Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Osiecki Honored for Heroism

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A year-and-a-half after the night she swam into Napeague Harbor to rescue a drowning woman, Sag Harbor’s own Katie Osiecki received a proclamation on Thursday from the State of New York and the Town of East Hampton recognizing her heroism.

Ms. Osiecki was one of 20 to receive a Carnegie Medal this year. The award was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1904, and is reserved for individuals in the United States and Canada who risk their lives to an extraordinary degree while saving, or attempting to save, the lives of others.

New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. and Supervisor Larry Cantwell presented Ms. Osiecki with a proclamation at the East Hampton Town Board’s regular meeting on Thursday, October 2.

“Therefore be it proclaimed by the State Legislature, by the New York State Assembly, that she be recognized for winning the Carnegie Medal,” Mr. Thiele read.

“This act, I think, really tells you all you need to know about Katie Osiecki. She’s a really special young woman, a special resident of the town of East Hampton,” he said.

 

Man Arrested After East Hampton Manhunt

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Sag Harbor Schools, like their counterparts in East Hampton, were briefly put on lockdown on Friday as East Hampton police sought a man, who was reportedly suicidal, and had left his Springs home after wounding shooting a family member with a shotgun.

Friday afternoon, East Hampton Police said they had taken Valon Shoshi, 28, of Springs into custody at approximately 12:40 p.m. and given local schools the all-clear.

East Hampton Town Police Captain Chris Anderson said the victim, who he would only identify as “a relative” of Mr. Shoshi, was taken to Southampton Hospital for treatment of minor injuries from a shotgun blast.

Capt. Anderson said “charges were pending” against Mr. Shoshi, who he, added, was taken into custody near One Stop Market on Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton.

“It’s a big sigh of relief,” said Sag Harbor Superintendent Katy Graves in describing how she felt when police called to say the lockdown could be lifted.

She said that school officials were still in the middle of implanting the lockdown when they were informed they could go back to normal business. She said the district immediately sent an automated telephone and text message to the school community informing it of what had occurred.

“I’m very proud of my staff,” she said. “They were all so child-centered and proactive.”

Friday afternoon, East Hampton Town Police issued a press release, stating they were called to 85 Gardiner Avenue in Springs at about 10:30 a.m. Friday after receiving a report of a shooting there. The suspect had fled the scene.

Officers from the East Hampton Village Police joined town officers and members of the East End Townwide Emergency Services Unit and a Suffolk County Police Department K-unit were called in.

Police said they secured a home on Jericho Lane in the village  and told local schools “as well as a few facilities in the immediate search areas” to go on lockdown.

Mr. Shoshi was taken into custody when he was spotted driving north on Abraham’s Path. Police said after a brief pursuit, he was pulled over on Springs-Fireplace Road near One Stop Market and taken into custody without incident at approximately 12:40 p.m.

In Sag Harbor Ms. Graves said the school district would use the incident to sharpen its own procedures. She added that the New York State Police and the state Department of Education are going to hold a joint webcast for school districts to discuss model safety plans on October 16.

 

Shellfishing in Northwest Creek

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Citing water quality improvements, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation on September 24 announced that it would reopen shellfish harvesting in some 300 acres of Suffolk County waters in East Hampton, Southold and Babylon towns.

Among the areas to be reopened are 88 acres in Northwest Creek, which will be “seasonally certified,” meaning they can be opened to shellfishing from December 15 through April 30 of each year.

The DEC said water testing had shown decreases in harmful bacteria in the waters, which will be reopened.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Southampton Hospital and the Coalition for Women’s Cancers at the hospital have planned a slew of events to increase awareness and raise funds to support local breast cancer survivors, starting with the lighting of a Pink Ribbon Tree at the Southampton Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday.

Other events include a Breast Cancer Awareness Health Fair on Friday, October 3, at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in East Hampton from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.;  the fourth annual Breast Cancer Summit at The Coral House in Baldwin from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 7; the Give Where You Live Campaign Kickoff at Parrish Memorial Hall at Southampton Hospital at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 8; Look Good, Feel Better at the Hampton Bays Library on October 14 from 1 to 3 p.m. the Shelter Island 5k Run/Walk on October 18 at 11 a.m. at Crescent Beach on Shelter Island; a Birdhouse Auction at the Southampton Social Club on Elm Street at 6 p.m. on October 18; a Shopping Benefit at Calypso at 21 Newtown Lane in East Hampton on October 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.; and Free Makeovers for Breast Cancer Survivors at Macy’s in Hampton Bays on October 24 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

In addition, there will be three Charity of the Month promotions. Sabrosa Mexican Grill on Montauk Highway in Water Mill will donate the total bill amount for the 100th customer each day in October to the Coalition for Women’s Cancers. The Deborah Thompson Day Spa at the Plaza in Montauk will donate 10 percent from all treatments during the month, and Panera Bread on Montauk Highway in Hampton Bays will donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of pink ribbon bagels to the Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition, the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline and Support Program and the The Breast Cancer Research Program at Cold Spring Harbor Research Laboratory during the month.

For more about the various breast cancer awareness events, call (631) 726-8715.

Regional Ban on Plastic Bags Could Be in Place by Earth Day

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By Mara Certic

The days of deciding between paper and plastic may be dwindling here on the East End, as local municipalities make plans to join together to enforce a regional ban on single-use plastic bags.

According to Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, the East End Supervisors and Mayors Association is considering a ban on the bags that would span from Montauk Point to beyond the Shinnecock Canal.

Southampton and East Hampton Villages both banned the bags back in 2011, but none of the local towns have managed to adopt such a law thus far. Southampton Town has considered similar legislation in the past, but those discussions were initially struck down by the former Republican town board before they could be taken to public hearing.

Dieter von Lehsten, co-chair of Southampton’s Sustainability Committee, has been one of the people spearheading the movement to ban plastic. According to Mr. von Lehsten, the single-use plastic bag is the largest consumer item in the world.

In America, 105 billion single-use plastic bags are distributed every year; 23 million of those are given out in the Town of Southampton, and it is estimated that only 3ee to 4 percent of those bags are recycled, he said.

The rest of the bags are floating around, somewhere, Mr. von Lehsten said. Many of them get buried in landfills, but a large number of them are found in our bays and oceans.

A lot of plastic pollution shows up in large slow-moving currents called gyres. A large island of plastic has built up in the North Pacific Gyre. “In the center of this gyre sits an island, imagine twice the size of Texas,” Mr. von Lehsten said. According to Greenpeace, this trash island is made up “of everything from tiny pieces of plastic debris to large ghost nets lost by the fishing industry.”

Plastic contains toxic chemicals, which then get passed on to animals when they mistake the small petrochemical particles for food. According to Greenpeace, plastic often then accumulates in animals’ digestive tracts, essentially choking them. Sometimes, animals who mistakenly ingest plastic starve and die from a lack of nutrition. And now plastic has found its way into our food chain, Mr. von Lehsten said.

Mr. von Lehsten said he has been met by overwhelming support among community members and legislators when he has discussed this ban with individuals and civic associations.

“I had meetings in Southold, Shelter Island and East Hampton and talked to all councils in these areas and they are going to vote for the ban of the bag,” Mr. von Lehsten said to the members of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee on September 22.

“It is now just a question, who makes the first step,” he said. “It is another one of those dances of the politicians.”

“So now we really want to force the issue,” Mr. von Lehsten said, and added he has started a letter campaign to get individuals and associations to ask the town boards to ban the bags.

The sustainability committee is suggesting the BYOB campaign—bring your own bag. One day, he would like to see a ban on all plastic and Styrofoam, he said, “but you’ve got to start somewhere, and the worst culprit is the single-use plastic bag.”

Mr. von Lehsten hinted heavily that he suspects public hearings on the matter to begin at some point in October. Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst said a public hearing will be held in the first week of December in Southampton, with the hope of implementing the law by Earth Day, April 22, 2015.

After almost 100 municipalities in the Golden State prohibited the use of the synthetic bags, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the country’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags last week.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Proposes $71.5 Million Budget

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Larry Cantwell photo for web

By Mara Certic

East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell presented his proposed  $71.5 million budget for the town in 2015 last week.

On Thursday, September 25, Mr. Cantwell released his tentative budget, which calls for a $1,490,349 increase in spending over this year. The proposed budget is $204,051 below the state-mandated 2-percent tax levy cap.

The tax rate, for those who live outside either East Hampton or Sag Harbor village, will increase by just over 2 percent, Mr. Cantwell said. The increase will amount to  $23.08 for those who own property assessed at $4,000 (a full value of $550,000) and $40.39 for those who own property with a full value of $960,000.

Those living in the villages will see a 3.12-percent increase in their property taxes, which will amount to $14.32 for those in homes worth $550,000 and $25.06 per year for a house assessed at $960,000.

By staying under the 2-percent tax cap, residents will receive rebate checks from the state for the amount their taxes increased between this year and last, he explained.

The total budgeted spending increase, Mr. Cantwell explained, is 2.95 percent, bringing the budget up to a total of $71,481,765.

“My goal in formulating this budget has been to integrate prudent budgeting and financial planning while improving code enforcement, protecting and improving environmental quality and assisting those who depend on certain town services,” Mr. Cantwell said.

“Improvements in services—delivered in a financially responsible manner—are what I was striving for in developing my tentative budget,” he said.

Mr. Cantwell has proposed three new full-time positions and converting one from part-time to full-time.

The first of these “recognizes and funds the position of public safety coordinator as a separate and distinct title,” the supervisor said in a release accompanying the budget. Previously, that position was a split title with an assistant town attorney handling those duties.

The new public safety coordinator will oversee building, fire prevention, animal control and code enforcement activities on a full-time basis. Mr. Cantwell added it will also allow one of the existing full-time assistant town attorneys to spend all of their time as a legal professional.

Mr. Cantwell also including funding in his tentative budget for a new ordinance inspector and promotion of inspector to code enforcement officer. The new ordinance inspector, he explained, will be able to ticket and write summons just as code enforcement officers do.  According to Mr. Cantwell, the budget specified that some part-time funding go toward a part-time town investigator in the Ordinance Enforcement Department.

In his first budget as supervisor, Mr. Cantwell revealed his intent to increase the town Police Department and Marine Patrol’s seasonal staff. He added $50,000 in funding for the police department and $25,000 for marine patrol. “This additional funding will add more coverage in the busy summer months, boost compliance with parking regulations, traffic control and local ordinances,” said Mr. Cantwell.

Mr. Cantwell also announced an additional $12,000 will go toward seasonal help to “combat litter and keep our beaches clean.”

In that vein, Mr. Cantwell also proposed to convert the part-time environmental technician position to a full-time job. The new position will be funded by the Town’s general fund and the Community Preservation Fund. The duties of the job will be split between general land management and tasks particular to CPF-acquired properties.

The last new job introduced in this year’s tentative budget is for an executive assistant to the supervisor in order to “make the supervisor’s office more responsive to the public.”

An additional $10,000 for the Natural Resources Department will set aside a total of $20,000 solely for water quality research in the town. “Water testing is one of the ways we can monitor what’s going on,” Mr. Cantwell said.

Another $100,000 will be set aside to develop a town-wide wastewater management plan, which, the supervisor said, would go toward funding the necessary groundwork before any such plan could be put in place.

Mr. Cantwell expanded services for the Senior Nutrition Program, extending the program’s cook’s hours and increasing the budget for the Montauk program by $5,000. The town will also increase some of its youth services, he said.

Mr. Cantwell included $25,000 for the South Fork Behavioral Health Initiative to help improve mental health care on the East End through clinics operated by the Family Service League. “Regionally, the goal is to get immediate mental health services available at Southampton Hospital,” Mr. Cantwell said.

The supervisor attributed much of the increase in the budget to escalating health insurance rates, which are expected to go up by 6 percent. A total of $17.3 million of the entire budget goes to pay benefits, he explained.

“The largest spending cut in my tentative budget comes from closing the Scavenger Waste Treatment Plant, which was servicing only a small number of vendors, with a budget of $800,000 and a net cost of well over $500,000 to taxpayers,” Mr. Cantwell said.

The CPF continues to perform strongly, Mr. Cantwell said, and the projected revenue for 2014 is $25.2 million. A “conservative” projection for next year is $18.3 million. As of last week, the CPF had a cash balance of over $52 million—$30 million of which is dedicated to pending acquisitions.

The supervisor has suggested the town add $1.7 million of surplus fund balance to an existing debt reserve, in order to pay off approximately 25 percent of the remaining deficit bond principal. By 2018, the town anticipates to have enough money in its dedicated debt reserves to pay off enough debt to ensure the principal payments drop by $1.25 million.

“I believe improvements in services—delivered in a financially responsible manner—are achieved in my tentative budget,” he said.

The East Hampton Town Board will discuss the tentative budget during the first two work sessions in October, and expects to have a public hearing on Thursday, November 6. The current plan is to adopt the final budget on Thursday, November 20, as mandated by the state.

East Hampton Farm Museum to Revive the Past

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The Selah Lester House at the corner of North Main and Cedar streets in East Hampton will open next week as a town farm museum, focusing on life at the dawn of the 20th century. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

In 1900, on the cusp of the 20th century, East Hampton was still a sleepy, farming and fishing community, with a growing summer colony, whose residents lived a life apart from the town’s year-round inhabitants. Modern conveniences, like electricity and indoor plumbing, were a luxury reserved for the well off. Other inventions, so common today, like the automobile, were still a novelty, rarely, if ever seen on local streets.

Within two decades, the United States had emerged from World War I, the women’s suffrage movement had been a success, and radios and telephones were in most houses. The modern world as we know it was in full swing.

A major goal of the East Hampton Town Historical Farm Museum, which opens on Saturday, October 11, in the Selah Lester House at the corner of North Main and Cedar streets in East Hampton, is to present a snap shot of what life was like in East Hampton during that period of transition.

“That’s why we picked 1900. It was a time of great change,” said Prudence Carabine, the chairwoman of the museum committee, who offered a preview tour to members of the press on Thursday, September 25.

“I also looked at all the other museums that are within a visitor’s driving distance, and none of them were focusing on this period,” she added. “I wanted to pick a timeframe that has never been explored.”

The three-acre property is owned by East Hampton Town, which also invested about $200,000 into renovating the 18th century farmhouse, which was moved to the site by sled from Amagansett in the late 1800s when Selah Lester bought the property.

Today, the two-bedroom cottage is freshly painted, with finished floors, including wide pine planks on the second floor. A collection of furnishings, kitchen utensils and other common farmhouse tools continues to grow, as Ms. Carabine and other volunteers plan ways to display it in a way that will allow school children the opportunity to handle objects, while protecting them from damage and possible theft.

“We want kids—and adults—to turn off their phones, turn off their gadgets,” said Ms. Carabine, “to see that things were different.”

A wood-burning stove—modern in that it was convertible to natural gas—that was salvaged from the Tillinghast house on Woods Lane sits in the kitchen. Nearby sits a wash tub with a handheld agitator that looks like a metal drain plunger, is in another corner. An old icebox sits in a side room, reminding the visitor that a cold beer was not always easy to come by.

Items ranging from old eyeglasses, tintype photos and hand tools rest on a table in a side room. In a dining room/parlor, dishes and silverware (from Sag Harbor’s Alvin Silver Company) are on the table, and a melodeon, a small pump organ, is on display.

Another side room is furnished with benches and a wide screen television. Rotating exhibits will be displayed on the walls, and a loop of videos, showing old East Hampton residents talking about the good old days, will be shown on the television.

On the second floor, two bedrooms are well furnished with beds typical of the era, bed clothing, and quilts and furnishings.

The museum committee is still in seeking donations of period clothing, toys and other artifacts that can be displayed at the site.

Ms. Carabine said the museum plans to have 50 to 70 docents trained, so it can be open at least one day a week with two on hand at all times. That way, volunteers would only have to work a day a year she said.

The museum will be open from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Saturdays. At its grand opening, Gaynel Stone, the noted archaeologist, will oversee the start of a dig, which hopes to uncover the foundation of an old Dominy mill, which had been used as a wind-powered saw mill. Alex Balsam of Balsam Farms will lead volunteers in planting garlic, which Ms. Carabine hopes will deter deer from foraging in the period garden she hopes to plant behind the house. East Hampton native and teacher David Cataletto will sing songs from the era, and there will be cider and donuts.

In the coming weeks, she plans to hold a pumpkin-pie eating contest on the grounds as well as sponsor talks on a variety of topics, including one by Diane McNally, the clerk of the East Hampton Town Trustees, who, Ms. Carabine points out, would not have been eligible to vote in 1900.

“What we have is a gem, it really is,” she said of the Lester house.  “We are hoping to share it.”

“Judy Gold: 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother” Comes to Bay Street Theater

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Judy Gold; Leslie E. Bohm photo.

Judy Gold; Leslie E. Bohm photo.

By Annette Hinkle

As a stand-up comedian, Judy Gold has gotten a lot of mileage out of Jewish mothers — particularly her own.

“I’m pretty sure I’m a comedian because of her contribution,” admits Ms. Gold. “I didn’t get a lot of affection, but she’s really funny, my mother, and says things that are so outrageous I’d be a fetal position if I didn’t laugh about it.”

Yes, the image of the neurotic, overprotective, self-sacrificing Jewish mother may be fertile ground for good humor, but Ms. Gold — A Jewish mother herself to sons Henry, 18, and Ben, 13 — wondered if there might be more to the matter beyond the punch line.

That part of the story is told in “Judy Gold: 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother,” Ms. Gold’s one woman show which she brings to the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor on Saturday, October 11.

“It’s the story of me becoming a mother,” explains Ms. Gold, an actress and writer who took home two Emmy Awards for writing and producing “The Rosie O’Donnell Show.” “Initially, I wanted to see how I fit into that stereotypical Jewish mother role. I was always criticized by the Jewish press for promoting a stereotype. But it’s not exactly a stereotype if it’s coming out of my mother’s mouth.”

So Ms. Gold and playwright Kate Moira Ryan hit the road in an effort to meet with a cross-section of Jewish mothers to see if their philosophies, motivations and relationships were similar to her own. Over the course of five years, they traversed the country talking to 50 Jewish women about their lives and experiences as spouses and mothers.

“We interviewed women all over and they were so not like each other,” says Ms. Gold. “It was an incredible journey, I can’t even tell you.”

Ms. Gold and Ms. Ryan turned those interviews into a book titled “25 Questions for a Jewish Mother.” Ms. Gold’s monologue, based on the book, premiered Off-Broadway in 2006 at the Ars Nova Theater in New York City. In it, Ms. Gold assumes the identity of many of the women she interviewed. The show won the 2007 GLAAD award for Outstanding New York Theater and while she is well-known for her comedic abilities, Ms. Gold notes there are some seriously poignant moments in this piece.

“It’s funny, but it’s also intense,” she explains.

Among the Jewish mothers Ms. Gold and Ms. Ryan met in their travels was a group of ultra Orthodox women living in Queens. Ms. Gold recalls that the husband of one of the women stood by the stairwell all evening listening to their discussion.

“When we were leaving, he said ‘I’ve known most of these women for over 40 years, and I feel like I now know them for the first time,’” says Ms. Gold.

The reason for that was simply because no one had thought to ask them the questions before.

“I feel it wasn’t like an interview to psychoan1alyze them, but an opportunity for them to tell their side of the story,” says Ms. Gold. “I felt like for the first time in a long time, if ever, these women were being asked about their lives instead of their kids or their husbands’ lives.”

One Orthodox woman shared a story about her daughter who was dating a man she didn’t approve of.

“She was so mean to the guy they broke up,” says Ms. Gold. “From the mother’s point of view this was the best thing she could do for the daughter.”

But when Ms. Gold interviewed the daughter, she told her that she never forgave her mother for driving the man away.

Mothers insinuating themselves in their children’s relationships came up more than once in her travels, and Ms. Gold tells another story of a mother who virtually disowned her son after he married and had children with a non-Jewish woman.

“She cut it off and sat Shiva as if they were dead,” says Ms. Gold. “A few years later, the mother was waiting in a doctor’s office with another woman who had little kids with her. She commented on how well behaved the kids were. The doctor came out and yelled for Mrs. Hoffman, and they both got up.”

“She realized those were here grandkids and that woman was her daughter-in-law,” adds Ms. Gold. “She never went to that doctor again.”

And she never talked to her son and daughter-in-law or saw her grandchildren again.

While the women all had very unique and personal stories to share, Ms. Gold found there was one common denominator among them all.

“When we did the interview at a home, they always had food,” says Ms. Gold who adds that the show also includes extremely moving stories shared by Holocaust survivors and their children.

It’s hardly the sort of material one would expect from a stand-up comedian, but Ms. Gold stresses that this monologue offers audiences a much different experience.

“I love doing standup, but I have more dimensions than just telling jokes,” says Ms. Gold. “In a comedy club you have to keep them laughing every 30 seconds. But when you go in a theater, people are sitting and ready to listen.”

And with “25 Questions For A Jewish Mother,” audiences will get an earful. While the show offers an in-depth look at one very specific demographic, Ms. Gold is pleased to report that it has universal appeal.

“So many people come up to me and say ‘I’m not Jewish, but I have the same mother,” says Ms. Gold. “It doesn’t matter where you come from, it’s a story many people can relate to.”

“Judy Gold: 25 Questions For A Jewish Mother” is Saturday, October 11 at 8 p.m. at Bay Street Theater, Long Wharf, Sag Harbor. Tickets are $59 to $89. Call 724-9500 to reserve or visit baystreet.org.

Glackens & Barnes at The Parrish Art Museum

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William Glackens (American, 1870–1938) The Little Pier, 1914 Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia and Merion, PA; BF497

William Glackens (American, 1870–1938) The Little Pier, 1914 Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia and Merion, PA; BF497

The Parrish Art Museum’s “Curator’s View” series will present an illustrated lecture about the lifelong friendship between artist William Glackens and the collector Albert C. Barnes by Judith Dolkart, The Mary Stripp and R. Crosby Kemper Director of the Addison Gallery of American Art at the Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, on Saturday, October 4 at 11 a.m.

Ms. Dolkart served at The Barnes Foundation as Gund Family Chief Curator and Deputy Director of Art and Archival Collections prior to her appointment at the Addison. In the talk, presented in conjunction with the Museum’s current special exhibition, “William Glackens,” Dolkart will share her unique perspective on the relationship between the American artist and Mr. Barnes.

Born in 1870 in Philadelphia, Mr. Glackens met Mr. Barnes when the two attended Philadelphia’s Central High School. Years later, Mr. Barnes, who amassed great wealth in chemical ventures, would send Mr. Glackens to Paris with $20,000 to purchase art by Pierre Auguste Renior and Alfred Sisley. Mr. Glackens returned with 33 paintings, prints and watercolors including work by Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Maurice Denis, Pablo Picasso, and Camille Pissarro. This began the alliance that would create one of the most important collections of modern art in America.

The lecture compliments The Parrish Art Museums exhibition of Mr. Glacken’s own artwork, the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work since 1966. That exhibition will be on view through October 13.

For more information, visit parrishart.org.

“Still Alice” Will Close Hamptons International Film Festival

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Kristen Stewart and Julianne Moore in "Still Alice."

Kristen Stewart and Julianne Moore in “Still Alice.”

The Hamptons International Film Festival (HIFF), October 9 through October 13, announced this week the festival will close with the U.S. premiere of “Still Alice,” on Monday, October 13 at Guild Hall in East Hampton. The film stars Julianne Moore as Alice Howard, a happily married linguistics professor who is idsgnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. The film also stars Kristen Stewart and Alec Baldwin.

“St. Vincent” will open the festival at Guild Hall on Thursday, October 9. Starring Melissa McCarthy as Maggie, the film centers on a single moves into a new home in Brooklyn, leaving her 12 year-old son in the care of a new neighbor, Vincent, played by Bill Murray. The film is directed by Theodore Melfi and also stars Naomi Watts.

“We are really looking forward to opening our 22nd edition with Theodore Melfi’s charming “St. Vincent” starring Bill Murray in a role he was born to play. Closing our festival with the US premiere of “Still Alice” featuring a mesmerizing performance from one of the great actors of our generation, Julianne Moore, is sure to be a moving end to five days of films from around the world,” said HIFF Artistic Director David Nugent.

For more information, visit hamptonsfilmfest.org.