Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Moonlight Paddle at Georgica Pond

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The Elements Fitness Studio is hosting a Moonlight Stand-Up Paddle Board event in East Hampton on Thursday, July 17, from 5:30 to 8:30 p.m.

The three-hour event will begin in Georgica Pond and end at Main Beach. Guest instructor Sarah Obserschall, a certified Pilates instructor, will teach the basics of stand-up paddleboard. Elements owner and head fitness instructor Andrea Hunsberger will bring her signature core building exercises followed by board mediation. An organic meal by Sakara and juices by Juice Press will be served. The event costs $250.

Elements Fitness Studio teaches high-energy customized fitness classes, based on the trademark manual by Ms. Hunsberger. The studio offers Barre Fitness, Dance Cardio, HIIT Fusion and other classes and is open every day except Wednesday. Ms. Obserschall is a certified Pilates instructor and has studied Lyengar yoga, Alexander Technique, anatomy and physiology.

To register for the event, e-mail info@elementsfitnessstudio.com or call (631) 604-5445.

Dead Dolphin Found on Bridgehampton Beach

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A deceased dolphin washed up on the beach in front of the Bridgehampton Club Tuesday morning. Photo by Jorge Rios.

 

By Tessa Raebeck

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Junior lifeguards surround the deceased dolphin at the Bridgehampton Club Tuesday. Photo by Jorge Rios.

Jorge Rios of East Hampton was teaching Junior Lifeguarding at the Bridgehampton Club, at the end of Ocean Road in Bridgehampton, Tuesday morning when the lifeguard came across a dead dolphin washed up on the beach.

“It had probably just washed up maybe ten minutes before,” Mr. Rios said Wednesday. “It was on the shore around 9:15 in the morning, so we dragged the 200-pound dolphin a little bit up the beach to keep it from washing away again.”

Mr. Rios promptly called the hotline at the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation.

“It was sad,” said Mr. Rios. “After growing up on the beach and seven years of lifeguarding, I’ve never seen a dolphin wash up dead before.”

Adding it was “gnarly” to touch the smooth, deceased dolphin, he said the dolphin had something sticking out of his mouth, which looked like seaweed.

“Right after we pulled it up the beach, it started bleeding from its mouth, which was odd,” said the lifeguard.

As of Wednesday morning, the Riverhead Foundation is performing an autopsy on the dolphin, with details to follow.

 

Two Arrested for Making Threats Against East Hampton Jewish Center

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Asli Dincer, 44, and Melih Dincer, 31, of Riverhead, New York, were arrested by East Hampton Village Police Thursday in connection to threats made against the Jewish Center of the Hamptons.

Asli Dincer, 44, and Melih Dincer, 31, of Riverhead, New York, were arrested by East Hampton Village Police Thursday in connection to threats made against the Jewish Center of the Hamptons.

By Tessa Raebeck

The East Hampton Village Police Department arrested two Riverhead residents on Thursday on charges of making terrorist threats against the Jewish Center of the Hamptons.

East Hampton Village detectives arrested Asli Dincer, 44, and her former husband, Melih Dincer, 31 on Thursday night at John F. Kennedy International Airport, when the two returned to the United States.

Mr. and Ms. Dincer were both wanted for questioning in relation to the threats, which police said had taken place over several months, but they had left the country early in the summer.

The case originated when threats were sent in writing to the Jewish Center of the Hamptons, which were turned over to local police. East Hampton Village Police then coordinated their investigation and the identification of the suspects with detectives from the Suffolk County Police Department and the New York State Police working with the Joint Terrorism Task Force.

Police did not reveal the nature of the threats.

The two face charges of making a terrorist threat, a felony, falsely reporting an incident in the first degree, a felony, menacing in the second degree, a misdemeanor, and conspiracy in the fifth degree, a misdemeanor.

East Hampton Village Chief of Police Gerard Larsen confirmed Friday that the two were arraigned at the East Hampton Town Justice Court by Justice Steven Tekulsky earlier that afternoon and bail was set at $50,000 for each.

East End Weekend: What to Do July 11 – 13

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Malin Abrahamsson, "Winter Lot," mixed media on canvas. Image courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

Malin Abrahamsson, “Winter Lot,” mixed media on canvas. Image courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

From shark hunting to art grazing, a carefully-curated selection of top picks to do on the East End this weekend:

Art Market Hamptons brings booths from selected modern and contemporary galleries to Bridgehampton, returning for its fourth season from Friday, July 10 through Sunday, July 13.

Scott Bluedorn of Neoteric Fine Art.

Scott Bluedorn of Neoteric Fine Art.

With 40 participating galleries, Art Market is more exclusive than other art fairs. Local galleries like Neoteric Fine Art, Sara Nightingale Gallery and Grenning Gallery will feature their artists in booths.

The fair is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, July 11, and Saturday, July 12, and from 12 to 6 p.m. Sunday, July 13, at the Bridgehampton Historical Society, located at 2368 Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton.

 

The Silas Marder Gallery in Bridgehampton shows East Hampton artist Richmond Burton in an exhibition running July 12 through August 11.

“Known for his dazzling kaleidoscopic abstractions, Richmond Burton melds geometry and naturalism to usher the pictorial language of his predecessors into a contemporary context,” the gallery said in a press release. “With swift, vibrantly hued marks, Burton creates densely gridded compositions that morph into expansive waves of pattern, their overlapping rhythms at once steady and unstable.”

The exhibition will feature Mr. Burton’s last large-scale paintings created in his East Hampton studio, as well as his more recent works. An opening reception is Saturday, July 12, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Silas Marder Gallery, located at 120 Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton.

 

The Shark’s Eye All-Release Tournament & Festival returns to Montauk Friday, July 11 through Sunday, July 13.

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A little girl watches a shark being tagged at the Shark’s Eye Festival and Tournament in 2012. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

The weekend-long event is “Montauk’s only satellite tag, catch-and-release, high stakes, big game sport fishing competition combined with cutting-edge science, conservation and informative entertainment focused on saving sharks,” according to a press release.

The tournament, held in the Montauk Marine Basin, offers prize money of $10,000. In 2013, participating teams tagged and released 64 sharks, including 33 mako and 31 blue sharks. Four sharks were tagged with satellite tracking devices.

Although it may sound scary, the event offers fun for the whole family, as kids can see sharks up-close-and-personal and learn about conservation and marine wildlife. The festival is free to the public on Saturday, July 12, from 3 to 7 p.m. and on Sunday, July 13, from 2 to 6 p.m. A dock part Saturday night runs until 10 p.m.

The tournament and festival are supported by marine artist and conservationist Guy Harvey of the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation.

“There is no other fishing tournament like Shark’s Eye,” Mr. Harvey said in the press release. “This tournament combines the thrill of shark fishing, practical conservation measures, and meaningful fisheries research and community involvement into a single event. It is truly the future of shark fishing tournaments.

The Montauk Marine Basin is located at 426 West Lake Drive in Montauk. For more information, call (631) 668-5900.

 

In its annual Sag Harbor house tour, the John Jermain Memorial Library presents five homes–one in North Haven and four in Sag Harbor Village–to the public. The houses were specially picked for their unique and personalized interior decorating and for the feeling of “home” each conveyed. For more information on the house tour: read the Express’ full article here.

A Swim to Save Lives

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By Mara Certic 

Hundreds of people are expected to show up to Fresh Pond in Amagansett on Saturday, July 12, in their bathing suits, trunks and goggles for a swim in aid of Fighting Chance, the cancer support group.

“Almost everything we do is fundraising for our community,” said Jim Arnold, one of the 10 officers in the East Hampton Volunteer Ocean Rescue, which is hosting its fifth annual swim in conjunction with Swim Across America this weekend.

Swimmers must raise money in order to partake in the event; children under 14 must raise a minimum of $300 and those 15 and older must get pledges for at least $500. According to Mr. Arnold, however, over the years, each swimmer has managed to collect an average of $1,000 apiece for this swim, all of which goes to benefit Fighting Chance and cancer research.

“Pretty much everyone has a story about how cancer has affected their lives,” Mr. Arnold said. He added that this one athletic event has raised over $450,000 since its inception in 2010.

Participants of all ages can choose to swim the half mile, mile or 3-mile course. “This is one of the many areas in how accomplished our swimmers are,” Mr. Arnold said. “Our children are the youngest to start in the Swim Across America events.” He explained that there are over 40 Swim Across America swims throughout the country. “We have 7- and 8-year-olds swimming the half-mile in record time,” he said.

Saturday’s swim, he added, is not competitive. Swimmers vying for a title or prize can compete in the two races organized by Ocean Rescue this summer—the Montauk Ocean Swim later this month benefits the Montauk Playhouse and August’s “Red Devil” Swim raises funds for the East Hampton YMCA Hurricanes Swim Team.  Both of these events are timed.

“If we lived on the mountains in Vermont they’d be racing down hills in record time,” he said. The very high standard of swimming might also be attributed to the Junior Lifeguarding Program organized and taught by members of the organization.

The very popular youth program for children aged 9 to 14 attracts approximately 300 kids a summer to beaches in East Hampton, Amagansett and Montauk. The summer-long program is taught by Ocean Rescue members and certified ocean lifeguards and is designed to make children more comfortable in the water, to teach them water safety and to instill among them a sense of camaraderie. “They make lifelong relationships,” Mr. Arnold said.

The volunteer organization trains and tests all of the guards, Mr. Arnold said. They hold CPR classes and hold lifeguarding tournaments. “Our little community puts forward one of the highest achieving teams” at the Lifeguarding National Championships, he said. “We’re rated right up there with Santa Monica; they have about 1,000 guards to our 60.”

The first incarnation of Ocean Rescue was the Dory Rescue Squad, a group of dory boat fishermen who realized that there was a need for a group to respond to water-related emergencies.

When that group eventually disbanded, a group of local surfers and lifeguards formed the current organization as it is today. “We’re all leftover lifeguards,” Mr. Arnold said of the organization’s members. “We’re the masters, if you will.”

In addition to responding to 911 calls and spearheading educational programs, these maritime maestros and mavens also guard all of the triathlons and paddling events in the area, including Sag Harbor’s “Paddle for Pink,” which raised $1.1 million for charity last year. “That blows us away,” he said. “That was phenomenal.”

The group is also responsible for one of winter’s most highly anticipated East End events: the Polar Bear Plunge. For a meager fundraising fee of $30, participants get to welcome in the New Year by jumping into the water at Main Beach in East Hampton—and they receive a free embroidered winter hat.

With promises to have five members at any nearby water emergency within five minutes, Ocean Rescue comprises residents dedicated to giving back to the community by saving lives, volunteering their time and supervision and educating the next generation of heroes who keep swimmers safe.

 

Aircraft Noise Still Tormenting East Hampton Residents

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By Mara Certic

Airport noise continues to disrupt residents of the East End, causing concern at the East Hampton Town Board as the busy summer season officially kicked off this Independence Day weekend.

“The horizon is littered with airplanes,” Sag Harbor resident Patricia Currie told the board on Thursday, July 3. “No peace can be found; not for man, woman or critter of any kind.”

Ms. Currie said that it was virtually impossible to enjoy peaceful recreational activities in the area anymore, adding that although helicopters are the main problem “large jets run a close second. They have been permitted at any hour.”

Ms. Currie implored the board to set in place restrictions on the types of aircraft that can use the airport and impose strict curfews. “You have the power to end the insanity,” she said. “I beg you, do not wait one day longer.”

Real Estate Agent Tom MacNiven started by complimenting the board for its work on the airport thus far. “You’re really demystifying the airport,” he said “You’re doing what the two previous administrations had ignored.”

He then, however, went on to discuss the adverse economic effects that the airport has been having in the area. Entire parts of town, he explained, have been stigmatized right now due to the incessant aircraft noise overhead. He believes this to be the reason why such a large number of available houses went unrented this summer. “What is the effect of this on my real estate?”

He said that 20 years ago the busiest day at the airport was the airport open house.

Wainscott resident Barry Raebeck also looked to the past when he addressed the board on Thursday.

Some 20 years ago, he said, the FAA qualified the East Hampton Airport as a municipal airport. Now it is a regional airport. “It has before our very eyes morphed into a monstrosity,” he said. “Will it next be a metropolitan airport?”

Helicopters fly over his Wainscott house every “three to five minutes for hours,” he said. “That’s not what we signed up for.”

He asked the board to revert the airport to what it started out as, a “local, recreational non-commercial facility,” or he said, “Close it.” Barry Raebeck is the father of Sag Harbor Express reporter Tessa Raebeck.

Tom Ogden seconded his sentiments: “The airport was a part of the fabric of the environment, but it’s become a severe problem,” he said. “Bring it back to what it was, an airport that was part of everything we love.”

Kathy Cunningham of the Quiet Skies Coalition used the date of the meeting to her advantage and, after expressing preemptive apologies to Thomas Jefferson, read the Quiet Sky Coalition’s “Declaration of Independence from the Torment of Unlimited Aircraft Noise.”

Her letter began as one might expect: “We hold these truths to be self evident that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their creator with some unalienable rights that among these are life, liberty and the pursuit of happiness.”

“Which can only be achieved,” it continued, “by substantial relief of the scourge that is aircraft noise.”

“In every stage of these oppressions we, the noise-affected, have petitioned for address in most humble terms. Even now while proper address is being sought by this town board, we continue to suffer the burdens of unlimited aircraft noise.”

The “declaration” went on to appeal to the board to remedy their suffering and restore the peace.  “These are our skies, this is our town, this is our airport.”

Most of the residents who spoke thanked the board for its efforts. One woman who lives in the Village of East Hampton even went as far to say that she was “encouraged that maybe something could be done.” She did, however, go on to say that one helicopter was flying so low overhead the previous Friday that she “could almost say hello to the pilot.”

Ms. Currie thanked the board for “restoring dignity and respect to the podium.”

“Thank you for choosing to buy more land for preservation,” she said. The Community Preservation Fund Financial report was presented in a work session meeting on Tuesday, July 1. CPF revenues, the report stated, were on the upswing and the fund is predicted to have approximately $40 million by the end of 2014.

No fewer than four CPF acquisitions were subject to public hearing in Thursday’s meeting alone, including an 18-acre area in the Northwest Woods owned by the heirs of Mary Whelan.

 

A Different Kind of Home on Show in Sag Harbor

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“House of The Whale,” by Scott Bluedorn.

By Mara Certic

A house is a walled structure with a roof and a floor and a number of other features. A home, however, is typically defined in a more abstract manner: where the heart is, where one starts from or, according to Emily Dickinson, where thou art. This ambiguity and flexibility is mirrored in “A Different Kind of Home/ Show” on view at Dodds & Eder in Sag Harbor.

Curator Kathy Zeiger, who is also the founder and director of ArtWalk Hamptons, was inspired to put on the exhibition after seeing “House of the Whale,” an ink drawing by local artist Scott Bluedorn.

“I just thought that’s so interesting,” she said of the drawing. “There are a lot of home shows that go on in the Hamptons. I’m going to do a different kind of home show.” And so the project was born.

“I have always been inspired by nautical things,” Mr. Bluedorn said in an interview on Monday. “The initial inspiration for the entire series was photographs that I took on a trip to Nova Scotia last year, and a lot of the old fishing houses, which are similar to the ones we have,” said the artist, who grew up in East Hampton.

His intricate drawings show a hybridization of nature and architecture. “I’ve always been very involved with detail in my drawings; I’ve always used texture,” he said. “That’s why shingles are such a big part of the series.”

Ms. Zeiger was determined to make this “not just your typical kind of home show,” but still wanted a homey and cozy element, which is why she chose to include textiles artist Casey Dalene. Ms. Dalene, a native of North Carolina who has lived full-time in East Hampton for the past decade, has decorated “the front nook” of the Dodds & Eder showroom for the exhibition. “I thought she would be great as ‘home sweet home,’” Ms. Zeiger said.

“I want this space to feel really warm and inviting and that’s why I chose to use drapery frames,” said Ms. Dalene who also has decorated the area with hand-painted pillows and six acrylic paintings on paper. Ms. Dalene “loves showing the artist’s hand in the work,” she said, explaining her use of obvious paintbrush strokes.

Through working with John Cino, a sculptor and the president of the Patchogue Arts Council , Ms. Zeiger met Paul Farinacci, an artist and sculptor based on the North Shore of Nassau County.

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Exterior and interior views of Paul Farinacci’s multi-media sculpture, “Assisted Living”

“He’s fantastic,” she said. “I was floored.”

For the past few years, Mr. Farinacci has been creating multi-media architectural pieces that are “kind of a response to how our private and public lives are getting blended together,” he said.

At first glance, Mr. Farinacci’s structures look like miniature papier-mâché buildings. “If they’re not in a room that’s totally dark [viewrs] don’t know to look inside,” the artist said of his sculptures.  But when spectators peek inside the handcrafted buildings, they catch a glimpse of the “dirty little secrets hidden within.” Mr. Farinacci at first used nightlights to illuminate interiors, but has since started wiring his own lights to brighten up the interiors.

Much of his artwork touches on controversial issues ranging from body image to big business. One structure, a small house within a cage, reveals on closer examination a slightly bewildered elderly woman inside, sitting alone with a cat.  Described by the artist as a commentary on the elderly, that piece is called “Assisted Living.”

Mr. Farinacci builds his sculptures entirely from recyclable paper and other materials related to the subject at hand. “I save everything you can think of,” he said.

“I get excited about artwork, I get excited about artists and I get excited about the process,” Ms. Zeiger said.

“Alexis Duque is a wonderful artist,” she said of the Colombian-born painter who now calls New York City home.

Mr. Duque creates highly detailed, whimsical acrylic paintings of cityscapes on canvas for his series “Metropolis,” which will be on view as part of the show. “I like the possibility of imagining and recreating my experience in the big city,” he wrote.

Ms. Zeiger noted similarities between the intricacies of the works of Mr. Duque and Mr. Bluedorn.

“How am I going to do something that breaks up the eye?” Ms. Zeiger asked herself. The curator always tries to include paintings, sculptures and photography, she said. Esperanza Leon recommended the mixed media artworks of Long Island artist Darlene Charneco, which “explore ways of seeing our human settlements, communication networks and communities as part of a larger organism’s growth stage,” the artist wrote.

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“Pondview Estates” by Darlene Charneco

“Pondview Estates” is made from resin and mixed media on wood; it is a commentary on “suburban developments encroaching,” Ms. Charneco said. “Humanity only partially aware of the land it is a part of.”

Ms. Charneco’s “dreamscapes and storage memories” got Ms. Zeiger thinking about “how we contain our own memories, and how we, as individuals, are our own personal homes,” she said.

The idea of each of us as our own home, she said, inspired her to exhibit portraits by Brooklyn-based Israeli photographer Rafael Fuchs. Mr. Fuchs moved to New York from Tel Aviv in the 1980s. He is a well-known commercial and entertainment photographer, and has done portraits of a diverse group including Ahmir “Questlove” Thompson, Regis Philban and David Blaine.

“Art doesn’t necessarily have to be new to be found,” Ms. Zeiger said: A portrait of Michael McKean of “Spinal Tap” fame taken in the late ’90s is included in the show at Dodds & Eder.

Rafael Fuchs is “like the mayor of Bushwick,” Ms. Zeiger said. Several years ago he did a series of portraits of artists from his neighborhood that included Mr. Bluedorn, who was living there at the time.

“There’s a connection all the time between artists,” said Ms. Zeiger. “It’s just like what happened with Pollack and deKooning, and it’s happening again. There’s a whole new generation of artists who are coming through. It’s simmering, it’s getting ready to go pop!”

 An opening reception for “A Different Kind of Home/ Show will be held at Dodds & Eder, 11 Bridge Street, Sag Harbor from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. on Saturday, July 12.

East End Weekend: Highlights of July Fourth Weekend

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Casey Evans in a San Lorenzo bikini.

Casey Evans in a San Lorenzo bikini on the beach in East Hampton.

By Tessa Raebeck

Norma Jean Pilates and San Lorenzo Bikinis are hosting a party in Sag Harbor tonight, Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 8 p.m. The event is celebrating the East Coast launch of San Lorenzo Bikinis. Guests can shop for bikinis, enjoy “bikini-friendly bites” and enter contests for “amazing” giveaways from local businesses like Happy Bowls, Flying Point and Wampum. Norma Jean Pilates is located at 52 Main Street in Sag Harbor.

To RSVP to the private party, email Abigail Gawronski at argawronski@gmail.com.

 

Mark Borghi Fine Art in Bridgehampton will showcase Bob Dylan’s work July 4 to July 18. “The Drawn Blank Series” showcases the musician’s colorful paintings and will be celebrated with an opening reception Thursday, July 3, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Mark Borghi Fine Art, 2426 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information or to RSVP, call (631) 537-7245 or visit borghi.org.

 

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“Art on the Edge” opens at Vered Contemporary in East Hampton SaturdayJuly 5, with an opening reception from 9 to 11 p.m. The expanded exhibition, an annual survey of the contemporary art of new and provocative painters, sculptors and photographers, will be on view July 5 to August 4. Nineteen modern artists will be featured.

The gallery is located at 68 Park Place in East Hampton.For more information, call (631) 324-3303 or visit veredcontemporary.com.

 

“Positivilly Marvillainous” opens at the Eric Firestone Gallery with an opening reception Saturday, July 5, from 6 to 9 p.m.

“Expanding on tradition doesn’t necessarily demand the push towards perfection or a high polish,” the gallery said in a press release. “Rather, it can entail building on established conventions in a particular artist’s unique voice. Today, contemporary artists, knowingly or unknowingly, reference George Herriman’s historically overlooked, unpretentious and universally accessible fantasy, Krazy Kat, a comic strip that ran in American newspapers from 1913 until 1944. The artists in Positivilly Marvillainous embrace tensions, arising from Herriman’s formal qualities in character portrayal, including those between line and shade, humor and drama, human and animal, collage and décollage, marvelous and villainous.”

The Eric Firestone Gallery is located at 4 Newtown Lane in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 604-2386 or visit ericfirestonegallery.com.

Summer Camp @Ross Empowers Kids With Quacks

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Summer Camp @Ross Director Christopher Engel, right, and counselors greet campers on their way into camp Tuesday, July 1. Photo by Kristen Hyland.

Summer Camp @Ross Director Christopher Engel, right, and counselors greet campers on their way into camp Tuesday, July 1. Photo by Kristen Hyland.

By Tessa Raebeck

“Pablo Picasso says,” Christopher Engel shouts, before aggressively flapping his arms and quacking like a duck. The crowd of some 250 kids gathered around him begins quacking too, perhaps to the dismay of the late Pablo Picasso.

For Mr. Engel, director of Community Programs at the Ross School in East Hampton, which includes the Summer Camp @Ross, now in its seventh year, doing ridiculous things is a means to set the stage for children to feel comfortable in their own skin.

“We try to make it imaginative and fun,” Mr. Engel said Tuesday, July 1, adding that the goal is to “make everyone feel good about who they are [and to] empower them to try and do things.”

Campers start their day by walking underneath a giant rainbow canopy, held by their counselors outside the entrance to the Wellness Center at Ross’s Upper Campus. Music blasts and the counselors dance with an energy you don’t often see among those under 25 at 8:30 a.m.

Ross Campers hang out before morning meeting Tuesday, July 1. Photo by Kristen Hyland.

Ross Campers hang out before morning meeting Tuesday, July 1. Photo by Kristen Hyland.

After dancing their way through the rainbow, campers go inside to check in with their counselors and hang out. Most of them chat excitedly, a little girl shows off her magic tricks to tennis program director Peggy Stankevich and another girl can’t seem to stop doing cartwheels.

One particularly tall counselor, Gari Blackett,  a basketball coach at the camp who is associated with the New York Knicks organization, holds a basketball up while some 10 boys jump at him.

At the campwide meeting each morning, assistant camp director Nick Behrens shoots a basketball backward over his head, aiming for the hoop at the other end of the gym. According to campers, he makes the difficult trick shot a lot, but today is not his day.

Backward basketball, although fun and somewhat ridiculous, has a serious intent behind it, Mr. Engel said. It is about empowering kids to try and do things and to feel comfortable being a little silly.

Campers can personalize their experience to pursue their own interests in sports, science, the outdoors and the arts. There are over 25 camp majors, including Junior Crime Investigators, Fashion Design, Filmmaking, Photography and Gymnastics. During the eight-week program, campers choose minors and majors. They go to their majors for the bulk of the day in the morning then regroup at lunch and do minors in the afternoon.

On Tuesday, Mr. Engel asks campers whether they think Jon Mulhern teaches tap dancing—as Mr. Mulhern does a little jig—or culinary—Mr. Mulhern pats his belly—or if he leads the Inventor’s Workshop. The tap dancing jig gives him away as the Inventor’s Workshop director.

Mr. Mulhern and counselors fashion a bridge made entirely of Popsicle sticks, hot glue and string in between two tables. A weight is hanging from the makeshift bridge. A volunteer from the mass of campers comes forward to hang on the weight and, somehow, it holds him, then another camper, a junior counselor and eventually counselor Lily-Anne Merat.

Inventor’s Workshop is one of the programs offered at the Innovation Lab, Ross’s science, math, engineering, media and technology academy. Jr. Crime Investigators, a new major in which campers are challenged to become detectives for the summer, learning forensics analysis skills like fingerprinting and ink chromatography, as well as collecting crime scene evidence and interviewing and interrogating suspects, is also offered at the lab, as are Stop-Motion Animation, Naturalist Explorers and Robotics.

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Photo by Kristen Hyland.

Inside the lab Tuesday, Summer Term students are trying to replicate the pieces of a Mr. Potato Head on a 3D printer. The three boys work with instructor Creighton Wirick and Dr. Dave Morgan, dean of science at the Ross School and director of the Innovation Lab. One of them has refashioned Rio de Janeiro’s famed statue “Christ the Redeemer” from his home country Brazil.

Campers can supplement time in the lab with outdoor activities like basketball, golf and rugby. On Tuesday, the multisport and dodge ball majors combined on the fields, with kids aged 6 to 14 competing. One would think the advantage went to the preteens, but counselor Bailey Arens insists the 6-year-olds are a threat, as they are prone to “sneak up on you,” he said.

From horseback riding to sneaking up on bigger kids to pelt them with dodge balls, the intent at Summer Camp @Ross is to help campers do what feels best. Or, as Mr. Engel said, “If you’re smart, make the sound of a dog—Pablo Picasso says woof.”

East Hampton Town Warns of Heavy Surf Conditions, Strong Rip Currents

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Virginia Briggs of East Hampton shakes her fist in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

Virginia Briggs of East Hampton shakes her fist in the aftermath of Superstorm Sandy in October 2012. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

Strong rip currents currently exist in the Atlantic Ocean along the East End’s beaches and heavy surf conditions are forecast for the 4th of July weekend, East Hampton Town Emergency Preparedness Coordinator Bruce A. Bates announced Wednesday, July 2.

In a message authorized by town supervisor Larry Cantwell, the town warned ocean bathers to swim only at lifeguard protected beaches.