Tag Archive | "fireworks"

Hampton Bistro to Host Firework Show

Tags: ,


Harbor Bistro in East Hampton will be hosting a Fireworks Spectacular on Saturday, July 19.

Located on Three Mile Harbor Road, the restaurant is a great location to watch the annual Three Mile Harbor firework show. There will be live music on the outdoor patio by Mamalee and Friends, starting at 6 p.m. The fireworks show, sponsored by the Clamshell Foundation, begins at approximately 9:15 p.m., weather permitting.

Outdoor seating will be available at the beer and wine bar. There will also be dinner seatings available at 6, 6:30, 8 and 8:30 p.m. but additional seats will be accommodated if need be.

The menu includes Yellowfin Tuna Poke, Chimichurri-Shrimp Tacos, Shichimi Shrimp Linguine, Jamaican Jerk-Pork Tenderloin and more.

For more information or to make a reservation, contact Harbor Bistro at (631) 324-7300 or visit www.harborbistro.net.

Fire in the Sky: Grucci Fireworks for HarborFrost

Tags: , , , , , ,


Sailfest - Grucci

By Annette Hinkle


Fireworks are as American as apple pie and baseball, and like those other traditions most often associated with Fourth of July.

But on Saturday, as part of HarborFrost, a pyrotechnics show will be offered at the end of Long Wharf at 5:45 p.m. Fireworks in February? It’s not commonplace, but because the show will be presented by Fireworks by Grucci, the Brookhaven firm whose name is synonymous with fantastic displays — it’s likely to generate a fair amount of winter oohs and ahhs.

Grucci producer Philip Butler admits that is unusual for his firm to offer fireworks at this time of year, but he expects it to be a great experience for those willing to brave the cold.

When you think about it, there are a lot of benefits to winter fireworks —the sun sets early, so the show can begin well before dinner time. And let’s face it, after the winter we’ve had so far, a lot of us could use a bit of cheering. That, Butler says, is something Grucci can surely do. While he stresses this will be a relatively small show by Grucci standards — a City Class program running around six minutes — Butler promises it will be a good one.

“In this case I’m thinking an all white scene over the water would be very dramatic,” he says. “In the winter it’s that much more stunning.”

Though firework displays here are viewed as a fairly literal interpretation of “the bombs bursting in air” referenced in the Star Spangled Banner, their origin can actually be traced to 12th century China when they were purportedly invented to scare away evil spirits. It was another Chinese invention – gun powder — that gave the fireworks the lift they needed to break the bonds of earth.

Today, the goal is not to scare people away, but bring them together, and Butler explains that no matter the size of the show, there’s a certain protocol.

“Much like any entertainment, there’s always an opening,” explains Butler. “And then the program settles into scenes and those may be of different colors — red, white, green or gold. Then there’s a finale. ”

The color of each individual firework is a matter of chemistry and the different metal salts used determine the specific colors that are seen in the sky.

“Red, white, blue, green, yellow — those are the five primary colors and other hues are combined exactly as they are with paint,” says Butler. “To make red, you use a compound of strontium and your blues are copper compounds. The green is barium. The chemicals are of a fine baby powder constituency to make stars, which are the individual points of light.”

“Purple is the most difficult color to make, and almost always the most expensive,” explains Butler who has found that despite the endless color possibilities, white remains a crowd favorite.

“It’s so stunningly beautiful,” he says. “That’s why it’s always been popular. All white scenes draw the most ‘oohs’ and ‘ahhs.’”

Though designs have changed, the practical realities of getting fireworks into the sky hasn’t, and in order to launch and break the shells, black powder (gun powder without the graphite) is used.

“Fireworks are almost ageless, having stayed exactly the same in the manufacturing and display mode,” explains Butler. “What has changed is the firing sequence.”

That, explains Butler, is done electronically now — from control panels similar to audio boards like those used for concerts.

“Because of electronic firing, the old fashioned ‘light ‘em up,’ isn’t done anymore,’ explains Butler. “It’s just like with electricity in a house, if you have 15 switches, you need 15 wires.”

“In this case, you need wires for every shell,” he says.

And how many shells will there be Saturday? Butler’s keeping mum on that one.

“You don’t want people to concentrate on the number,” he says. “It’s what your eye tells you.”

HarborFrost Plans to Bring Spark to Winter

Tags: , , , , , , ,


By Claire Walla

HarborFest … in February?

That’s the idea.

This winter, the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce aims to hold the first of what it hopes will become an annual tradition based on the successful September event. This one will instead be called HarborFrost.

This year’s proposed one day Frost, tentatively set for Saturday, February 5 from 3 to 7 p.m., will revolve around the theme “Fire and Ice,” an idea that will manifest itself through the event’s main spectacles. In addition to flanking Main Street with two ice sculptures (as of yet with undetermined designs), the event will be capped-off by a fire works display that will light-up the winter sky over Long Wharf. Event planners are also floating the idea of having a hot soup contest (in the same vein of HarborFest’s chowder contest), and will encourage local restaurants to offer post-fireworks prix fixe menus.

“The goal is to get some sort of winter activity to give Sag Harbor families something to do in the wintertime,” said chamber member Phil Bucking, owner of the Sag Harbor Gardening Center and one of the catalysts behind this year’s event.

Plans to implement HarborFrost are not yet set in stone, though the Chamber of Commerce hopes to have insurance and logistical documentation to the village trustees by Friday, a few days before the board’s meeting on Monday, January 10 at 6 p.m.

Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce President Robert Evjen said that he and other chamber members have been toying with the idea of creating a winter festival for a few years now. Based on the success of HarborFest, held each September, HarborFrost will bring people to Main Street for a day of shopping, eating and celebrating — in spite of the cold.

“We want an event that will help our businesses in the winter months,” Evjen added. The event could be especially helpful for stores looking to clean-out last year’s summer merchandise in preparation for the coming year. Keeping with the theme of fire and ice, one of the chamber’s ideas is for stores to sell summer (fire) merchandise alongside winter (ice) goods.
Previous attempts to create such a Frost have included more ambitious activities, like a Polar Bear Plunge and plans to bring an ice-skating rink to Main Street. But these ideas never came to fruition, Bucking said.

“Funding has been an issue, and it’s sometimes hard to get people involved,” he added.

This year, however, event organizers have a clear and simple plan of action, with several financial pledges already in place.

The total cost will run about $14,000, more than half of which is already expected to be covered by financial pledges.

Prudential Douglas Elliman, Brown Harris Stevens, Hampton Gym Corp and the Sag Harbor Express have pledged money that will go toward the cost of the ice sculptures (which will cost a total of $7,000); and local non-profit Save Sag Harbor has signed on to cover all media costs (which are budgeted at $2,000). What’s more, the Grucci family, which estimated the cost of a five to seven minute firework show at $5,000, said it would match any amount over that $5,000 total dollar-for-dollar. (In other words, if the chamber raises $7,500, the Grucci’s will put on a $10,000 show.)

Other Main Street businesses have reportedly expressed interest in making small financial contributions, should the village approve plans for HarborFrost at its trustee meeting on Monday.

“Since this is the first year, the plan is to do more and make the event bigger [each subsequent year],” Bucking explained. “This time, we just want to get the ball rolling.”