Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Meet the Candidates Night Becomes One-Man Show

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U.S. Representative Tim Bishop listened to Sag Harbor resident Bob Malafronte at an evening sponsored by the Noyac Civic Council. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

What was supposed to be a meet the candidates night with U.S. Representative Tim Bishop and his Republican challenger, Lee Zeldin, sponsored by the Noyac Civic Council Tuesday night, instead turned out to be a one-man show featuring Mr. Bishop.

Citing a scheduling conflict, Mr. Zeldin first tried to cancel his appearance Tuesday afternoon, before agreeing to arrive at 9 p.m., two hours after his scheduled slot, to informally meet voters.

The Republicans sent Southampton Town Trustee Ed Warner as a stand-in, who deferred most questions of national issues to Mr. Zeldin.

Noyac Civic Council president Elena Loreto on Tuesday said that Mr. Zeldin’s camp had informed her its candidate would not be able to attend the event at 2 p.m. that day, citing another scheduled appearance upisland and despite confirming on Friday that he would appear.

Mr. Bishop said at his previous appearances before the council, helicopter noise was the chief concern. This time none of the two dozen people attending asked about that, instead peppering him with questions about everything from budgets to energy policy.

In his opening statement, Mr. Bishop said he was proud of his record of constituent service and cited his role as one of four sponsors of federal waterways legislation, which he described as one of only 26 pieces of “substantive legislation” passed by the current Congress. The bill successful, he said, because its sponsors engaged in the lost art of compromise, which, he said, has become a “four-letter word” in Washington.

Mr. Bishop said he was particularly proud of his role in helping reform the federal student loan program, which he said, ended $61 billion in bank subsidies and resulted in an additional $26 billion being funneled to Pell Grants to aid the neediest students.

“I ran for Congress because I wanted to be a voice for the middle class,” Mr. Bishop said, recounting how his father used to work an average of  80 hours a week for the phone company to put five children through college. “I used to hate the phone company because I couldn’t understand how they could make this guy who had five kids work every Christmas.” It was only when he was in college, he said, that he learned that his father had put in for the overtime.

Audience members had some tough questions. Reg Cornelia of Springs, said Democrats had prevented inquiries into many scandals.

“What bugs me the most is this IRS scandal,” Mr. Cornelia said. “You and your colleagues have done everything to thwart this investigation.”

“Your characterization is simply not accurate,” Mr. Bishop responded, pointing out that the Internal Revenue Service’s inspector general, a nonpartisan investigator, had determined that the IRS had simply not targeted Tea Party organizations in its efforts to determine whether political groups qualified for tax exempt status, but had also investigated liberal organizations.

Carole Campolo, another East Hampton resident, said the country has been brought to the precipice of financial calamity annually and asked why the federal government has failed to pass a budget since 2009.

Mr. Bishop said that while the budget itself may be an “overrated document” in that Congress achieves the same ends by passing appropriations bills, he said it was a “bipartisan failure,” said that both President Bush and President Obama had sent annual budget proposals to Congress.

Stu Jones, another East Hampton resident, said it was his understanding that no more soldiers were being sent to Afghanistan, but said his son had just received his third posting there. Mr. Bishop thanked Mr. Jones for his son’s service, but explained his being sent back to Afghanistan had to do with troop rotations, not a clandestine increase in force levels.

“If it was up to me I would have been out of Afghanistan a long time ago, and if was up to me I have never gone into Iraq,” Mr. Bishop said. “I think that was the single greatest foreign policy mistake this nation has ever made.’

James Sanford of Sag Harbor wanted to know why New Yorkers pay more for natural gas, a problem he said was caused by a shortage of pipelines and storage capability. He also wanted to know Mr. Bishop’s position on fracking.

The congressman responded that most pipelines are privately owned said he saw no “federal impediment” to more lines being built. As to fracking, Mr. Bishop said he supported Governor Andrew Cuomo’s cautious approach, saying a national policy has to be formulated for dealing with wastewater.

Gene  Polito of Noyac pressed Mr. Bishop on his support of natural gas as a source of energy, saying “global warming is for real” and carbon dioxide levels had to be reduced. “We ignore its implications at its own peril,” he said.

Janet Verneuille of Sag Harbor wanted to know what Mr. Bishop’s stance on the practice of corporations moving their headquarters offshore to save on taxes and asked if he favored lowering the American corporate tax rate.

“I think it is an obscenity that corporations are more interested in the bottom line than in the country that has allowed them to be successful,” Mr. Bishop said, pointing out that they had benefited from a publicly educated workforce and publicly provided infrastructure.

He added, though, that while the American corporate tax rate is one of the highest in the world the actual amount collected as a percentage of gross domestic product is the lowest. He said he favored reforming the corporate tax structure.

Nada Barry of Sag Harbor asked about the prospects for meaningful immigration reform. Mr. Bishop said he was not optimistic and said when the Senate passed a decent bill, House Speaker John Boehner announced it “dead on arrival.”

 

Hyperlocal Plans for Harbor Market in Sag Harbor

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Proprietors Paul and Susana Del Favero in front of the soon-to-be Harbor Market and Kitchen. Michael Heller photo.

Proprietors Paul and Susana Del Favero in front of the soon-to-be Harbor Market and Kitchen. Michael Heller photo.

By Emily J. Weitz

Everybody wants to know what’s to become of the iconic little market on the corner of Division and Henry streets in Sag Harbor. Since the 1930s, this building has provided the community with an easy, casual spot to grab meals or linger over the paper. Chef Paul Del Favero and his wife Susana Plaza Del Favero want to keep that heritage alive with Harbor Market, offering a revitalized menu that takes into account the local, seasonal, and health-conscious demands of the community.

Mr. Del Favero is no stranger to the East End. After training at La Varenne Ecole de Cuisine in Paris and working in both France and New York City, he landed a job as the head chef at Nick and Toni’s in East Hampton in the early 1990s and worked  at the South Fork culinary institution for seven years. He then went on to several other endeavors out here—including serving as the executive chef at The Maidstone Arms—before his friend Bobby Flay offered him a position in his new restaurant in Las Vegas. The couple, with their two young sons in tow, moved to Las Vegas, where Mr. Del Favero settled into a whole different pace of life and business.

“It was a whole new world for me,” said Mr. Del Favero. “We had a staff of 45 in kitchen and 70 in the dining room. We got rave reviews, I got a Michelin star there, and learned a lot.”

The Del Favero family originally thought their stay in Las Vegas would be three to five years, and they ended up there for nine. But as their children got older, the family realized they missed the small town life.

“We missed that local, small town feeling,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero. “This will literally be a mom and pop market. We are excited to make it small and make it ours, and to be a part of the neighborhood and community.”

The Del Faveros know that Espresso was a treasured part of the Sag Harbor community, and they hope to maintain the clientele who have loved it, while also casting a wider net. The menu will change, of course, but the idea of offering food that you can take home to your family will not. They still plan to serve the breakfast crowd, with coffee and egg sandwiches starting at 7 a.m. They still plan to reach the after-school crowd, and the moms and dads picking up dinner for later.

But there will be some changes. They’re installing a wood-burning oven, in which they plan to do a lot of roasted vegetables and proteins.

“We want to serve healthy food,” said Mr. Del Favero, “and to keep vegetarians in mind. We want to sell fresh produce and dairy, and as much local produce as we can when it’s in season.”

In that sense, Harbor Market really intends to be a market, with lots of sundries on its shelves. They are growing their list of local farmers, and hope to offer not just local produce, but products like farm fresh eggs.

“We want to fill our shelves with local products,” said Mr. Del Favero. “And we want to offer food that is not processed. No GMOs, healthy meats, organic vegetables – we want to offer better quality that is eco-friendly.”

Of course, healthier foods come with a higher price tag, and the Del Faveros want to be mindful of keeping prices reasonable.

“We want to give people a bargain,” said Mr. Del Favero. “This is restaurant quality food that you can take home.”

Variety is a key part of the menu, with items influenced by Mr. Del Favero’s classical French training, his wife’s Spanish heritage, and the American, Italian, Mexican, and Southwest flavors he’s drawn on in his past restaurant endeavors.

The family is excited to be part of the community, hoping one day to live in the house attached to the restaurant, and maybe to send their kids to Sag Harbor schools.

“Sag Harbor is such a tight little community,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero, “and we want to be a part of it. People were so concerned about us missing the last summer season, but that’s not what we’re about. We are not a pop-up summer business. We want to be a year round local neighborhood market.”

They’re looking at a few more months of renovations, so the couple is estimating a soft opening sometime in January or February.

“We’ll probably open on a Tuesday in February during a snowstorm,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero.

Now that’s local.

 

Watershed Weekend with The Parrish Art Museum & The Nature Conservancy

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Accabonac Harbor. Image courtesy of The Nature Conservancy. 

The Parrish Art Museum has partnered with The Nature Conservancy in two events meant to highlight one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the East End of Long Island: water quality.

On Saturday, September 27 at 11 a.m., the museum will host “Watershed: Artists, Writers, Scientists and Advocates on Our Waters” in the Lichtenstein Theatre. The PechaKucha style talk will feature eight speakers including LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) accredited architect Glynis Berry who serves on the Suffolk County Planning Commission and is with the U.S. Green Building Council; Dr. Chris Gobler, a professor at SUNY Stony Brook’s School of Atmospheric and Marine Sciences and an expert on the topic of harmful algal blooms; Nature Conservancy Long Island Executive Director Nancy Kelley, Hampton Bays bayman Ken Mades; Southampton resident and Executive Director of the Lloyd Magothy Water Trust, Thomas McAbee; Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst; Edwina von Gal, East Hampton-based landscape architect and President of the Azuero Earth Project whose mission is to preserve the earth’s ecosystems, protect biodiversity, and promote healthy communities; and artist and teacher at the School of Constructed Environments at Parsons the New School for Design in New York City, Allan Wexler, whose work in the fields of architecture, design, and fine art explores human activity and the built environment.

The museum will follow the discussion with a Sunday, September 28 Walking Tour of Accabonac Harbor, one of the regions most diverse tidal marsh systems. Both programs are being presented in conjunction with The Parrish Art Museum’s ongoing exhibition, “Platform: Maya Lin.”

For more information, visit parrishart.org. 

Noyac Civic Council Celebrates 60 Years With Gala to Benefit Ambulance Corps

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The Noyac Civic Council will celebrate 60 years of community services with a gala celebration on Saturday, September 27 from 6 to 10 a.m. at Harlow, 1 Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. The event, which is $90 per person with tickets available at The Whalebone General Stone, will feature cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, as well as a sit down dinner with all proceeds benefiting the Sag Harbor and Southampton Volunteer Ambulance Corps. The civic council is offering a group discount rate of $80 per person for purchases of six or more tickets at one time. For more information, email cnmn@optonline.net.

Clavin Earns Spot on NY Times Best Sellers List

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Author, journalist, professor and Sag Harbor resident Tom Clavin has earned a spot on The New York Times best sellers list for his book, “The Heart of Everything That Is,” co-written by Bob Drury. The biography of Red Cloud, the influential Sioux leader, the book examines his life and military prowess as well as the Plains Indians’ changing way of life in the 1850s and ’60s. The book appeared in the number 10 position on The New York Times Print Paperback Best Sellers, non-fiction, on September 21. It was the book’s first week on the list.

Surf Benefit for Disabled

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The crowd at the first annual ONCE surf benefit in memory of Sax Leader. Photo courtesy of Jacqui Leader.

The first annual ONCE surf benefit for the learning disabled was held at Indian Wells Beach in Amagansett on September 6 in memory of Sax Leader, who died nine months ago.

Mr. Leader loved the ocean and  cared very much for people who are mentally challenged, the saxleaderfoundation stated in a release. “We believe he would have loved seeing professional surfers donating their time to take a person with special needs out on a surf board ONCE in their lifetime.”

People donated $30 to sponsor a surfer, and friends and family cheered on the surfers and their students.

All proceeds from the event will go toward sending a person with drug, alcohol or depression issues to counseling at a reputable drug rehabilitation center.

For further information or to help support the effort, visit saxleaderfoundation.com or call (631) 678-7560.

East Hampton Calls for Volunteers for Beach Cleanup

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The East Hampton Town Recycling and Litter Committee announced this week that it will participate in the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup Day this Saturday, September 20.

The program asks volunteers to come out and clean up any local beaches while recording the types of trash found on the beaches, according to a press release from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby on September 16.

“This information will help the Conservancy collect and analyze data that will raise awareness, identify debris hotspots of unusual trash events and can help communities adopt policies that will work towards cleaner oceans,” the release read.

Garbage bags and disposable gloves will be supplied by the town of East Hampton; anyone interested in participating can pick up free bags and gloves and a data collection form from Town Hall through Friday, September 19. Volunteers can leave full trash bags by town garbage cans on Saturday and they will be picked up by the parks department.

Volunteers who document their day of cleanup on Saturday are asked to e-mail them to soverby@ehamptonny.gov so they can put on the town’s website. For more information about the Ocean Conservancy’s Coastal Cleanup Day, visit oceanconservancy.org.

 

North Haven Hunting Injunction Lifted

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By Mara Certic

A temporary restraining order to prevent the issuance of new deer nuisance permits in North Haven has been lifted by Suffolk County Supreme Court Judge W. Gerard Asher in a ruling on Friday, September 12.

The Wildlife Preservation Coalition of Eastern Long Island (WPCELI) filed suit against the Village of North Haven last spring for a preliminary injunction to prevent  the DEC from issuing nuisance permits on the East End, after hearing word of a proposed mass deer cull.

In March 2014, the Supreme Court issued a six-month temporary restraining order that prevented new permits from being issued. According to a press release issued by Wendy Chamberlin, president of WPCELI, the temporary restraining order “effectively, halted the Long Island Farm Bureau and United States Department of Agriculture, Wildlife Services’ planned 2013-2014 cull of, potentially, thousands of deer, which concluded this past spring.”

The WPCELI argued the planned 2013-2014 cull of 3,000 to 5,000 deer “was a substantial increase from previous years and that a cull of this size has not been properly evaluated or studied by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation,” according the release.

According to court records, the wildlife coalition asserted “the DEC’s recent issuance of DDPs involves significant departures from their established and accepted practices of doing so and asserts that a new evaluation of the need and scale of any deer cull program must be done.” They also said, according to the records, “the DEC does not follow its own guidelines.” The DEC countered that it does indeed follow its own guidelines and that there was not a significant departure from past years, noting there are only 12 applications currently pending before the DEC, and that those are for mostly farmland.

“WPCELI is confident that the court will find that DEC has not justified this unprecedented cull and will direct DEC to comply with the law before issuing more permits for the LIFB program,” Ms. Chamberlin said in the release.

According to North Haven Village Mayor Jeff Sander, the lifting of the temporary restraining order will not have much of an immediate impact on North Haven.

“It won’t affect the state-wide hunting season that starts on October 1,” Mr. Sander said on Wednesday morning. “The normal hunting season starts October 1 and goes through the end of the year. The nuisance deer hunting starts on January 1, so it will allow us to continue as we have for many years.”

The North Haven Village Board presented an update of its deer management plan at its regular meeting earlier this month. It discussed the possibility of adding a deer sterilization program as well as plans to plans to deploy in the spring 10 four-poster feeding systems, which apply insecticide to a feeding deer’s neck and shoulders.

The board also discussed a proposed law that would require all hunters in North Haven to apply for special hunting permits from the village, as well as a permit from the DEC. “We just want to be able to control what hunters are in North Haven, what areas they’re hunting in. And they’ll need that permit whether they’re hunting in the normal season starting next month or during January to March for the nuisance deer hunting,” Mr. Sander said.

Mr. Sander said during the village board meeting the primary focus is to reduce the herd. North Haven, however, has no plans to bring in professional firm White Buffalo for a deer cull this year, he added.

East Hampton Management Plan

Andrew Gaites of the Deer Management Committee gave a report at the East Hampton Town Board’s Tuesday morning work session this week and offered options and recommendations to the board.

According to Mr. Gaites, changes in bow-hunting setback laws created an additional 300 acres of town land that can be opened for bow-hunting this year. The law, signed by Governor Andrew Cuomo earlier this year, reduced mandatory setbacks from residences from 500 feet to 150 feet. There is also an additional 174 acres of town land now available for gun hunting as well, he said.

Mr. Gaites said he believes the New York State Parks Department is working to open up more land in Napeague and Montauk for hunting.

The committee did not recommend planning for a professional deer cull this winter, “mostly due to a lawsuit against the DEC and the USDA,” Mr. Gaites said. The committee did suggest the town consider allowing local hunters onto private land during certain hours, “possibly at other times of year using nuisance permits,” as well as the regular hunting season, Mr. Gaites said.

He also suggested the possibility of opening up two landfill sites to hunting on Wednesdays, when they are closed. Mr. Gaites said if this was possible, the properties would only be open on a limited basis and only to a select number of lottery winners. It was also recommended that deer accidents be better documented and that the board consider extending the gun season to include weekends.

East Hampton Will Let Citizens Weigh In

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East Hampton Town announced this week that it would hold a series of informational hearings on hot topics in the coming weeks.

Two public meetings have been scheduled to discuss the town’s comprehensive wastewater management plan. The first will be on Tuesday, September 23, at 10 a.m. in the Emergency Services Building in East Hampton Village. A second will take place during a regularly scheduled town board work session on Tuesday, October 14, at 10 a.m. at the Montauk Firehouse. Each meeting will include an overview of the plan, as well as a detailed discussion of specifics as they relate to the hamlet in which the meeting is held.

The Montauk Beach Stabilization Plan will be the topic of a special meeting at noon on Thursday, September 25, at the Montauk Firehouse. The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers will present the final details of their downtown Montauk beach stabilization project. Representatives from the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation and Suffolk County Department of Public Works, as well as East Hampton Town, will also attend.

The town’s proposed rental registry law will be the topic at two town board work session, the first on Tuesday, October 21, at 10 a.m. at Town Hall, and the second on Wednesday, November 12, at 10 a.m. at the Montauk Firehouse.

“Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” at Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival

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Anita Hill testifying at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

Anita Hill testifying at the 1991 Senate confirmation hearings of U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas.

By Tessa Raebeck

Anita Hill, shown speaking candidly for the first time since she testified before Congress in 1991, will open a discussion on gender inequality and sexual harassment at Bay Street Theater on Saturday at the presentation of “Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” by the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival.

In the documentary, Academy Award-winning director Freida Lee Mock examines the experience of Ms. Hill, an attorney and law professor who testified before the U.S. Senate about being sexually harassed by U.S. Supreme Court nominee Clarence Thomas. Fourteen senators, all male, questioned her for nine hours.

“The challenge for me as a filmmaker is to tell a universal story of transformation and empowerment that is riveting, entertaining and amazing to a generation of women and men too young to know, but who are benefiting by Anita Hill’s courage to speak truth to power,” Ms. Mock said.

A panel discussion following the film includes: Gini Booth, executive director of Literacy Suffolk and radio/TV host for PBS and CBS affiliates; Wini Freund, former board president of the Women’s Fund of Long Island; Deborah Kooperstein, attorney and Southampton Town Justice; and Betty Schlein, past president of the Long Island National Organization of Women.

“Anita: Speaking Truth to Power” will be presented as a preliminary event of the Hamptons Take 2 Documentary Film Festival. It will be screened on Saturday, September 20, at 4 p.m. at the Bay Street Theater, located at the corner of Bay Street and Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. Tickets are $15 at the door. The festival will run from December 4 to 7. For more information, visit ht2ff.com or call (631) 725-9500.