Tag Archive | "Hamptons"

Consignment Coupons

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The Collette Consignment stores, with locations on the East End and New York City,  are currently offering a set of specials for customers.

Customers will receive a $50 gift card for every purchase of $250 or more, valid in all locations, except Collette’s Basement. All of the merchandise in Collette’s Basement, located on Main Street in Southampton, will be priced at 50 percent off, including all sale items. There will also be an additional 20 percent off clothing at the newly revamped Collette Annex, located on Hampton Road in Southampton.

The specials will last all summer long.

The Collette stores offer designer items at discounted prices, with high-end brands such as Chanel, Hermes and Yves Saint Laurent. The company has a store on Madison Avenue in Manhattan, several boutiques in Southampton, and a store on Main Street in Sag Harbor. At the Sag Harbor location, the store has a collection of European designer bags, and customer jewelry at prices of $30 as well as the Sag Town coffee shop next door.

For more information, visit colletteconsignment.com.

A Refill, Please

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The Sag Harbor Bond No. 9 Store, located on Main Street, will be hosting a Refill Event. If a customer purchases two Bond No. 9 items, they can refill an empty perfume bottle—regardless of brand—with any Bond No. 9 perfume. The sale lasts until Wednesday, June 11.

Bond No. 9, which was created in 2003, creates and sells fragrances inspired by New York City. The store has a range of women’s, men’s and unisex scents.

Prices range from $265 to $330. The store also sells its signature candles for $98.

For more information, visit bondno9.com.

Father’s Day Arts and Crafts Fair

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The Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce will present its annual Father’s Day Arts and Crafts Fair and Sidewalk Sale on Saturday and Sunday, June 14 and 15. Marine Park will be home to over 50 arts and crafts vendors, jewelers, photographers, painters and potters, along with those selling natural scents and one-of-a-kind clothing and accessories. Unique items for the home and office will also be available, with many price ranges and items especially priced for children to buy as gifts.

In addition to the fair, stores that are members of the chamber can participate in a “Whale of a Sale” and offer sales merchandise on the sidewalk. For more information visit saghaborchamber.com.

Gordian Raacke

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Gordian Raacke

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Mara Certic

Gordian Raacke is the executive director of Renewable Energy Long Island and has been instrumental in East Hampton Town’s decision to pledge to pursue the goal of meeting all communitywide electricity needs with renewable energy by 2020. 

You’re a founding member of Renewable Energy Long Island (RELI). What was it that compelled you to become involved?

It was when the Exxon Valdez disaster happened; I was really upset about that. And I thought what can we do about that? You know, I was blaming Exxon the way that everybody else was, and a friend of mine said you shouldn’t just point your finger at the big oil companies. You should point the finger also at yourself because that tanker was on the way to your gas tank, your oil tank. If we’re part of the problem, we’re also part of the solutions.

In 1993 I became the executive director of RELI’s predecessor organization which was called the Citizens Advisory Panel (CAP.) And it was a federal, court-appointed watchdog. And that had a 10-year lifespan given by the court and when that sun set I figured why not continue this? It’s very much needed and so we established Renewable Energy Long Island.

Your background is in civil engineering. How did you become an authority on climate change and renewable energy?

I was trained by Al Gore as a presenter as part of the climate reality project. I have also helped train others, too. I got a very good look at the science of climate change because he has very good scientific advisors. As an engineer, I have a scientific and technical background, but it really opened my eyes to the urgency of finding a solution to the climate crisis and that’s why it’s so refreshing now to see communities actually taking that on and adopting renewable energy policies so that’s what we need to do; we need to find solutions very quickly and implement them.

What sort of thing does RELI do?

We work on two tracks. We work on policy. We provide information and assistance to government entities to enact policies that are designed to flick the switch from fossil to renewable energy sources. And then we help individuals, homeowners and businesses to find the right solutions that work for them and then we help them find contractors. We provide free assistance, advice and guidance to anyone who asks for it.

East Hampton Town has recently set itself a goal to use 100-percent renewable energy for community-wide electricity needs by the year 2020. Do you think this is plausible?

Renewable energy is 100-percent doable. It requires a big effort on everyone’s behalf, it’s not going to happen all by itself. But it requires effort not only from town government but from every residence and every business within the Town of East Hampton. We need to do things a little bit smarter, a little bit better. Firstly, we need to work on making our homes and businesses more energy efficient. We need to stop the leakage of energy in our buildings. Then we can generate the energy that we need with smaller and much less expensive renewable energy systems. And that’s exactly what I did in my house; I made sure it was energy-efficient to start with and then I was very much able to afford a small solar-electric system.

We know everyone in East Hampton can now afford an energy audit and can afford — through on-bill financing that’s now available — to make the upgrades that the house will need to make it more energy efficient. So you don’t really need any upfront cash to pay for that, you’ll pay back on your utility bills and the monthly savings are greater than the payments you have to make to pay back the principal and interest on that energy efficiency loan. It’s affordable now for everyone. This isn’t just the right thing to do for the environment; it’s the right thing, and a good thing, to do for your wallet.

East Hampton Residents Sue PSEG LI and LIPA

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New power lines on Cedar Street in East Hampton. Photo by Mara Certic

 

By Mara Certic

Citing the presence of potentially dangerous toxins in electric utility lines being erected by PSEG Long Island in East Hampton Town, a group of residents has filed suit against the company and the Long Island Power Authority in New York State Supreme Court.

The Long Island Bureau For Responsible Energy (LIBFRE) filed the suit on behalf of a group of residents who live near the poles. It claims the overhead transmission lines will negatively affect wells and drinking water for the 300-plus people they represent.

A press release issued on Thursday by the group stated that an environmental review of the project by LIPA had “failed to disclose the adverse cumulative impact of the project on health, property values and alternatives, and intentionally misrepresented them.”

The group is being represented by former special counsel to Suffolk County, Irving Like, and Professor Leon Friedman who once represented the boxer Rubin “Hurricane” Carter, who had been wrongly convicted of murder.

The suit claims that a banned chemical in 26 countries, pentachlorophenol (PCP), has been placed on wooden utility poles and has been leaching dangerous toxins into the soil in the surrounding area and is also emitting toxic gases into the air.

According to Rebecca Singer, co-chair of LIBFRE, the level of PCP in East Hampton soil was recently tested and was found to have more than 312 times the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation’s acceptable level.

PCP has been used as a wood preservative since 1936. It has also been used as an insecticide, an herbicide, a sealant, and a molluskicide, among others. The Stockholm Convention on Persistent Organic Pollutants showed that exposure to PCP can interfere with endocrine processes in humans and has been found to stunt brain development, impair memory and even cause infertility in women, the suit states.

A hydrogeologist’s report says that the PCP will contaminate East Hampton’s groundwater, eventually traveling into Hook, Georgica and Town Ponds.

The second concern in the suit is that the high voltage power lines that are being added to the existing lines might result in electromagnetic fields dangerously close to houses on narrow streets.

The suit also charges that the new utility poles are damaging trees and vegetation along the 6.2-mile route along which they have been installed. According to Thursday’s press release, experts have already noted that there has been damage done to the landscape.

The final cause of action is the suit is the claim that the high levels of PCPs in the soil and water have drastically devalued the property for all of the houses in close proximity to the new poles.

The complaint demands that the utility pole project be cancelled and restitution in excess of $30 million to cover attorneys’ fees, removal costs and emotional distress of the residents involved.

Nessel Brothers To Be Honored at Montauk Dinner

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By Stephen J. Kotz

Richie and Jacob Nessel will be the honorees at the annual Montauk Harbor Old Timer’s Dinner, hosted by the Montauk Chamber of Commerce, on Thursday June 5, at the Clam and Chowder House at Salivar’s from 5 to 8 p.m. The two brothers have made their living fishing in Montauk for over 50 years. They own their own boats and have also worked on various charter and party boats in the hamlet.

Richie Nessel, who captains the “Nasty Ness,” recently received the Chester Wolf IGFA Sportsman Award at the first annual Shark’s Eye Tournament, which is a tag-and-release event to promote conservation of sharks. He was also instrumental in easing this year’s New York State fishing regulations and catch limits, specifically addressing the summer flounder restrictions in the state compared to neighboring states.

To do, he reached out to Governor Andrew Cuomo and invited him for a day of fishing on his boat. That resulted in the governor learning of the unfair regulations and a change in the daily bag limits by the Department of Environmental Conservation, which will have a positive impact on charter and party boat business in Montauk Harbor this summer.

Jacob Nessel began fishing in Montauk with his dad in 1951. By 1955, as a 15-year-old, he was already working as a deckhand on Montauk party boats on weekends and summer vacations. Captain Jake spent the next 15 years running the Marlin 3, 4 and 5.  His own charter boat, “Sportfisher,” fished in 1994 and 1995. Since 1996 he has captained the Marlin5/Ebb Tide.

Tickets for the event are $40., which includes dinner with wine or beer.  The evening begins at 5 p.m. with a roast of both brothers. Tickets are available at the Montauk Chamber of Commerce office, or by calling (631) 668-2428. Tickets can also be purchased online by going to www.montaukchamber.com, scrolling to the “Events” tab and using PayPal or a credit card to purchase a ticket.

After Tragedy, Woman Petitions for Dog Park

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Tina Pignatelli and her dog Huckleberry.

 

By Stephen J. Kotz

A Bay Point woman whose pet dog was struck and killed by a Sag Harbor Village truck at Havens Beach a few weeks ago has started an online petition drive to have a portion of the park fenced off as a dog park.

“He was a wonderful, wonderful dog,” said Tina Pignatelli of her 6-year-old golden doodle, Huckleberry. “I felt like I could talk to him and he understood exactly what I was saying.”

Ms. Pignatelli said she has already collected about 160 signatures on her iPetition and has an ultimate goal of 500. She hopes to pitch her idea to the Sag Harbor Village Board at its next meeting, on June 10.

“I’m not trying to go against the village,” she said. “I’m just trying to make this a really beautiful place for people and make it safer for dogs.”

The field on the eastern side of the park is an informal gathering place for dog owners and their pets.

Mayor Brian Gilbride said on Wednesday that even though he was sympathetic to Ms. Pignatelli, he would not be inclined to support her idea. “At the end of the day that is not a dog park, nor is it supposed to be,” he said. “It is really supposed to be a picnic park.”

The mayor added that the village has spent a lot of money trying to clean up Havens Beach and pointed out that a person hired by the village to take water samples there recently remarked that there was a significant amount of dog feces on the beach.

Ms. Pignatelli said she thought most dog owners were conscientious about cleaning up after their pets, adding that she thought a formal, fenced-in dog park might result in them becoming even more diligent.

As part of her proposal, Ms. Pignatelli said she had reached out to landscape architects, Jack Delashmet Associates, and they had agreed to design a landscaped area on the south side of the field, leaving ample space for landing Medevac helicopters and a wide enough gate to accommodate cars if the field is needed for parking for events like the fire department’s annual carnival.

“I’m willing to raise the money,” she said. “I’m not asking for village’s money. I just want their permission.

Ms. Pignatelli said on the fateful day, Huckleberry was in a playful mood when she brought him to the beach to exercise him off his leash. When she tried to get him back in the car, he dashed out in front of a village work truck that was leaving the parking area.

She was able to get the injured dog back in her vehicle, but he died as she drove him to Old Towne Animal Hospital in Southampton. “There was nothing that anyone could have done,” she said. “He came to me during a hard time in my life. I miss him every day.”

Kevin Pollak Kicks off Bay Street’s Comedy Showcase Series

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Comedian Kevin Pollak performs at Bay Street Theatre on Monday, June 2 at 8 p.m. Photo courtesy Bay Street Theatre.

 

By Mara Certic

The Comedy Showcase returns for its fourth year this Monday, June 2, at Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor. This year’s summer-long series kicks off with a performance by stand-up comedian and actor Kevin Pollak.

“We’re really excited that we were finally able to get him this year,” said Gary Hygom, Bay Street’s managing production director. “The kind of the cool thing about him is that he’s one of the few comedians who have had a huge dramatic career. Few people know that he started out as a comic.”

Known for dramatic roles in “A Few Good Men,” “Casino” and “The Usual Suspects,” Mr. Pollak started performing stand-up comedy in 1967 when he was just 10 years old. In his late teens, he started performing professionally and, after taping his first solo HBO comedy performance, Mr. Pollak was cast in “Willow,” a 1988 film directed by Ron Howard.

Mr. Pollak is known for his solid celebrity impressions, particularly his Christopher Walken, Peter Falk and William Shatner shticks.

Five years ago Mr. Pollak began “Kevin Pollak’s Chat Show,” an online talk show aired once a week. Guests such as Matthew Perry and Dana Carvey have been invited on air to play games like “The Larry King Game” –during which guests complete a series of tasks all while doing a bad Larry King impression—and “Who Tweeted”—in which guests guess the celebrity authors of embarrassing tweets.

Steve Rannazzisi will take to the Bay Street stage a few weeks later, on Monday, June 30. Mr. Rannazzisi is known for his role as Kevin on the FX show, “The League.” Mr. Rannazzisi got his break on MTV’s “Punk’d”: Ashton Kutcher’s practical joke reality television show. He has since become known for work on the comedy stage, on television and on the silver screen.

“I’m really looking forward to seeing Steve perform,” said Mr. Hygom of Mr. Rannazzisi. “I’ve never seen him live, but I’ve heard he’s just unbelievable.”

A newcomer to the showcase will be writer and comedian Heather McDonald who will continue the series the following week with a July 7 performance. Ms. McDonald has been celebrated for her writing for the late-night comedy talk show, “Chelsea Lately,” and her collaboration with the Wayans brothers on two of their feature films.

Ms. McDonald has been featured on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and has guest-starred on several prime time shows. Her 2010 book, “You’ll Never Blue Ball in This Town Again,” spent seven weeks on The New York Times best-seller list.

After his sold-out show at Bay Street last year, Bobby Collins returns to its stage on July 14. Mr. Collins performs upward of 200 stand-up bits every year and is well known for his work on VH1′s “Stand Up Spotlight.” Mr. Collins has been the warm-up act for artists such as Frank Sinatra, Dolly Parton and Cher.

Mr. Collins’s career in observational stand-up comedy began over 20 years ago, when he gave up a well-paying job at Calvin Klein to pursue his dream to make people laugh.

“I don’t like to have comedians come back and do the same material,” Mr. Hygom said. “But Bobby has such a huge repertoire, his shows always change. Everything is always new and fresh”

Maine-native Bob Marley—not to be confused with the Wailer—will perform the first of August’s comedy showcases on August 11. Mr. Marley is one of few who have performed on the entire late night talk show circuit. He has had roles in cult film favorites, such as the “Boondock Saints.”

Last in the series, Grammy- and Tony-award nominee Robert Klein returns to Bay Street on August 18 for what is expected to be another sold-out performance. Mr. Klein has received recognition for his comedy and also for his musical work on Broadway.

With over 100 appearances on “The Tonight Show and Late Show with David Letterman” to his credit, Mr. Klein got his start in comedy when he auditioned for the improvisational troupe, Second City.

Mr. Klein has released several successful comedy albums, one of which is said to have influenced comedy great Bill Crystal—who on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” admitted to have, in his youth, decorated his apartment wall with a poster of Mr. Klein.

Bay Street Theatre will present up-and-coming comedy stars when the All-Star Comedy Showcase also returns this summer. Hosted by Joseph Vecsey, the June 9 show will also feature comics recognizable from appearances on Comedy Central, MTV and PBS.

The Comedy Showcase performances are at 8 p.m. on most Mondays throughout the summer season. Bay Street Theatre is located at 1 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, or to purchase tickets visit baystreet.org or call (631) 725-9500.

Laurie Barone-Schaefer

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Laurie Barone-Schaefer has lived in Sag Harbor for the past eight years. A professional photographer by trade, Ms. Barone-Schaefer has became a dedicated Cub Scout den mother—a job that she pours her heart into, she says. She discusses the importance of scouting and the upcoming Soap Box Derby, which will take place on Sunday, June 8. 

By Mara Certic

How did you become involved in the Cub Scouts in Sag Harbor?

Well, I have three little boys. And the organization is just absolutely wonderful for our children to be involved in, and I feel very strongly about that. And because of that I inquired about having my children join, and there was no leader available for my middle son’s age group, so I pretty much stepped up and became a leader.

Why is it that you felt so strongly about your sons joining the Scouts?

I was a Girl Scout and my brother was a Boy Scout and this is something that I just wanted my boys to be exposed to. They learn so much about the outdoors. We go on nature hikes; we go on adventures. The bonding and the lifelong friendships that are formed through the different things that we do is so amazing to see. You see them grow right before your eyes. They all have this bond that is something you can’t force, it just happens naturally. I really think that being part of the organization is a huge part of that.

 Last year’s Soap Box Derby was the first Sag Harbor had seen since the 1950s. Why did you bring it back?

Growing up, you have a lot of fond memories of your childhood, and things have changed so much even from when I was a child. All the community kids congregated outside and played and we wouldn’t go inside until the sun started to go down and it was dinnertime. And as a parent now you sit back and you see what’s going on and everything is cyber this, or cyber that. So I said, you know what? We need to get these kids back to basics. And we need to get them experiencing things outside; not driving virtual cars. We need them in those cars and experiencing it firsthand.

Who is participating in this year’s race?

Last year we had approximately 34 racers, and this year we have 42, so we have quite a substantial increase this year, which is absolutely wonderful. We’re very excited about that. Racers who did race last year are able to use their cars from last year. I know some of them are probably revamping them and giving them a fresh look, a new update. We have involved all the Scouts in Sag Harbor: Girl, Boy and Cub. We wanted to invite all the Scouts together into the event. There are two divisions this year, the Mustang division (the driver and car combined can weigh up to 150 pounds) and the Thunder Road division (for the older kids, 225 pounds combined weight).

 Are there different rules for the two divisions?

This year, the Thunder Road division don’t need to use the kit part wheels; it gives them more of an opportunity to use their creativity and have a little more fun with things. They do have a safety requirement that they need to meet, of course.

 What exactly is going to happen on June 8?

This year, we’re doing something a little different, we’re having our safety inspections and registrations down over by the Elementary School gym on Saturday, June 7, and we are going to be impounding the cars there. On Sunday, we’re starting with a parade down Main Street at 1 p.m. with the fire department, local vintage cars, trailers trailering the derby cars, and then we’ll make our way to High Street for the race. This year it is our honor to dedicate the race to Katy Stewart, whose brother is a member of Troop 455.

 How has the local community responded to the Soap Box Derby?

There’s been an outpouring of support from the community, and we just want to thank all of them. The Scouts are being embraced by their community in such a loving way. This is what they’re going to take with them when they get older, and this is what being part of a community really means. It’s a beautiful thing to see.

New Magazine Features Sag Harbor Students’ Artwork

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“Jesse Owens” by Pierson student Ana Sherwood, was created during a workshop with Push Pin Studios co-founder Reynold Ruffins.

By Mara Certic

“It really is the story of two guys,” Peter Solow said in his art room at Pierson Middle-High School this week as he flicked through the pages of RETina, a magazine displaying his students’ artwork.

“One of them was Don Reutershan, who was very much involved in helping the community. The other is this amazing man named Hobie Betts.”

The two, he explained, were responsible for the creation of the Reutershan Educational Trust, which provides support for art and architecture educational programs at the public schools in Sag Harbor. “No other school, no other place,” Mr. Solow said.

Since its creation over a decade ago, the trust has provided the Sag Harbor School District with close to $100,000 each year. Mr. Betts was an architect who started the trust in memory of his good friend, Mr. Reutershan.

Money from the trust has gone to provide Pierson students with a professional large-format printer and better materials, which allow students to transfer sketches done on note paper directly onto fine art paper and canvas.

The Reutershan Trust also provides a $10,000 scholarship every year and contributes to art department trips to Europe.

In addition to that, the trust has held a combination of workshops and projects, bringing in professional artists to work with students.

Just last week, photographer Francine Fleischer returned to Pierson to teach one of the classes. Last year, Ms. Fleisher lead a photography project with high school students, which resulted in their photographs being posted on The New York Times website and in an exhibition at the John Jermain Memorial Library.

“And so we’re getting ready for her to be coming back and work with the kids today,” Mr. Solow said on Friday.

Last year, Catalan artist Perrico Pascal was flown in—again by the trust—to put on a workshop at Pierson that he had previously taught at universities in Cairo and Tokyo.

Bailey Briggs, who graduated from Pierson last June, got to work with Mr. Pascal during this program. “He’s the kind of artist who helps you do whatever your hands are going to do; it’s painting, it’s not thinking so hard about everything,” she said of the visiting artist.

Ms. Briggs studied photography at length during her time at Pierson. From the school, she said, she learned both the fundamentals of Photoshop as well as an appreciation of the details of art, she said.

Digital printmaking and photography, wax and portrait sculpture and illustration have all been taught by visiting artists, thanks to the Reutershan Educational Trust.

“We just finished this illustration project; this was Reynold Ruffins,” Mr. Solow said about one class. “There’s a collaboration that the trust works very hard at; not to be an outside group but to work with the faculty. The trust supplements and reinforces what we do in the classroom. It doesn’t supersede it and it doesn’t replace it,” he said. Thanks to this sense of cooperation, Mr. Ruffins’s workshop was integrated into Mr. Solow’s studio art class.

“The trust is really pretty wonderful,” Mr. Solow said.  “And what we wanted to do with RETina is try to document the work that was done by the kids in trust workshops because there really wasn’t a record of it.”

RETina is a 40-page color magazine that features about two years’ worth of work produced in these classes.

Mr. Solow brought in a friend and former classmate at Cooper Union, Michael DiCanio, to design the magazine. Mr. DiCanio, a trained painter, took an interest in design in art school. To support his painting, he worked his way into the advertising world and “fell in love with the profession,” he said.

Mr. DiCanio ran a two-dimensional workshop in which students participated in the editing, layout and design processes. “We thought the need to showcase the student work would be best done by putting it between two covers,” said Mr. DiCanio.  “And that there might be further educational value in getting the kids involved in the process of creating that, too.”

Mr. DiCanio said that his class focused on brand identity, and that he made sure the students examined and considered the best “language” to express their message.

“In a way, what we are putting between two covers is Sag Harbor itself,” he said. “There is no way to oversee the organization of hundreds of paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures done by a community’s youth and not see the world as they do—their world.”