Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Writer David Sedaris to Perform in East Hampton

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David Sedaris, author of “Me Talk Pretty One Day”, will be at Guild Hall on Sunday, August 3. Photo credit Hugh Hamrick

Critically acclaimed writer and humorist David Sedaris, often lauded as one of the best writers of his generation, is coming to the John Drew Theater at Guild Hall in East Hampton on Sunday, August 3.

Mr. Sedaris caught his first big break on NPR in 1992 when he was invited to read an essay on “Morning Edition.” “The SantaLand Diaries” is the author’s firsthand account of his experience working as a Christmas elf at Macy’s, complete with tales of crazy parents, howling children, Santas stuck in character and a healthy serving of self-deprecation. The story begins as he applies for the job and talks about the high hopes he had when he first moved to New York, imagining himself as the writer of his favorite soap opera: “But instead, I’m applying for a job as an elf. Instead, someone will say, ‘What’s that shoe size again?’ and hand me a pair of seven and a half slippers, the toes of which curl to a point. Even worse is the very real possibility that I will not be hired, that I couldn’t even find work as an elf. That’s when you know you’re a failure.”

The broadcast of “The SantaLand Diaries” in December has now become an annual fixture on NPR’s schedule.

Mr. Sedaris is also the author of “Me Talk Pretty One Day”—a collection of lively and comical essays about the difficulties and amusing, often embarrassing, anecdotes of living in a foreign country. The audio version of his latest book, “Let’s Explore Diabetes with Owls,” was nominated for a Grammy for Best Spoken Word Album in 2014.

An Evening with David Sedaris is at 8 p.m. on Sunday, August 3. Guild Hall is located at 158 Main Street in East Hampton. A book signing will follow. Tickets range in price from $48 to $150. For more information, visit guildhall.org or davidsedarisbooks.com.

Southampton Seeking Sites for Solar

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By Stephen J. Kotz

While East Hampton Town has created a great deal of buzz with its ambitious plan to provide all the community’s energy needs through sustainable methods by the year 2020, Southampton Town is taking a much quieter approach.

According to Deputy Supervisor Frank Zappone, within the new few weeks, the town is preparing to issue a request for proposals to vendors asking them to analyze town-owned facilities and property to see if it will be feasible to use them for sustainable energy projects, like solar farms.

Unlike East Hampton Town, “Southampton does not have expanses of land like the airport that are relatively free of limitations,” said Mr. Zappone, citing restrictions imposed on Community Preservation Fund purchases and other factors.

While the capped North Sea landfill off Majors Path has also been named as a potential site for something like a solar array, Mr. Zappone said such a project would have be vetted first by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation, which would determine whether development would pose a risk to the landfill cap, among other things.

Christine Fetten, the town’s director of municipal works, is the point person for the town’s efforts to find suitable sites for sustainable energy projects. She did not reply to a request for an interview.

Dieter von Lehsten, co-chairman of the town’s sustainability committee, said this week that Southampton officials are wary of promising too much and delivering too little.

East Hampton, on the other hand, is shooting for the stars with its own ambitious plans, with the result that it might very well fall short of its goal, he said. Not that Mr. von Lehsten thinks that is a bad thing:  “They are taking the Greenpeace approach, which is to ask for 150 percent and be happy with 25 percent,” he said.

Mr. von Lehsten said that the sustainability committee is excited that the town is preparing the RFP.

“We are all behind this, of course,” he said. “We are helping push things along. It is on the regular agenda.”

The Tempest Storms Through East Hampton’s Summer Season

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By Mara Certic

As August approaches at Mulford Farm, so do spirits, shipwrecks and storms. The Hamptons International Theater Festival will bring 12 outdoor performances of “The Tempest” to the East Hampton Village site.

“It’s a Herculean task to do this,” said artistic director Josh Perl. “But we’re all really passionate about Shakespeare.”

Mr. Perl chose “The Tempest” for several different reasons. Mainly, he said, because of its accessibility to children. Traditionally deemed a tragicomedy, “The Tempest” distinguishes itself from Shakespearean tragedies in distinct ways, the most obvious of which is that nobody dies.

The entire play takes place on a fictional island. It begins with a storm, which the audience later finds out had been started by a spirit, Ariel, at the behest of Prospero—the former duke of Milan whose brother had left him and his daughter Miranda for dead on a raft at sea many years before.

The great tempest strikes a ship carrying his brother, Antonio and his family, as Prospero hopes to make things right and enact his revenge. As with Shakespearean comedies, confusion and misunderstandings ensue throughout the play.

The only challenge of staging the play outdoors, according to Mr. Perl, is the opening thunderstorm during the daytime. But he decided to remedy that problem and another at the same time.

“In choosing ‘The Tempest’ I thought how can we make this show more accessible to kids?” Mr. Perl said during a phone interview on Friday. “How come everything seems so serious?” he asked himself about other stagings of the play.

Mr. Perl decided to interest his younger audience was to include children in his cast. “So we’re partnering up with CMEE,” he said of the Children’s Museum of the East End. The children will open the show; each will get a piece of a costume (a pirate patch or tattoo, perhaps) and will speak a few lines before the spirits help them create the opening storm.

“We have a really professional show,” Mr. Perl said, adding that having the children’s participation is “just perfect.”

“We’re getting kids to do what they’re good at and that is the spirit of Shakespeare,” he said.

In order to lighten the mood of the play and continue to entertain children, Mr. Perl also decided to use songs, playfulness and puckishness, he said. “I had thought that I wanted to have the spirits be very flamboyant, almost like drag queens,” he said. “They’re singing, they’re on stage a lot reacting to what’s happening,” he said, adding that at one point the spirits sing “On the island, the magic island, the spirits awake tonight” to the tune of the 1961 Tokens hit, “The Lion Sleeps Tonight.”

Mr. Perl then decided that gender-reversal might have other positive effects, and so he decided to explore that. “There’s really only one female role in “The Tempest,” which is just unfair,” he said.

“I really wanted a female Prospero. We live in an age where there are women CEOs and women in charge of all sorts of things,” he added, noting that with the exception of Queen Elizabeth I, this was hardly the case in Shakespearean England.

So Prospero became Prospera, Antonio turned into Antonia, and faithful counselor Gonzalo had a sex change too. “I just noticed how the play’s gender politics center has shifted from being about this noble, magician authority figure into being more about a woman who may have deserved to be driven out of the dukedom because of her focus on magic,” he said.

“Apart from having to change the occasional pronoun though, there’s nothing that’s textually different,” said Mr. Perl.

“It’s a really nice dimension and it’s working really well,” said Molly McKenna, who grew up in Sag Harbor and still has a base here. Ms. McKenna, who has worked with Mr. Perl for years, had not thought that there would be a part for her. “I was just going to be cheering him on,” she said.

“And then he suggested that I play the role of Gonzalo, usually played by a man.”

“It makes complete sense,” said Ms. McKenna. “She is a very caring and sincere person who is a counselor to the King of Naples. It makes sense that she’s a woman. She aided and abetted Prospero’s escape.”

The non-profit theater company is paying all 18 members of the cast, Mr. Perl said. And the set designers, stagehands, lighting designers, assistants, directors, and so on.

“Everyone gets paid, but no one gets paid enough,” said Mr. Perl, who has had to fundraise in order to put on this show. “We had to house four actors out here for eight weeks. We were lucky that friends were nice to us.”

Some money has been raised, but more is required. For more information or to donate, visit hitfest.org/the-tempest. Mulford Farm is located at 10 James Lane in East Hampton.

“The Tempest” will run Wednesdays through Sundays from August 6 through August 24. Showtime is 6 p.m. Tickets are $20 for adults, $10 for students, and free to children under 10. Tickets are $17.50 for seniors at the door only.

The Neo-Political Cowgirls Present “VOYEUR” at Parsons Blacksmith Shop in Springs

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The sneak peak of "VOYEUR" at Guild Hall in March. Photo by Tom Kochie.

The sneak peak of “VOYEUR” at Guild Hall in March. Photo by Tom Kochie.

By Tessa Raebeck

While many 8-year-old girls spend their evenings playing with toys or watching TV, Kate Mueth preferred to wander her neighborhood in northern Illinois and peer into her neighbors’ windows.

She was not looking to see anything depraved or risqué, she was merely people watching, observing a mother helping her son with homework or a family enjoying a meal at the dinner table.

“I loved watching people wash dishes or read a book, the most seemingly mundane things,” Ms. Mueth said on Tuesday, July 22. “I was trying to make sense of my world, I was trying to make sense of my home life, how people behave…am I behaving properly? Am I normal? Am I whacked out? … and I think some people would think I am sort of whacked out, but that’s why I make art.”

Ms. Mueth, founder and director of the East Hampton-based theatre troupe The Neo-Political Cowgirls, has transferred this childhood fascination into the company’s latest production, “VOYEUR,” which opens, Thursday, July 31, at the Parsons Blacksmith Shop in Springs.

Written and directed by Ms. Mueth, “VOYEUR” is a personal reflection on time, friendship and the transient notion of normalcy.

Photo by Tom Kochie.

Photo by Tom Kochie.

Ms. Mueth believes the reason many artists, such as herself, are continually driven to create something new is because they are trying to “figure it all out.”

“It’s a very, very personal piece, surprisingly,” the director said, adding she didn’t expect it to turn out so. “I think probably, ultimately, every artist creates something very personal without even necessarily knowing it.”

In “VOYEUR,” a young girl guides the audience in small groups around the blacksmith shop’s exterior. Through a series of short vignettes, they peer from outside through the shop’s windows, watching the story of the life of another girl, the guide’s best childhood friend, unfold.

A “theater art installation,” as Ms. Mueth calls it, “VOYEUR” lasts about 20 minutes per group and explores what theater can entail.

While the actor on the exterior remains a young girl, the girl on the inside progresses through her life, growing from a child to a teenager and eventually an adult, mother and elderly woman.

“It’s essentially about two little girls who are in love as friends are in love, as little girls can be in love. It’s not a sexual thing; it’s a total friendship, sensual thing,” Ms. Mueth said. “And one of them goes away and it could be that she goes away psychologically, she goes away emotionally or literally physically moves away.”

Ms. Mueth, careful to leave the piece open to personal interpretation, said from her perspective, the little girl on the outside still yearns for the friendship she shared with the one within. While the girl inside seems to move on, however, “her life is ultimately not fully realized in terms of joy, in terms of fulfillment.”

“It’s very nostalgic for me,” the director added, “from a friendship I had growing up at a very young age, from birth, into a friendship that was really intense, really beautiful, really connected. And it broke. And it broke through betrayal and it broke through misunderstanding and it broke right around sixth grade, which is a very tricky time anyways.”

The abandonment felt by that loss of her first friendship compelled Ms. Mueth to examine time and the effects when a love that comes from such an innocent yet intense beginning is broken.

Her theater work, she said, is “always an examination of life, of emotions, of happenings, of humanity. And how we deal with it, how it feels to be human, how it feels to survive certain things in our lives.”

Ms. Mueth relates to both the young girls, the one who moves on within the blacksmith shop and the one watching from without.

“I think that’s kind of what childhood friendship is,” she said. “When you’re in one of these closely bonded friendships, where you begin and where your friend ends is kind of impossible to see.”

For girls, Ms. Mueth said, a best friend, “that person that you can be with 12 hours and still want to spend more time with,” is practice for our relationships later in life, for lovers and marriage, “of how we relate and how we love and what we get from each other in terms of nurturing.”

“VOYEUR” examines the passage of time and the impact of growing up—and often apart—on that most intimate relationship with your first best friend, “somebody who you feel that bond with and you can just go and play and be in this imagination land; you literally are creating your world together. And that’s your world—you can’t do that with just anybody.”

“VOYEUR” is July 31, August 1, 2, 7, 8, 9, at 7 p.m. until 8:20 p.m. at the Parsons Blacksmith Shop at Springs Fireplace Road and Parson Place in Springs, East Hampton.  Tickets are $15 and can be ordered ahead of time at brownpapertickets.com/event/756705.

Wainscott Parcel Targeted for Affordable Housing

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By Stephen J. Kotz

A plan to build as many as 48 affordable rental apartments on a 31-acre site owned by East Hampton Town in Wainscott was proposed to the Town Board on July 15.

Michael DeSario, the chairman of the Windmill Village Housing Development Fund Corporation, which has been involved with other subsidized housing projects in the town, made his pitch at the board’s weekly work session and stressed that any project is far from a done deal, saying that even if everything went without a hitch, he was looking at a timeframe of up to four to six years before they would be completed.

Supervisor Larry Cantwell agreed with Mr. DeSario’s assessment that the project would take some years to bring to fruition.

“There’s a lot of lead time on a project like this,” said Supervisor Larry Cantwell on Wednesday, “but you never get anything done if you don’t get started on something.”

The first hurdle, the supervisor said, would be making sure the project is workable with the tiny Wainscott School District, whose residents enjoy the lowest school tax rate in town.

“We know there is a demand for affordable housing. Young, working familes have few places to live,” Mr. Cantwell said. “Want to consider locations and proposals and get community input.”

“Several months ago, the town asked Windmill to look around and work with the Planning Department to see if there are any sites available for affordable housing,” Mr. DeSario said on Tuesday. “We came up with a couple and this was at the top of the list.”

The targeted site consists of several parcels off Stephen Hands Path, behind the town-owned soccer fields and the Child Development Center of the Hamptons school.

Mr. DeSario said he envisioned a development that would consist of eight buildngs with six apartment units in each one. Twenty would be one-bedroom apartments of about 600 squae feet, 20 would be two-bedroom units of about 800 square feet, and another eight would be three-bedroom units with about 1,200 square feet of living space.

The project would also have a community room and a superintendent’s apartment and could be served by standard individual wastewater systems or a small-scale onsite waste treatment plant.

A wastewater treatment plant could upward of $1 million to build and another $50,000 a year to run, “so we wanted to make sure it could be done either way,” he said.

Mr. DeSario estimated that the complex would cost up to $15 million and would be funded through federal grants and tax credits.

The units would be rented to “low and very-low income people,” Mr. DeSario said, adding that they would provide tenants “with clean, healthy housing that would be guaranteed. They wouldn’t have to wory about being evicted or someone selling and having their rent tripled.”

Although Mr. DeSario said that care had been taken to see that the complex was not populated with too many children—he estimated there would be 30 to 40 children living there—at last week’s board meeting, David Eagan, an attorney and president of the Wainscott School Board, told the board he was worried about the impact the development could have on the district.

Mr. Cantwell said he was aware of the district’s concerns and said the board would wait until Wainscott received a study assessing the impact the project would have on the district before taking the next step.

On Wednesday, Mr. Eagan said the district had hired the SES Study Team, an educaitonal consulting firm, to assess the impact such a housing complex would have on Wainscott.

“The impact is going to be dramatic,” he said. “We know it is going to be profound.”

Besides doubling the number of students in the district, it could “compromise our longheld mission of individualized programs for our students,” he said. “We’re concerned about the need for new facilities, the need for new staff and the impact on the bottom line.”

Supervisor Cantwell said the board was also cognizant of the recent announcement by the Sag Harbor Community Housing Trust that it will buy the Cottages, a group of eight affordable housing units on Route 114, which are also in the Wainscott School District. Although those units are currently used for affordable housing, Mr. Cantwell said it is expected they will be expanded and could have an additional impact on the school district.

Project MOST Gets a Boost

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. announced that Project MOST in East Hampton is one of 68 after-school programs across the state to received grants to continue providing school-age children with quality youth development opportunities.

Project MOST received $137,500 through the Advantage After School Program.

Project MOST is a highly successful and effective community-based after-school program, providing programs to the youth in East Hampton. Project MOST provides an accessible opportunity for the youth of the East End, especially children with developmental disabilities and children of very low income immigrant families.

AASPs offer a broad range of educational, recreational, cultural, an age-appropriate activities that integrate what happens in the school day. Programs operate five days per week during the regular school year, and may also operate during school breaks or extend hours into the early evening.

The AASP was created to help provide New York’s children with educational, interesting and fun activities to fill the vital three-hour gap directly after school. A growing body of research shows that children who participate in quality after school programs have higher school attendance and academic achievement, and are less likely to be involved in risky behaviors after school hours.

East End Weekend: Highlights of July 18 to 20

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"Calabrone" by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

“Calabrone” by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Summer is in full swing and there’s plenty to choose from to do on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

 

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception for Ramiro’s Solo Show on Saturday, July 19, from 6 to 8 p.m.

“Ramiro solo show this year steps forward into a more mystical and hopeful realm,” owner Laura Grenning wrote in a press release.

“Anchoring the exhibit is a suite of four substantial figurative works, with each painting representing a season of the soul.  Although well known for his expert likenesses in portraiture and grand figurative work, Ramiro’s distinguishing characteristic is, ironically, his ability to let go of the discreet reality of the eyes when necessary.  With this, he infuses his narrative compositions with mystery that allows the paintings to endure the critical test of time,” added Ms. Grenning.

The Grenning Gallery is located at 17 Washington Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-8469.

 

Water Mill’s  Parrish Art Museum is hosting its second edition of Gesture Jam, an adult figure drawing class in which artists sketch live models in a high-energy environment, Friday, July 18 at 6 p.m.

Facilitated by local artist and educator Andrea Cote, this year’s Gesture Jam will be held outdoors on the museum’s terrace and include live musicians Nicolas Letman-Burtanovic on bass and Sean Sonderegger on saxaphone. Local dancers Adam and Gail Baranello are the models.

“Imagine going home with drawings that look like you’ve been to some sort of psychedelic cabaret, and feeling that way too. Andrea Cote’s Gesture Jam classes have just that effect,” Parrish Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover said in a press release.

The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call (631) 283-2118.

 

Celebrities are coming to Bridgehampton for CMEE’s 6th Annual Family Fair on Saturday, July 19 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Children’s Museum of the East End‘s largest fundraiser, this year the fair will have a magical theme.

George Stephanopoulos, Dan Abrams, Jane Krakowski, Joy Behar, Julie Bowen, Molly Sims and Tiffani Thiessen (of Saved by the Bell fame) are some of the CMEE supporters expected to be in attendance.

Children and their families can enjoy magical arts and crafts, water slides, games and entertainment, music, food, and CMEE’s brand new nine-hole miniature golf course.

CMEE is located at 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike on the Bridgehampton side. For more information, call (631) 537-8250.

 

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is hosting its fourth Haitian Art & Handcraft Sale all weekend, July 18 to 20, to benefit the village of Chermaître in partnership with the Vassar Haiti Project.

An opening reception will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and the sale will continue in the Upper Parish Hall on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Two hundred original paintings and a large assortment of unique and affordable gifts, including silk scarves, jewely and iron sculpture, will be on sale.

Many women in the village, Chermaître in northwestern Haiti, are struggling to start small businesses to support their families by selling the crafts they create and the coffee they grow. Proceeds from the church sale will go toward building a community center in the village to support those women.

For more information on the charity, call (970) 946-7614 or visit haitiproject.org. The Christ Episcopal Church is located at the corner of East Union and Hampton Street (Route 114) in Sag Harbor. For more information, call the church at (631) 725-0128.

 

The gallery at Sag Harbor’s Canio Books is hosting artists Ron Focarino and Jeanelle Myers, with her latest assemblage series, Plains Reverie, with an opening reception Friday, July 18 from 5 to 7 p.m.

“Myers work reflects the influence of her Nebraska roots, echoing the work of Wright Morris and Joseph Cornell,” the gallery said in a press release. “Myers incorporates a diverse array of found objects including old letters, metals, writing implements, fabric and many other materials into her compelling assemblages.”

"Golden Scarab" enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio's Books.

“Golden Scarab” enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio’s Books.

Artist Ron Focarino will also be exhibiting, showing his “creature creations, delightful enamel sculptures of insects, including a dragonfly, crane fly, scarab and others,” according to Canio’s.

The exhibit runs July 11 through August 5 at Canio’s Books, 290 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-4926.

The Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor presents the artwork of Anna De Mauro and Thomas Condon, with an opening reception Saturday, July 19 from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Sculptor and painter Anna De Mauro is a figurative artist working from the live model.

“Her work process includes observation from life to record instinctual responses to the subject, passage of time and impressions of the metaphysical and the human condition,” the gallery said in a press release.

Thomas Condon lives part-time in East Hampton and focuses on the local landscape here on the East End, as well as the urban scenes of New York City.

The show runs July 17 through August 7 at the Romany Kramoris Gallery, 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-2499.

East Hampton Antiques Show to Amass International Crowd

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By Sam Mason-Jones

The historical grounds of Mulford Farm will play host to the East Hampton Antiques Show of 2014, which this year will benefit the East Hampton Historical Society. The show will be kicked off with a cocktail party on the evening of Friday July 18, and will remain open for the Saturday and Sunday.

Now in its eighth year, the show has been known to provide a combination of aged oddities and more modern items, and this time around the wares of 55 antique dealers are to be showcased in the 3.5 acres of grounds.

While some of these dealers are local, the fair is beginning to attract attention from further afield. Vendors will travel from seven states of America, some as far away as California, with international dealers also making the journey from Thailand and China.

The  whole host of dealers making their debuts in East Hampton, coupled with this touch of the exotic, has proffered a diversity which organizer Tom D’Arruda believes will make this year’s show particularly exciting.

“Its not as exciting for the general public to come through here, and to see the same people as they have seen before,” said Mr. D’Arruda. “There is a really large group of people who have never set up around here, which will bring a fresh look to the show.”

The show will open to the public between the hours of 10:00am-6:00pm on Saturday July 19, and 10am-5pm on Sunday July 20, with a $10 entrance fee. The cocktail party will run from 6:00pm-8:30pm on Friday July 18, tickets start at $150 per person, allowing return to the show on both days, and can be purchased at www.easthamptonhistory.org.

Using Your Weight to Build Strength

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Linda Silich demonstrating the TRX equipment at her East Hampton studio. Photo by Genevieve Kotz

By Genevieve Kotz

While most business owners on the East End dread the end of the summer season, Linda Silich, who opened SILICH Core + Strength in East Hampton, which is the only studio specializing in TRX Suspension Training on the East End, is not at all worried.

“I really look forward to the fall and having people realize it’s another option in the fitness world that’s more personable and that’s more tailored to their needs,” Ms. Silich explained.

The SILICH Core + Strength studio, located on Newtown Lane, only opened in April, but it already has a large group following, which Ms. Silich knows will expand even as the months grow colder.

“It’s a relaxed atmosphere, but with an intense workout and a big community,” She said.

TRX, which stands for Total Resistant Exercise, was created by Navy SEAL Randy Hetrick just 10 years ago, but already has a devoted following due to its versatile nature. The TRX Suspension Trainer allows the user to work against his or her own body weight and incorporates strength training, balance and flexibility. The biggest benefit, though, is that it always engages the core muscles.

Moves, such as the TRX plank or the TRX chest press, are done with either the arms or legs suspended with the straps, which are created with the same material as parachutes, that are hung from the ceiling. Each move is done in 45-second increments, with 15 seconds of rest in between. The difficulty level of each move is determined by the angle of the body.

At her studio, Ms. Silich offers both personal training and group classes. The 45-minute group classes, which are open to as many as 15 people and are set to upbeat music, are modified to ensure that they benefit all levels of fitness, from beginner to advanced. She even offers a complimentary 15-minute introduction for people who have never attended a TRX class before.

“It’s for everybody, it’s versatile,” Ms. Silich said, noting that her clients are of all ages and fitness levels. “I have teenagers in the same class as a rocking 50 year old.”

Over the summer, the courses have been especially popular with lifeguards, who need to stay in tip-top shape, and she regularly works with high school athletes to keep them at peak performance. This fall, she is also planning a program with the East Hampton Village Police Department.

As someone who has been a trainer for 20 years, Ms. Silich is able to adapt her classes or personal training to the needs of the clients. With cross-country athletes, for example, she makes sure to incorporate more High Intensity Interval Training (HIIT) to get their heart rate up and will even take her student to the track to have them do sprints.

She also is aware of how to ensure that her clients are getting the best workout, no matter their mood. “I’m very hands-on and conscientious—mindful of people’s moods. I know exactly how they are when they walk in the door, and every person is different,” she said. “Some people need to be left alone and some people need to be pushed.”

Ms. Silich is often described by her clients as energetic, memorable, and personable. She and the four other group trainers are certified in TRX training, ISSA and AFAA, CPR First Aid and come from a variety of backgrounds, from body building to yoga. In her group classes, she combines resistant stretchy bands, stability balls, and medicine balls as well as moves from yoga and Pilates, depending on the class. She also offers TRX HIIT classes and is planning on including a cardio kickboxing class, which she taught before being introduced to TRX.

Classes are $30 for a single class, but there are also packs of 10 and 20 available with discounted rates. For the summer season, she is also offering a five-pack for people who are not here for long. Her private training sessions typically run $150 an hour and there are 10-packs available for devoted clients. She is always offering different promotions.

The studio itself is tucked away behind UPS and the Golden Eagle on Newtown Lane. The one-room studio is equipped with mats, weights, 15 TRX machines and bouquets of fresh flowers to create a home-y feel.

“It’s a very calming, welcoming environment,” Ms. Silich explained, “I just want it to be a place that people can feel at home.”

Ina Garten

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Ina Garten

Photo by Ben Fink.

 Ina Garten, sometimes known as the Barefoot Contessa, has been on the East End for over 35 years. She discusses her current work and her involvement in an upcoming fundraiser for the EAC Network Suffolk County Child Advocacy Center at the Pat & Mary Bagnato Place for kids (CAC).

By Mara Certic

Between cooking shows, what have you been working on recently?

I have a book coming out in October, it’s called “Make it Ahead,” it’s all about not just things that are okay to make in advance but also things that are better made in advance. And right now I’m working on my 10th book. I’m making rum raisin ice cream and chocolate hazelnut gelato in my test kitchen today.

Where do you get your inspiration for new recipes?

I always think you can’t come up with new ideas sitting at home all alone. So I go to markets in France and I talk to friends, I go to restaurants and read books. You just never know where the ideas are going to come from. I’ll read a newspaper article about ice cream and then I’m like “Hmm, I’d really like to make gelato,” and then I think about what my favorite kind would be. The difference between ice cream and gelato is that gelato is more milk than cream, whereas ice cream is more cream than milk. So I just play around with the difference. It’s a fun science experiment, but with dessert. I used to be in science, so that’s my interest. I used to work on nuclear energy policy in the White House—it’s a long distance to travel from that to what I’m doing now, but it’s basically the same interest in science.

How did you get involved in CAC?

It started at the store. Katie Beers worked for me at the store; she came to East Hampton when she was 10 and she started working for me at the store as soon as she was old enough to. And I just adored her, I still do. And so I know she’s very involved in this and she asked if I would do a benefit and I said absolutely yes.

What does the CAC do?

First, it’s a safe place for kids to go if they’d have issues, problems with violence and abduction—like Katie, which was just such a horrific, terrible case. But I also see how with such a loving, supportive environment and very quickly, it’s just astonishing to see how’s Katie grown up to be such a strong person. And it really had to do with the people around her and the organization, the support she had from the state and the therapists. It was just extraordinary to me how someone could survive that—not just that they could survive it, but survive it and thrive. And the CAC really provides a place for kids like that, which is so critical. I mean, when we’re children we think that that’s how the world is, we need an adult to say “No, the world’s not bad, and I’m going to help you heal.” And that’s really Katie’s story, it’s an extraordinary story of overcoming the most horrific odds and becoming a strong person who’s an advocate for other children. I think they really give children everything that they need to come out of this hole. They have therapists, they have a legal department, they have police departments, they have child services, they have medical staff—they have all those things that kids need to reorient to their thinking to realize that they can actually move on from this and not be crippled by it.

What is the event that you’re hosting for the CAC?

Well, it’s a cocktail party on Friday, July 25, from 4 to 6 p.m., people will come to my house in East Hampton. They can wander around the gardens and see the kitchen where we write cookbooks and we’ll have cocktails and hors d’oeuvres and it’ll be fun.

Apart from your relationship with Ms. Beers, why do you think that this is an important organization to support?

The organization is made up of grown-ups who care about children, and I hope everyone would support an organization like this. I think there are many, many of our children who have been victims of abuse. So I think it’s really important that we as a society get together to support our children.