Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

East Hampton GOP to Hold Screenings

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The East Hampton Town Republican Committee announced this week that it will hold screenings for the positions of highway superintendent, town justice, town assessor and town Trustee on Wednesday, March 11, at 7 p.m. at the American Legion in Amagansett.

The committee has already nominated Amos Goodman as its candidate to run for the Suffolk County Legislature seat that will be vacated by Jay Schneiderman at the end of the year.

It plans to screen candidates for town supervisor and the two open seats on the town board at a later date. With three Democrats, Supervisor Larry Cantwell and incumbent Town Board members Peter Van Scoyoc and Sylvia Overby, all facing reelection, control of the town board is at stake in this year’s election.

Prospective candidates for any of the positions listed above and those who would like to attend the screening have been asked to call the committee’s chairman, Tom Knobel, at (631) 875-8652.

Grant for Project MOST

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Heller_Project MOST at John Marshall Elementary 2-23-15_4484_LR

From left to right, County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, East Hampton Town Trustees Debra Klughers and Tim Bock, and Amos Goodman, who recently announced he would seek the seat Mr. Schneiderman is vacating, at a tour of Project MOST at John Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton on Monday.

State Farm Insurance has awarded Project MOST, the East Hampton after-school program, with a $31,000 grant to create Google Chrome labs at the John Marshall Elementary School in East Hampton and the Springs School, where Project MOST offers its daily programs.

The program was unveiled at a press conference and tour for elected officials at John Marshall Elementary School on Monday, February 23.

Among the elected officials attending were U.S. Representative Lee Zeldin, Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, East Hampton Village Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr., East Hampton Town Board members Peter Van Scoyoc, Sylvia Overby, Kathee Burke-Gonzalez and Trustees Tim Bock and Debra Klughers.

State Farm was represented by Dermot Dolan, Rachael Risinger and Naomi Johnson.

The grant is called “Igniting Minds in the 21st Century Classroom” and will become an enrichment activity at Project MOST, which has been supporting an expanded education model for students for the past 10 years.

Both schools are currently using Google Chromebooks as an educational tool to improve learning. The State Farm-funded program will supplement the current curriculum by having youth leaders teach students educational applications.

“Being on the State Farm Youth Advisory Board has allowed me to share my passion for service-learning with other highly motivated young people, and helped develop me as an individual,” said Marissa Brophy, a sophomore at East Hampton High School who is currently acting as the liaison between the high school students and the project.

“Clyborne Park” Opens March 12 At Hampton Theatre Company

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postCard-clybourne-park-patronMail

“Clybourne Park”—the wickedly funny and provocative play by Bruce Norris about how the different faces and shades of racism can make a straightforward real estate transaction anything but—will be the third production of the Hampton Theatre Company’s 30th anniversary season. The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play opens on March 12 at the Quogue Community Hall and will run through March 29.

The two acts of “Clybourne Park” are in fact two separate plays set 50 years apart and spinning off Lorraine Hansberry’s landmark drama, “A Raisin in the Sun.” With a cast of seven taking on different roles in the play’s two halves, act one is set in 1959, as nervous community leaders anxiously try to stop the sale of a home to a black family. Act two is set in the same house in the present day, as the now predominantly African-American neighborhood battles to stand fast against the onslaught of gentrification.

Calling the play, which won the Olivier and Evening Standard awards for its London production, a “sharp-witted, sharp-toothed comedy of American uneasiness,” Ben Brantley wrote in The New York Times that “the very structure of ‘Clybourne Park’ posits the idea of a nation (and even a world) trapped in a societal purgatory of ineptitude and anxiety.”

The cast of “Clybourne Park” features four Hampton Theatre Company veterans and three newcomers. Matt Conlon was most recently on the Quogue stage in the fall in the role of Ellwood P. Dowd in “Harvey,” following his turn in the title role in “The Foreigner” last March. Joe Pallister, who also appeared in “The Foreigner,” was last on the Quogue stage in last spring’s production of “God of Carnage.”  Ben Schnickel is familiar to Hampton Theatre Company audiences from “The Foreigner,” as well as “The Drawer Boy,” “Becky’s New Car,” and “Rabbit Hole.” Returning to the Quogue stage for the first time since her appearance in “Desperate Affection,” Rebecca Edana first appeared with the HTC in the company’s revival of “Bedroom Farce.” Rounding out the cast and trailing extensive lists of New York and regional credits are Juanita Frederick, Shonn McCloud, and Anette Michelle Sanders. HTC Executive Director Sarah Hunnewell will direct.

“Clybourne Park” runs at the Quogue Community Hall from March 12 through 29, with shows on Thursdays and Fridays at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Information is available at hamptontheatre.org. Tickets can also be purchased by calling 1 (866) 811-4111.

 

Almond Expands Into Tribeca

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Chef Jason Weiner.

Chef Jason Weiner.

By Gianna Volpe

Chef Jason Weiner now has another Almond to love, which brings the count up to four if one considers his lovely wife – namesake to the now three Almond restaurants owned by Mr. Weiner and partner, Eric Lemonides – as the brand-new Tribeca location had its official opening last Wednesday night.

“We had a press dinner, then four nights of friends and families,” Chef Weiner said of private events that led up to Almond Tribeca’s opening night. “Before that we had a mock service where half of our staff sat down and ate while the other half took orders and then we flipped it around. That’s part of the process, so by opening night it’s almost old hat because we’ve been doing it for more than a week.”

This is a common service tightening ritual among experienced restaurateurs and one that should not be ignored, according to Chef Weiner.

“It’s so important,” he said of practicing mock service trials before opening a new restaurant. “The last thing we want to do is charge people money when we don’t really have it together.”

Lovers of Bridgehampton and Manhattan’s Almond locations will be happy to learn the menu in Tribeca includes the restaurant’s tri-steak standard, as well as its signature Caesar salad and Brussels sprouts two ways, but may be thrilled by its new roast chicken for two and a unique duck dish Chef Weiner said is simply bursting with Long Island flavor.
He said the duck breast dish combines the Amber Waves Farm sweet potato and Long Island Mushroom Company shitake ravioli that can found at Almond Bridgehampton with a Crescent Farms duck breast that is served with house-made Sirracha at its Tribeca location and a l’orange in Manhattan.

“We’re also doing a super fantastic lobster sausage appetizer, which is delicious and getting some great feedback,” Chef Weiner said of the menu at Almond Tribeca. “I’m still keeping as local as possible, but bringing stuff from my friends on Long Island. If you know us from other places, the menu will have familiarity to you, but there are some things on there that are specific to the new space.”

That includes the décor at Almond on Tribeca’s Franklin Street, which East Enders may also be pleased to learn includes the red-back dropped zebra herd found in the signature Scalamandre wallpaper found at Almond’s Bridgehampton location.

“It has a lot of warmth to it, but is airy and Tribeca-ish in its own right; we like our places to stand on their own,” said Chef Weiner.

He added Almond Tribeca is a “pretty, cool place” that can be found “smack dab” between TriBeCa Grill and Nobu, which belongs to Myriad Restaurant Group’s Drew Nieporent.

“Eric [Lemonides] worked for him as the general manager of Della Femina 20 years ago,” Chef Weiner said of Mr. Nieporent. “We’ve been building the place since October, so he’s been popping in to give us some informal advice and wish us well. He’s a good guy…a real trailblazer. They opened TriBeCa grill 25 years ago when there really wasn’t much down there, so the guy’s a visionary, obviously.”
Chef Weiner said today the area’s unique dichotomy – where “families and commerce” set streets a-bustle by day leaving behind “ a lot of dark alleyways” by night – is one in which he and his team are excited to join.

“Tribeca is very specific” he said of the new Almond location. “We’re really psyched to be down there.”

Almond Tribeca is located at 186 Franklin Street in New York City. Almond NYC is located at 12 East 22nd Street in New York City. Almond Bridgehampton is located at One Ocean Road in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit almon

Pierson Students Earn Choral Society of the Hamptons Scholarships

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Pierson High School Senior Rebecca Dwoskin.

Pierson High School Senior Rebecca Dwoskin.

Four South Fork high school seniors have won this year’s scholarships for voice training from the Choral Society of the Hamptons, including three students from Pierson High School.

The Society established the scholarship program more than two decades ago and has awarded scholarships to several dozen students, a number of whom have gone on to professional careers in music and active participation in amateur musical organizations.

The 2014 winners were announced this week.

Rebeccsa Dwoskin, a senior at Pierson High School, has performed in a number of school musicals locally, including “A Chorus Line.” Ms. Dwoskin has studied voice with Amanda Jones of East Hampton, while also taking dance and performing as a flutist. Her musical theater roles have also included the title role in Annie. Her chorus teacher, Suzanne Nicoletti, wrote the committee that “she has the work ethic, dedication and passion” for a successful career.

Oree Livni, also a Pierson senior, is a member of the Choral Society and studies piano with Daniel Koontz. Mr. Livni has performed in middle and high school choirs as well as in the Hamptons Music Educators Association (HMEA) festival and in the New York State School Music Association (NYSMA) chorus.

“One of the most musical teenagers I have met,” said Ms. Nicoletti.

Megan Beedenbender, another Pierson senior will also receive scholarship. Since sixth grade, she has sung in choirs at HMEA and NYSMA performances, as well as in the New York State Council of Administrators of Music Education chorus. “Music is my biggest passion,” she says, and she was described by Ms. Nicoletti as “my most enthusiastic singer.” In college, she hopes to expand her knowledge of classical works in German and Italian.

Southampton High School’s Jacqueline Minogue also earned an award.

Ms. Minogue and Ms. Dwoskin won Doris and William Leese Scholarships worth $500. Mr. Livni won the Norman Dello Joio Scholarship and Ms. Beedenbender the Charlotte Rogers Smith Scholarship, each worth $250.

Parrish Recognizes 25 Young Artists

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The 2015 Student Exhibition, High School Artists Reception. Photo by Tom Kochie

The 2015 Student Exhibition, High School Artists Reception. Photo by Tom Kochie

On Saturday, February 28, the Parrish Art Museum will honor 25 young artists for their work that is on view in the 2015 Student Exhibition. Selected from more than 150 high school student participants by Neill Slaughter, a professor of Visual Art at Long Island University, C.W. Post campus, these up-and-coming artists will be celebrated at a ceremony at the museum, where Parrish Director Terrie Sultan and Mr. Slaughter will present Awards of Excellence to 19 Seniors, and “Ones to Watch” Awards to six underclassmen.

Mr. Slaughter, a practicing artist and professor for 36 years who has been the judge at several Student Exhibitions, based his selection of winners on a variety of criteria, not limited to ability nor talent.

“While I certainly value skill and technique, ultimately I look for an honesty and truth in the artwork,” he said. “Artists become inspired by something, which is … interpreted as well as communicated visually. The best art is transcendent, whereby the viewer is emotionally moved or taken to another place by the artist’s interpretation.”

The ceremony will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. with Parrish Education Director Cara Conklin-Wingfield announcing the names of the winners, who will come forward with their teacher to accept certificates. Refreshments will be served at the event, which is open to the public.

The Student Exhibition, a 60-year tradition at the Parrish Art Museum, opened this year on January 31 and is on view through March 1, featuring the work of more than 2,000 young artists from public, private, parochial, and home schools on the East End.

On the Southampton and East Hampton towns, East Hampton High School’s Claudia Fino will be honored for her drawing, “Three Spheres.” Southampton High School’s Kim Gonzalez will be awarded for her mixed media piece, “Concentration.” Pierson’s Theo Gray will be honored for his photography project, “Untitled.” East Hampton High School’s Brenden Snow and The Ross School’s Brenna Leaver are also honored for their untitled photography projects. In printmaking, Pierson’s Daniella Nolan has received honors for her piece, “Innocence;” The Ross School’s Evelyn Jiaoxue and Abby Wang will also be honored for “Untitled,” and “The Rape of Nanking,” respectively. In 3-D sculpture, Pierson’s Zoe Diskin will be honored for her “Self Portrait Assemblage.”

Southampton’s Abby Clemente and East Hampton’s Elvis Uchupaille have been named as underclassmen “One’s to Watch.”

The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org. 

HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show at Bay Street

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Corinne Fisher is one of several comedians that will appear at Bay Street Theater’s HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show.

Corinne Fisher is one of several comedians that will appear at Bay Street Theater’s HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show.

Bay Street Theater & Sag Harbor Center for the Arts will host the HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show, hosted by Joseph Vecsey, on Saturday, February 28 at 8 p.m. The comedy show features rising stars of comedy, including Mr. Vecsey. Other comics for the evening include Corinne Fisher (Guys We F*****), Regina DeCicco (Gotham AXS TV), and Chris Clarke (BET Comic View).

Mr. Vecsey has performed in bars, clubs, theaters, colleges, restaurants, rough urban rooms in Brooklyn and Staten Island, even a hostel on 103rd and Amsterdam. He opened for Jim Breuer and Susie Essman at Bay Street Theater in 2013. Since the beginning of his show at Bay Street Theater he has hosted various shows in New York City and popular clubs like the Laff House in Philadelphia and Jokers Wild in New Haven.

Ms. Fisher is a stand-up comedian, writer and actor originally from Union, New Jersey. She first made a splash with her debut one-woman show Corinne Fisher: I STALK YOU, which had a run at The Peoples Improv Theater (The PIT) in the Summer of 2010 and was featured in Time Out New York. Since then, she has been a regular on the stand-up scene playing anything from dive bars to world-famous comedy clubs like Stand Up NY, New York Comedy Club, Caroline’s, Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Broadway Comedy Club, Comix, Laugh Boston, The Stress Factory & Gotham. Perhaps most notable is her duo show with Krystyna Hutchinson. In December 2013, the duo launched Guys We F*%!@*!: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast that now boasts over half a million subscribers.

Ms. DeCicco became the winner of the Ladies of Laughter competition (2012), which was held at various clubs all over Manhattan-with participants from all over the country. She was accepted into the 2013 Laughing Skull Festival in Atlanta, Georgia. She has performed at various comedy clubs and bars.

Mr. Clarke has appeared on BET’s 106th Park, the Las Vegas Comedy Festival, and was The Runner up in New England’s Funniest Comic Competition. Mr. Clarke has also appeared on BET Comic View.

Tickets to the HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show at Bay Street Theater, 2 Bay Street, Sag Harbor are $20 and are available online at baystreet.org or by calling the Bay Street Theater Box Office at (631) 725-9500.

 

Loretta K. Davis

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Loretta

By Mara Certic

Loretta Davis became the new executive director of The Retreat, East Hampton Town’s shelter for the victims of domestic abuse, last month. She spoke about her background and some of the programming the nonprofit organization offers.

When did you move out to the East End?

I started work on the 28th of January, right around when we had our first storm. I moved out that weekend. I spent a lot of time in Vermont, so I’m used to the snow, but the ice is unbelievable. But I’ve been coming out here for about 20 years, friends from college and high school have houses out here, and so I’ve been coming out for a long time.

I was a judge for 19 years in Tuxedo, New York, and that really is what I’ve been doing. I had criminal and civil cases, and of course we had domestic violence cases.  I was an elected official, I ran every four years. And I really enjoyed that because I got to be involved with local government and with the community. I did that until 2013 when I was on the Roundtable [for the Health and Welfare Council of Long Island] moved here to Long Island.

What made you decide to change careers?

Well, I’ve always been involved in women’s issues, I’ve worked with the Business Council for Peace, which helps women in war-torn countries. So, I’ve always been interested in women’s issues, and I’ve helped women survivors in Rwanda, done some pro bono domestic violence work [in New York] as well. This seemed like a good opportunity and I thought I could use my experience both as a judge, and in administration.

What do you think are the most important programs offered by The Retreat?

Well, there’s the core programs we offer; we have the shelter and with that we have the 24-hour crisis hotline, and advocacy services for when survivors go to court, as well as violence protection programs. But there are a lot of other programs for people who aren’t in our shelter, and people in the community. We have counseling programs at our office here; we do work with the youth in schools including an educational program about healthy relationships. There’s also a program in high schools to prevent physical violence in relationships. There are also programs that work with fathers in order to educate fathers who might be at risk. That’s a program we’ve had now for a couple of years. I know people are surprised we work with men, but the idea is to work to prevent violence, it’s kind of a re-education for them. And it’s all free.

But we’ve also been working on a campus security program in Nassau County which is going to extend to Suffolk County Community College. So it’s not just family violence that we deal with. We can make a difference. What I’d like to do is strengthen our programs and expand our outreach.

How are you planning on doing both those things?

What I’d like to do is strengthen our programs, and expand our outreach. We have our big fundraiser coming up in June and that really helps us a lot. We do get a lot of grants, but if we didn’t have our contributions we wouldn’t be able to survive. But I think we should have some more community awareness events.

Last week there was an event in Sag Harbor with the Neo-Political Cowgirls: One Billion Rising. It was a great event; there were testimonials, lots of artists and musicians. It was a great community event, it brought awareness; donations were accepted. It was free! Everyone just provided everything: their services, their music, their dancing, the space. It was a really positive and personal evening; I was really impressed with how the community came together.

The Retreat has offices at 13 Goodfriend Drive in East Hampton, which is open Monday through Friday from 8:30 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. It also has legal advocates and counselors available. For more information, or to volunteer, call (631) 329-4398. The confidential 24-hour hotline number is (631) 329-2200.

 

 

Parrish Announces Chuck Close Photographs Exhibit

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Chuck Close (American, born 1940). Self-Portrait/Composite/Nine Parts, 1979. 9 Polaroids, 83 x 69 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Gift of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz.

Chuck Close (American, born 1940). Self-Portrait/Composite/Nine Parts, 1979. 9 Polaroids, 83 x 69 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Gift of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz.

The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill announced last week that it has organized Chuck Close Photographs, the first comprehensive survey of the photographic work of the renowned American artist. The exhibit will be on view May 10 through July 26 and will feature some 90 images from 1964 to the present, from early black and white manquettes to composite Polaroids to intimately scaled daguerreotypes and the most recent Polaroid nudes. The exhibition explores how Mr. Close, one of the most important figures in contemporary art, has stretched the boundaries of photographic means, methods, and approaches.

“The photographic origin of each Close painting is well known; however, Close’s exploration of the medium itself extends far beyond the use of photographs as a programmatic tool,” said Parrish Art Museum Director and exhibition co-organizer Terrie Sultan. “Whether he uses a photographic image as source material or as an end in and of itself, everything he creates begins with a photograph. Chuck Close Photographs provides an in-depth look at photography as the foundation of Close’s creative process.”

The exhibition builds on the Parrish Art Museum’s long history of working with Close, as Sultan also organized Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration, which has travelled to nearly 20 venues worldwide since 2003. Chuck Close Photographs, co-organized by Sultan and Colin Westerbeck, independent curator and photography scholar, traces Close’s use of the camera throughout his more than 45-year career and features a variety of photographic media.

Madoo Talks Lecture Series Opens with Lindsey Taylor

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Lindsey Taylor.

Lindsey Taylor.

The Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack will host its Madoo Talks Winter Lecture series in February and March, opening with Lindsey Taylor, one of the authors of “The Gardener’s Garden,” a book that explores gardens from around the world and throughout the ages meant to serve as an inspiration to the modern-day gardener. Ms. Taylor, who will speak on Sunday, February 22, will use examples such as

Hollister House, Dawn Ridge, Les Quatre Vents, Prospect Cottage and other personal idiosyncratic gardens featured in “The Gardener’s Garden,” to discuss the need for a garden to have a soul, passion and individual vision to be truly successful. A book signing will follow the discussion.

Madoo Talks will continue on Sunday, March 8 with Sagaponack farmer, artist and writer, Marilee Foster. Ms. Foster, whose family settled in Sagaponack during the mid-1700s, will take a realistic yet humorous look at development on the East End along with the difficulties of farming in the 21st century and the success at her wildly popular Sagg Main farmstand.

Stephen Orr, author of “The New American Herbal,” will join Madoo Talks on March 29, examining the long tradition of herbals while adding new layers of information based on a multicultural look at the herbs we use in our homes and gardens.

Maddo Talks: Lindsey Taylor will be held on Sunday, February 22 at noon at the Madoo Conservancy summer house studio, 618 Sagg Main Road in Sagaponack. Tickets are $25 for members; $30 for non-members and a reception, sponsored by The Topping Rose House, will follow. To reserve your seat, email info@madoo.org or call (631) 537-8200.