Viva Los Bastarditos” is Tuesday, September 16, at 7:30 p.m. at the John Drew Theater at Guild Hall, located at 158 Main Street in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 324-0806 or visit guildhall.org.

Firefighters Battle House Fire in Bridgehampton

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Fire Department believe the house fire on Bridge Hill Lane on Sunday morning may have been caused by lightning. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Mara Certic

Members of the Bridgehampton Fire Department and neighboring departments spent several hours battling a house fire on Bridge Lane in Bridgehampton early Sunday morning, according to Chief Gary Horsburgh.

The chief said the department responded from an automatic fire alarm at the house on 10 Bridge Hill Lane at 1:52 a.m. Responders smelled smoke when they arrived and immediately requested assistance, he said.

The fire began in the basement and burned through the first floor, causing serious damage to the kitchen and the western side of the house, Chief Horsburgh said on Sunday morning. He added that heat and humidity made firefighting particularly taxing and tiring, and fire departments from Sag Harbor, East Hampton, Springs, North Sea, Hampton Bays and Southampton Village were all called in for mutual aid.

According to Chief Horsburgh the house is “still standing” but the western side is “pretty much gone.” No one was in the house when the fire began, Chief Horsburgh said, and there were no injuries.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation by the Southampton Town Fire Marshal, but Chief Horsburgh said he thought it could have been caused by lightning, as thunderstorms swept through the area that night.

Southampton Town Fire Marshal Brian Williams said on Wednesday that the investigation is ongoing.

 

East Hampton Airport Founder’s Eyes Were on the Stars

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Charlotte Niles, who founded the East Hampton Airport to teach locals how to fly in 1946. Photographs courtesy of Charlot Taylor.

By Mara Certic

Charlotte Niles was born in September 1913 in New York. Her father was a lawyer and a founder of the Wildlife Conservation Society. According to her niece, Charlot Taylor of East Hampton, she grew up rather comfortably and spent her summers in the family’s home on Amagansett’s Main Street, where it still stands today.

But when World War II began, Ms. Niles knew it was her time to pitch in. She trained with the Women’s Air Force Service Pilots (WASPs) at Avenger Field in Sweetwater, Texas. Ms. Taylor still has letters that her aunt wrote to the family during the time of her “rigorous” training in the intense Texas heat.

Ms. Taylor remembers her aunt telling her of the various bombers she flew during the war. The WASP motto was “We live in the wind and sand… and our eyes are on the stars.” Perhaps Ms. Niles took those words to heart, for when the war ended, she decided to come back to where she spent her summers and bring aviation to the East End.

In 1946, Ms. Niles set up shop at the small East Hampton Airport, which, at the time, her niece remembers to be nothing more than a large field.  According to her niece, Ms. Niles built a small terminal, a hangar, two short runways and installed a gas pump.

“I don’t even remember that there was a parking lot,” Ms. Taylor said at her East Hampton home on Wednesday. She does remember her aunt flying her around the area, taking her to nearby islands. “‘Let’s go for a spin,’ she’d say” and niece and aunt would spend the afternoon exploring the East End from the sky.Charlotte Niles 2

Ms. Taylor also recalls a split rail fence around the airport, and at each post there was “a beautiful red rose,” she said. “Things were done with care and simplicity and beauty. It was a pleasant environment, it was a welcome to visitors,” Ms. Taylor said.

Ms. Niles gave flying lessons for $3 a pop, to local GIs, potato farmers, the two airport secretaries and Perry B. Duryea. According to her niece, she was always trying to teach other women how to fly the small prop planes that, at that time, were the only aircraft in and out of the airport.

One day, a Bonanza plane landed at the East Hampton Airport and Ms. Niles’s life changed. She fell in love with its pilot and they got married. Her husband had a boatyard in Massachusetts, where Ms. Niles ended up spending most of her time.

Ms. Taylor doesn’t remember exactly when her aunt moved on from her airport life, but a Newsday article from December 1955 names the East Hampton Airport manager as a Mr. Lamb. In that same article, the airport manager reportedly rejected a proposed $1.5 million expansion of the airport, deeming it “too grandiose.”

Ms. Niles died in 1981. Next Tuesday, September 9 would have been her 101st birthday, according to her niece.

Another Newsday article, this one from 1952, spoke of socialites stranded on the East End following a Long Island Rail Road strike, who decided to “take to the air.”  “The traffic, though unexpected, was not unprecedented at the airport, which has transported as many as 150 passengers in a single week end,” the article read.  On one weekend in July this year, there were 623 flights reported at the airport.

Ms. Taylor who said she was previously never particularly affected by aircraft noise, is among the group imploring the town board to reject FAA funding and put in place restrictions. “My aunt would be shocked and horrified to see what the airport has become,” she said at the special airport meeting on August 27. “This was never, never her intention, make no mistake.”