Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Firefighters Battle House Fire in Springs

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Heller_SFD Working Fire 52 Cedar Drive 7-1-14_2652_7x

 

Photo by Michael Heller

At roughly 5:00 p.m. the Springs Fire Department was called to 52 Cedar Drive for a report of a structure fire. First arriving units reported flames extending up the front of the building and into the roof, but firefighters were able to know the flames down quickly without incident. The East Hampton Fire Department’s RIT (Rapid Intervention Team) was called to the scene to stand by, and one engine from the Amagansett FD was called to stand by at the Springs firehouse. All units were back in service within two hours, and the East Hampton Town Fire Marshal’s Office is investigating the fire’s cause and origin.

After Once, It’s Time to Begin Again

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beginagainposter

 

By Danny Peary

The cast and director. Danny Peary photo.

The cast and director. Danny Peary photo.

Begin Again fits my category Movies That Should Play in Sag Harbor. John Carney’s extremely engaging follow-up to the 2006 international sensation Once opened last Friday in New York City and this Wednesday begins its national release. I anticipate that it will soon play in the East End because who isn’t curious about seeing Keira Knightley sing and Adam Levine act?  They, surprisingly, come off with flying colors doing both.  They play a song-writing couple, Gretta and Dave, who split when he becomes a huge recording star and is unfaithful. In New York, she stays with her busker friend, Steve (James Corden, who won the Tony as the lead in Broadway’s One Man, Two Guvnors) and is about to go back to London when she is “discovered” singing at a club by a heavy-drinking, formerly successful A&R man, Dan (Mark Ruffalo).  Dan is estranged from his wife (Catherine Keener) and teenage daughter (Hailee Steinfeld) and is on his last legs, thinking he’d never find a raw talent again.  Hoping that starting her career with a hit album can rescue his career, the re-energized Dan records the semi-reluctant Gretta singing at outdoor locations around the city with a makeshift band of his musician friends.  The movie comes off as a fantasy set in an alternate New York but like Once it effectively brings real emotions and issues to the surface and you’re happy to go along for the ride.  And then there’s the music.  In the New York Times, A.O. Scott was really unkind to the songs.  Pay no attention. It’s a fabulous soundtrack and the way both Knightley and Levine perform the catchy, well-written songs in the movie is exciting. Begin Again is more flawed than Once, but it too is the rare movie you can recommend to almost anyone.  I attended the following press conference held last Thursday in SoHo.  In attendance were (R-L in the picture) Carney, Knightley, Levine, Ruffalo, and Corden.

Kiera Knightly and Adam Levine.

Keira Knightly and Adam Levine.

Moderator: John, there was this movie that came out, Once, that was a global phenomenon.  We talked a few weeks ago, when you were in Dublin, where you live, and you told me that you had the idea for Begin Again back when you were wrapping Once, but that you wanted to wait before you started working on it.  Is that right?

John Carney: I did want to wait so that the two films weren’t following each other directly. I feared I’d just become the ‘music guy,’ which is what has happened anyway. So waiting did nothing for that. But I did want to wait until the story was ready.  I’ve been watching the music industry change so much even since then, so I’ve developed the story on those terms. I think the print industry is the only industry that has changed to the same degree that the music industry has changed.

Moderator: And the inspiration was that when you were in high school you were touring with a band. And you thought it would be interesting to tell the story…

JCa: Well, actually I was in a band after I left high school. I had a bunch of A&R men angling for the next U2, which we weren’t, unfortunately, but Dublin was the city that everybody came to.  I guess they went a lot to London as well. These A&R men were really 25-year-old guys, with coke habits and credit cards without limits. And they were sort of swarming around, bringing these band kids out to clubs and wining and dining them, just in hopes of finding the next big band. The stories they were telling us! And I just look back over my life and I wonder where those guys are now, and I wonder whether they’ve adapted to the massive changes in the industry.  Still got the coke habit? Are they still trying to discover music?  Is that desire still there? Even though the Internet has changed the industry, are there still music-loving A&R men on the hunt for that new magical thing? Is that magical thing still out there?

Moderator: And the first person you cast was Mark Ruffalo as a heavy-drinking, washed-up former A&R man.

JCa: Yeah, Mark was the dream guy for this role.

Moderator: Mark, do you sing at all in real life?

Mark Ruffalo: No. Well, I did sing for the movie and it was cut out. I was singing in the shower.  It was supposed to be a lyric poem song.  But we couldn’t get the rights to that song.

JCa (joking): That’s what I said to Mark.

Moderator: And Keira, have you sung in public before?

Keira Knightley: Yes and no!  I did a film years ago called The Edge of Love and I sang a bit in that. A very 1940s kind of theatrical thing. So yes, I have sung before but it was very different.

Q: Did you take lessons?

KK: They very kindly got me some lessons with a very lovely man called Roger Love. For a lot of those songs, the lyrics weren’t written until a couple of days before we got into the studio so we didn’t have the songs to try to figure it out before we got there.  So it was just about trying to figure out what my voice was, because I didn’t know.  He tried to figure that out.

JCa: It was fun actually. We had this really new song and she went in and sang the first few lines and we all gave a sigh of relief.  We knew we can make this work!

KK (laughing): I wasn’t exactly relaxed when I was doing it.

Moderator: Adam, you did this before appearing in American Horror Story. You hadn’t done any acting before. Did you take acting classes?

AL: No. I tried to take one and it didn’t go well. It was bizarre. I didn’t like it. I didn’t like what I was being told, because it wasn’t making me happy, but that’s a whole other conversation I don’t want to have. So I just thought that I would pretend that I knew what I was doing and hope and pray that it worked, because these people on stage with me are all very, very talented. Mark’s shaking his head because he’s angry with me. But yeah, no lessons, actually.

MR: I’m shaking my head because for some people acting is so easy.  And acting isn’t easy.

Moderator: And James, you’re now in Into the Woods. And you’ve been a singer for quite some time.

James Corden: Yeah, I’m a professional singer. It’s my trade. I’m joking – not at all. But I have a theory that all rock starts want to be actors and all actors want to be rock stars, so I spent my whole school life forming boy bands.  I was in a boy band called Insatiable. We were quite big in the Buckinghamshire area, you might know.  We had a song that I wrote, called “Girl Are You Ready?”  We thought it was amazing, but in hindsight I think it sounds a bit rapey.   It didn’t work out for us. But since Adam’s heard some of Insatiable’s stuff, I think we’re going to hook up for some tracks. I think we’ll most definitely go forward.

Adam Levine (straight-faced): I look forward to that.

JCo: It’s a big surprise but I can share it with you guys. We’re going to be called Maroon 6.

MR: And Satiated.

Question from Journalist: Now that you’re all wonderfully successful, was it easy or hard to go back to that experience of being a struggling artist?

MR: It wasn’t my favorite place to be, so it’s not easy to go back there.

JCo: Mark really committed to the alcoholism aspect of the film. Because at the time I was on Broadway, I would shoot in the afternoon and get in a car and whisk across town to do the play and then quite often go back afterward and shoot quite a lot of the montage stuff.  And it was a great time when we were on the subway shooting this montage scene, and Mark said, “You must be exhausted from just doing the play, you must really need a drink,” and he was holding a Starbucks cup, and I said, yeah, I could really use one, and he passed me this Starbucks cup and it contained a vodka tonic. I really thought, well, this is the greatest moment of my life. I’m drinking booze with Mark Ruffalo while watching him film on the subway.

JCa: A little anecdote to that: the first AD comes up to me on the film set and says, Mark and James are both drinking alcohol–they think we don’t know, but we do know!

Q: Can Adam and Keira answer that question too about whether it’s hard to go back to play a struggling artist.

KK: I’m an actress, so yeah.

AL: You know, my character is kind of in the midst of becoming successful, and it was a very specific time when it happened to me. I was probably tempted by some of the same things that Dave is.  My story’s very different than his, but it was very easy to tap into what it was like to experience all these things that we never expect to experience. When you’re a musician, I don’t know if you’re ever very sure of anything.  You never know what’ll pay the bills–you don’t care about that as much as you care about playing music.  So this guy is just overwhelmed, and so was I, so that was pretty easy to play, actually. I believe that had something to do with why John called me.  Very few people get to experience those things and I think he thought I’d be able to articulate it for the camera. It was all John telling me what to do the entire time.

Q: Did you say yes right away when John called you?

AL: Yes.  Fuck yes, I believe..

Q: Adam, now that you’ve gotten a taste of acting, where do you want to take it?

AL: I have no idea. All I know is it was really fun. It was a dream experience.  I don’t think I could have done it [without these people up here.] This sounds really kiss-assy, though it’s really not meant to be, but I love these guys–all of them. They were so nice. I had no scenes with Mark, and the first day I got there and was trying on my clothes for the film, and he was so welcoming and warm and sweet. He and John and Keira and everybody made it easy. It was just one of those things, I don’t think it can get better than this, so I might not ever make another movie!  There’s no way it can surpass this as far as how much fun I had, it was a blast.

JCo: It stops being fun after the first movie!

Q: And, Adam, how did you tap into and relate to your character?

AL: I wanted to treat this guy, Dave, like a totally different person from me, even though it was impossible, because I literally don’t know how to act. So I was like, okay, some of me is coming out here, it’s not fucking possible that’s not going to happen. Referring to my character, like I said, there was a very specific point in my life, where I thought, “Oh my God, you know, I’ve made it!” There were fifty of those moments, I’ve been so fortunate in my career. There was a time probably in the early 2000s when our album went platinum, when I said, “What, are you kidding me?”  That was when I partied too hard and did a lot of stupid things and that is part of who Dave is. I was that guy.

Q: Keira, did you draw on anyone for inspiration for Gretta.

KK: I didn’t, no.  The part wasn’t based on anything for me, we just sort of worked on it from the character’s point of view, like “Okay, this is somebody who doesn’t like fawning, she’s just somebody who really likes being in the background.” It was just about finding what would work for me.

Q: What about the inspiration for Dan?

JCa: I had a really good conversation early on, years ago, with Mark.  Mark, you were shooting somewhere in Ireland, and I couldn’t believe that I’d gotten your phone number and I rang you up and we had a discussion about this character. And we ended up talking a lot about 1970s movies that we loved, like The French Connection with Gene Hackman.  We we were trying to find what the vibe might be like with this guy, and a bunch of late ‘60s, early ‘70s films were references.

MR: Well, I did want him to feel a little bit like a throwback.  And I liked the kind of A Star Is Born relationship that Dan has with Gretta. It’s warm, it’s not sexualized. He’s someone who really sees a talent and wants to develop it. I do a fair amount of daydreaming about these people, and I somehow came to this idea that any music person I played would be like Wayne Coyne from the Flaming Lips.

AL: It’s so fucking funny you just said that because the second I saw you, you just exuded that guy.  That’s Wayne Coyne! You looked like him, your hair looked like his hair. Wow!  I’m so glad you said that.

MR: I really love him, he feels like the real deal as far as music goes. I hope he doesn’t take offense to my homage to him. But I’m a big fan of his. So he was probably the only music person I drew from, although with Dan’s glasses, there was probably a little weird Dylan type gene. But that was pretty much it.

JCa; You use one thing as an actor, and that alone gives you the character. I thought the glasses were that for you, Mark.

MR: That and Dan smokes. I knew an old Jewish songwriter who was a manager in the ‘70s, and he was on the music scene and so a lot of my character’s qualities, especially the Nat Sherman cigarettes and that gruff quality, that throwback quality, were his. He was a really interesting character.

Q: Keira, In regard to clothes, was there anything about [your previous characters] Anna Karenina or Sabina Spielrein that you found in Gretta, and if either of them were to give advice to Gretta, should she take it?

KK: No on the advice.  The clothes–we actually had discussions with the costume designer.  I wanted Gretta to dress for women, not for men.  I wanted her clothes to be something that women would like and get for themselves, and men wouldn’t necessarily get it for them. So we worked quite hard on that kind of idea. So that slightly tomboy, slightly Annie Hall, completely non-sexualized thing is what were going for. The men’s trousers was a big thing.

Q: This movie is an attack on selling out in the music industry, but all of you have to confront that daily, whether you’re in the film industry or the music industry. For instance, you make small films but after a few small films, you have to make a big film. So when that happens, do each of you say, “Well, I have to sell out a little today?”

KK: Do I have to go first?  Well, I like differences, and I think that’s what’s been really nice about being Gretta.  I don’t dislike big blockbusters, in fact I like them very much and sometimes that’s exactly what’s called for on a day when it’s raining and I want to sit and have popcorn and just kind of get lost in a movie. I think about that as far as making them, as well. I did Jack Ryan because I wanted to do a pure piece of popcorn. And it exactly fit coming after I did Anna Karenina, this incredibly stylized movie that was—we were sort of trying something in a new way—very, very dark. What I really wanted after that experience was to make something absolutely different. And it was the same with Begin Again.. I wanted it to be really low-budget and hit the ground running and keep going as fast as possible, all that. I wanted that kind of speed. So I feel incredibly privileged that I get the opportunity to do both types of films. I certainly don’t sneer at big-budget things, and I don’t sneer at small-budget things, I think it’s about the opportunity for me to do all different styles of movies.

JCo: Most things aren’t very good, but that’s nothing to do with scale or size or any of those things. Most things, 90%, just aren’t that great. No one sets out to make something bad, sometimes they just are. And the trick is to operate in that 10%, whether it be something with a huge budget or a small budget, and that goes for music, television, theater, art, everything. You want to operate in the 10% but acknowledge that sometimes you’ll miss the mark with that, and sometimes you’ll make mistakes.  But those are the only things that teach you to go on and try and operate in that place where you can make something that’s really good. I love watching films that some people would say are trash, and I love  watching things in a different style. I don’t think it’s a question of selling out or not selling out, I think it’s just trying at the core to make something that’s good. And there’s no better representative of that than this film, where a group of actors get on board with a director they love because they’d seen something of his that they loved. We all went, “Yeah I’m in on this journey with you, John, whatever it is and wherever we go. And I’ll absolutely do my best to make sure it sits within that 10%.”

AL: I really want to answer this question. There’s a great scene in the movie with you guys [Mark and Keira] when Dan and Gretta talk about how people spend a lot of time figuring out who they are and presenting that to the world and then re-calculating.   I think in order to understanding selling out, you first have to define what it means to sell out. To do something you don’t want to do because you might be able to gain something financially, or to not be behind something that you wind up doing for some other reason–that’s probably what I’d call selling out. Not feeling good about doing something that might help you get ahead. But doing something that you love regardless of whether it’s making a blockbuster movie or writing a pop song or trying shamelessly to succeed at something–that’s not selling out, I think that’s actually fine and I would encourage that all the time. Selling out really comes at a point when you sacrifice your own personal credibility in order to have success on a larger scale.  Doing something that makes you feel gross and benefitting from it. That’s what that is to me. And it’s very clear-cut. But people do have a hard time defining it, and they kind of throw a lot of things out there and say it about giant movies or a huge record that’s very popular and a lot of people like…and people then say they don’t like them anymore [because they had commercial success]. I always hated that growing up and if my favorite bands became successful I thought, “Good for you, that is fucking amazing, congratulations, I still love you!”  I didn’t get a selfish, possessive, bullshit attitude and think “Oh, they were mine and now they’re everyone else’s and I don’t like them anymore.” That’s a horrible way to operate. God, they get to pay the bills and have amazing lives, that’s great. And they’re a great band, fuck yeah.  So that’s how I feel.

MR: I got into acting because I wanted to act, and I love acting. And so that’s my true north, to be creative and to be challenged in what I love to do. And sometimes that takes me into a big-budget movie, sometimes that takes me to a small-budget movie, but I’m doing essentially the same thing in each one of those, which is stretching in a way that I hadn’t. That’s my aim. I come from the theater, and in the theater you’re never pegged for one thing. You can be in a comedy in one season and you can be the romantic lead the next season, and you can do a period piece the following season and do something modern the season after that. No one ever says to you, “This is what you have to do! This is what we expect of you!” So that work ethic is what I know to bring to my film work as well. It just takes you on this wild ride.  And, cynically, the day that I decide to do something just purely for monetary gain or because it is going to get me to the next thing  will, I think, only lead to my downfall somewhere. It hurts your creative self. And so I think the idea of selling out is a lot of times a projection that people create about artists that is more a reflection of who they are than what is actually happening in front of them with the artist.

JCo: I slept with John to get in the film, and it didn’t feel like I was selling out at the time. I’d do it again.

Q: Keira, how did you relate to the romantic and the heartbreak aspect of the movie?

KK: I think it’s what I liked about the film. You can kind of take it out of the music industry story, and essentially what it’s about is people falling down in life and trying to pick themselves back up, and whether that has to do with a relationship or a career or wherever. I think you can’t be adult and not have felt that in whatever extreme way. So obviously yeah, I completely understood where Gretta was coming from and the feeling that you know exactly what’s going on and who you are and where you’re going and suddenly finding that you have no idea who you are, where you’re going, or what’s going on. All adults have experienced that.

Moderator: Finally, John, can you talk about the scene in which Gretta and Dan walk around Times Square. Was it at three o’clock in the morning and you had a handheld camera?

JCa: Yeah, we did actually. That was the one true maverick moment working on this movie, when we did not get permits and it was Mark, Keira, me, an AD, and a focus puller. There was supposedly no way we were doing to get that scene I had written in Ireland of walking around in Times Square.  Those three words—“in Times Square”—terrorized the producers.  People would get the script and go, “Ha, that’s not going to happen!”  It can happen as long as you don’t tell anybody or try to close it down, because that would have looked ridiculous.  We didn’t want extras pretending that they’re looking up at signs going, “Wow, Times Square!” So they’re real tourists walking around in the movie.  If I extended any shot in that sequence by two frames, there’d be someone going, “It’s Keira Knightley and Mark Ruffalo!”

AL: There’s a scene Keira and I shot in which our characters are walking into an apartment building together and someone recognizes Dave and comes up to him–and only thirty seconds earlier two girls had come up to me on the street. So literally it was happening and then we shot the scene where it was happening and there was just no difference between reality and what we shot.  There was zero projection of anybody and it was great because we were immersed in all of it the whole time. It felt real because it was. Shooting on the street was amazing.

JCo: I’m still surprised that we got away with it in New York. Sorry man, but the paparazzi just follow me wherever I go.

JCa: We had to take James’s name off the call sheets to try to get them off his scent.

East End Weekend: Highlights of June 27 – 29 Events

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Marc Dalessio, "Tina Under the Olive Tree" 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Tina Under the Olive Tree” 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

By Tessa Raebeck

Marc Dalessio, "Laundry in the Wind" 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Laundry in the Wind” 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

There’s a lot going on on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for a new solo show of Marc Dalessio, a regular artist at the gallery who spent the last year traveling the world looking for beauty. “Ironically, the most beautiful subject was found right at home,” gallery owner Laura Grenning said in a press release, speaking of “Tina Under the Olive Tree,” a plein air painting of his newly wed wife at his longtime farmhouse in Tuscany.

According to Ms. Grenning, Mr. Dalessio’s “humility, a rare commodity in the art world today, is sincere–just look at the paintings. These ideas, although not articulated at the time, explain my personal choice to leave the world of international finance and move to [the] East End almost 20 years ago.”

“The Grenning Gallery,” she added, “was created to provide a stable exhibition space and steady source of capital for these artists to continue their efforts to seek out and record nature’s beauty for the rest of us.”

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

 

A seal named Ocean will be released by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation Saturday morning at 10 a.m. Ocean the seal will return to his home and namesake following two months of rehabilitation at the foundation after he was found in Montauk suffering from a broken jaw and respiratory condition.

After Oceans of Hope, the foundation’s annual fundraising event Friday, Ocean the seal will be released from under the Ponquogue Bridge in Hampton Bays.

 

 

Design Night Sag Harbor opens high-end stores for charity Saturday in an evening of shopping, wine, and fundraising for at-risk youth. Participating stores are donating 10 percent of sales to Community of Unity, a non-profit that empowers young people at risk to make good choices for their futures.

Ten Sag Harbor boutiques are participating: Urban Zen, Bloom, JanGeorge, Sylvester & Co., La Lampade, Ruby Beets, La Maisonette, Black Swan Antiques, JED and MAX ID NY. Design Night runs from 5 to 8 p.m.

 

Rounding out the weekend Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m. Sylvester & Co. At Home is hosting an opening reception for EJ Camp’s show “Faces of the Sea.” The Amagansett branch of the store, which also has a shop in Sag Harbor, will show the photographer’s photos of the East End sea, from fog over Orient Bay to the tide crashing into the jetty on Georgica Beach in East Hampton.

E.J. Camp, "Trumans Beach Sunset."

E.J. Camp, “Trumans Beach Sunset.”

 

CPF Up 5 Percent for Year

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The Peconic Bay Community Preservation Fund has raised $28.26 million for the first five months of the year, a 5 percent increase over the same period last year when it collected $36.38 million, according to Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr.

Since it was created in 1999, the CPF, which is funded by a real estate transfer tax in the five East End towns, has collected$923 million.

It is on pace this year to better the 2013 totals, which was the second most successful year in its history, after 2007.

“This reflects the continued strength in East End real estate and the continued availability to local towns of the necessary revenues to protect community character,” he said in a release.

Southampton is leading all towns,  collecting a total of $22.5 million this year, while East Hampton has collected $11.66 million. Southold has collected $1.7 million, Riverhead $1.58 million, and Shelter Island, $820,000.

Bob Bori

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 bobbori

Bob Bori is beginning his fifth season as the Sag Harbor harbormaster. He discusses his job and how he prepares for the summer boating season.

By Mara Certic

You worked as a police officer for Southampton Town for 23 years. You have been a member of the Sag Harbor Fire Department for 35 years. Is experience in law enforcement a pre-requisite for becoming the harbormaster?

For civil service it’s a good idea to have some prior experience, if not, you have to go to a police officers school held by the Sheriff’s office.  And some marine experience—I mean I worked on the bay when I was younger before I started working at the police department. And I’ve been on the water ever since I was a kid, clamming, fishing, scalloping.

With a staff of only eight, how do you manage to keep on top of the waterways when hundreds of boats arrive for the summer?

Ed Michaels is a senior harbormaster in East Hampton; he’s in charge of the marine patrol. And he was pretty much instrumental in putting the East End Law Enforcement Task Force together about six or eight years ago. And what it did was brought all the East End marine patrols together. I was just working on the preparations for the upcoming fireworks. For example, because we only have one boat, the other jurisdictions get together. East Hampton’s sending a boat, Southampton will send two boats, Shelter Island will send a boat and we’ll use a couple of fireboats.

What else have you been doing to prepare for the Independence Day fireworks?

Everybody’s assigned an area, a certain sector out there that they’re responsible for, and then in case there’s an EMS issue or somebody gets sick, or there’s an arrest situation we figure out ahead of time how that’s going to be addressed. The firework barge goes about 2,000 feet northeast of the breakwater; so there are a lot of boats that go out from all over. We have to keep a certain zone cordoned off as a safety zone.

How many accidents are there during a typical summer season?

It varies. Last year was pretty quiet, but the year before we had quite a few. I’m guessing maybe 12 or 15 accident reports the year before last; for the most part those accidents are people hitting rocks at Gull Island—which is just north of here, south of the main channel. Some people just don’t know the area and don’t really know what they’re doing. The last really serious accident was about eight years ago—a few kids got seriously injured, but since then, at least in the last five years we haven’t had anything major.

What preventative measures do you take to avoid accidents?

We started last summer, and we’re doing it again this summer, having some boating-while-intoxicated checkpoints. It works out pretty well, everybody’s limited in resources but then when we need them—or if there’s a serious boat accident or a search and rescue trip, then everyone gets involved.

If there is an accident out on the water that requires an emergency response, what is the general procedure?

If there is a boat accident, I get dispatched and if it comes through that there are injuries onboard, then the ambulance will be dispatched too, and the fire department. Everybody goes out. We usually have a plan in place where I take a few EMTs out with me on my boat and a few of them also go out on the fireboat, and we assess it from there.

This week, the Village Board approved advertising spots in your mooring field, just south of the breakwater. What provoked you to seek that approval?

People just aren’t re-upping this year; we have two lists for dock spaces and moorings, residents and non-residents. The dock spaces are the premium and we have a lot of people who want them. But for some reason, we haven’t received as much interest in our mooring spots this year.

 

The Secret Life of Long Pond Greenbelt

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deerfoweb

 

Two deer fighting in Long Pond Greenbelt. Photo by Jill Musnicki.

By Mara Certic

After a burglar repeatedly tried to break into her parents’ home, Jill Musnicki and her husband had the idea to install motion-sensitive cameras around the property to try to catch the crook red-handed. The police ended up catching the pilferer without the help of the cameras, but the security system she had set up inspired Ms. Musnicki to embark on an artistic investigation of her own.

“As I watched what images came out, I thought it would be neat to use them in an artistic way,” she said. As part of the Parrish Art Museum’s road show in 2012, Ms. Musnicki installed game cameras from Water Mill to Montauk to shoot pictures of unsuspecting creatures as they moved past.

The artist, who is a fourth generation East End resident, wanted to show the lives of the animals who continue to live among us, in spite of all the development that has depleted their natural habitats. The show was called “What Comes Around,” and provided a fascinating glimpse into what animals do when undisturbed by humans.

This Friday, June 27, at the South Fork Natural History Museum in Bridgehampton, Ms. Musnicki will present “What Comes Around II,” which will show the secret behavior of the animals who live in the 1,100 acres of Long Pond Greenbelt.

According to Ms. Musnicki, the cameras she installed throughout the area—which stretches from Sagaponack to Sag Harbor—are typically used by hunters to “track where the action’s going on.”

The artist, however, uses them to catch glimpses of foxes, osprey and endless deer interacting, uninterrupted by the hustle and bustle of humanity. The cameras take still pictures whenever something moves in front of them, Ms. Musnicki explained. She then collected them and has spent hours whittling down the series of images from 100,000 to 5,000.

“I put myself in the zone, sit in front of the computer, scroll through thousands of pictures,” she said. The process, she said, is hugely time consuming: “It definitely takes me away from my painting in the studio,” said the artist who is primarily known for her work in that medium.

After whittling out the photos triggered by a leaf or a twig blowing in front of the camera, Ms. Musnicki enters them into a film editing software in which she, with help, edits the pictures together, speeds up the process and creates a stop-motion film of the undisturbed animal kingdom. “It’s a little tiny pocket of animal life,” she said.

A large part of the artistic process is in the presentation of her hidden cameras’ shots.

Ms. Musnicki’s edits become a “fast little film,” adding an interesting artistic element to the project. The same film will be projected onto two giant screens at the Museum Barn at SOFO. The films will be screened in a round, if you will, with one starting five minutes after the first. “The more screens I have the more dynamic it becomes,” she said.

The Long Pond Greenbelt cameras have captured pictures of “lots of creatures,” Ms. Musnicki said. The nine-month span of this project has allowed Ms. Musnicki to document baby foxes growing up. “There’s a little log that a turtle jumped off of,” she added. The artist’s house faces part of the reserve. “I particularly love the [camera] across the street from me, so much stuff happens there,” she said, citing a brawl that she captured between two deer locking horns.

The project, she added, “involves people in every step of the process. When it comes to show it, I definitely feed off of people. I need help, I get help, people like to help, and so it turns into a nice collaboration,” she said.

Each project is very different, she said. The friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt “know where to go, and that was fun for me, to learn a few places that I didn’t know of.” Ms. Musnicki has also been working in collaboration with the Nature Conservancy on a similar project at the Warhol Estate in Montauk, thanks to grants from the conservancy and Warhol Foundation.

A preview of the Montauk project will be shown on five different screens the next day on Saturday, June 28, at the Nature Conservancy’s Beaches and Bays Gala at the Center for Conservation in East Hampton.

The final Warhol project, which has been in the works for a year, will be shown at a later date and will be the artist’s most dynamic and detailed view into our animal neighbors and “a life of their own in the middle of all of us,” she said.

What Comes Around II will be shown on Friday, June 27, from 5 to 7 p.m. at the South Fork Natural History Museum Art Barn, located at 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike in Bridgehampton. A preview of the Warhol project will be shown at the Beaches & Bays Gala on Saturday, June 28, which will take place at the Center for Conservation on Route 114 in East Hampton.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Proposed Beach Alcohol Ban Has East Hampton Town Boards at Odds

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 wellswebb

By Mara Certic

A proposed ban on alcohol at two beaches in Amagansett has the two elected branches of East Hampton Town’s government at odds.

The East Hampton Town Board has suggested a ban on drinking at Indian Wells and Atlantic Avenue Beaches in Amagansett during lifeguarding hours in the summer months in an effort to curtail what many believe to be inappropriate behavior that has become more prevalent over the past few years.

One speaker at the public hearing on Thursday, Mark Schultz, referred to Indian Wells Beach as “frat beach.”

But the town board’s proposal has frustrated many of the Trustees, who obtained their power from King James II in 1686 and to this day own and manage the beaches on behalf of the commonality.

In the past few years, Indian Wells Beach has transformed. In 2012 the family-friendly beach in Amagansett began to host a different sort of beach-goer after various media began advertising the town beach as “the place to party.”

According to Police Chief Michael Sarlo, this resulted in hundreds of people showing up to the beach on weekends with coolers, kegs and loud music—and about 60 summons a year, roughly half of which were issued for open containers of alcohol in the parking lot, the rest for public urination, littering and failure to follow posted regulations or directions from the lifeguards.

The situation “became dangerous” and the “flow of traffic became burdensome,” according to Chief Sarlo. The problem, however, is difficult to enforce, as officers must physically witness violations in order to issue a summons.

Another problem, according to the police chief, is that the acts that are being committed do not actually rise to the level required by the New York State penal code, even though they “may be offensive to some, and may be morally questionable.”

For example, he explained, according to state law, the revelers cannot be cited for unlawful assembly unless their reason for congregating is to engage or prepare to engage in tumultuous or violent conduct.  “Once again,” he said. “[Unlawful assembly is] a class b misdemeanor and the courts have not found, unfortunately, that beer funnels or drinking games are tumultuous and violent conduct.”

The proposed ban would prohibit drinking alcohol from 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. every day, in an area spanning 3,000 feet—1,500 feet both east and west of the road end.

The Trustees had suggested that the ban be in effect only on weekends and only in 500 feet in each direction from the parking lot.

Trustee Deborah Klughers expressed concern that increasing the area of the alcohol ban would, in fact, worsen the current situation, because the revelers would move farther down the beach, out of lifeguarded areas and farther away from garbage cans and the restrooms. “They will be urinating in the dunes, they will be littering more,” she said. “Pushing these people away will push them even farther away, to other beaches in our community.”

Many of those who spoke on Thursday—both for and against the law—said that this was a problem unique to Indian Wells Beach, and they did not understand why the beach at Atlantic Avenue was included.

Ms. Klughers said in Thursday’s meeting that Councilman Peter Van Scoyoc had forwarded her e-mails that the town board had received from the public concerning this issue, but that they mentioned solely Indian Wells as the problem beach in the town. “They were clear in their e-mails that they were in favor of banning at Indian Wells, but not at Atlantic,” she said.

Mr. Schultz, who is in favor of the ban, spoke after Ms. Klughers and said “I agree, this is an Indian Wells problem, for now.”

In an interview on Tuesday, East Hampton Town Trustee Clerk Diane McNally said that the town board had included the beach at Atlantic Avenue into this law “just because of its close proximity” to Indian Wells.

Ms. McNally said that the Trustees “were hoping that the issues of public intoxication or disorderly conduct could be addressed in another fashion instead of a new law.” What the alternative could be, however, she was “not clear on,” she said.

“We want to just be sure that we’re not going to inadvertently cause more problems,” she said.

Diane Walker spoke out in favor of the ban on Thursday: “The East Hampton Town Trustees who are the property managers for our beaches want peace and good order,” she said.  The East Hampton Town Trustees are conditioned to be defensive about their jurisdictions. The East Hampton Town Trustees sometimes lose perspective. What must be agreed upon is a good faith experiment to restore peace and good order at Atlantic and Indian Wells Beaches.

Ms. Walker suggested a mobile court to allow arrests to be adjudicated at the scene.

The town board and the Trustees will continue their discussions over the coming weeks, according to Ms. McNally.

 

On View in East Hampton: FAPE Fills American Embassies with Art

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"View Points" by William Wegman, with his dog Penny, 2005.

“View Points” by William Wegman, with his dog Penny, 2005. Part of the FAPE collection now on view at Guild Hall.

By Tessa Raebeck

Art needs no language to be understood; it communicates without spoken word.

This is the idea behind FAPE, the Foundation for Art and Preservation in Embassies, which aims to promote unity and open communication across cultures and countries by putting artwork in United States embassies across the world.

Honoring the long connection between American artists and the East End, the first comprehensive exhibition of FAPE’s collection is opening Saturday, June 28, at Guild Hall in East Hampton. It will be on view through July 27.

FAPE started in 1989 with Frank Stella’s donation of enough prints of “The Symphony” to be sent to every American embassy. It has grown to include the work of noted artists such as Chuck Close, Jasper Johns, Ellsworth Kelly, Roy Lichtenstein and Robert Rauschenberg.

“For the first time, the public will have the rare opportunity to view works commissioned by and donated to FAPE by some of this country’s most iconic artists in a concentrated setting,” said FAPE Chairman Jo Carole Lauder in a press release. “We celebrate these artists’ generosity and the places they hold in the history of American art.”

“Jo Carole Lauder asked me if I wanted to do something and of course I said yes, because it’s a really good thing,” said William Wegman, a FAPE artist known for his books and photos of his pet Weimaraners, the tall and thin gray dogs that were originally bred and used by royalty for hunting. “Also, Jo Carole is a really good supporter of the arts and anything she recommends tends to be worthwhile.”

Mr. Wegman is currently focusing on geometric shapes and sculpture in his photos.

“One of my dogs, Topper, is such a magnificent piece of sculpture and he likes being on top of things,” he explained. “So, I’m accommodating him—I usually do change according to the dogs.”

The first dog he photographed was Man Ray, who became so popular the Village Voice named him “Man of the Year” in 1982. Since then, he’s photographed Fay, her daughter Batty who “was very narcoleptic and could care less,” and an assortment of other Weimaraner personalities.

Batty, he said, “was willing to do anything, but had this sort of whatever attitude, was very comic where Fay was kind of scary and serious.”

“So, when I was casting my first children’s book, Fay became both the Fairy Godmother and the Evil Stepmother and Batty became Cinderella,” he added.

Fay’s firstborn son, Chundo, resembled a prince, but could also be a wolf, as in Mr. Wegman’s well-known 1993 book, “Little Red Riding Hood.”

Chundo, said the artist, was “named after the biggest person I ever met in the south of Chile on a trip I made back in the ’80s.”

After that came Chip, Batty’s son, who was “incredibly handsome and kind of sad looking, so in a lot of my books he became this kind of wistful boyish figure that things happen to.”

Chip’s son Bobbin was “much more scary looking and looked really quite evil, even though he wasn’t. He just had a very severe, humorless face.”

One of Mr. Wegman’s current dogs, Penny, who is featured in the FAPE exhibition, was on the cover of National Geographic. He was asked to create a photo to accompany a February 2012 article on the dog genome.

Penny, who wore dozens of wigs and costumes for the photo shoot, was his best worker, “probably the only dog I never once had to reprimand,” he said.

“She was really remarkable, very still and had this sort of inner quiet to her,” added Mr. Wegman. “Unless there was a thunderstorm and then she disappeared.”

Throughout the exhibition, Guild Hall is hosting panels with the artists, curators and FAPE personnel. Guest Curator Robert Starr, chairman of FAPE’s Professional Fine Arts Committee and dean of the Yale School of Art, is moderating the opening panel on Saturday, June 28, from 3 to 4 p.m.

Panelists include artists Tina Barney, Lynda Benglis, Mr. Close, Joel Shapiro and Carrie Mae Weems. Two additional panels will be held Sunday, July 20, and Sunday, July 27, at 11 a.m.

Lynda Benglis. Untitled (Half Sphere). 2007. Cast bronze. 37.5 x 36 x 17.5 in. Part of the FAPE collection on view at Guild Hall.

Lynda Benglis. Untitled (Half Sphere). 2007. Cast bronze. 37.5 x 36 x 17.5 in. Part of the FAPE collection on view at Guild Hall.

Ms. Benglis first made waves when she burst onto the art scene in the ‘70s. In an ad for Artforum in 1974, she posed naked with a giant fake penis, aiming to mock both artists and feminists who take themselves too seriously, as well as the idea of sexuality. Needless to say, it caused some backlash.

Today, Ms. Benglis splits her time between several art studios from India to New Mexico, working on different projects at each and returning to her home in East Hampton for grounding.

“This is my thinking place and my home,” she said Friday, sitting with her dachshund Pi surrounded by a green jungle of trees on her back deck in the Northwest Woods.

“Their mission,” she said of FAPE, “is to get arts into the public sphere—particularly for peaceful means—to encourage a kind of communication with other countries and embassies and make things more relaxed.”

“We’re a small world now and art is nonviolent, nonpolitical,” she said, adding, “The art’s really about communication and that’s why we have an embassy project, that’s why we have FAPE.”

The opening reception of FAPE’s exhibition is Saturday, June 28, from 4 to 6 p.m. at Guild Hall, located at 158 Main Street in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 324-0806 or visit guildhall.org.

East End Weekend: Top Picks for What To Do

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Andrew Wyeth, Sail Loft, 1983, Watercolor on paper, 22 x 29 ½ inches.

Andrew Wyeth, Sail Loft, 1983, Watercolor on paper, 22 x 29 ½ inches.

By Tessa Raebeck

The weather’s supposed to be perfect this weekend, why not end a long day at the beach with a great evening out? Here are some entertainment ideas for this weekend on the East End:

 

Rosé Week at the Wölffer Estate Vineyard

Running Friday, June 20 through Thursday, June 26, the Wölffer Estate Vineyard is celebrating its specialty: Rosé, or “summer in a bottle,” as the vineyard calls it.

Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider.

Wölffer No. 139 dry rosé hard cider.

On Friday at 8 p.m. at the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center, the winery’s famed vintage will be available before the Rufus Wainwright concert. For tickets, visit whbpac.org.

The rosé travels Saturday to the Group for the East End’s “Here Comes the Sun!” benefit, at the vineyard from 6 to 11 p.m. The fairly new and equally delicious No. 139 Rosé Cider will be poured for gala guests. For information and tickets, visit groupfortheeastend.org.

Rounding out the weekend—but not the rosé week, which goes till Wednesday—on Sunday on the lawn of the Wölffer residence, “A Taste of Provence” lunch from 1 to 4 p.m. will give guests not just a taste of rosé, but also of a grand meal prepared by Chef Christian Mir of the Stone Creek Inn. The event is reserved for Wölffer Wine Club Members.

For more information on rosé week, visit wolffer.com.

 

“Under the Influence” at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum

Pairing contemporary artists’ works with those of the artists who have inspired them, “Under the Influence” offers a collection of masters and mentees at the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum.

Curated by local gallery owner Peter J. Marcelle, the exhibition explores the relationship between nine contemporary artists and the greats whose influence got them started.

The pairs, with the contemporary artist first, are: Terry Elkins with Andrew Wyeth, Eric Ernst with William Baziotes, Cornelia Foss with Larry Rivers, Steve Miller with Andy Warhol, Dan Rizzie with Donald Sultan, Stephen Schaub with Alfred Stieglitz, Mike Viera with Eric Fischl and Gavin Zeigler with William Scharf.

An opening reception is Friday, June 20 from 6 to 8 p.m. at the Sag Harbor Whaling & Historical Museum, located at 200 Main Street in Sag Harbor. All sales benefit the museum. For more information, call (631) 613-6170.

 

Artists Against Abuse to Benefit The Retreat

To benefit The Retreat, the domestic violence services agency in East Hampton, Artists Against Abuse will be held in Bridgehampton Saturday, June 21.

The event, with the theme of Midsummer Night Fever, brings artists, philanthropists and residents from across the East End together in support of The Retreat, eastern Long Island’s only comprehensive domestic violence services organization.

The event will feature Congressman Tim Bishop and actress and social advocate Rachel Grant.

“The World Health Organization reports that in some countries, up to 70 percent of women report having been victims of domestic violence at some stage in their lives,” said Congressman Tim Bishop in a press release. “I have always been a strong advocate for the needs and rights of women. Women play integral roles in the global community and they deserve to be treated with respect by their male counterparts.

The benefit begins at 6:30 p.m. at the Ross School Lower Campus Field House on Butter Lane in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit artistsagainstabuse.com.

 

Shop Til You Drop for Katy’s Courage

Looking for a good reason to shop? Katy’s Courage, a not-for-profit in honor of Katy Stewart, a beloved Sag Harbor resident who passed away at age 12 from a rare form of liver cancer, invites you to shop ‘til you drop for a good cause.

On Saturday from 6:30 to 9 p.m. Sequin in Southampton will be serving cocktails while shoppers browse through designer Gabby Sabharwal’s new swimsuit line, Giejo, and create their own necklaces.

Sequin is located at 20 Jobs Lane in Southampton. For more information, call (631) 353-3137.

Libraries Receive Grants

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. , the chairman of the Assembly’s Committee on Libraries and Education Technology, announced this week that the John Jermain Memorial Library in Sag Harbor, the East Hampton Library, and the Montauk Library had received grants totaling $210,107.

The John Jermain Memorial Library received $75,054 to help with its ongoing renovation project, while East Hampton will receive $75,053 for its children’s addition project. Montauk will receive $60,000 for an emergency generator project.

The grant funds are from $14 million in capital funds for public library construction provided in the 2013 state budget.

“With libraries now experiencing remarkable increases in use, and with budget cuts creating significant hardship, I am thrilled that so many of my constituents will benefit from increased library resources made possible through these state funds,” said Mr. Thiele in a press release.