Tag Archive | "extra curricular trips"

Kids can Earn College Credits at Pierson

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A few weeks ago, Jeff Nichols, the principal of Pierson High School, gave a presentation at a board of education meeting about Advanced Placement (AP) courses that the school currently offers. The presentation outlined how the students in the district compare with others taking similar courses around the world.
At this week’s board of education meeting, school superintendent Dr. John Gratto announced that he and Nichols are looking to get district students college credit for enrolling and passing the AP courses.
“We have been talking about the ways we could offer these courses to have dual credit,” Gratto said referring not only to high school, but college credit as well. “Jeff [Nichols] has been working with the Suffolk County Community College.”
Currently, Suffolk County Community College offers courses similar to those offered at Pierson such as European History, Physics and US Government.
The students would still be required to take a mandated AP exam, but at the same time, the students would be able to earn three college credits per course.
With the number of AP classes currently in place, the students could take 10 additional courses at Pierson and conceivably earn 30 college credits even before graduating from Pierson, according to Nichols.
At present, Pierson students can earn college credits for AP Math and AP Spanish through Long Island University, which gives the students college credit for these courses which are similar to courses at a college level.
The administrators are now waiting to hear back from Suffolk County Community College to see how the AP courses can be modified to fit the requirements.

Also at Monday’s board of education meeting, the board unanimously adopted a new policy on extra-curricular trips, which had been the topic of much discussion in prior meetings. Some residents and board members have, in past weeks, expressed concern for the students left behind as well as the educational purpose of the trips.
On Monday, Tin Wilcoxen, school board president Walter Wilcoxen’s significant other, said that she is in favor of extra-circular trips and believes these trips are a great asset to the curriculum.
The new policy outlines that a single teacher may only be allowed to take part in one extra-curricular trip per school year and that each teacher attending a field trip must submit a lesson plan to the principal a week in advance.
Also, the new policy will now require teachers to give a follow-up report on the trip to the principal, superintendent or board of education.

Purchasing Consortium Dead

In other news, at Monday’s meeting, Gratto announced that his idea for a South Shore Purchasing Consortium (SSPC) was “defunct.” The SSPC was an attempt to combine the resources of schools on the East End and have local businesses bid for providing things like fuel oil and paper. After a meeting with BOCES’ (Board of Cooperative Educational Services) district superintendent, Gary Bixhorn, Gratto found that it would be better to let BOCES work on getting better pricing for items while keeping the focus on schools on the South Fork. Gratto said that BOCES is better equipped with staff and information to put out request for bids for lower pricing.
According to Gratto, BOCES will hold informational meetings for local businesses to learn how the bidding process works.
“Now we have the opportunity to get bids on more products,” Gratto announced.
Additional items BOCES will focus on will include paint and supplies, fine and recycled paper, stationery, custodial supplies, fence equipment and art and craft supplies.
Business Manager of the Sag Harbor School District, Len Bernard, said at the meeting that BOCES will not charge a separate fee for this opportunity.
“We will get products at a lower cost and educate local bidders,” he said.
Gratto said on Monday that the South Shore Purchasing Consortium idea could be resurrected in the spring, if need be.

Push for Tuition Students

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President of School Board Walter Wilcoxen and Superintendent Dr. John Gratto



At their last meeting, the Sag Harbor Board of Education was treated to a demonstration by Pierson High School Jeff Nichols, who showed the students’ achievement levels compared to others on a global scale. At this week’s board of education meeting, superintendent Dr. John Gratto talked about those achievements and proposed that the school look at ways to raise revenue, including a plan to invite more students to the district on a tuition-based status.

“There are good test scores and they are attractive to any parent that may want to send their kids to this school,” Gratto said on Monday. “Could we be a bit entrepreneurial? And are we willing to accept students on a tuition basis?”
Gratto explained that by looking at the master schedule, he predicted the school could accept more students at no additional cost.
“How many kids could we take, without negatively affecting class size?” asked school board member Ed Haye.
Gratto responded there could be up to 35 more students per grade level, on the current schedule. Haye suggested that the district should start off slow, and added that 35 seemed like a lot of additional students in one grade.
School board president, Walter Wilcoxen suggested that for some of the Advanced Placement (AP) courses, adding more students might make those classes more economical to run.
Gratto added that the school might have to make some major decisions next year as to whether the school will offer the AP courses with limited enrollment.
“If we decided as a district to keep the classes vibrant, keep a rich curriculum … it would be a good thing to look into as long as we are able to say when we have too many students,” board member Mary Ann Miller, said. “We have tuition paying students now and this is the school they chose; I think that speaks to the program.”
“I second the notion of exploring it gently,” board member Daniel Hartnett said, “I think our school may be appealing because of our small class size.”
“We are talking about negatively increasing 25 to 35 percent and that it won’t have a negative impact on the kids,” Parent Teacher Association President Chris Tice said at the meeting. She said the idea of raising revenue was approached nonchalantly by the board and noted that even if the district added three, four or five students to the class it would have a negative impact on the students. She said she would be cautious about adding to class size.
Gratto said on Tuesday that he intended to bring in more tuition-based students, but still stick to the school’s goal of small class sizes. For example, he said that if 30 new students came in to the school on a tuition-paying basis, and that tuition was $20,000 for each child, that would be $600,000 revenue for the district. He added, if the district had to add a teacher to keep class sizes small – that may cost the district $50,000, but the district could still potentially make $550,000 in profit.

Teacher Contracts
President of the Teacher’s Association of Sag Harbor, Eileen Kochanasz, spoke at Monday’s meeting about the prolonged teacher contract negotiations, which are closing in on the one-year mark.
“We are asking the board for a change in the process,” Kochanasz said, “There is an inordinate amount of time that goes by to consider the proposals.” She explained that in between the contract negotiation meetings, too much time lapses before they are able to come to the table again. She asked on Monday that the board consider authorizing the superintendent and the school’s attorney to negotiate at the table – eliminating the study and review process after each session.
Kochanasz said that as TASH president she is able to actively negotiate on the teachers’ behalf.
Wilcoxen responded that the board hasn’t discussed that but said that he supposed board members and Gratto could do so after the meeting.
“Let John [Gratto] know prior to the 10th [of December], that would clearly move this process,” said Kochanasz to Wilcoxen, “rather than stopping and waiting, stopping and waiting.”
“I’m torn,” Wilcoxen said. “On one hand I want to be honest and open, but I’m limited to what I can say, I’m only one voice of our seven.”
“We always had the authority to negotiate within parameters,” Gratto said on Tuesday. He said along with the board and the school’s attorney, he will meet with TASH members to talk about teacher negotiations on December 10.

Extra-Curricular Trips
At the start of Monday’s school board meeting, high school art teacher, Peter Solow, asked the board if he could show them a short film about past school trips to Italy.
“We hope to show you the effects and lasting effects of this very meaningful experience,” said Solow who would like to plan a trip to Italy in 2010.
At last month’s board of education meeting, a change in policy for field trips was discussed. In the past, several trips have extended beyond scheduled school vacation time and the board had its first reading of a new policy at that meeting, which outlined parameters for class-based and extra-curricular trips.
Resident Elena Loreto expressed her concerns that students would be losing valuable instructional time and also expressed concern for those students that would be left behind. Loreto asked the board to reconsider the policy.
Wilcoxen said that he did not believe the policy was ready to go yet, and it was tabled, for now.