Tag Archive | "fine art"

Four Painters, a Sculptor and a Photographer at Sag Harbor’s Grenning Gallery

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


A photograph from Sebastiano Vitale's "Raw Horse" collection, which will be shown at the Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor.

A photograph from photojournalist Sebastiano Vitale’s “Raw Horse” collection, parts of which will be shown at the Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor. Photo courtesy of the Grenning Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Sag Harbor’s Grenning Gallery will open its season Saturday with a new show featuring an eclectic mix of artists across several mediums.

The young artist Kristy Gordon, discovered by the gallery last year, will show her surreal paintings of people and water. In “Collective Consciousness,” a man in scrubs, a woman in jeans and other ordinary New Yorkers tread through green water as if it is an urban street.

“Collective Consciousness” by Kristy Gordon.

“Collective Consciousness” by Kristy Gordon.

Maryann Lucas of Sag Harbor will show “Lilies by the Window” and other floral and still life paintings in her second show at her hometown gallery,

Having just completed his first major public commission, a giant bronze statue in Philadelphia of former Flyers coach Fred Shero, Chad Fisher will show his half and full life size “Deadly Sins” bronzes, statues of seven classical figures engrossed in each of the deadly sins.

One of California’s premiere plein air painters, Karl Dempwolf will exhibit colorful paintings of “Crystal Lake” and other Western landscapes. His friend and fellow Californian Ben Fenske will show his paintings of Catalina Island.

Italian photojournalist Sebastiano Vitale is presenting his “Raw Horse” collection, photographs of horses in different capacities across the world, from Spanish clubs to farms in Argentina. Using the categories of wildness, elegance, ritual, game and work, Mr. Vitale has captured horses in the polo clubs of Santo Domingo, the horseback fighting festivals of Indonesia and the nomadic culture of Mongolia, to name a few.

The opening reception is Saturday, April 12 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. at the Grenning Gallery, 17 Washington Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call 725-8469 or visit grenninggallery.com.

"7 Sins Group" by Chad Fisher. Photo courtesy of the Grenning Gallery.

“7 Sins Group” by Chad Fisher. Photo courtesy of the Grenning Gallery.

Daniel Schoenheimer and Mellisa Hin at the Crazy Monkey Gallery

Tags: , , , , , , ,


"Cotton Candy Sky - Sunset at Sands Point" by Mellisa Hin.

“Cotton Candy Sky – Sunset at Sands Point” by Mellisa Hin.

By Tessa Raebeck

The Crazy Monkey Gallery in Amagansett will display the work of two of its member artists, Daniel Schoenheimer and Mellisa Hin, on view April 4 through May 4. The show at the Co-op gallery will present landscapes from the American West to Long Island.

With her emphasis on “exploring the expression of emotion,” Ms. Hin said, the artist will show a collection of her large landscape paintings, many of them inspired by the Long Island landscape.

A resident of Miller Place, Ms. Hin instructs at two galleries, “combining my love of people and my love of art,” she says, and serves as a Brookhaven Arts and Humanities Council Board Member and is President of the North Shore Art Guild.

Assistant Director of the Crazy Monkey Gallery, Daniel Schoenheimer will show his new series of digital photographs, highlighting the diverse landscapes from Arizona to the East End.

"Shadmoor II" by Daniel Schoenheimer.

“Shadmoor II” by Daniel Schoenheimer.

“The Arizona desert provides the perfect counterpoint to Montauk,” Mr. Schoenheimer said of his series of photographs, “where rolling hills and the blues of the Atlantic give way to rocky canyons, spiky plants and dusty browns. Every once in a while the desert blooms – an unexpected festival of flowering that gives rise to tiny petals, giant cactus and an abundance of fauna. This is what I seek to capture.”

From up close, detailed photos to “sweeping desert landscapes” and panoramas, Mr. Schoenheimer hopes to show “the vast range of desert life in an ‘uninhabited’ environment.”

An opening reception for the exhibit will be held Saturday, April 5 from 5 to 7 p.m. at The Crazy Monkey Gallery, 136 Main Street in Amagansett. For more information, call 267-3627.

Multi-media Artist Jayoung Chung in Residence at the Watermill Center

Tags: , , , , , , , ,


"Drawing YOU," 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing YOU,” 2013 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

“Like the Moon, I am constant. My work, however, keeps changing like the moonshape which is changing all the time,” says Jayoung Chung, the newest artist in residence at the Watermill Center in Water Mill.

Starting her residency this week, Ms. Chung will be at the Watermill Center through April 6 working on her visual and performance art piece “Performing with You,” which incorporates drawing, music and technology into a performance. Primarily a visual artist, Ms. Chung is also a musician, animator, filmmaker and storyteller and most of her work is multi-media. A native of South Korea, she has exhibited her work in both solo and group shows worldwide.

In “Performing with You,” Ms. Chung has embedded 12 strings made of conductive wire, paint and tape within a sheet of paper. The artist creates a multi-dimensional portrait of an individual in the drawing performance. As she draws with charcoal, the instrument touches the stings, generating sounds in real time through a computer program. The act of drawing creates the sounds and the sounds in turn affect digitized, moving images projected on screens. The drawing, words and sounds all interact with one another to create a multi-dimensional portrait.

"Drawing, as composing and performance," 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Courtesy of the artist.

“Drawing, as composing and performance,” 2012 by Jayoung Chung. Photo courtesy of the artist.

During her six weeks in residency at the Watermill Center, Ms. Chung hopes to create and record a series of 40 performance portraits.

“Above all, I want my art to be yours,” the artist explains in her bio, “I want it to be a sweet whisper, a consolation and happiness for you. I want your story to be revealed beautifully through my sensitivities, and approach you as nature’s wonder. For you.”

Student Art Festival at Guild Hall Opening Reception Saturday

Tags: , , , , , , ,


SAF-9-12-artwork-e1393868238263

A 2011 entry in the Student Art Festival at Guild Hall. Courtesy of Guild Hall.

By Tessa Raebeck

Celebrating the talent of local high school students, Guild Hall will host the opening reception of the Student Art Festival for grades nine through 12 on Saturday, March 8 from 2 to 4 p.m. Art from students across the East End will fill the museum, with fine art in the galleries, live performances on stage and film screenings from the Student Film Competition.

Public, private and home-schooled students from Amagansett, Bridgehampton, East Hampton, Montauk, Sagaponack, Shelter Island and Wainscott will showcase their work. The 11th annual Student Film Competition features young local artists from second grade through 12th grade while the fine art portion is reserved for high school students.

“It is part of our mission to celebrate and support the artistic pursuits of our local young people by presenting their work in our museum and theater,” said Ruth Appelhof, Guild Hall’s executive director. “We applaud their teachers who inspire, nurture and cultivate the arts.”

Admission is free. The opening reception includes the art exhibition and live performances. There will be an award ceremony and screening for the film competition on Sunday, April 6 at 5 p.m. in the John Drew Theater. Exhibitions will be on view through April 20 at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street in East Hampton. For more information, call 324-0806 or visit guildhall.org.

Southampton Students Show at Creative Partners Exhibition at the Parrish Art Museum

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


By Tessa Raebeck

Featuring this year’s work from its longstanding collaboration with the Southampton and Tuckahoe Schools, the Parrish Art Museum will present the Creative Partners Exhibition, on view from Saturday, March 8 through April 14.

The centerpiece of the exhibition is “This Is Us,” a photo-documentary created by the Parrish Art Club, the Southampton High School’s after-school group, taught by Southampton art teacher Gail Altomare with help from Cara Conklin Wingfield, education director at the Parrish. Being shown in the gallery through video projection and also via an interactive website, the film is a digital portrait image-and-text exploration of the community at Southampton High School, including students, teachers and staff. Inspired by the Humans of New York project in New York City, the photo-documentary provides a candid view of the everyday lives of Southampton students through the unique, individual portraits they shaped of the people in their world.

The Creative Partners exhibition will also feature work by the schools’ pre-kindergarten, fourth, fifth and sixth grade students, including relief sculptures reflective of an art history curriculum focused on ancient Egypt and paintings inspired by the master landscapes of the museum’s permanent collection.

For more information, call 283-2118 x121 or visit parrishart.org.

Six-Hour, Multimedia Experience Challenges Conventions of Performance Art at the Watermill Center

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


Kenneth Collins, Alaina Ferris and John Sully of the New York City-based performance group Temporary Distortion. Photo by Scott Fetterman.

Kenneth Collins, Alaina Ferris and John Sully of the New York City-based performance group Temporary Distortion. Photo by Scott Fetterman.

By Tessa Raebeck

The same performance could be enjoyed for 15 minutes or six hours—the only necessity is that the audience member has an autonomous, unique experience.

In “My Voice Has An Echo In It,” a new durational performance by the New York City based group Temporary Distortion, the traditional boundaries of performance and art are challenged in a six-hour, installation-based performance with live music, text and video. Temporary Distortion will present its latest work at The Watermill Center on Saturday from 2 to 8 p.m.

The performance comes at the end of the group’s two-week residency at the center, where its members have been developing the project, creating a site-specific installation and adjusting the ever-evolving final product.

Founded in 2002 by Kenneth Collins, Temporary Distortion has shown in venues across the world, including in Australia, the Czech Republic and Japan. According to the group, its  multimedia art “explores the potential tensions found between practices in visual art, theater, cinema and music.” Most recently, its focus has been on long, durational, installation-based performance with live music. Saturday will mark the first time the ensemble will consecutively perform all six hours of the material for “My Voice Has An Echo In It.”

Although the piece will run six hours in its entirety—and performers Alaina Ferris, Scott Fetterman, John Sully and Mr. Collins will perform throughout it—audience members are encouraged to come and go as they please.

“The audience can interface with it for however long they want to,” TJ Witham of The Watermill Center explained. “The audience is 100 percent in control, you can come and sit for the entire six hours if you want or you can experience it, go away and come back.”

The center is hosting a tour at 2 p.m., so that visitors can see the piece has started, take a tour of the building, grounds and art collection, and then reengage with the piece after their tour.

During its residency in Water Mill, the group has installed a corridor on-site in the center’s dining room space, alongside pieces from the art collection. While the performers are inside the enclosed box playing music and reciting text, accompanied by screens flashing text, images and video, the audience will use headphones to hear the material.

At the group’s New York City studio, it has installed a 24-by-6-foot hallway, which completely encloses the performers in a freestanding, soundproof box. Spectators watch the performance through two-way mirrors, so the audience can see inside the box, but the performer can only see his or her reflection. Following this weekend’s premiere, Temporary Distortion is bringing the show on tour through the United States and to France, using similar installations that interact with each building it visits.

“So what they’re presenting on Saturday is almost, in essence, like a dress rehearsal for them,” said Mr. Witham, adding the content of Saturday’s performance is yet undetermined, as the group is “creating it as they go along.”

Unlike traditional performances, the audience at “My Voice Has an Echo in It” is discouraged from trying to follow a progressive storyline or piece together some sort of plot; the intent is for people to engage, disengage and reengage, to create their own experience from what the group provides.

“The fact that an audience member could come at 2 p.m. and stay all the way to 8 p.m. and just listen to the music and hear the performance in the entirety and then someone else could come at 7:30 and be there until 8 and still have their own experience; that is a completely unique performative experience,” said Mr. Witham.

“It has the feeling,” he continued, “it’s connected with both performance and gallery installation, performance art installation—it’s extending the boundaries of what we consider performance and that’s obviously 100 percent at the core of what we do at Watermill and the kind of art what we want to support.”

The Watermill Center is committed to showcasing artists who are “doing what no one else is doing,” in the words of the center’s, Robert Wilson, and Mr. Witham said Temporary Distortion was an obvious choice for the residency program’s selection committee.

Dedicated to pushing the boundaries of theater and performance art, Watermill founder Mr. Wilson is known for his durational work. One of his earliest pieces, “The Life and Times of Joseph Stalin,” was 12 hours long.

“My Voice Has an Echo in It” will premiere Saturday, February 22, at the Watermill Center, 39 Water Mill Towd Road in Water Mill. The performance will run from 2 to 8 p.m. Reservations are free but required and can be made online here. For the 2 p.m. tour of the Watermill Center, reservations can be made here. For more information, visit The Watermill Center.

The Tonic Artspace Returns with “Phenomena” at the Kathryn Markel Gallery

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


A print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

A print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

A contemporary art collective in constant movement, both in theory and action, the Tonic Artspace returns with “Phenomena” at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Brigehampton.

Springs-raised Grant Haffner founded the Tonic Artspace as a way to showcase the East End’s emerging artists and challenge the limits of the traditional art show. Through his collective, Haffner brings unique group shows to different venues, using the experience both as inspiration for his own work and as a way to spread the talent of his friends, family and neighbors.

"Portrait of Phil Haffner" by Lori Weiss, 1974. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

“Portrait of Phil Haffner” by Lori Weiss, 1974. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

An “undefined, forever evolving pop-up art promoting machine that understands no boundaries,” the Tonic Artspace returns this year with “Phenomena,” which will showcase the work of six emerging East End artists. A 1974 portrait of Philip Clark Haffner by artist Lori Weiss will also be on view in memoriam of Mr. Haffner’s father, who passed away February 6.

Color print by Arrex. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

Color print by Arrex. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

The Tonic Artspace is an extension of Bonac Tonic, a collective of local up-and-coming artists founded in 2005 by Mr. Haffner and his twin sister Carly, who is also a painter and will exhibit her latest works in the show.

Inspired by the “phenomena” of death and severe illness in his family, the artist Arrex will show a series of screen-printed and hand cut skulls that “serve as a small reminder of our mortality and the fragility in life.”

The show also includes the work of painter and sculptor Maeve D’Arcy of Queens and Christine Lidrbauch, who uses various media and recycled objects “to communicate a melding of male and female cultures.”

The imaginative creatures and installations of Scott Gibbons, a core artist of the collective and “a creator of worlds unbeknown to conventional art circles,” will also be on display.

The “Phenomena” opening reception will be held February 22 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Kathryn Markel Fine Arts gallery, 2418 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit here.