Tag Archive | "East Hampton"

Springs Man Released on $25,000 Bail After Shooting Incident

Tags: , , ,


By Mara Certic and Stephen J. Kotz

Springs resident Valon Shoshi was arrested on four charges following a manhunt by East Hampton Town Police on Friday, October 3, and was released on $25,000 bail after appearing in East Hampton Town Justice Court on Saturday.

Mr. Shoshi, 28, was charged with felony reckless endangerment as well as illegal discharge of a weapon, assault and possession of a loaded gun in a motor vehicle, three misdemeanors.

On Friday morning, Mr. Shoshi reportedly fired a shotgun several times in his bedroom at 85 Gardiner Avenue in the Springs section of East Hampton. According to the police, his mother suffered minor injuries as a result and was sent to Southampton Hospital for treatment. Mr. Shoshi then allegedly fled the house with the gun in tow in a new Cadillac sedan.

According to Captain Chris Anderson of the East Hampton Town Police, a family member contacted the police following the incident.

The police initially had information that indicated Mr. Shoshi had fled the scene and gone to a secondary residence. After police determined he was not at that location, they managed to establish communication with Mr. Shoshi and he was stopped in his vehicle on Springs Fireplace Road near One Stop Market and put into custody without incident.

During the manhunt, nearby schools and some facilities in the immediate area were asked to go into lock-down as a precaution. Sag Harbor, Springs, East Hampton and Wainscott school districts all were in what the police call “locked-in status” on Friday morning.

Capt. Anderson said it was of “paramount importance” to the police department to protect the schools until they determined what the threat was.

“It’s a big sigh of relief,” said Sag Harbor Superintendent Katy Graves in describing how she felt when police called to say the lockdown could be lifted.

She said that school officials were still in the middle of implementing the lockdown when they were informed they could go back to normal business. Ms. Graces said the district immediately sent an automated telephone and text message to the school community informing it of what had occurred.

“I’m very proud of my staff,” she said. “They were all so child-centered and proactive.”

Capt. Anderson added “the school districts as a whole did a tremendous job.”

Mr. Shoshi, moved to East Hampton from Kosovo with his family in 1999. He attended East Hampton High School and is an accomplished boxer. He volunteered in the Springs Fire Department, was assistant chief of the East Hampton Village Ambulance Association, and also worked as an aide in the East Hampton School District.

According to Edward Burke Jr., Mr. Shoshi’s attorney, his client’s family and many other community members were at court on Saturday in his support.

“His entire family, including his mom, fully support Valon,” Mr. Burke said. “They are entirely behind him in this journey through the criminal justice system.”

Justice Lisa R. Rana, who heard Mr. Shoshi’s case on Saturday, released him on $25,000 bail under the condition that Mr. Shoshi undergoes an immediate psychological evaluation.

Mr. Burke said on Wednesday that his client is cooperating fully and has been in counseling. He and his client will report to the court today, October 9 to inform the court he has been seeking counseling, as ordered by Justice Rana.

Mr. Shoshi will appear before court on Thursday, October 30.

 

East Hampton Plans to Ban Plastic Bags By Earth Day

Tags: , , , , , , ,


PIC DAVID CRUMP.TESCO PLASTIC BAGS

By Mara Certic

While banning plastic bags may not be the lynchpin in solving the world’s environmental crisis, according to East Hampton Town Councilwoman Sylvia Overby it is at least a step in the right direction.

East Hampton’s celebration of Recycling Awareness Month was in full swing at their first work session of the month on Tuesday, October 7, when Ms. Overby discussed a proposed ban on single-use plastic bags.

“It’s a small step, it’s not going to solve all the problems,” Ms. Overby said. “It will be something that I think is going to be important to start making those steps,” she said.

The towns of Southampton, Southold and Shelter Island have all put their support behind a regional ban on plastic bags, the world’s largest consumer item. Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst said last month the town will hold a public hearing on the ban the first week in December, and the idea is to implement a regional ban by Earth Day, 2015.

John Botos of East Hampton’s Natural Resources Department has been working with Ms. Overby on the draft legislation. Using data from the EPA, Mr. Botos estimates the town – excluding the village, which banned the bags back in 2011 – uses approximately 10 million bags a year.

Frank Dalene, president of the East Hampton Energy Sustainability Committee gave a few statistics from the Citizens Campaign for the Environment: the plastic offenders are used for an average of 12 minutes, he said, but they never fully break down, just becoming smaller and smaller particles of petrochemicals.

According to Mr. Dalene, 2.2 billion pounds of fossil fuels and 3.9 billion gallons of fresh water are needed to make the 100 billion plastic bags that American consumers use each year. As it stands today, there are approximately 46,000 pieces of plastic in every square mile of ocean, he said.

Ms. Overby has been working closely with business-owners, and added “We’re really delighted and happy because we really worked well with the business community.”

In fact Catherine Foley, who with her husband Stuart owns Air and Speed Surf Shop in Montauk, spoke up during Tuesday’s work session to lend her support to the ban. “The public is ready,” she said, “they just need continued encouragement, guidance and support.”

East Hampton Town Trustee and Chair of the Litter Committee Deborah Klughers did an online poll regarding the ban, she said, and found that 92-percent of her sample of the community were in favor of the ban. “It’s looking really good, it would be good for the planet,” she said.

Ms. Overby said she is still working on a draft of the public hearing for the ban, but welcomes anyone interested to take a look and give the board some feedback on it as written. In the meantime, the town is dedicated to helping to educate the public and business-owners about the ban and about the BYOB initiative – “bring your own bag.”

Ms. Klughers discussed some of the other activities going on in conjunction with recycling awareness month on Tuesday.  A “Kids Can Recycle” campaign has students in East Hampton Town competing to see who can collect and recycle the largest number of aluminum cans; the winning school will win an evergreen tree.

The last week of October will be dedicated to recycling cardboard, she said. Businesses, residents and even out-of-towners are invited to drop off their (flattened) cardboard at the town recycling centers during that week.

Ms. Klughers also announced the Trustees have begun a new, very different recycling campaign. “Don’t chuck it if you shuck it,” is the motto for the Trustees’ new seashell recycling initiative. Bivalve-enthusiasts are asked to drop off their clam, oyster and scallop shells for the town to reintroduce to the local waters in order to provide habitats for other sea creatures.

Mr. Botos announced the town has been awarded a $13,000 grant to install an electric car charging station outside town hall. Work on that, he said, may begin next month.

The town is working on different ways to educate the public about energy conservation and sustainability. Mr. Botos said their main priority now is to educate people about “phantom-load energy,” which is the energy used by appliances that are not running, but are plugged in.

Although a microwave might only be on for a couple of minutes a day, he explained, if it is plugged in, it is still drawing out energy and costing the homeowner. The Natural Resources Department is looking to use social media networks to spread this message and will be using the hashtags #unplugeasthampton and #unplugeh.

 

East End Towns Budget Money for South Fork Behavioral Health Initiative

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


By Mara Certic

Supervisors in both East Hampton and Southampton kept to their words this week when they put $25,000 aside in their tentative budgets to go towards improving mental healthcare in South Fork school districts.

In April, New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. and State Senator Kenneth P. LaValle awarded $150,000 in state aid as seed money for the first step of the three-pronged South Fork Behavioral Health Initiative.

Senator LaValle secured an additional $5,000 each for the Sag Harbor, Southampton, East Hampton and Hampton Bays school districts. Each district, in turn, is expected to match that amount.

Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman managed to get his hands on $17,000 more from the county, bringing the anticipated total funding on the South Fork up to $257,000 for phase one.

This first phase, which Mr. Thiele had anticipated would require $320,000 in total funding, would establish a crisis service that would provide immediate mental and behavioral health needs specifically to South Fork area students. It is proposed one full-time psychiatrist be hired to work at the Family Service League’s East Hampton and Westhampton Mental Health Clinics. The first step is also slated to include the hiring of two full-time social workers.

“It also establishes Family Service League as the interim point of contact for crisis intervention,” Mr. Thiele’s proposal reads. “A permanent point of contact will be established in the second phase, which builds on and expands the crisis service through a mobile unit and community collaboration.”

The third phase would involve seeking out support from Stony Brook University’s psychiatric residency program.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell said the issue of seriously lacking mental healthcare on the South Fork was first brought to his attention by the East Hampton School District over a year ago.

As it stands now, there is no appropriate process set in place for a student who might be experiencing a crisis at school on the East End, be it threatening self-harm or contemplating suicide. According to Karen Boorshtein, president and CEO of the Family Service League, “When a school district encounters a crisis, they usually need to involve the police and have the youth transported over 60 miles to the psychiatric emergency room at Stony Brook.” Not only does this place strain on local police departments, but more often than not, these troubled children are handcuffed and placed into the back of a police vehicle for their trip up to their evaluation.

Once students return from their emergency evaluations, they then often face long waiting lists at local mental health clinics. There is not a large pool of mental health professionals on the East End, which many attribute to our remote location and rather sparse year-round population. Those who do operate on the South Fork often do not accept insurance and typically charge $200 to $300 an hour, according to Ms. Boorshtein.

“The last two years have seen the completed suicides of three youth and a significant increase in the number of mental health crises being experienced by youth and requiring school districts to respond,” Ms. Boorshtein wrote in a e-mail on Monday.

According to the CDC, the second leading cause of death among people aged 10 to 24 is suicide. In a 2011 nationally representative sample of high school students, 15.8 percent of youths reported they had seriously considered attempting suicide during the 12 months preceding the survey.

According to Suicide Awareness Voices of Education (SAVE), an organization dedicated to suicide prevention, the strongest risk factor for suicide is depression. The organization also claims that 80 percent of those who seek treatment for depression are treated successfully.

“The grant will increase and improve coordination of community mental health services to avoid future mental health crisis and suicides,” Ms. Boorshtein said.

The initiative also calls for telepsychiatry, which will provide secure phone lines on which troubled students can talk to licensed psychiatrists. The American Psychiatric Association recently deemed telepsychiatry “one of the most effective ways to increase access to psychiatric care for individuals living in underserved areas.”

The Family Service League is gearing up to start making these changes, and soon enough, phase one will be implemented on the South Fork. But the battle ahead is long, and much more money will be needed to complete all three of the steps.

“The potential catastrophe here is around the corner if we can’t deal with this better than we have been in the past,” Mr. Cantwell said.

Thursday, October 9 is National Depression Screening Day on which individuals can take a free online mental health screening at helpyourselfhelpothers.org 

Plein Air Peconic Celebrates Land, Sea, Sky

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


Hendrickson Farm by Kathryn Szoka.

Hendrickson Farm by Kathryn Szoka.

“Land, Sea, Sky,” Plein Air Peconic’s Ninth Annual Show, will debut with an artists reception this Saturday, October 11 from 5 to 8 p.m. at Ashawagh Hall, 780 Springs Fireplace Road in East Hampton. The show will be on view throughout Columbus Day weekend.

“Land, Sea, Sky” celebrates art inspired by direct observation of the East End’s cherished local farmlands, wildflower fields, salt marshes, and beaches in an exhibition and sale by the artists of Plein Air Peconic.  Many landscapes that have been conserved by Peconic Land Trust will be included.  Plein Air Peconic includes painters Casey Chalem Anderson, Susan D’Alessio, Aubrey Grainger, Anita Kusick, Keith Mantell, Michele Margit, Joanne Rosko, and photographers Tom Steele, Kathryn Szoka.  Plein Air Peconic has announced that two guest painters, Ty Stroudsburg and Gail Kern, will be exhibiting as well.

The show will partially benefit the Peconic Land Trust. To learn more about the artists of Plein Air Peconic visit PleinAirPeconic.com.

 

BNB Announces Quarterly Dividend

Tags: , , , , , ,


Bridge Bancorp, Inc., the holding company for The Bridgehampton National Bank, announced the declaration of a quarterly dividend of $0.23 per share. The dividend will be payable on October 31 to shareholders of record as of October 17.  The company continues its trend of uninterrupted dividends.

Bridge Bancorp, Inc. is a bank holding company engaged in commercial banking and financial services through its wholly owned subsidiary, The Bridgehampton National Bank (BNB).  Established in 1910, BNB, with assets of approximately $2.2 billion, and a primary market area of Suffolk and Southern Nassau Counties, Long Island, operates 27 retail branch locations.

For more information, visit bridgenb.com. 

Mattituck Junior Girl Scouts Donate Handmade Blankets to East Hampton’s The Retreat

Tags: , , , ,


people1

To support the East End’s domestic violence services and educational programs, the Mattituck Junior Girl Scout Troop 1334 created more than 30 handmade blankets and welcome bags for children staying at The Retreat’s residential shelter for women and children in East Hampton.

“We always have children staying in our shelter and we are so grateful to be able to give them security blankets and welcome bags when they arrive,” shelter director Minerva Perez said. “Many times, women and children come to us for help with nothing and to be able to give them something they can keep is so important to us.”

The Retreat provides safety and support for those dealing with domestic abuse by offering a 24-hour hotline, shelter, counseling, advocacy, educational programs, housing assistance and more. The residential shelter housed 58 women and 59 children from the East End in 2013. For more information, visit theretreatinc.org.

 

 

 

 

Osiecki Honored for Heroism

Tags: , , ,


A year-and-a-half after the night she swam into Napeague Harbor to rescue a drowning woman, Sag Harbor’s own Katie Osiecki received a proclamation on Thursday from the State of New York and the Town of East Hampton recognizing her heroism.

Ms. Osiecki was one of 20 to receive a Carnegie Medal this year. The award was founded by Andrew Carnegie in 1904, and is reserved for individuals in the United States and Canada who risk their lives to an extraordinary degree while saving, or attempting to save, the lives of others.

New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. and Supervisor Larry Cantwell presented Ms. Osiecki with a proclamation at the East Hampton Town Board’s regular meeting on Thursday, October 2.

“Therefore be it proclaimed by the State Legislature, by the New York State Assembly, that she be recognized for winning the Carnegie Medal,” Mr. Thiele read.

“This act, I think, really tells you all you need to know about Katie Osiecki. She’s a really special young woman, a special resident of the town of East Hampton,” he said.

 

Man Arrested After East Hampton Manhunt

Tags: , ,


policefilephoto21

Sag Harbor Schools, like their counterparts in East Hampton, were briefly put on lockdown on Friday as East Hampton police sought a man, who was reportedly suicidal, and had left his Springs home after wounding shooting a family member with a shotgun.

Friday afternoon, East Hampton Police said they had taken Valon Shoshi, 28, of Springs into custody at approximately 12:40 p.m. and given local schools the all-clear.

East Hampton Town Police Captain Chris Anderson said the victim, who he would only identify as “a relative” of Mr. Shoshi, was taken to Southampton Hospital for treatment of minor injuries from a shotgun blast.

Capt. Anderson said “charges were pending” against Mr. Shoshi, who he, added, was taken into custody near One Stop Market on Springs-Fireplace Road in East Hampton.

“It’s a big sigh of relief,” said Sag Harbor Superintendent Katy Graves in describing how she felt when police called to say the lockdown could be lifted.

She said that school officials were still in the middle of implanting the lockdown when they were informed they could go back to normal business. She said the district immediately sent an automated telephone and text message to the school community informing it of what had occurred.

“I’m very proud of my staff,” she said. “They were all so child-centered and proactive.”

Friday afternoon, East Hampton Town Police issued a press release, stating they were called to 85 Gardiner Avenue in Springs at about 10:30 a.m. Friday after receiving a report of a shooting there. The suspect had fled the scene.

Officers from the East Hampton Village Police joined town officers and members of the East End Townwide Emergency Services Unit and a Suffolk County Police Department K-unit were called in.

Police said they secured a home on Jericho Lane in the village  and told local schools “as well as a few facilities in the immediate search areas” to go on lockdown.

Mr. Shoshi was taken into custody when he was spotted driving north on Abraham’s Path. Police said after a brief pursuit, he was pulled over on Springs-Fireplace Road near One Stop Market and taken into custody without incident at approximately 12:40 p.m.

In Sag Harbor Ms. Graves said the school district would use the incident to sharpen its own procedures. She added that the New York State Police and the state Department of Education are going to hold a joint webcast for school districts to discuss model safety plans on October 16.

 

Shellfishing in Northwest Creek

Tags: ,


Citing water quality improvements, the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation on September 24 announced that it would reopen shellfish harvesting in some 300 acres of Suffolk County waters in East Hampton, Southold and Babylon towns.

Among the areas to be reopened are 88 acres in Northwest Creek, which will be “seasonally certified,” meaning they can be opened to shellfishing from December 15 through April 30 of each year.

The DEC said water testing had shown decreases in harmful bacteria in the waters, which will be reopened.

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

Tags: , , , , ,


October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Southampton Hospital and the Coalition for Women’s Cancers at the hospital have planned a slew of events to increase awareness and raise funds to support local breast cancer survivors, starting with the lighting of a Pink Ribbon Tree at the Southampton Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday.

Other events include a Breast Cancer Awareness Health Fair on Friday, October 3, at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in East Hampton from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.;  the fourth annual Breast Cancer Summit at The Coral House in Baldwin from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 7; the Give Where You Live Campaign Kickoff at Parrish Memorial Hall at Southampton Hospital at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 8; Look Good, Feel Better at the Hampton Bays Library on October 14 from 1 to 3 p.m. the Shelter Island 5k Run/Walk on October 18 at 11 a.m. at Crescent Beach on Shelter Island; a Birdhouse Auction at the Southampton Social Club on Elm Street at 6 p.m. on October 18; a Shopping Benefit at Calypso at 21 Newtown Lane in East Hampton on October 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.; and Free Makeovers for Breast Cancer Survivors at Macy’s in Hampton Bays on October 24 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

In addition, there will be three Charity of the Month promotions. Sabrosa Mexican Grill on Montauk Highway in Water Mill will donate the total bill amount for the 100th customer each day in October to the Coalition for Women’s Cancers. The Deborah Thompson Day Spa at the Plaza in Montauk will donate 10 percent from all treatments during the month, and Panera Bread on Montauk Highway in Hampton Bays will donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of pink ribbon bagels to the Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition, the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline and Support Program and the The Breast Cancer Research Program at Cold Spring Harbor Research Laboratory during the month.

For more about the various breast cancer awareness events, call (631) 726-8715.