Tag Archive | "fine art"

“The Honest Medium:” Ted Davies Woodcuts at the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor

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"Entrance Uptown" by Ted Davies. Courtesy Romany Kramoris Gallery.

“Entrance Uptown” by Ted Davies. Courtesy Romany Kramoris Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

When Romany Kramoris first opened her gallery space in Sag Harbor, it was on the recommendation of Ted Davies. Nearly 40 years later, the Romany Kramoris Gallery is showcasing the work of the late artist, an innovator in woodcutting, screen printing and photogram techniques, who captured the intricacies of New York City street scenes and created timeless pieces of social criticism.

“He’s the one that got me started in the art world,” Ms. Kramoris said of her friend and mentor, who died in 1993.

Ms. Kramoris was renting a small studio space at the end of Main Street in Sag Harbor during the 1970s when one day Mr. Davies, who had a second home in Sag Harbor and spent much of his time out East in his later years, wandered in and suggested she open a gallery.

“I said, ‘Well, how do you do that?’” Ms. Kramoris recalled.

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“Broadway and Bowling Green” by Ted Davies. Courtesy Romany Kramoris Gallery.

“He said, ‘Well, I’ll help you do it and I can be your first show,” she added. “I said, ‘Oh, that sounds pretty good.’”

He showed her how to create a press release, mount a show and host a reception and in the summer of 1980, Mr. Davies became Ms. Kramoris’s first artist.

“Ted was always getting involved in the different art community situations here and helping other artists,” said Ms. Kramoris. “He absolutely loved doing what he was doing—he was an artist through and through.”

A Queens native, Mr. Davies studied under Harry Sternberg and the German Expressionist George Grosz, who instilled in him the importance of political commentary in art.

“Ted’s work was sociologically charged,” said Ms. Kramoris.

Mr. Davies captured the New York he loved in his woodblock prints, intricate carvings of famous destinations such as Central Park, Broadway and Wall Street, as well as common places like the old elevated train stations, Chinese laundries and shoe shine stands. He captured 1960’s New York City through renderings of barbershops, second-hand bookstores and bars frequented by artists and writers.

“His vision of the city is intimate and amused, catching the quirky details and human touches, the city’s hard edges softened into tilts, curves and loops,” Christina Schlesinger, a cultural historian and art critic, wrote of Mr. Davies.

An old friend of Mr. Davies, master printer Dan Welden, called his friend’s technique of woodblock printing “the honest medium,” because mistakes are permanent and every stroke made is clear.

Mr. Davies would take a piece of wood, usually a soft type that was easier to mold, and first draw a pencil outline. The artist then pounded chisels, hammers and other hand tools into the block to make impressions before he chiseled away the negative space.

In order to make a face, for example, Mr. Davies would draw the outline and chisel it down from the flat block, leaving the nose and other parts of the face that jut out. Undercuts would be made around the eyes, then he would chisel away the whites of the eyes, leaving the iris raised. After ink is applied to the raised parts, the piece is put through a hand press, so that the raised areas are reflected in the print while the chiseled negative space remains plain.

Mr. Davies also “developed certain techniques in the photogram genre that he more or less invented,” Ms. Kramoris said.

In photogram, a photographic image is made without using a camera. Objects are placed directly onto a light-sensitive material and then exposed to light, resulting in a negative shadow image that highlights the textures and depth of objects with gray and pale blue tones.

In the mid-1960’s, Mr. Davies created his “Cards of Life, Cards of Death” series of woodcuts, a politically satirical pinochle deck of cards.

“They’re certainly not outdated even though he did them 50 years ago,” Ms. Kramoris said of the prints, which highlight the abundance and excess of American culture.

Unattractive prostitutes surround the King of Hearts in “The Great Lover,” while a 1960’s Playboy bunny—closely resembling the king himself—serves him drinks.

In “Resources,” the Ace of Diamonds card has a circle filled with money, factories and consumer goods flanked by oceans, mountains and the sun. The King of Spades is a matador, who faces a pair of bullhorns in the grim sport of bullfighting as an audience of spectator skeletons looks on.

The King of Diamonds appears as Uncle Sam in “The Government,” standing on a pile of money with crosses and the capitol building behind him and fighter planes, grenades and helicopters overhead.

In addition to the standard critiques of capitalism, big business and war-mongering, “there are many subtleties to which such a simplified reading cannot do justice, and close study is repaid by many delightful discoveries in both form and content,” Helen Harrison said of the suite of woodcuts in a 1981 New York Times article.

The work of Ted Davies will be on display at the Romany Kramoris Gallery, located at 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor, from Thursday, September 18, through October 9. An opening reception will be held on Saturday, September 20, from 4:30 to 6 p.m. For more information, call (631) 725-2499 or visit kramorisgallery.com.

J. Steven Manolis at Chase Edwards Contemporary Fine Art

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J. Steven Manolis' studio. Courtesy Chase Edwards Gallery.

J. Steven Manolis’ studio. Courtesy Chase Edwards Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Water Mill artist Steven Manolis will show his colorful and expressive watercolor paintings at Chase Edwards Contemporary Fine Art in Bridgehampton, with an opening reception on Saturday, September 20, from 6 to 9 p.m.

J. Steven Manolis, “Surf’s Up 2014.04,” acrylic on canvas, 60” x 52”.

J. Steven Manolis, “Surf’s Up 2014.04,” acrylic on canvas, 60” x 52”.

“From the earliest moment I can recollect,” wrote the artist, “I have experienced an unusually strong visual pull toward beauty, proportion, style and color.”

“My objective is to make striking diversified color images that are not only beautiful, but also evoke excitement in my collectors. When this occurs, I am thrilled and fulfilled. And I just want to do it again and again. Nothing makes me happier artistically than receiving calls from collectors telling me how much they enjoy living with my paintings,” he added.

The Chase Edwards Contemporary Fine Art is at 2462 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information, call (631) 604-2204 or visit chaseedwardsgallery.com.

Pollock-Krasner Foundation Announces 2013-14 Grant Winners

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Yuki Nakamura, “Trespass,” 2004.

Yuki Nakamura, “Trespass,” 2004.

By Tessa Raebeck

In its 30th year of grant making, the Pollock-Krasner Foundation Inc. has awarded 116 grants to artists and art organizations worldwide totaling $2,163,000 for the 2013-14 fiscal year. The grants support artists’ personal and professional expenses for one year.

Wolfgang Aichner, “Tilia Inflata,” 2005.

Wolfgang Aichner, “Tilia Inflata,” 2005.

Since the foundation started awarding grants in 1985, over $61 million has been given to artists in 76 countries.

“Pollock-Krasner grants have enabled artists to create new work, purchase needed materials and pay for studio rent, as well as their personal and medical expenses. Past recipients of Pollock-Krasner grants acknowledge their critical impact in allowing concentrated time for studio work, and in preparing for exhibitions and other professional opportunities such as accepting a residency,” the foundation stated in a press release.

Awards went to many artists in New York City, as well as in Guatemala, the Czech Republic, India, South Korea, and Zimbabwe.

Artists who are interested in applying for next year’s grants or would like to view the work of this year’s honorees should visit pkf.org.

Tuki Nakamura, “Red Stair,” 2003.

Tuki Nakamura, “Red Stair,” 2003.

East End Weekend: Labor Day Highlights

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Danielle Leef, "Flying Point Sunrise." Courtesy Southampton Artists Association.

Danielle Leef, “Flying Point Sunrise.” Courtesy Southampton Artists Association.

By Tessa Raebeck

With the East End at full capacity this Labor Day, what better way to unwind from a crazy summer than with a little party hopping? Here’s our highlights of what to check out this weekend:

 

With an opening reception on Sunday, the Southampton Artists Association Labor Day Show will show paintings, photography and sculptures by local artists.

The free reception is from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Levitas Center for the Arts in the Southampton Cultural Center, located at 25 Pond Lane in Southampton. The show runs through September 7.

 

The king of nerd humor and that stand-up comedian who doodles on television, Demetri Martin is coming to the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center on Sunday, August 31.

He earned an Emmy nomination as a writer on “Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” has been a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” and starred in the Ang Lee film “Taking Woodstock.” He also created and starred in the series “Important Things with Demetri Martin” on Comedy Central and wrote “This is a Book by Demetri Martin,” a New York Times bestseller.

Jeanelle Myers, "Untitled," for "Curious" at Ashawagh Hall.

Jeanelle Myers, “Untitled,” for “Curious” at Ashawagh Hall.

Mr. Martin’s performance at the will begin at 8 p.m. The PAC is located at 76 Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Tickets are $60, $75, and $90. For tickets and more information, call (631) 288-1500 or visit WHBPAC.org.

 

On Saturday at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, “Curious” exhibits a selection of contemporary artists exploring the concept of “Curious and Curiosity.”

Works include painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. Out of 50 participating artists, five are from Sag Harbor: Ted Asnis, Barbara Freedman, Jonathan Morse, Jeanelle Myers and Pamela Topham.

The group show is curated by Ellen Dooley, a painter and mixed media artist focused on social and political commentary.

An opening reception for “Curious” will be held on Saturday, August 30, from 5 to 8 p.m. The gallery is open all weekend from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Ashawagh Hall, located at 780 Springs Fireplace Road at Old Stone Highway in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 987-7005.

 

At the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor, Sheryl Budnik will show her work in “Turbulence II,” open from August 28 to September 18. An opening reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, August 30, from 5 to 7 p.m.

“The term ‘Lumen Naturae–the Light Within the Darkness of Nature’ refers to the Middle Age idea (Paracelsus c. 1493-1541) that knowledge springs from the Light of Nature,” Ms. Budnik said in a press release issued by the gallery.

“This light in Nature illuminates the consciousness and allows inspiration and intuition to rise from human subconscious,” the artist continued. “This is the core of my study; this is what I want to capture with my paint. Not paintings defined as ‘seascape’ or ‘landscape,’ but paintings so powerfully about nature that an open spirit responds with human emotion and an intuitive understanding of the immensity and power of Nature itself.”

The Romany Kramoris Gallery is located at 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-2499.

Sheryl Budnik, "Light at the End of the Day" will be on view at the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor.

Sheryl Budnik, “Light at the End of the Day” will be on view at the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor.

 

The Captains, Mates and Widows of Whaling Return to Sag Harbor

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Sabina Streeter with her portrait of Captain Thomas Roys in her Madison Street studio. Photo by Tanya Malott.

Sabina Streeter with her portraits of Captains Thomas Roys and David T. Vail. Photo by Tanya Malott.

By Tessa Raebeck

Some of the subjects of Sabina Streeter’s portraits visited her Madison Street studio over the winter, while others haven’t been in the building for nearly 200 years.

Captain David T. Vail, by Sabina Streeter.

Captain David T. Vail, by Sabina Streeter.

In “Captains, Mates, and Widows,” opening Friday at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum, Ms. Streeter used contemporary village residents, historical records and her imagination to create a series of mixed media portraits of the village’s prominent and lesser known figures during the peak years of the whaling industry. Artist Dan Rizzie curated the show and Carlos Lama has created an accompanying sound installation that recreates the howling winds and crashing waves of whaling.

Between 1829 and 1847, Sag Harbor was a capital of the whaling industry. As local men headed out to sea as cabin boys and captains—some of them never to return—their families made do at home, peering out from widows’ watches in hopes of seeing a ship on the horizon.

The building that houses Ms. Streeter’s studio was built in 1820 from reclaimed ship’s timber by shipbuilder Abraham Vail. It is the original residence of his son, whaling captain David P. Vail, who captained the ship “Sabina.” Little did he know an artist of the same name would be recreating his likeness in his home more than a  century later.

The two-family building, which houses two apartments with identical layouts, was made so that whalers’ wives and children could keep each other company during the long months spent waiting for the men’s return from seas.

“It’s interesting, some of these characters were probably actually here in this building, because they must have socialized somehow,” Ms. Streeter said of her subjects.

One portrait features a young Captain Thomas Wickham Havens, drawn with a soft face and sensitive eyes, the ancestor of George Sterling, who wrote the poem, “The Ballad of the Swabs,” about his relative’s whaling past.

Mrs. Wickham Havens, by Sabina Streeter.

Sarah Darling Havens, by Sabina Streeter.

“The tale is of my grandsire and his good whaling-ship. Back to Sag Harbor faring from his eleventh trip,” starts the poem. It ends with the men “twice as hot as any there for home and wife and bed.”

Ms. Streeter portrayed Captain Wickham Havens in the same gray hues she used for his wife, Sarah Darling Havens. Captain Havens’ likeness is taken from a portrait in the whaling museum. Mrs. Havens’ comes from a small tintype.

Before oil tycoons, hedge fund barons and start-up tech financiers, there were whaling captains.

“These whalers were incredibly risk-willing,” said Ms. Streeter. “Most of these boats were like hedge funds—were venture capitalists, ’cause they had to be financed somehow, except they were hands-on.”

For cabin boys and other crewmembers, who came from across the world and on which there is little documentation, Ms. Streeter used her imagination to recreate their likenesses.

One portrait of an unknown cabin boy was done solely from imagination, but for a striking portrait of a harpooner done in bright orange hues, local restaurateur Dan Gasby posed for the artist. His wife and business partner, Barbara Smith, also sat for a portrait.

To recreate the likeness of Enoch Conklin, a privateer whose ship went down in 1814, his ancestor Ted Conklin, owner of The American Hotel, sat for Ms. Streeter.

Harpooner Gasby, by Sabina Streeter.

Harpooner Gasby, by Sabina Streeter.

Captain Jonas Winters, depicted by Ms. Streeter with a full, long beard and a hint of a smile, went on 11 voyages, during which he accumulated 24,500 barrels of oil and 244,000 pounds of bone.

According to an article by H.P. Horton that appeared in “Long Island Forum” in 1948, Sag Harbor Express Editor John H. Hunt asked the then-retired Captain Winters to write an autobiographical sketch covering his 25-year career as a whaler, which appeared in the newspaper on March 15, 1888.

Born in Sag Harbor, Mr. Winters ascended from a common sailor to a captain in a parallel rise to that of the village’s whaling industry. He sailed with men from Amagansett, East Hampton and Southampton, but his shipmates were mostly often from Sag Harbor.

“In these 11 voyages which comprise 22 years of active and ever changing life, occurrences transpired which would fill volumes with interesting and thrilling matter,” wrote Captain Winters. “Sunshine and storm, surprise and disappointment, joy and sadness, never found better illustrations than were obtained in the whale fishery which was Sag Harbor’s most important industry.”

“Captains, Mates and Widows,” will be on view at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum through September 25, with an opening reception on Friday, August 29, from 6 to 8 p.m. For more information, visit sabinastreeter.com.

Finding the Art in “The Selfie”

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One of the “selfies” that will show at the Chase Edwards Gallery, a collage by Nicole Franz.

One of the “selfies” that will show at the Chase Edwards Gallery, a collage by Nicole Franz.

By Tessa Raebeck

Reflecting on that new cultural phenomenon—and vain indulgence—the Chase Edwards Gallery in Bridgehampton presents “The Selfie,” a group exhibition that opens on Saturday, August 30.

The show features the work of seven Long Island artists, collage artist Nicole Franz, Jess Fox, Christine Benjamin, Elizabeth Cassidy, Lesley Cerniglia, Beth Costello and Roseann Nicotra.

“The Selfie is pop culture’s portraiture providing everyone with the opportunity to experiment with the physical and psychological constraints of representing oneself. Inclusive of many styles—expressive, realistic or abstracted, the Selfie is an unveiling of one of the many facets of ourselves affording the artist and viewer an intimate look into the human condition,” the gallery said in a press release.

An opening reception for “The Selfie” will be held on Saturday, August 30, from 6 to 9 p.m. at Chase Edwards Contemporary Fine Art, located at 2462 Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton. For more information, call (631) 604-2204 or visit chaseedwardsgallery.com.

Art Takes Over Apple in the Parrish Road Show

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"Spinning Beach Ball of Death," Evan Desmond Yee.

“Spinning Beach Ball of Death,” Evan Desmond Yee.

By Tessa Raebeck

The Parrish Road Show is coming to Sag Harbor this weekend, with artist Evan Desmond Yee taking over GeekHampton.

Now in its third year, the road show put on by the Parrish Art Museum brings the work of East End artists to places outside of the Water Mill museum—and off the beaten path.

“’Road Show” aims to broaden the traditional understanding of the function of an art museum by bringing art outside and into the community,” Parrish Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover said in a press release.

For “The App Store,” Evan Desmond Yee has created a mock Apple computer retail space. The artist’s sculptural interpretations of iPhone apps and other digital icons will be on display in GeekHampton’s education room.

A video interpretation of the iPhone’s Siri will describe the artwork and the “Pinwheel of Death,” the rotating colorful circle that is synonymous with waiting for your computer to work, is replicated on stickers, magnets and other objects.

“With the tremendous popularity of the app, virtual environments have eclipsed ‘mechanical,’ utilitarian objects,” Mr. Yee said in a press release. “They blur the boundaries between the physical and digital worlds. ‘The App Store’ will motivate users to question our progress towards a ‘virtual utopia’ and to reevaluate our obsession with contemporary design as a panacea for the trials of modern life.”

“The App Store” will be on view at GeekHampton from Saturday, August 30, through Sunday, September 28. An opening reception for the public is Saturday, August 30, from 6 to 7 p.m. GeekHampton is located at 34 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. Admission is free. For more information, visit parrishart.org or call (631) 283-2118.

East End Weekend: Highlights of August 22 to 24

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Dean Taylor Johnson, MARILYN. Courtesy Monika Olko Gallery.

Dean Taylor Johnson, MARILYN. Courtesy Monika Olko Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Sick of the beach? That’s strange, but luckily there’s ample else to do around the East End this weekend. Here are our weekend highlights:

 

Introducing his latest body of work, Dean Johnson will show “Living Legends” at the Monika Olko Gallery, with an opening reception on Saturday, August 23, from 6 to 8 p.m.

The show, which features iconic figures in “living pieces,” of mixed media, always changing LED light panels composed of plexi-resin, pigmented inks, film and encaustic wax dyed with oil paints. The Sag Harbor gallery is sponsoring a fundraising event to benefit the Alzheimer’s Disease Resource Center‘s Southampton office as part of the opening reception.

The Monika Olko Gallery is located at 95 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call Art Curator and Gallery Manager Wafa Faith Hallam at (631) 899-4740.

 

Dougenis, Abstract Rubber Plant (Blue), c. 1977, watercolor on Arches, 25 x 13 inches. Photo by Gary Mamay.

Dougenis, Abstract Rubber Plant (Blue), c. 1977, watercolor on Arches, 25 x 13 inches. Photo by Gary Mamay.

At the Peter Marcelle Project in Southampton, Miriam Dougenis will show her early selected watercolors, with an opening reception on Saturday, August 23, from 6 to 8 p.m.

Known primarily for her contemporary oil on canvas landscapes, characterized by her unique style and the use of familiar locations around the East End, the local artist is also an award-winning watercolor artist. The exhibition, on view from August 23 through September 9, showcases examples of her earliest watercolors from the 70′s and 80′s.

The Peter Marcelle Project is located at 4 North Main Street in Southampton. For more information, contact Catherine McCormick at (631) 613.6170.

 

Before you head to Sag Harbor Saturday, stop by Marder’s in Bridgehampton where there will be free, live music from 3 to 5 p.m. A string trio in the garden will play classical music featuring Vivaldi, Bach and select composers. The concert is free of charge and all are welcome.

Marder’s is located at 120 Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton. For more information, call (631) 537-3700.

 

Stages presents “The Wind in the Willows” at the Pierson High School auditorium this weekend, with performances on Friday, August 22, at 7 p.m., Saturday, August 23, at 4 p.m., and Sunday, August 24 at 4 p.m.

Based on the English children’s classic by Kenneth Grahame, “The Wind in the Willows” follows the comedic story of Mr. Toad and his friends, McBadger, Rat and Mole, as they go on the classic, hilarious adventures.

Mr. Toad in his infamous motor car.

Mr. Toad in his infamous motor car.

Helene Leonard will direct the full-length musical production, an original version of the script that was written for television by her late father, Jerry Leonard. Mr. Leonard wrote the music and lyrics along with John Petrone, and there is additional music by Larry Loeber.

All tickets are $15. For reservations, call (631) 329-1420.

 

 

At Duck Creek Farm in East Hampton, Amagansett artist Christine Sciulli will show “Quiet Riot,” an immersive site-specific projection installation presented by the John Little Society.

The installation will be open to the public by appointment and Fridays and Saturdays from 4 to 7 p.m. through September 20.

In her primary medium of projected light, Ms. Sciulli “asks us to consider the potential of simple geometry by projecting these forms onto a network of materials that fragment and expand on their structures.

The installation will be in the John Little Barn at Duck Creek Farm, located at 367 Three Mile Harbor to Hog Creek Road (enter and park at north access to Squaw Road) in East Hampton. For more information on the artist, visit sound and vision or vimeo.

 

BLACKOUT at Bay Street. Photo by Lenny Stucker.

BLACKOUT at Bay Street. Photo by Lenny Stucker.

In the second installment of the new BLACKOUT at Bay Street, Bay Street Theater will feature a cabaret evening of performers from its latest hit, “My Life is a Musical,” on Friday, August 22 and Saturday, August 23.

The cabaret performance is complimentary for those who attend the 8 p.m. Mainstage production of the musical and $15 for those only attending the cabaret at 11 p.m.

BLACKOUT, an evening of cabaret and comedy, will feature the performers singing both musical theater and rock songs. For more information on BLACKOUT at Bay Street, call the box office at (631) 725-9500.

In East Hampton, Box Art Auctioned to Aid East End Hospice

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One of the pieces that will be auctioned off at the Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice next Wednesday.

One of the pieces that will be auctioned off at the Box Art Auction to benefit East End Hospice next Wednesday.

By Sam Mason-Jones

A 14-year-old tradition continues over the coming weeks with the auction of a number of ornamentally decorated boxes to benefit East End Hospice. In 2000, supporters of the facility gathered the support of about 100 local artists, each of whom was asked to transform a single wine or cigar box into a work of art. The success of the enterprise, both artistically and monetarily, has enabled it to continue as a highlight of the late summer each year since.

This year, the benefit will take place on Saturday, September 6, at the Ross School Center for Well Being on Goodfriend Road in East Hampton, where all of the boxes will be sold in a silent auction beginning at 4:30 p.m. Before the auction, the public will have a chance to see the selection of boxes at viewings at St. Luke’s Episcopal Church in East Hampton on Wednesday, August 27, and Thursday, August 28.

A chance to meet the artists prior to the sale is also available at a preview reception after the first box viewing at 5 p.m. on Wednesday, August 27. Among the 90 contributing artists are Eric Fischl, Connie Fox, Stan Goldberg, April Gornik, James Kennedy, William King, Stephanie Brody-Lederman, Daniel Pollera, Randall Rosenthal and Frank Wimberley.

Another participating artist, Hans Van de Bovenkamp, said, “East End Hospice is one of the most loving organizations when the light dims near the end of living. To help through donating, such as artists do with their work, or through volunteering, is one of the most profound and satisfying acts.”

Tickets for the benefit, which includes wine and hors d’oeuvres, are priced at $75 and are available at eeh.org. All proceeds benefit East End Hospice.

Art and Fashion Legends to Host a Conversation at the Parrish Art Museum

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Ross Bleckner, Calvin Klein and Edward Nardoza will host a conversation at the Parrish Art Museum.

Artist Ross Bleckner, Designer Calvin Klein and Fashion Editor Edward Nardoza, who will host a conversation at the Parrish Art Museum on Sunday, August 24.

By Tessa Raebeck

Design legends—and East End residents—Ross Bleckner and Calvin Klein will share their experiences in a conversation moderated by Edward Nardoza at the Parrish Art Museum on Sunday, August 24.

The first event in the museum’s new annual series, “By Design: Innovators in Art & Fashion in Conversation,” the evening aims to inspire through dialogue.

Mr. Nardoza has been the editor-in-chief of Women’s Wear Daily since 1991, steering the paper into the digital age and expanding its international coverage, marketing, media, financial and technology beats.

Known for his large-scale paintings that deal largely with remembrance and loss, Mr. Bleckner is an American artist who was born in New York City and grew up on Long Island. He lives in a Sagaponack beach house previously owned by Truman Capote.

Internationally renowned fashion designer Calvin Klein, also of New York City, has, through his self-named brand, launched numerous perfume, watch, jewelry and clothing lines. His local beach house is in Southampton Village.

He designed his signature tight-fitting jeans in 1974, which reportedly went on to gross $200,000 in their first week of sales.

The conversation will be held in the Lichtenstein Theater, followed by a cocktail reception with the guest speakers on the Mildred C. Brinn Terrace. The event runs from 4 to 6 p.m. Tickets are $150 for Parrish members and $200 for non-members and can be purchased at parrishart.org/ByDesign.