Tag Archive | "Greenport"

Water’s Edge Radio Hour Celebrates Local Voices of the East End

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.web Waters Edge Radio Hour @ Wolffer 11-9-13_1804

By Tessa Raebeck; photography by Michael Heller

Without lighting effects, set design or elaborate costumes, the audience is transported in time and setting, traveling from the waiting room of a modern day doctor’s office to the whaling docks of 1840’s Sag Harbor in a matter of minutes.

“Language is the most powerful thing we have,” says Josh Perl, co-creator of Water’s Edge Radio Hour, a new variety show on WPPB, 88.3 FM. “Good writing is compelling. We can transport people there with just a few words or sound effects and their imagination follows the rest of it.”

Along with partners John Landes and Peter Zablotsky, Perl proudly unveiled his newest project in the tasting room at Wölffer Estate Winery in Sagaponack last Saturday.

A locally based radio show a la “A Prairie Home Companion,” Water’s Edge promises to capture the unique character of the East End without catering solely to visitors. The hour-long program includes three short plays, three essays, and two full songs, as well as musical interludes. It will be performed before a live audience and recorded for broadcast on WPPB.

Inspired by his own love of radio, Landes came up with the idea for an East End variety show and quickly enlisted the expertise of Zablotsky and Perl, partners in the Naked Stage Theatre Company and HITfest, the Hamptons Independent Theatre Festival. Perl and Zablotsky added theater connections and experience to Landes’ vision. Also contributing acting chops, Perl hosts the show.

While many local artists wait to unveil their projects until the crowded summer months, Landes felt the winter was the perfect time for Water’s Edge to begin regular broadcasting.

“It occurred to me that the Hamptons – the North and the South Fork – in a lot of ways are perfect for a show like this because we have kind of a captive audience in the winter time,” said Landes. “Those of us who live out here year round and love living out here year round, we know each other in the community and there’s so many good, talented people out here – writers, actors and people who love it out here and want to get the message out to others about what it’s like out here.”

In April, Water’s Edge presented a pilot run at Guild Hall. The story centered on the conflict between a well-known group of locals and some unwelcome outsiders, represented by surprisingly talkative deer ticks and bed bugs.

Following positive feedback on the pilot, Landes, Perl and Zablotsky moved forward, crafting enough material for four shows and continuously working on more. The environment could switch from a whaling ship to a corn maze instantly; it is entirely dependent on sound effects made by the actors. In one scene, two dads sit in the waiting room of a doctor’s office, supported by sounds of a receptionist, baby noises, and Velcro ripping.

“The nice thing about radio is you can do anything,” says Perl. “Our tagline is where anything can happen – and it usually does. We’re able to transport people to the Sag Harbor waterfront in 1840 where Herman Melville is seeking work on a whaling ship.”

Although they range in time period and location, all sketches have one common thread: humor.

“He just happens to have a Jewish mother who’s very worried about him being in a boat with 100 men. His mother errs on the side of a little bit over protective, she wants him to be a butcher like his older brother,” Perl says of Herman Melville.

The creators are hopeful this is the start of a long running variety show with locally written pieces and locally based characters, ranging from celebrities to surfers to fishermen. Water’s Edge strives to go beyond the public’s perception of “The Hamptons” and deliver a compelling and authentic narrative that includes the year round community. Composed entirely of original work, the program is wholly inclusive; the creators are consistently looking for new local writers to contribute editorials and plays. According to Perl, although the plays use “Hamptons kinds of archetypes,” the stories are universal. In one scene, a wealthy older couple searching for entertainment during a fall visit find themselves slightly out of place in a corn maze.

“When a friend tells you a story about people you don’t know, if they’re a good storyteller, you’re right there in the moment with them,” he said. While the stage actor acknowledges that costumes and set design add to certain productions, he said that without those elements, radio allows for the text to truly triumph.

To complement the stories, Hopefully Forgiven, comprised of musicians Brad Penuel and Telly Karoussos, will perform several times during the show.

Water’s Edge Radio Show celebrates the East End community in a way “the Hamptons” are not always celebrated – from a local perspective – and it does so with good humor.

“It’s kind of funny,” says Perl of the variety show. “It’s not kind of funny, it’s actually very funny.”

Upcoming live broadcasts of Water’s Edge Radio Hour will take place on November 23 and December 14 at 7 p.m. at the Wölffer Estate Winery Tasting Room, 139 Sagg Road in Sagaponack.

Studio 89 Fitness in Sag Harbor Unveils New Group Classes, Free During Opening Promotion

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Ashley Farrell works out at Studio 89 in Sag Harbor.

Trainer Ashley Farrell works out at Studio 89 in Sag Harbor.

By Tessa Raebeck

At Studio 89 Fitness in Sag Harbor, you can duke it out boxing, suspend mid-air in gravity training or crawl through the sand in a military-style outdoor obstacle course. This weekend, Studio 89 will further its already extensive exercise line-up with the unveiling of Studio 89 GX, a group fitness program offering a wide variety of exercise classes.

“For an individual facility, we’re offering the largest amount of classes on the East End and we have the largest space,” said Studio 89 founder and trainer Rich Decker. “So really, we’re going after it pretty aggressively.”

For the past three years, Studio 89 has catered to a high-end clientele as a private training facility, with its focus on one-on-one training and measurable results within an exclusive atmosphere. Noticing the growth in popularity of group classes at other local fitness centers, Decker saw an opportunity to expand Studio 89 with “a more community-oriented part of the facility.”

A 2,000 square foot addition will provide the space for Studio 89 GX to offer unlimited Ball, Bootcamp, Sculpt, Spin, Step, TRX, Yoga, Zumba classes, as well as five fitness classes designed by the Les Mills Group, an international organization that supplies workout facilities with varied workout programs, such as BodyCombat, a workout that incorporates kickboxing and Tai Chi, and BodyVive, which is more reflective of Yoga and Pilates programs. As with Studio 89, the emphasis at GX is on hard-earned, verifiable results.

“It’s not like a regular gym where you go work out, socialize and hang out,” said Decker. “It’s very much a results-oriented facility. They actually come to get work done.”

Classes will be taught by Studio 89’s instructors and supported by its state-of-the-art facility. Outside, “The Pit” is a 20,000 square foot sand pit with over 20 exercise stations, including a rope wall, rope climb and agility tires. According to Studio 89, it is “the only outdoor obstacle course in the Hamptons designed with military style bootcamp precision.” Inside, the space is open and airy, with lots of natural light coming in through windows and doors. Half of the building is devoted to private, training, while the other half will be reserved for the new group classes.

Starting at $365 for a limited time, purchasing a one-year membership allows you unlimited group fitness in any class, excluding spin and TRX. Any existing gym membership terms will be honored when members sign up for fitness classes. All classes are free during the opening promotion, from November 16 through December 1. Studio 89 GX plans to offer 40 to 50 classes each week.

With the motto, “U R The Machine,” Studio 89 uses personal attention, minimal equipment and innovative exercises to engage every muscle of the body and show clients just how much they’re capable of. The extensive and varied class options are designed to keep clients from getting bored and diverse exercises prevent the body from plateauing at a fitness level. Workouts are designed to be both challenging and fun, and Studio 89 GX promises fast results, said Decker.

“Health shouldn’t be a luxury – it should be a way of life,” says Decker, who is eager to expand his clientele by offering more affordable class programs. In January, Decker plans to unveil another Studio 89 location in Southampton. He expects to be in East Hampton by summer 2014. The new studios’ exact locations are not yet determined.

Studio 89 Fitness is located at 89 Clay Pit Road in Sag Harbor. Studio 89 GX is opening November 16, with free classes through December 1. For more information, call (631) 899-4310, email Studio89fitness@gmail.com or visit Studio89Fitness.com.

Yes on Both School Propositions 11.07.13

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Next Wednesday, November 13, residents of the Sag Harbor School District will be asked to weigh in on two propositions aimed at maintaining, and improving, facilities at both the Sag Harbor Elementary School and Pierson Middle/High School.

We believe both propositions deserve community support.

The first bond, which totals $7,357,132 in spending, will cost a resident who owns a home with a market value of $1 million less than $9 a month. For that price, the school district will be able to completely renovate the Pierson Middle/High School auditorium, which will not only increase safety, but also give the school adequate seating for assemblies, and allow the district’s performing arts curriculum to thrive. Shop and technology classroom spaces will also be improved, as will the elementary school gymnasium. A partial roof replacement at the elementary school, bringing the Pierson Middle/High School kitchen up to health department safety standards, reconfiguring parking at both schools.

The second proposition, which calls for $1,620,000 in funding, will allow for the creation of a turf field at Pierson Middle/High School, which would include a track, a baseball diamond, softball diamond and a small plaza for spectators. For a homeowner with a residence that has a market value of $1 million, it would cost a little more than $1 per month to fund.

The first proposition is a no brainer. It allows for significant upgrades to both schools that will improve health, safety and curriculum. The second proposition, while it may seem extravagant, would increase safety, save in annual maintenance costs, give the athletic program facilities on par with schools throughout the county and give community members a safe outdoor track to exercise on.

Ultimately we believe bonding for projects like this at a time of low interest rates allows our school district to move long overdue projects forward without placing too large a burden on the shoulders of taxpayers. Which is why we encourage people to support both propositions next Wednesday, November 13.

Looking for Greater Value 11.07.13

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Anonymous comments, or those made with a pseudonym, are not uncommon in this day and age. In fact, on most websites it’s the norm — far more users are comfortable sharing their thoughts while hiding behind a random group of numbers or letters, a witty moniker or pop culture alias rather than using their full given name.

Posting anonymously is not without reason, and certainly not always an attempt to malign without repercussion. Whistleblowers have contacted news organizations anonymously since before the advent of the printing press, and for those individuals with or without anonymous online comments there will always remain multiple avenues to open up dialogue on critical issues without risk of losing one’s job, or worse. Anonymous comments have also started meaningful dialogues within the community, made by those who may not have been comfortable otherwise sharing their thoughts and views.

That being said, often the whistleblower or the commenter with the heart of gold is the exception and not the rule when it comes to anonymous online comments. Instead, these can be used as a mechanism to judge, criticize, occasionally harass and, in the worst cases, attack or threaten without cause and without the fallout one would experience if they had to sign their name to that comment.

As a newspaper we require anyone who writes a Letter to the Editor to sign his or her true name, otherwise it will not be printed. While we do not currently have a mechanism on our website to require, and more importantly, enforce, the requirement for the disclosure of a full name in order to make an online comment, as we redesign our website it will become an integral part of our programming.

Because at the end of the day, we should be willing to stand behind our opinions and views. And if we don’t, what value do they really have?

East Hampton: Overton, Burke-Gonzalez Earn Town Board Seats

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Supervisor elect Larry Cantwell with running mates Job Potter and Kathee Burke-Gonzalez on Tuesday night at Democratic Party headquarters at Rowdy Hall in East Hampton.

By Kathryn G. Menu

The East Hampton Town Board will welcome two new members this January with the election of Democrat Kathee Burke-Gonzalez and Republican candidate Fred Overton during Tuesday’s town elections.

According to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections, Overton — the town clerk — had the most support with 3,216 votes or 28.2 percent of ballots cast in Tuesday’s town board race. Burke-Gonzalez followed with 3,125 votes, carrying 27.4 percent of the vote. Her running mate, Democrat Job Potter, placed third with 2,764 votes, followed by the lone incumbent in Tuesday’s town board race, Republican Dominick Stanzione, who earned 2,293 votes.

For Overton, who is not affiliated with any party, but ran with the support of the Republican, Conservative and Independence parties, Tuesday’s election to the town board extends his career in public service, which began 50 years ago.

“I ran on my record,” said Overton Wednesday morning. “I have served this community for 50 years, working in the town as assessor and then town clerk for 25 years. People know me. They know I am fair and reasonable and I act with common sense and I think that resonated with people.”

Overton will join a town board made up entirely of Democrats, including Supervisor-elect Larry Cantwell, Burke-Gonzalez and incumbents Sylvia Overby and Peter Van Scoyoc.

“If I am going to be of any value to the community I have to develop a working relationship with the board,” said Overton. “I have worked with Sylvia and Peter for two years, I am lifelong friends with Larry, so I think I have a head start.”

“It’s been an incredible, incredible journey,” said Burke-Gonzalez Wednesday. “It was a growth experience for me and the support I got from this community was so incredibly rewarding.”

Burke-Gonzalez, a Springs resident and former member of the Springs School Board of Education, credited her family’s involvement in the community for giving her an edge in the race.

“I think people related to the fact that we are working people and this was an opportunity to give a voice to working people,” said Burke-Gonzalez. “On the school board I am also a firm believer in participatory leadership. I don’t have all the answers and I never will. I want to hear what other people think.”

Cantwell, the former East Hampton Village administrator who ran unopposed in his bid for supervisor, said Wednesday the town will face serious challenges in the next two years.

“I am looking forward to working with each one of the new members of the town board,” said Cantwell. “We will invite Fred Overton to be a full participant in all of our decisions. I want him to feel included in what we do. If any of us disagree, I expect we will do it with respect and appreciation of each other’s point of view, but the overall goal will be to do what is right for this community.”

“We have a requirement to address regional issues,” continued Cantwell. “I extend my hand to [Southampton Town Supervisor] Anna Throne-Holst, I extend my hand to [Sag Harbor Mayor] Brian Gilbride and [East Hampton Village Mayor] Paul Rickenbach, and all of the East End mayors and supervisors to do all we can do to preserve the Peconic Estuary, address airport issues and look at transportation.”

In other East Hampton election news, Democrat Steven Tekulsky was successful in his bid for town justice, besting Republican Carl Irace, and Eugene De Pasquale III was re-elected as the town assessor over Republican challenger Joseph Bloecker. In the town trustee race Deborah Klughers, Stephen Lester, Timothy Bock, Stephanie Talmage-Forsberg, Sean McCaffrey, Diane McNally, Nathaniel Miller, Brian Byrnes and Dennis Curles earned election to that board. In uncontested races, Carol Brennan was elected town clerk and Stephen Lynch earned a second term as the town’s superintendent of highways.

Suffolk County: Schneiderman Earns Sixth and Final Term

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Incumbent Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman Celebrates his Victory at a Democratic Party gathering at 230 Elm in Southampton November 5.

By Kathryn G. Menu

Jay Schneiderman has earned a sixth and final term on the Suffolk County Legislature handily defeating his Republican challenger Chris Nuzzi during Tuesday night’s election.

Schneiderman — an Independence Party member running with the support of the Democratic and Working Families parties — earned 11,329 votes or 60.34 percent of ballots cast, according to unofficial results from the Suffolk County Board of Elections (BOE). Nuzzi — a Southampton Town Councilman running with the support of both the Republican and Conservative parties — earned 7,444 ballots or 39.64 percent of the vote.

With absentee ballots, and the results of three election districts not yet reported, Nuzzi conceded the race to Schneiderman in a phone call just after 11 p.m. on Tuesday night.

“I want to congratulate Jay, a long serving elected official,” said Nuzzi Wednesday morning. “It is not an easy thing to do and despite our disagreements on the campaign trail I respect his win.”

“I want to reiterate my thanks to Southampton residents, in particular, for all the support they have shown me in my two terms on the Southampton Town Board,” added Nuzzi, who will step down from that board due to term limits in January. “I value that experience more than anyone knows.”

“To the residents of the second legislative district, of course, I was in this to win it — we all are,” said Nuzzi. “But it is bigger than just the election. You can make a point and force conversations about important issues regardless of the election outcome.”

As to whether or not he would seek another run for public service, Nuzzi said it was simply too early to speculate on his political future.

“It takes an awful lot of any person, and their families for that matter, to put themselves through the election process,” he said. “Right now I would be purely speculating and it would be premature. At the same time, I love public service, I love serving in office and I would certainly consider public service in the future.”

On Wednesday, Schneiderman said he was pleased with the outcome, and in particular was satisfied with the large margin of approval given he was running on his record of service.

“The race is over,” he said. “Chris called and conceded last night and we had a very nice conversation. I credited him on a well-run race. I think he was a formidable opponent.”

Schneiderman added he was pleased to have the opportunity to work with incumbent Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, who appears to have secured a third term, as well as Larry Cantwell, the Democrat-elect to the town supervisor’s seat in East Hampton.

“I want to assist the towns in tackling regional issues in any way I can,” said Schneiderman who added he plans to hit the ground running on issues like tick borne illness abatement.

Schneiderman recently passed legislation requiring the county to develop a comprehensive plan to address tick abatement and tick borne illnesses through its division of vector control.

“Over the last few weeks, so many people have reached out to me that I believe it is a more prevalent issue than I initially believed it to be,” he said. “That will be a central issue I focus on, and in particular having the county step up to secure resources from state and federal officials to bring attention to this health epidemic we are facing on the East End.”

Revitalizing the Riverside area in Southampton, and looking at water quality issues are also at the top of Schneiderman’s agenda, he said.

“I don’t know exactly what the next two years will hold,” he said. “I know the next big fight will be who will be the presiding officer of the Suffolk County Legislature. I am interested. Whether that comes to pass, we will see, but I am a senior member of the majority, so it is possible despite the power center of the legislature being in western Suffolk.”

Preparing for Thanksgiving at North Sea Farms

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By Tessa Raebeck

When Richie King approaches the pen, the turkeys cannot contain their excitement. They flock towards the gate as he greets them and follow him around in a massive cluster. King appreciates the attention, but flattery can’t change the turkeys’ fate; with Thanksgiving around the corner, North Sea Farms and King’s Farm Stand in Southampton are in full preparation for the holiday season.

“A small farm with a little bit of everything,” North Sea Farms has been supplying East End families with their Thanksgiving turkeys since 1945. Richard King represents the third generation of the King family to work the land off Noyac Road, following in the footsteps of his father, Richard “Tate” King.

Brought to the farm as chicks in early July, some 700 turkeys are fully grown by mid-November. Their caretaking is fairly straightforward; the turkeys are fed and allowed to “run around outside,” according to Sam Dosch, who has been working on the farm since she was 14. Both King and Dosch maintain that the fresh feed and active lifestyle North Sea turkeys enjoy on the farm makes their taste – not to mention nutritional value – far superior to caged, mass-produced turkeys found elsewhere.

“It’s all about quality,” writes Julia King, an American College of Sports Medicine certified Health/Fitness specialist and Richie’s youngest daughter, on the farm’s blog on LocalHarvest.org. “It is time we all got back to basics with our food. By building relationships with your farmers you are building relationships with your food. And, as in any good relationship, if you take the time to nurture it, it will give back far more than ever expected.”

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The free-range, organic turkeys available on the farm range in size from 12 to 25 pounds. Some turkeys are naturally bigger, but activity and “which ones are pigs and eat more food” can also determine size, said Dosch. The main determinate of a larger sized turkey is simple: “they hang out a little longer,” according to Dosch.

With perceived cultural shifts away from eating meat and a new children’s film in theaters, “Free Bird,” about the plight of Thanksgiving Turkeys, King is wary that turkey sales will suffer this year, but Dosch is hopeful that social media outlets like the farm’s Facebook page will continue to draw new customers. If all else fails, North Sea Farms can always rely on the regulars, with countless local and visiting families returning every year.

“People kind of slowly start ordering in October,” said Dosch. “But then like a week or two before Thanksgiving, there’s a mad panic and that’s when the phone won’t stop.”

In addition to turkeys, North Sea Farms sells a wide variety of produce, fresh herbs and baked goods to fill Thanksgiving tables.

“We have everything but stuffing mix here for Thanksgiving,” said Dosch, who, while outlining the staples of a fresh and organic Thanksgiving table available in the shop, categorized the food not by type, but by the member of the King family who makes it.

Richie King’s wife, Robin, makes and sells her renowned cranberry sauce and may add homemade gravy to the line-up this season. Richie’s sister, Kathleen King, is the force behind Tate’s Bake Shop, named after her father and started out of the family farm stand when she was 11. She continues to supply King’s Farm Stand with all their baked goods, and an assortment of pies, tarts and other Thanksgiving treats are available for sale.

Most produce is grown on the farm and all of it is grown locally. Outside the shop’s entrance, wooden carts filled with colorful squash, pumpkins and other seasonal vegetables greet visitors. When families pick up their turkeys, they can explore the farm, learn about the day-to-day operations and visit the family’s two goats, Jiggy and Gilbert. Gilbert has been accompanying King to local schools and petting zoos for 13 years.

With cranberry sauce made by Robin, pumpkin pies baked by Kathleen and turkeys raised by Richie, the King family invites other families to enjoy their harvest as much as they do this holiday season.

North Sea Farms and King’s Farm Stand are located at 1060 Noyac Road in Southampton. For more information, call 283-0735 or visit their page on Facebook.

Veterans Day Events Planned in Sag Harbor

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By Tessa Raebeck; photography by Michael Heller

Two hundred years after British troops attempted unsuccessfully to invade the small coastal village during the War of 1812, Sag Harbor will celebrate those who have defended it ever since with several events around town this Veterans Day.

At 9 a.m. Monday, November 11, the annual Veterans Day Parade will head from the Civil War Monument down Main Street and onto Bay Street, with an observance at the American Legion Hall immediately following.

The featured speakers, Roger King, Marty Knab and Robert Riskin, range in age from 28 to 86, but, having served in our armed services, they share an experience few can understand.

After graduating from Pierson High School, King served in the Marine Corps from 2005 to 2009, during which he completed two combat tours in Iraq. In 2012, he became the youngest commander ever appointed to lead Sag Harbor’s Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9082.

Marty Knab is the Commander of the American Legion Chelberg and Battle Post 388 and an organizer of the Veterans Day commemorations. He served for 20 years in the Coast Guard.

The final veteran speaker is Robert Riskin, 86, who was drafted to World War II when he was 18 and completed basic training, although he was fortunate enough not to see combat firsthand.

Following the speakers, State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. will present a proclamation to Mayor Brian Gilbride and Dockmaster David Thommen honoring Sag Harbor’s heroic moment in the War of 1812 in commemoration of the 200th anniversary of the battle that took place in Sag Harbor, which was celebrated this July.

According to an official report written by General Abraham Rose, five barges carrying British troops landed in Sag Harbor on July 11, 1813. The barges were positioned off Long Island’s coast with the intent of blocking trade coming out of New York City. Lacking supplies on the stationed barges, the British troops would routinely invade, pillage and burn villages across Long Island.

When the British approached Sag Harbor’s shore, according to General Rose, they were greeted with “a reception so warm and spirited from our militia that they abandoned the operation and retreated.”

Due to the heroism of its residents, Sag Harbor was spared the fate endured by the island’s other villages.

Also on Monday, a different 200-year anniversary will be commemorated. North Haven Village historian and Vietnam veteran Joe Zaykowski will celebrate his restoration of the Ferry Road Cemetery, and the anniversary on which John Payne, Sr. was laid to rest in it.

A veteran of both the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War, Payne was a resident yeoman (gentleman farmer) in North Haven. His father was among the first settlers of North Haven and his grandson built the hamlet’s first bridge.

“[Payne’s] stone was broken in half and it was quite illegible,” said Zaykowski, adding that due to his restoration, the cemetery is “quite spiffy now.”

Starting at 10 a.m., Zaykowski will give a brief talk on Payne, as well as his connections to those buried around him. Refreshments will be served and period music from the Revolutionary War days will be played.

Payne died on November 1, 1813, so “the timing is really awesome,” said Zaykowski, who was born and raised in Sag Harbor and co-authored a book on the early history of North Haven with his mother, Dorothy Ingersoll Zaykowski.

The celebration will also honor two other North Haven veterans from the period: Joseph Trowel, who was captured and held prisoner during the Revolutionary War, and Constance Havens II, who, along with Payne, is one of only two veterans from the hamlet to fight in both the French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War.

“I know the Payne family history and the Trowels and Havens as well as I do my own genealogy,” said Zaykowski, who first became interested in Payne while working on the cemetery restoration.

“Just discovering who’s stone that was over there that was so neglected and forgotten,” he explained, “I thought it would be nice to bring that to the surface again. Being a veteran myself, I thought that would be cool.”

Eighth Annual Black Film Festival Explores Roots

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Quvenzhané Wallis in Beasts of the Southern Wild which will screen at the Eighth Annual Black Film Festival this weekend. 

By Tessa Raebeck

On screen, he played the evil overseer who raped her character, the helpless slave. Off screen, they were dating.

“Imagine how hard it was,” said Tina Andrews, recalling her experience playing Aurelia in the hit 1977 mini-series “Roots.” Along with director John Erman, Andrews will discuss the groundbreaking television series at Southampton’s 8th Annual Black Film Festival Thursday.

Started in 2006 by the newly formed African American Museum of the East End in order to get the organization’s name out there, the festival has grown from a one-day event to a four-day experience. This year’s line-up features live jazz, spoken word poetry and panel discussions, not to mention an array of diverse, thought-provoking films. The featured filmmakers range from renowned documentarian Ken Burns to Kareema Bee, a 2013 scholarship recipient at Stony Brook Southampton.

“Opening night, we generally have a screening and panel discussion on a really important topic that needs to be shared,” explained Brenda Simmons, a co-founder of the museum and festival organizer.

The festival begins Thursday with a screening of “Central Park Five,” a 2012 documentary by Ken Burns, Sarah Burns and David McMahon. The award-winning film covers the background, investigation and aftermath of the Central Park jogger case, a notorious crime that made waves in 1989 when five Latino and African American male teenagers were arrested for the rape of a white woman in Central Park. They were proven innocent when a convicted rapist and murderer confessed to the crime 13 years later. Following the screening, a panel discussion will include Yusef Salaam, one of the Central Park Five, and four experts in related fields.

On Friday, Charles Certain and Certain Moves, the museum’s “house band,” will perform “jazz, rock, funk and R&B with everything in between — all with a smooth jazz twist.”

Local up-and-coming jazz singer Sheree Elder will also perform Friday evening, along with guest poets who will present spoken word poetry in a café type setting.

“We like to promote people who are starting out, give them a chance,” said Simmons. “Especially local people.”

Another young artist the festival is excited to feature is Kareema Bee, the 2013 scholarship recipient for the 20/20/20 film program at Stony Brook Southampton. On Saturday, Bee will screen “Tug O War,” a short film she wrote, directed and edited.

Also on Saturday, the festival will feature “Beat the Drum,” a family film.

“You have to understand how to deal with diverse, controversial issues,” said Simmons. “It’s a great film for young people.”

Nominated for four Academy Awards, including a nomination for Quvenzhané Wallis, the youngest Best Actress nominee in history, “Beasts of the Southern Wild” will screen Saturday.

Closing out the day Saturday is “I Am Slave,” a film based on the actual experience of Mende Nazer, a Sudanese girl who was abducted at age 12 and sold into slavery.

“It’s a thriller, but it’s a powerful, powerful movie,” said Simmons.

Academy Award-winning director — and longtime East Hampton resident — Nigel Noble will present two films Sunday, “Voices of Sarafina!” and “Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall.”

“It’s very serious, but it’s very light,” said Simmons of “Voices of Sarafina!” Noble’s  documentary based on the 1987 Broadway musical. “The singing and the dancing in this film is extraordinary.”

In its world premiere Sunday, “Prison Terminal: The Last Days of Private Jack Hall” is sure to move audiences. Drawn from footage shot over a six-month period in Iowa State Penitentiary, it is one of eight documentary short films that will compete in the 86th Academy Awards in 2014.

“I can’t even tell you how awesome it was to see that movie,” said Simmons. “It made me cry, it made me think; it is such a dynamic documentary.”

In addition to exciting newcomers, the festival will feature the Emmy award-winning second episode of the “Roots” first season. The Q&A with Erman and Andrews follows, during which Andrews will explain the emotional experience of playing a slave.

“We’re going to do it in a very interesting way,” said Andrews of the Q&A. “It’s going to be from both a black and white perspective…[It was] a very unique perspective for us because it conjured up the ghosts of all of our ancestors.”

Prior to “Roots,” the complete story of those ancestors, from being taken from Africa through the Middle Passage and onto plantations and being sold into slavery, was never told, said Andrews, who splits her time between Manhattan and the North Fork.

According to Andrews, the actors on the show — black and white — faced immense difficulty in coping with the emotions brought on by playing both the oppressed and the oppressors.

“Most of us who were black actors on that show who were playing slaves, we would drive up in our Mercedes and we had our homes in the hills and we had our fabulous lifestyle and then we had to go in and don these rags,” she recalled. “The actors who were playing plantation owners or slave owners, they had a hard time playing those characters, a hard time using those words.”

“It was one experience that I will never forget, it is why I am a writer today,” said Andrews, who wrote the critically acclaimed CBS mini-series, “Sally Hemings.” “It was just the hardest thing for these actors, to go from joking around with us, going out later and having a drink with us, then they’d have to put on these characters and play these roles to you — who they’re looking at and saying the ‘N word’ or beating you or stripping you naked — that’s a hard thing to ask an actor to do. The ancestors showed us who we had to be.”

The 8th Annual Black Film Festival will be shown on November 7, 8, 9 and 10. For tickets and more information, call (631) 873-7362 or email info@aamee.org

East Hampton Man Charged in Federal Child Pornography Case

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By Tessa Raebeck

Michael S. Bonnet of East Hampton was arrested last Wednesday afternoon on charges that he transported child pornography, according to federal officials.

A registered sex offender, Bonnet, 28, is being held without bail in federal court in Central Islip, after being arraigned around 4:30 p.m. on Wednesday, October 30 said Assistant U.S. Attorney Allen Bode. He is being charged with one complaint of transporting child pornography for interstate commerce, or distribution, according to Robert Nardoza, a spokesman for the U.S. Attorney’s office.

Under the alias “Bob Jones,” the defendant knowingly sent numerous images depicting child pornography to an undercover FBI agent in February 2013, according to a complaint filed with the U.S. District Court on Tuesday. Public defender Randi Chavis, who is representing Bonnet in the case, declined to comment.

Bonnet, of Cosdrew Lane in East Hampton, is currently on probation with the Suffolk County Office of Probation after being convicted of sexually abusing a 14-year-old girl in 2008, states the complaint. While Bode did not have the exact location of the 2008 incident, he said it did occur in New York State.

According to the complaint, the defendant responded to an advertisement seeking to “trade” images of child pornography which was posted by an undercover FBI officer on a “Human Sexuality forum” website. Using an email address that includes the first initial of his first name and his full last name, Bonnet responded to the undercover advertisement on February 24, according to the complaint.

The complaint states that Bonnet, using the name “Bob Jones,” and the undercover agent exchanged several emails that day. In one email, according to the complaint, Bonnet wrote to the undercover agent, “Just hoping your [sic] not a cop or anything don’t need trouble.” On February 24, “Bob Jones” sent the undercover agent a pornographic image of a prepubescent female, the complaint states.

The advertisement posted by the undercover FBI agent said, “send to receive,” according to the complaint. In response to the pornographic image allegedly sent by Bonnet, the undercover agent sent a corrupted video to “Bob Jones” with a title alluding that the file contained child pornography, states the complaint. Using an online program that is available to the general public, the FBI identified the IP address, a unique number that identifies a computer or device using the Internet, being used by “Bob Jones” when the file was opened by the recipient, said the complaint.

The complaint states the agent then determined that the IP address was associated with a cellular phone. During the conversation between “Bob Jones” and the undercover agent, the defendant allegedly said he used a cellular phone so the IP address could not be linked to a particular device, the complaint states. “Bob Jones” sent the undercover agent two more pornographic images of underage females, states the complaint.

According to the complaint, the undercover agent located additional postings under the name “great times” by a user using the same email address on a different forum, each time with the location of East Hampton, New York. Using the letters in the defendant’s alleged email address, the undercover agent then searched for subjects with the last name “Bonnet” and the first initial “M” in East Hampton, according to the complaint.

The complaint states that the search provided the undercover agent with one name, Michael S. Bonnet of Cosdrew Lane, East Hampton. An additional search revealed that the defendant was a registered sex offender located at the same address, according to the complaint.

On or about October 24, the defendant was interviewed at his probation office after being advised of and waiving his Miranda rights, the complaint states. According to the complaint, the defendant stated that he had sent the images of child pornography to the undercover agent in February 2013, that he traded and received child pornography with others via the same website and that he had approximately 100 pornographic images of children on his cellphone.

According to the complaint, after searching the content of Bonnet’s cellphone, authorities found “numerous images of apparent child pornography depicting victims ages five to 11 years old.”

Because of his prior conviction, Bonnet faces a minimum of 15 years in convicted.