Tag Archive | "Hamptons"

East End Services on Memorial Day Celebrate Those Who Served, Those Who Fell

Tags: , , , , ,


The color guard makes its way down Main Street during the 2013 Sag Harbor Memorial Day parade. Michael Heller photo.

The color guard makes its way down Main Street during the 2013 Sag Harbor Memorial Day parade. Michael Heller photo.

By Kathryn G. Menu

Residents across the East End will honor those men and women who died while serving in the military during this country’s wars at Memorial Day services beginning Sunday and continuing on Monday.

In Sag Harbor, remembrance will begin this Sunday, May 25, said Martin Knab, commander of the Sag Harbor American Legion Chelberg & Battle Post, as members of the Legion and the Sag Harbor VFW are joined by Sag Harbor Boy Scouts in replacing the flags on the gravestones of veterans in cemeteries throughout the village. Flags and wreaths will also be laid at the veterans memorial at North Haven Village Hall, and on the South Ferry Lt. Joseph Theinert, named for the Shelter Island resident who perished in Afghanistan in June 2010. A flag will also be placed at the 1812 memorial on High Street in Sag Harbor, said Mr. Knab.

On Memorial Day—Monday, May 26— veterans, government officials and scouts will begin the Memorial Day Parade at the World War I monument at Otter Pond at 9 a.m. to lay a wreath, and march down Main Street to the Civil War monument to do the same before stopping in front of the Municipal Building and the Lance Corporal Jordan C. Haerter Veterans Memorial Bridge. The parade will continue to Bay Street and to Marine Park, stopping at the village’s memorials to those who fought and died in World War II, the Vietnam War and the Korean War. Both Mr. Knab and Sag Harbor VFW Commander Roger King will speak, as will James Larocca, a Sag Harbor resident and veteran who has dedicated much of his life to public service.

Residents will be invited back to the Legion for refreshments and hot dogs, said Mr. Knab.

Sag Harbor will not be alone in celebrating and honoring fallen soldiers.

On Sunday, May 25, the Montauk Veterans and Service Club will host its annual Montauk Memorial Day parade at noon, beginning at Kirk Park and moving east through Montauk to the village green. On Monday, May 26, beginning at 9 a.m. the annual Bridgehampton Memorial Day service will be held at the war monument at the corner of Ocean Road and Montauk Highway, hosting by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion, Nathaniel Howell Topping Post 580. Members of the Bridgehampton Fire Department and the Bridgehampton School band will also be on hand for the ceremonies. The Village of Southampton Commission on Veterans Patriotic Events will host its Memorial Day service on Monday starting at 11 a.m. at Agawam Park, after a brief parade at 10:45 a.m. starting at the First Presbyterian Church and heading down Jobs Lane to the park.

 

 

 

Walking with Women in Sag Harbor

Tags: , , , , , ,


mrs.russellsage

Mrs. Russell Sage is responsible for building Mashashimuet Park, Pierson Middle-High School and John Jermain Memorial Library. 

 

By Mara Certic

As you walk down the streets of Sag Harbor, its history is palpable. Treading in the footsteps of sea captains, authors and artists past, you pass buildings on Main Street that date to the 1770s. The histories of Mashashimuet Park, Pierson High School and the John Jermain Memorial Library share one thing in common: they were all funded and built in the first 10 years of the 20th century, by a woman.

“It was so unusual then for a private, independent benefactress to pay for those municipal buildings,” said Tony Garro, who along with Annette Hinkle, hosts a women’s history walking tour of Sag Harbor on Thursday, May 22, sponsored by the League of Women Voters.

Mr. Garro moved to Sag Harbor shortly after retiring from his teaching job of over 30 years in the Massapequa School District. His love of history quickly had him enamored of Sag Harbor. “A little town with this much history is just incredible,” he said. A combination of research, curiosity and long walks led him to start leading historic walking tours in the village. “I thought to myself, instead of putting together a walk in the woods, it would be great to start a walk in Sag Harbor.”

When Mr. Garro first began his tours, they tended to be more generic. The tour would begin at Mashashimuet Park and would continue down Main Street, pausing to look at and learn about some of the historic houses along the street. Continued research prompted Mr. Garro to look into doing themed walks.

A maritime tour during HarborFest one year was his first venture into the world of specialized historical tours.

“But I had an idea for a woman’s tour, and a man leading a woman’s tour doesn’t have too much credibility,” he said. So Mr. Garro brought on writer, Annette Hinkle. Since then, the two have formed “Sag Harbor Sidewalks” and plan to offer tours through the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum this summer.

This Thursday’s tour will explore the homes of four women who played major roles in history, both local and on the larger stage.

Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage, who even today is still most often referred to as Mrs. Russell Sage, did not live in Sag Harbor, or own a home in the village, until she was 74 years old. When her reportedly tight-fisted husband died in 1906, she inherited a fortune estimated at over $50 million to be used at her own discretion.

Mrs. Sage spent the rest of her life spending that money, supporting education, programs for women and also several “pet projects,” including Sag Harbor. As a descendant of both Abraham Pierson and Major John Jermain, she named the school and library that she built after them, respectively.

“She didn’t grow up here, she grew up in Syracuse, but she almost had an unrealistic romanticism about Sag Harbor because her grandmother had grown up here, and I guess she had regaled her with stories of Sag Harbor when she was younger,” Ms. Hinkle said.

In 1912 Mrs. Sage left Sag Harbor never to return. From 1908 until she left, she lived in the Huntting House, where the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum is now located, and where this tour of Sag Harbor begins.

Another stop on the tour is the former home of the feminist pioneer Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” whose family still owns the house.

“But it’s not just the Betty Friedans that we look at,” said Mr. Garro, mentioning the lesser-known women whose lives are explored on the Sag Harbor Sidewalks tour.

One of the houses the tour will visit was home to Annie Cooper Boyd. At the age of 15, she began keeping a diary, which has since been published. Her writings offer an intimate look into what it was like for a “wild child” to grow up in Sag Harbor in the end of the 19th century.

“She was really trying to be a free spirit in a society that didn’t reward women for being free spirits. On her 17th birthday she talks about not being able to climb trees—at least in her front yard—anymore.”

Annie Cooper Boyd was an artist as well, painting wherever she could—including on the walls of her Sag Harbor home, now home to the Sag Harbor Historical Society and open to the public.

In her artwork, “you can see some really cool views of Sag Harbor that don’t exist anymore,” said Ms. Hinkle. Mr. Garro added “She, in essence, became a historian of Sag Harbor through her art.”

Also included on the tour is the former home of Nelson Algren. “I mean obviously not to talk about Nelson, really.” Mr. Garro said. The tour stops at the Glover Street house because of a torrid love affair the writer had with one of the most celebrated feminists and philosophers of the 20th century, Simone de Beauvoir.

Just a few yards away, on the corner of Glover and Green Streets, is what Mr. Garro refers to as an old “Sag Harbor B&B—a bar and brothel.”

“In the end, it all comes back to the economics, women doing what they had to do to survive,” Ms. Hinkle said.

 Sag Harbor Sidewalks will be putting on themed tours throughout the summer, including maritime tours, cemetery tours and their popular haunted house tours. For more information call the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum at (631) 725-0770.

Sag Harbor Village to Target Illegal Rentals

Tags: , , , , ,


By Mara Certic

Like all municipalities on the South Fork, contending with overcrowding, parking and noise from share houses or illegal short-term rentals in the Sag Harbor is a challenge. But according to village attorney Denise Schoen it is not a challenge the village will take lightly this summer.

Rental-by-owner websites such as VRBO, AirBnB and HomeAway have hundreds of houses to rent in Sag Harbor Village; many of which offer rentals for very short periods of time and claim to offer sleeping arrangements for a worrying number of people, according to Ms. Schoen.

In the village, it is illegal to rent a home in short-term capacity, Ms. Schoen said this week. Although there is no specific provision defining the minimum length of stay allowed for a renter, the occupancy of houses in the village must be “permanent, or tantamount to permanent,” according to the village code.

“If we’re able to prove by presenting enough facts to a judge that they’re renting the house on a short-term basis, they are going to automatically fall outside the permitted use of the zone,” Ms. Schoen said.

Ms. Schoen said those who rent their houses for the full summer season do not have to worry that they are operating outside the law. “Obviously, Sag Harbor is a resort community,” she said. But short-term rentals, she added, can be very disruptive within a community.

“There’s no control over quality-of-life issues for neighbors, ” said Ms. Schoen, noting anonymous complaints have already been logged with the village about these kinds of rentals.

This week, of the 183 houses advertised on one rent-by-owner website, only 25 of them had a minimum rental period of 30 days or more— with many offering a two-night minimum stay during certain parts of the season.

East Hampton and Southampton Towns both have specific rental provisions in their codes. Southampton does not allow rentals for a period of less than 14 days. The law in East Hampton is slightly different, stating that a single-family residence may only be rented out for a period shorter than 14 days three times within a six-month period.

Ms. Schoen said that believes that adopting a specific rental law in Sag Harbor might be a way to buck the disturbing rental trend.

A provision in the village code allows for private homes to run bed-and-breakfasts within Sag Harbor’s residential zones if a permit is issued by the village planning board. In those cases there are many restrictions, such as a limit of four guests at one time, and a two-night maximum stay.

However, few of the two-or three-night rentals listed on rent-by owner websites fell under the B&B criteria. One house “two minutes from the center of town” charges more than $1,000 a night throughout the summer season and claims to sleep 13, despite stating that it has only three bedrooms.

Ms. Schoen said she is most concerned about overcrowding in the smaller houses within the central village area. Not only is this a matter of legality and quality-of-life, but there are also health and safety concerns.

A particularly worrying discovery on these rental websites is that quite a few of the houses are advertised as having cottages. “How many of those cottages are legal? And if they’re not legal, I’m even more concerned about the health and safety issues because that means they don’t have a C of O for sleeping,” she said.

The fear is that the detached structures might not have fire protection; the “cottages” are “built differently than other houses; they burn faster,” said Ms. Schoen, who has been a volunteer with the Sag Harbor Ambulance Corps for over a decade. The worry in a village as small as this one is that a fire on one property could quickly spread to another.

Although no official complaints have been logged with the village clerk in the last year, more than one anonymous grievance has been made to officials about rentals causing garbage, parking and noise problems.

“It was very hard for [these neighbors] to enjoy their backyards anymore because it was just constant parties because it was a different group of people every week,” Ms. Schoen said.

Building Inspector Tim Platt has had some success writing letters and stopping illegal “party rentals” in the summer season, when houses are rented out for one-night only for blowout celebrations, like prom. When a homeowner is cited by the village for an illegal rental, their only recourse to fight the charge is in Sag Harbor Village Justice Court.

The part-time code enforcement officer in the summer has focused more in the past on problems of overcrowdings in the business district. Ms. Schoen said that the lack of this resource might be why “the word isn’t out there that there’s a possibility you could be cited; there’s no fear on anyone’s part.”

Ms. Schoen urged residents to inform the building department if they are concerned that illegal, or dangerous, rentals are going in Sag Harbor. “We will take complaints very seriously,” she said. “So if a neighbor sees a situation where a short-term rental is taking place, especially in overcrowding situations, they should call down to village hall, to the building department, and we’ll check it out.

 

Paula Poundstone Opens Saturday Night Comedy This Weekend at Bay Street Theatre

Tags: , , , , , , ,


PaulaPoundstonefor2014

Comedian Paula Poundstone will open a series of special Saturday night comedy performances at Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theatre on May 24 at 8 p.m.

Richard Lewis will take the stage June 21, and audiences can spend “A Divine Evening with Charles Busch,” accompanied by Tom Judson July 26.

Ms. Poundstone is a regular panelist on NPR’s rascal of a weekly news quiz show, “Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me,” and is known in her decades long career in stand-up for her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd.

“No two shows I do are the same,” said Ms. Poundstone. “It’s not that I don’t repeat material. I do. My shows, when they’re good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves.  Then, someone says, ‘Tell that story you used to tell,’ and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them.  No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.”

For more information, or to reserve tickets, visit baystreet.org. 

A Whale of a Show Comes Back to Sag Harbor

Tags: , , , , , ,


Edward Holland

“Sag Harbor Sleigh Ride”, Graphite, colored pencil, acrylic and collage on canvas by Edward Holland of New York City.

 

By Mara Certic

Sag Harbor residents Peter Marcelle and Dan Rizzie proposed a challenge to 17 local artists: Create a piece of art inspired by Sag Harbor’s favorite sea creature and mascot, the whale.

Returning for its second summer, A Whale of a Show, featuring paintings and sculptures, kicks off the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum’s “Salt Air Exhibition II” series with an opening on Friday evening.

Mr. Rizzie approached Mr. Marcelle about curating last year’s show in an effort to raise money for the museum, which was badly in need of restoration.

“I think I came up with the whale of a show and Dan came up with the title,” Mr. Marcelle said. The aim, he explained, was to both raise money to renovate the museum building and give local artists an opportunity to showcase their work.

Money earned through the proceeds from the art sales last year went toward repainting the old building.

“I get a huge smile on my face every time I drive by it and see it painted. I mean it got more than a facelift. It really looks magnificent,” said Mr. Rizzie.

The show returns this year with six new artists in an effort to fund further restoration at the museum.

The artists “all have something to do with the town: they either live here or have a home here—that’s sort of the basic requirement” said Mr. Rizzie, who, for this year’s show, created “North Haven Whale,” which he described as being something between a painting and a sculpture.

“We’re so lucky to be as rich as we are with artists in Sag Harbor; curating a show like this is such a thrill,” he said.

Returning artists Eric Fischl and Donald Sultan both coincidentally painted orcas on paper this year. “They both did killer whales, and they’re both killer artists,” said Mr. Rizzie. Mr. Sultan’s whale has also been made into a t-shirt which will be available for purchase at the museum.

Award-winning cartoonist Gahan Wilson has created a work on paper for the show, which Mr. Rizzie said is sure to feature his trademark humor.

Co-founder of Push Pin Studios, Reynold Ruffins will also offer his interpretation of a whale again this year.  Veteran artists Paul Davis and James McMullan—who has designed more than 40 posters for Lincoln Center—have also returned to support the whaling museum.

“What we really do is try and bring new people in; it’s really exciting when you get new blood,” said Mr. Rizzie of the six new artists participating this year.

Abstract artist Edward Holland said he jumped at the chance. “When Peter approached me and asked me to be involved I absolutely said yes,” he said.

The New York City-based artist, whose paintings all feature heavy collage elements, has been coming to the East End for over a decade. “I’ve always enjoyed Sag Harbor and the area,” he said.

Recognizing a whale in Mr. Holland’s work might be difficult: a collage on canvas with acrylic, colored pencil and graphite, “Sag Harbor Sleigh Ride” is a “very loose” deconstructed map of the town, according to the artist. “I was reading and doing research about Sag Harbor, and what kept coming up was community involvement and how linked the industry was to the town,” he said. “I thought about doing a whale, but I figured that territory would be mined by different people. I wanted to focus on the town and the geographical location a little bit more.”

Mr. Holland’s piece is steeped in historical details and accents. The artist chose media specifically to evoke ideas of whaling and the sea, including an entry on Herman Melville from a 1913 Encyclopedia Britannica. The dominant white and gray hues in the center of the painting are an allusion to the thrashing of water after a whale is harpooned.

The title of his work makes reference to this as well: Mr. Holland explained that whalers referred to the violent aftermath of freshly harpooned whale trying to break free of the whaling boat as a “Nantucket Sleigh Ride.”

“I repurposed it here for Sag Harbor,” Mr. Holland said. “No doubt whalers of this town experienced the same violent drag.”

The opening reception for A Whale of a Show will take place Friday, May 23, from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will be on view at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum until Wednesday, June 18. For more information visit sagharborwhalingmuseum.org. or call (631) 725-0770.

Finney Comes Forward as $20 Million Lotto Winner

Tags: , , , ,


IMG_1526

Southampton Hospital orderly Cameron Finney, 48, of Mastic, came forward last Thursday, May 16 at the New York Lottery’s Plainview Center as the winner of a $20 million Mega Millions jackpot.

Mr. Finney, who won the jackpot in a March 25 drawing, claimed his winnings Thursday, which amounts to $7.4 million after state and tax withholdings.

According to a release issued by the New York Lottery, Mr. Finney had been out for a chicken dinner at Popeye’s the evening of the drawing when he made a last-minute decision to go next door for a lottery ticket, spending just $4. The next day, while buying breakfast, Mr. Finney swiped his ticket and saw the “Big Winner” message. The ticket was sold at a gas station in Coram.

Mr. Finney collected his winnings with his wife, Donna, and daughter, Christina.

Former East Hampton Town Judge Forced to Pay $1 Million

Tags: , , , ,


By Mara Certic

In an April 21 decision, New York State Supreme Court Justice Paul J. Baisley Jr. ordered former East Hampton Town Justice Catherine Cahill to pay back over $1 million of funds her late husband, Marvin Hyman, an attorney, had deposited into their personal joint account from a land sale shortly before his death in December 2005.

Under the decision, Ms. Cahill, the first woman to serve on the town’s justice court, must pay $1,045,400 plus interest to Nelson Gerard, her late husband’s former partner in Buckskill Farm, LLC.

In June 2003, Mr. Hyman and Mr. Gerard created the limited liability corporation and purchased a 9.6-acre parcel of vacant land in East Hampton. According to court records, Mr. Gerard contributed $2 million and Mr. Hyman $350,000 toward the purchase.

According to a civil suit brought by Mr. Gerard, the agreement between Mr. Hyman and Mr. Gerard required Mr. Hyman to “take all steps necessary or desirable at his own cost and expense” to get a subdivision of the parcel into as many as eight lots, including a required agricultural preserve, approved by the East Hampton Town Planning Board.

In the agreement, several different distribution scenarios were offered depending on how many lots the town permitted in the subdivision. If only four or five lots and a reserve area were allowed, all the lots were to be owned by Mr. Gerard, with Mr. Hyman receiving only the reserve area. In February 2004, Mr. Hyman wrote to Mr. Gerard stating that a proposed eight-lot subdivision plan had been submitted for approval and also mentioning that the town had shown interest in buying four of the lots as well as the agricultural reserve area—leaving Buckskill Farm, LLC with just four smaller lots.

In his letter, Mr. Hyman wrote, “if we continue to pursue the town purchase we should discuss the financial implications on the members that such a purchase would have. As we did not consider this possibility in the original agreement, we should address the same as soon as possible.”

According to Mr. Gerard’s suit, he offered his partner the option of receiving either $850,000 or one of the remaining four lots in exchange for his share of the LLC. Mr. Hyman presented Mr. Gerard with a proposed contract that would leave Buckskill Farm, LLC with the southern four lots of the property. For $1.9 million, the town would buy the remaining 6.8-acre area through a Community Preservation Fund purchase—all of which eventually became known as the agricultural reserved area – to lease to an organic farmer.

During the time of the town purchase, Ms. Cahill was serving as a town justice. She served on the bench for 20 years before retiring from the position last year.

In September 2005, Mr. Hyman closed the sale with the town, without his partner’s knowledge, according to Mr. Gerard’s suit. He deposited the money into the LLC’s bank account and then “drew a check on the Buckskill Farm account for virtually the entire amount of the sale proceeds, payable to himself, which he alone signed, and then deposited into a joint account he maintained with his wife, Catherine Cahill,” the suit states.

Shortly before his death, Mr. Hyman testified that he had thought, based on the operating agreement, that he was to receive all of the proceeds “because the operating agreement provided for him to receive the reserve area in a five or four-lot subdivision.”

The court ruled, however, that Mr. Hyman had adopted a “self-serving interpretation of the agreement.”

When Mr. Hyman died in 2005, Ms. Cahill inherited the case along with her husband’s estate. During a sworn deposition she invoked spousal privilege when asked questions about her husband’s business agreements, later waiving that right in trial. The court agreed with Mr. Gerard that “it is improper for a party to obstruct discovery by the assertion of a privilege at a deposition only to waive it and subject the opponent to surprise testimony at trial.”

The court found both Ms. Cahill’s deposition and trial testimonies “as a whole to be not credible,” in particular, her stated ignorance regarding certain matters “fully within the comprehension of any lawyer or judge.”

Ms. Cahill has been ordered pay Mr. Gerard 9 percent interest on the $1,045,400. Her attorney, Stephen Angel, of Riverhead, could not be reached for comment by this paper’s deadline.

 

BNB Announces First Quarter Gains

Tags: , , , , , , ,


Bridge Bancorp, Inc., the parent company of Bridgehampton National Bank (BNB; bridgenb.com) announced last week its first quarter results for 2014, reporting core net income and core earnings per share of $4 million and $0.35 per share. The core net income excludes $3.6 million or $0.31 per share of charges and net tax associated with the February 2014 acquisition of FNBNY Bancorp and the First National Bank of New York, branch restructuring costs and net losses on sales of securities. Inclusive of these charges, Bridge Bancorp reported net income of $0.4 million in the first quarter of 2014 and $0.04 per share.

According to a press release issued late last week, before the cost of the acquisition, the net income of $4 million and $0.35 per share for the quarter represents a 39-percent increase compared to last year. Net interest income also increased $3.6 million to $15.5 million for March 2014, with a net interest margin of 3.46-percent. Total assets of $2.1 billion are also reported as of March 2014, 34-percent higher than 2013. Loan growth also grew in the first quarter, to $274 million or 32-percent higher than in March 2013, and deposits increased 22-percent in the first quarter over last year with $1.67 billion made.

“The first quarter of 2014 featured several noteworthy accomplishments for the company,” said Kevin M. O’Connor, President and CEO of Bridge Bancorp, Inc. “We completed the acquisition of FNBNY and converted their core systems in mid February 2014. This adds three branches in new markets: Melville, in Suffolk County and Massapequa and Merrick, our first two branches in Nassau County, along with a loan production office in Manhattan. Our 26 branch locations, along with two loan production offices, combined with our expanded network of nearly 600 surcharge-free ATMs in select Rite Aid pharmacies across Long Island, New York City, and throughout New York State, offer our customers more convenient access to our community banking services,”

“In addition to the FNBNY acquisition, we experienced strong organic growth in loans and deposits during the quarter,” added Mr. O’Connor. “This growth contributed to record core net interest income and core net income.  Our strong, well-capitalized balance sheet, funded by core branch deposits, positions us to successfully fulfill our mission to be the community bank of choice for the communities we serve.”

Sag Harbor’s Temple Adas Israel’s Menorah Restored

Tags: , , , , ,


menorah

Peter Lipman-Wulf’s copper and brass Menorah, which for 35 years has adorned the façade of Sag Harbor’s Temple Adas Israel, has been restored and reinstalled by his daughter, Ghilia Lipman-Wulf, also an artist.

Conceived during a period of rebirth for both the building and its evolving congregation, the menorah was commissioned by Mrs. Alvin H. Rossuck, in memory of her late husband. Originally exhibited at Mr. Lipman-Wulf’s one-man-show of Sacred Art at the John Jermain Memorial Library in 1978, the piece was mounted on the temple’s exterior above Romana Kramoris’ stained glass windows in March 1979.

The restoration project was welcomed by Rabbi Leon Morris. Ghilia was assisted by husband Bruce Marienfeld, who—against expectation—found one of the flames missing for over a decade in the yew bushes below the site, and artist and jewelry maker Breahna Arnold, also of Sag Harbor. Sculptor Jameson Ellis re-soldered the junctures in need of repair.

With its seven flames, the menorah is considered a traditional symbol of Judaism, rather than the more commonly rendered Hanukkah menorah—or Hanukiah—which has nine branches. In accordance with Mr. Lipman-Wulf’s original vision, no lacquer was used on the polished piece, thus it will again become tarnished over time.

Mr. Lipman-Wulf’s installations can be seen in numerous public and private institutions, including the ceramic wall relief gracing Pierson High School’s main entrance.

Corcoran First Quarter Shows Significant Increase in Demand

Tags: , , , , ,


Corcoran Group Real Estate (corcoran.com) released its First Quarter report last Thursday, showing a significant increase in East End sales activity.

The number of closed sales increased 38-percent and sales volume rose by 27-percent,” reads the report. “While sales volume and number of sales increased, market-wide median price rose a minor 1-percent and average sales price decreased 8-percent. This reflects an increase in sales occurring at the lower end of the market as first-time homebuyers and investors were active in the Hamptons market this quarter, especially in communities west of Shinnecock Canal. Luxury properties traded at lower price points vs. a year ago, which contributed to market-wide sales being more diversified across all price categories this quarter.”

According to the report, in Sag Harbor/North Haven, the average sales price in the first quarter of 2014 was $1.65 million, a 30-percent increase over the same period in 2013. The median home price also increased by 59-percent, from $740,000 in 2013 to $1.180 million in the first quarter of 2014. Sales were up 81-percent, from 48 in 2013 to 87 in 2014 with a total volume of $143.118 million compared to $60.952 million in 2013.