Tag Archive | "Hamptons"

Kevin Pollak Kicks off Bay Street’s Comedy Showcase Series

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Comedian Kevin Pollak performs at Bay Street Theatre on Monday, June 2 at 8 p.m. Photo courtesy Bay Street Theatre.

 

By Mara Certic

The Comedy Showcase returns for its fourth year this Monday, June 2, at Bay Street Theatre in Sag Harbor. This year’s summer-long series kicks off with a performance by stand-up comedian and actor Kevin Pollak.

“We’re really excited that we were finally able to get him this year,” said Gary Hygom, Bay Street’s managing production director. “The kind of the cool thing about him is that he’s one of the few comedians who have had a huge dramatic career. Few people know that he started out as a comic.”

Known for dramatic roles in “A Few Good Men,” “Casino” and “The Usual Suspects,” Mr. Pollak started performing stand-up comedy in 1967 when he was just 10 years old. In his late teens, he started performing professionally and, after taping his first solo HBO comedy performance, Mr. Pollak was cast in “Willow,” a 1988 film directed by Ron Howard.

Mr. Pollak is known for his solid celebrity impressions, particularly his Christopher Walken, Peter Falk and William Shatner shticks.

Five years ago Mr. Pollak began “Kevin Pollak’s Chat Show,” an online talk show aired once a week. Guests such as Matthew Perry and Dana Carvey have been invited on air to play games like “The Larry King Game” –during which guests complete a series of tasks all while doing a bad Larry King impression—and “Who Tweeted”—in which guests guess the celebrity authors of embarrassing tweets.

Steve Rannazzisi will take to the Bay Street stage a few weeks later, on Monday, June 30. Mr. Rannazzisi is known for his role as Kevin on the FX show, “The League.” Mr. Rannazzisi got his break on MTV’s “Punk’d”: Ashton Kutcher’s practical joke reality television show. He has since become known for work on the comedy stage, on television and on the silver screen.

“I’m really looking forward to seeing Steve perform,” said Mr. Hygom of Mr. Rannazzisi. “I’ve never seen him live, but I’ve heard he’s just unbelievable.”

A newcomer to the showcase will be writer and comedian Heather McDonald who will continue the series the following week with a July 7 performance. Ms. McDonald has been celebrated for her writing for the late-night comedy talk show, “Chelsea Lately,” and her collaboration with the Wayans brothers on two of their feature films.

Ms. McDonald has been featured on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and has guest-starred on several prime time shows. Her 2010 book, “You’ll Never Blue Ball in This Town Again,” spent seven weeks on The New York Times best-seller list.

After his sold-out show at Bay Street last year, Bobby Collins returns to its stage on July 14. Mr. Collins performs upward of 200 stand-up bits every year and is well known for his work on VH1′s “Stand Up Spotlight.” Mr. Collins has been the warm-up act for artists such as Frank Sinatra, Dolly Parton and Cher.

Mr. Collins’s career in observational stand-up comedy began over 20 years ago, when he gave up a well-paying job at Calvin Klein to pursue his dream to make people laugh.

“I don’t like to have comedians come back and do the same material,” Mr. Hygom said. “But Bobby has such a huge repertoire, his shows always change. Everything is always new and fresh”

Maine-native Bob Marley—not to be confused with the Wailer—will perform the first of August’s comedy showcases on August 11. Mr. Marley is one of few who have performed on the entire late night talk show circuit. He has had roles in cult film favorites, such as the “Boondock Saints.”

Last in the series, Grammy- and Tony-award nominee Robert Klein returns to Bay Street on August 18 for what is expected to be another sold-out performance. Mr. Klein has received recognition for his comedy and also for his musical work on Broadway.

With over 100 appearances on “The Tonight Show and Late Show with David Letterman” to his credit, Mr. Klein got his start in comedy when he auditioned for the improvisational troupe, Second City.

Mr. Klein has released several successful comedy albums, one of which is said to have influenced comedy great Bill Crystal—who on “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” admitted to have, in his youth, decorated his apartment wall with a poster of Mr. Klein.

Bay Street Theatre will present up-and-coming comedy stars when the All-Star Comedy Showcase also returns this summer. Hosted by Joseph Vecsey, the June 9 show will also feature comics recognizable from appearances on Comedy Central, MTV and PBS.

The Comedy Showcase performances are at 8 p.m. on most Mondays throughout the summer season. Bay Street Theatre is located at 1 Bay Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, or to purchase tickets visit baystreet.org or call (631) 725-9500.

Laurie Barone-Schaefer

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Laurie Barone-Schaefer has lived in Sag Harbor for the past eight years. A professional photographer by trade, Ms. Barone-Schaefer has became a dedicated Cub Scout den mother—a job that she pours her heart into, she says. She discusses the importance of scouting and the upcoming Soap Box Derby, which will take place on Sunday, June 8. 

By Mara Certic

How did you become involved in the Cub Scouts in Sag Harbor?

Well, I have three little boys. And the organization is just absolutely wonderful for our children to be involved in, and I feel very strongly about that. And because of that I inquired about having my children join, and there was no leader available for my middle son’s age group, so I pretty much stepped up and became a leader.

Why is it that you felt so strongly about your sons joining the Scouts?

I was a Girl Scout and my brother was a Boy Scout and this is something that I just wanted my boys to be exposed to. They learn so much about the outdoors. We go on nature hikes; we go on adventures. The bonding and the lifelong friendships that are formed through the different things that we do is so amazing to see. You see them grow right before your eyes. They all have this bond that is something you can’t force, it just happens naturally. I really think that being part of the organization is a huge part of that.

 Last year’s Soap Box Derby was the first Sag Harbor had seen since the 1950s. Why did you bring it back?

Growing up, you have a lot of fond memories of your childhood, and things have changed so much even from when I was a child. All the community kids congregated outside and played and we wouldn’t go inside until the sun started to go down and it was dinnertime. And as a parent now you sit back and you see what’s going on and everything is cyber this, or cyber that. So I said, you know what? We need to get these kids back to basics. And we need to get them experiencing things outside; not driving virtual cars. We need them in those cars and experiencing it firsthand.

Who is participating in this year’s race?

Last year we had approximately 34 racers, and this year we have 42, so we have quite a substantial increase this year, which is absolutely wonderful. We’re very excited about that. Racers who did race last year are able to use their cars from last year. I know some of them are probably revamping them and giving them a fresh look, a new update. We have involved all the Scouts in Sag Harbor: Girl, Boy and Cub. We wanted to invite all the Scouts together into the event. There are two divisions this year, the Mustang division (the driver and car combined can weigh up to 150 pounds) and the Thunder Road division (for the older kids, 225 pounds combined weight).

 Are there different rules for the two divisions?

This year, the Thunder Road division don’t need to use the kit part wheels; it gives them more of an opportunity to use their creativity and have a little more fun with things. They do have a safety requirement that they need to meet, of course.

 What exactly is going to happen on June 8?

This year, we’re doing something a little different, we’re having our safety inspections and registrations down over by the Elementary School gym on Saturday, June 7, and we are going to be impounding the cars there. On Sunday, we’re starting with a parade down Main Street at 1 p.m. with the fire department, local vintage cars, trailers trailering the derby cars, and then we’ll make our way to High Street for the race. This year it is our honor to dedicate the race to Katy Stewart, whose brother is a member of Troop 455.

 How has the local community responded to the Soap Box Derby?

There’s been an outpouring of support from the community, and we just want to thank all of them. The Scouts are being embraced by their community in such a loving way. This is what they’re going to take with them when they get older, and this is what being part of a community really means. It’s a beautiful thing to see.

New Magazine Features Sag Harbor Students’ Artwork

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“Jesse Owens” by Pierson student Ana Sherwood, was created during a workshop with Push Pin Studios co-founder Reynold Ruffins.

By Mara Certic

“It really is the story of two guys,” Peter Solow said in his art room at Pierson Middle-High School this week as he flicked through the pages of RETina, a magazine displaying his students’ artwork.

“One of them was Don Reutershan, who was very much involved in helping the community. The other is this amazing man named Hobie Betts.”

The two, he explained, were responsible for the creation of the Reutershan Educational Trust, which provides support for art and architecture educational programs at the public schools in Sag Harbor. “No other school, no other place,” Mr. Solow said.

Since its creation over a decade ago, the trust has provided the Sag Harbor School District with close to $100,000 each year. Mr. Betts was an architect who started the trust in memory of his good friend, Mr. Reutershan.

Money from the trust has gone to provide Pierson students with a professional large-format printer and better materials, which allow students to transfer sketches done on note paper directly onto fine art paper and canvas.

The Reutershan Trust also provides a $10,000 scholarship every year and contributes to art department trips to Europe.

In addition to that, the trust has held a combination of workshops and projects, bringing in professional artists to work with students.

Just last week, photographer Francine Fleischer returned to Pierson to teach one of the classes. Last year, Ms. Fleisher lead a photography project with high school students, which resulted in their photographs being posted on The New York Times website and in an exhibition at the John Jermain Memorial Library.

“And so we’re getting ready for her to be coming back and work with the kids today,” Mr. Solow said on Friday.

Last year, Catalan artist Perrico Pascal was flown in—again by the trust—to put on a workshop at Pierson that he had previously taught at universities in Cairo and Tokyo.

Bailey Briggs, who graduated from Pierson last June, got to work with Mr. Pascal during this program. “He’s the kind of artist who helps you do whatever your hands are going to do; it’s painting, it’s not thinking so hard about everything,” she said of the visiting artist.

Ms. Briggs studied photography at length during her time at Pierson. From the school, she said, she learned both the fundamentals of Photoshop as well as an appreciation of the details of art, she said.

Digital printmaking and photography, wax and portrait sculpture and illustration have all been taught by visiting artists, thanks to the Reutershan Educational Trust.

“We just finished this illustration project; this was Reynold Ruffins,” Mr. Solow said about one class. “There’s a collaboration that the trust works very hard at; not to be an outside group but to work with the faculty. The trust supplements and reinforces what we do in the classroom. It doesn’t supersede it and it doesn’t replace it,” he said. Thanks to this sense of cooperation, Mr. Ruffins’s workshop was integrated into Mr. Solow’s studio art class.

“The trust is really pretty wonderful,” Mr. Solow said.  “And what we wanted to do with RETina is try to document the work that was done by the kids in trust workshops because there really wasn’t a record of it.”

RETina is a 40-page color magazine that features about two years’ worth of work produced in these classes.

Mr. Solow brought in a friend and former classmate at Cooper Union, Michael DiCanio, to design the magazine. Mr. DiCanio, a trained painter, took an interest in design in art school. To support his painting, he worked his way into the advertising world and “fell in love with the profession,” he said.

Mr. DiCanio ran a two-dimensional workshop in which students participated in the editing, layout and design processes. “We thought the need to showcase the student work would be best done by putting it between two covers,” said Mr. DiCanio.  “And that there might be further educational value in getting the kids involved in the process of creating that, too.”

Mr. DiCanio said that his class focused on brand identity, and that he made sure the students examined and considered the best “language” to express their message.

“In a way, what we are putting between two covers is Sag Harbor itself,” he said. “There is no way to oversee the organization of hundreds of paintings, drawings, prints and sculptures done by a community’s youth and not see the world as they do—their world.”

 

 

 

East End Services on Memorial Day Celebrate Those Who Served, Those Who Fell

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The color guard makes its way down Main Street during the 2013 Sag Harbor Memorial Day parade. Michael Heller photo.

The color guard makes its way down Main Street during the 2013 Sag Harbor Memorial Day parade. Michael Heller photo.

By Kathryn G. Menu

Residents across the East End will honor those men and women who died while serving in the military during this country’s wars at Memorial Day services beginning Sunday and continuing on Monday.

In Sag Harbor, remembrance will begin this Sunday, May 25, said Martin Knab, commander of the Sag Harbor American Legion Chelberg & Battle Post, as members of the Legion and the Sag Harbor VFW are joined by Sag Harbor Boy Scouts in replacing the flags on the gravestones of veterans in cemeteries throughout the village. Flags and wreaths will also be laid at the veterans memorial at North Haven Village Hall, and on the South Ferry Lt. Joseph Theinert, named for the Shelter Island resident who perished in Afghanistan in June 2010. A flag will also be placed at the 1812 memorial on High Street in Sag Harbor, said Mr. Knab.

On Memorial Day—Monday, May 26— veterans, government officials and scouts will begin the Memorial Day Parade at the World War I monument at Otter Pond at 9 a.m. to lay a wreath, and march down Main Street to the Civil War monument to do the same before stopping in front of the Municipal Building and the Lance Corporal Jordan C. Haerter Veterans Memorial Bridge. The parade will continue to Bay Street and to Marine Park, stopping at the village’s memorials to those who fought and died in World War II, the Vietnam War and the Korean War. Both Mr. Knab and Sag Harbor VFW Commander Roger King will speak, as will James Larocca, a Sag Harbor resident and veteran who has dedicated much of his life to public service.

Residents will be invited back to the Legion for refreshments and hot dogs, said Mr. Knab.

Sag Harbor will not be alone in celebrating and honoring fallen soldiers.

On Sunday, May 25, the Montauk Veterans and Service Club will host its annual Montauk Memorial Day parade at noon, beginning at Kirk Park and moving east through Montauk to the village green. On Monday, May 26, beginning at 9 a.m. the annual Bridgehampton Memorial Day service will be held at the war monument at the corner of Ocean Road and Montauk Highway, hosting by the Veterans of Foreign Wars and the American Legion, Nathaniel Howell Topping Post 580. Members of the Bridgehampton Fire Department and the Bridgehampton School band will also be on hand for the ceremonies. The Village of Southampton Commission on Veterans Patriotic Events will host its Memorial Day service on Monday starting at 11 a.m. at Agawam Park, after a brief parade at 10:45 a.m. starting at the First Presbyterian Church and heading down Jobs Lane to the park.

 

 

 

Walking with Women in Sag Harbor

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Mrs. Russell Sage is responsible for building Mashashimuet Park, Pierson Middle-High School and John Jermain Memorial Library. 

 

By Mara Certic

As you walk down the streets of Sag Harbor, its history is palpable. Treading in the footsteps of sea captains, authors and artists past, you pass buildings on Main Street that date to the 1770s. The histories of Mashashimuet Park, Pierson High School and the John Jermain Memorial Library share one thing in common: they were all funded and built in the first 10 years of the 20th century, by a woman.

“It was so unusual then for a private, independent benefactress to pay for those municipal buildings,” said Tony Garro, who along with Annette Hinkle, hosts a women’s history walking tour of Sag Harbor on Thursday, May 22, sponsored by the League of Women Voters.

Mr. Garro moved to Sag Harbor shortly after retiring from his teaching job of over 30 years in the Massapequa School District. His love of history quickly had him enamored of Sag Harbor. “A little town with this much history is just incredible,” he said. A combination of research, curiosity and long walks led him to start leading historic walking tours in the village. “I thought to myself, instead of putting together a walk in the woods, it would be great to start a walk in Sag Harbor.”

When Mr. Garro first began his tours, they tended to be more generic. The tour would begin at Mashashimuet Park and would continue down Main Street, pausing to look at and learn about some of the historic houses along the street. Continued research prompted Mr. Garro to look into doing themed walks.

A maritime tour during HarborFest one year was his first venture into the world of specialized historical tours.

“But I had an idea for a woman’s tour, and a man leading a woman’s tour doesn’t have too much credibility,” he said. So Mr. Garro brought on writer, Annette Hinkle. Since then, the two have formed “Sag Harbor Sidewalks” and plan to offer tours through the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum this summer.

This Thursday’s tour will explore the homes of four women who played major roles in history, both local and on the larger stage.

Margaret Olivia Slocum Sage, who even today is still most often referred to as Mrs. Russell Sage, did not live in Sag Harbor, or own a home in the village, until she was 74 years old. When her reportedly tight-fisted husband died in 1906, she inherited a fortune estimated at over $50 million to be used at her own discretion.

Mrs. Sage spent the rest of her life spending that money, supporting education, programs for women and also several “pet projects,” including Sag Harbor. As a descendant of both Abraham Pierson and Major John Jermain, she named the school and library that she built after them, respectively.

“She didn’t grow up here, she grew up in Syracuse, but she almost had an unrealistic romanticism about Sag Harbor because her grandmother had grown up here, and I guess she had regaled her with stories of Sag Harbor when she was younger,” Ms. Hinkle said.

In 1912 Mrs. Sage left Sag Harbor never to return. From 1908 until she left, she lived in the Huntting House, where the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum is now located, and where this tour of Sag Harbor begins.

Another stop on the tour is the former home of the feminist pioneer Betty Friedan, author of “The Feminine Mystique,” whose family still owns the house.

“But it’s not just the Betty Friedans that we look at,” said Mr. Garro, mentioning the lesser-known women whose lives are explored on the Sag Harbor Sidewalks tour.

One of the houses the tour will visit was home to Annie Cooper Boyd. At the age of 15, she began keeping a diary, which has since been published. Her writings offer an intimate look into what it was like for a “wild child” to grow up in Sag Harbor in the end of the 19th century.

“She was really trying to be a free spirit in a society that didn’t reward women for being free spirits. On her 17th birthday she talks about not being able to climb trees—at least in her front yard—anymore.”

Annie Cooper Boyd was an artist as well, painting wherever she could—including on the walls of her Sag Harbor home, now home to the Sag Harbor Historical Society and open to the public.

In her artwork, “you can see some really cool views of Sag Harbor that don’t exist anymore,” said Ms. Hinkle. Mr. Garro added “She, in essence, became a historian of Sag Harbor through her art.”

Also included on the tour is the former home of Nelson Algren. “I mean obviously not to talk about Nelson, really.” Mr. Garro said. The tour stops at the Glover Street house because of a torrid love affair the writer had with one of the most celebrated feminists and philosophers of the 20th century, Simone de Beauvoir.

Just a few yards away, on the corner of Glover and Green Streets, is what Mr. Garro refers to as an old “Sag Harbor B&B—a bar and brothel.”

“In the end, it all comes back to the economics, women doing what they had to do to survive,” Ms. Hinkle said.

 Sag Harbor Sidewalks will be putting on themed tours throughout the summer, including maritime tours, cemetery tours and their popular haunted house tours. For more information call the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum at (631) 725-0770.

Sag Harbor Village to Target Illegal Rentals

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By Mara Certic

Like all municipalities on the South Fork, contending with overcrowding, parking and noise from share houses or illegal short-term rentals in the Sag Harbor is a challenge. But according to village attorney Denise Schoen it is not a challenge the village will take lightly this summer.

Rental-by-owner websites such as VRBO, AirBnB and HomeAway have hundreds of houses to rent in Sag Harbor Village; many of which offer rentals for very short periods of time and claim to offer sleeping arrangements for a worrying number of people, according to Ms. Schoen.

In the village, it is illegal to rent a home in short-term capacity, Ms. Schoen said this week. Although there is no specific provision defining the minimum length of stay allowed for a renter, the occupancy of houses in the village must be “permanent, or tantamount to permanent,” according to the village code.

“If we’re able to prove by presenting enough facts to a judge that they’re renting the house on a short-term basis, they are going to automatically fall outside the permitted use of the zone,” Ms. Schoen said.

Ms. Schoen said those who rent their houses for the full summer season do not have to worry that they are operating outside the law. “Obviously, Sag Harbor is a resort community,” she said. But short-term rentals, she added, can be very disruptive within a community.

“There’s no control over quality-of-life issues for neighbors, ” said Ms. Schoen, noting anonymous complaints have already been logged with the village about these kinds of rentals.

This week, of the 183 houses advertised on one rent-by-owner website, only 25 of them had a minimum rental period of 30 days or more— with many offering a two-night minimum stay during certain parts of the season.

East Hampton and Southampton Towns both have specific rental provisions in their codes. Southampton does not allow rentals for a period of less than 14 days. The law in East Hampton is slightly different, stating that a single-family residence may only be rented out for a period shorter than 14 days three times within a six-month period.

Ms. Schoen said that believes that adopting a specific rental law in Sag Harbor might be a way to buck the disturbing rental trend.

A provision in the village code allows for private homes to run bed-and-breakfasts within Sag Harbor’s residential zones if a permit is issued by the village planning board. In those cases there are many restrictions, such as a limit of four guests at one time, and a two-night maximum stay.

However, few of the two-or three-night rentals listed on rent-by owner websites fell under the B&B criteria. One house “two minutes from the center of town” charges more than $1,000 a night throughout the summer season and claims to sleep 13, despite stating that it has only three bedrooms.

Ms. Schoen said she is most concerned about overcrowding in the smaller houses within the central village area. Not only is this a matter of legality and quality-of-life, but there are also health and safety concerns.

A particularly worrying discovery on these rental websites is that quite a few of the houses are advertised as having cottages. “How many of those cottages are legal? And if they’re not legal, I’m even more concerned about the health and safety issues because that means they don’t have a C of O for sleeping,” she said.

The fear is that the detached structures might not have fire protection; the “cottages” are “built differently than other houses; they burn faster,” said Ms. Schoen, who has been a volunteer with the Sag Harbor Ambulance Corps for over a decade. The worry in a village as small as this one is that a fire on one property could quickly spread to another.

Although no official complaints have been logged with the village clerk in the last year, more than one anonymous grievance has been made to officials about rentals causing garbage, parking and noise problems.

“It was very hard for [these neighbors] to enjoy their backyards anymore because it was just constant parties because it was a different group of people every week,” Ms. Schoen said.

Building Inspector Tim Platt has had some success writing letters and stopping illegal “party rentals” in the summer season, when houses are rented out for one-night only for blowout celebrations, like prom. When a homeowner is cited by the village for an illegal rental, their only recourse to fight the charge is in Sag Harbor Village Justice Court.

The part-time code enforcement officer in the summer has focused more in the past on problems of overcrowdings in the business district. Ms. Schoen said that the lack of this resource might be why “the word isn’t out there that there’s a possibility you could be cited; there’s no fear on anyone’s part.”

Ms. Schoen urged residents to inform the building department if they are concerned that illegal, or dangerous, rentals are going in Sag Harbor. “We will take complaints very seriously,” she said. “So if a neighbor sees a situation where a short-term rental is taking place, especially in overcrowding situations, they should call down to village hall, to the building department, and we’ll check it out.

 

Paula Poundstone Opens Saturday Night Comedy This Weekend at Bay Street Theatre

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Comedian Paula Poundstone will open a series of special Saturday night comedy performances at Sag Harbor’s Bay Street Theatre on May 24 at 8 p.m.

Richard Lewis will take the stage June 21, and audiences can spend “A Divine Evening with Charles Busch,” accompanied by Tom Judson July 26.

Ms. Poundstone is a regular panelist on NPR’s rascal of a weekly news quiz show, “Wait, Wait … Don’t Tell Me,” and is known in her decades long career in stand-up for her ability to be spontaneous with a crowd.

“No two shows I do are the same,” said Ms. Poundstone. “It’s not that I don’t repeat material. I do. My shows, when they’re good, and I like to think they often are, are like a cocktail party. When you first get there, you talk about how badly you got lost and how hard it was to find parking. Then you tell a story about your kids or what you just saw on the news. You meet some new people and ask them about themselves.  Then, someone says, ‘Tell that story you used to tell,’ and then someone on the other side of the room spills a drink, and you mock them.  No one ever applauds me when I leave a party, though. I think they high five.”

For more information, or to reserve tickets, visit baystreet.org. 

A Whale of a Show Comes Back to Sag Harbor

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“Sag Harbor Sleigh Ride”, Graphite, colored pencil, acrylic and collage on canvas by Edward Holland of New York City.

 

By Mara Certic

Sag Harbor residents Peter Marcelle and Dan Rizzie proposed a challenge to 17 local artists: Create a piece of art inspired by Sag Harbor’s favorite sea creature and mascot, the whale.

Returning for its second summer, A Whale of a Show, featuring paintings and sculptures, kicks off the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum’s “Salt Air Exhibition II” series with an opening on Friday evening.

Mr. Rizzie approached Mr. Marcelle about curating last year’s show in an effort to raise money for the museum, which was badly in need of restoration.

“I think I came up with the whale of a show and Dan came up with the title,” Mr. Marcelle said. The aim, he explained, was to both raise money to renovate the museum building and give local artists an opportunity to showcase their work.

Money earned through the proceeds from the art sales last year went toward repainting the old building.

“I get a huge smile on my face every time I drive by it and see it painted. I mean it got more than a facelift. It really looks magnificent,” said Mr. Rizzie.

The show returns this year with six new artists in an effort to fund further restoration at the museum.

The artists “all have something to do with the town: they either live here or have a home here—that’s sort of the basic requirement” said Mr. Rizzie, who, for this year’s show, created “North Haven Whale,” which he described as being something between a painting and a sculpture.

“We’re so lucky to be as rich as we are with artists in Sag Harbor; curating a show like this is such a thrill,” he said.

Returning artists Eric Fischl and Donald Sultan both coincidentally painted orcas on paper this year. “They both did killer whales, and they’re both killer artists,” said Mr. Rizzie. Mr. Sultan’s whale has also been made into a t-shirt which will be available for purchase at the museum.

Award-winning cartoonist Gahan Wilson has created a work on paper for the show, which Mr. Rizzie said is sure to feature his trademark humor.

Co-founder of Push Pin Studios, Reynold Ruffins will also offer his interpretation of a whale again this year.  Veteran artists Paul Davis and James McMullan—who has designed more than 40 posters for Lincoln Center—have also returned to support the whaling museum.

“What we really do is try and bring new people in; it’s really exciting when you get new blood,” said Mr. Rizzie of the six new artists participating this year.

Abstract artist Edward Holland said he jumped at the chance. “When Peter approached me and asked me to be involved I absolutely said yes,” he said.

The New York City-based artist, whose paintings all feature heavy collage elements, has been coming to the East End for over a decade. “I’ve always enjoyed Sag Harbor and the area,” he said.

Recognizing a whale in Mr. Holland’s work might be difficult: a collage on canvas with acrylic, colored pencil and graphite, “Sag Harbor Sleigh Ride” is a “very loose” deconstructed map of the town, according to the artist. “I was reading and doing research about Sag Harbor, and what kept coming up was community involvement and how linked the industry was to the town,” he said. “I thought about doing a whale, but I figured that territory would be mined by different people. I wanted to focus on the town and the geographical location a little bit more.”

Mr. Holland’s piece is steeped in historical details and accents. The artist chose media specifically to evoke ideas of whaling and the sea, including an entry on Herman Melville from a 1913 Encyclopedia Britannica. The dominant white and gray hues in the center of the painting are an allusion to the thrashing of water after a whale is harpooned.

The title of his work makes reference to this as well: Mr. Holland explained that whalers referred to the violent aftermath of freshly harpooned whale trying to break free of the whaling boat as a “Nantucket Sleigh Ride.”

“I repurposed it here for Sag Harbor,” Mr. Holland said. “No doubt whalers of this town experienced the same violent drag.”

The opening reception for A Whale of a Show will take place Friday, May 23, from 6 to 8 p.m. The exhibition will be on view at the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum until Wednesday, June 18. For more information visit sagharborwhalingmuseum.org. or call (631) 725-0770.

Finney Comes Forward as $20 Million Lotto Winner

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Southampton Hospital orderly Cameron Finney, 48, of Mastic, came forward last Thursday, May 16 at the New York Lottery’s Plainview Center as the winner of a $20 million Mega Millions jackpot.

Mr. Finney, who won the jackpot in a March 25 drawing, claimed his winnings Thursday, which amounts to $7.4 million after state and tax withholdings.

According to a release issued by the New York Lottery, Mr. Finney had been out for a chicken dinner at Popeye’s the evening of the drawing when he made a last-minute decision to go next door for a lottery ticket, spending just $4. The next day, while buying breakfast, Mr. Finney swiped his ticket and saw the “Big Winner” message. The ticket was sold at a gas station in Coram.

Mr. Finney collected his winnings with his wife, Donna, and daughter, Christina.

Former East Hampton Town Judge Forced to Pay $1 Million

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By Mara Certic

In an April 21 decision, New York State Supreme Court Justice Paul J. Baisley Jr. ordered former East Hampton Town Justice Catherine Cahill to pay back over $1 million of funds her late husband, Marvin Hyman, an attorney, had deposited into their personal joint account from a land sale shortly before his death in December 2005.

Under the decision, Ms. Cahill, the first woman to serve on the town’s justice court, must pay $1,045,400 plus interest to Nelson Gerard, her late husband’s former partner in Buckskill Farm, LLC.

In June 2003, Mr. Hyman and Mr. Gerard created the limited liability corporation and purchased a 9.6-acre parcel of vacant land in East Hampton. According to court records, Mr. Gerard contributed $2 million and Mr. Hyman $350,000 toward the purchase.

According to a civil suit brought by Mr. Gerard, the agreement between Mr. Hyman and Mr. Gerard required Mr. Hyman to “take all steps necessary or desirable at his own cost and expense” to get a subdivision of the parcel into as many as eight lots, including a required agricultural preserve, approved by the East Hampton Town Planning Board.

In the agreement, several different distribution scenarios were offered depending on how many lots the town permitted in the subdivision. If only four or five lots and a reserve area were allowed, all the lots were to be owned by Mr. Gerard, with Mr. Hyman receiving only the reserve area. In February 2004, Mr. Hyman wrote to Mr. Gerard stating that a proposed eight-lot subdivision plan had been submitted for approval and also mentioning that the town had shown interest in buying four of the lots as well as the agricultural reserve area—leaving Buckskill Farm, LLC with just four smaller lots.

In his letter, Mr. Hyman wrote, “if we continue to pursue the town purchase we should discuss the financial implications on the members that such a purchase would have. As we did not consider this possibility in the original agreement, we should address the same as soon as possible.”

According to Mr. Gerard’s suit, he offered his partner the option of receiving either $850,000 or one of the remaining four lots in exchange for his share of the LLC. Mr. Hyman presented Mr. Gerard with a proposed contract that would leave Buckskill Farm, LLC with the southern four lots of the property. For $1.9 million, the town would buy the remaining 6.8-acre area through a Community Preservation Fund purchase—all of which eventually became known as the agricultural reserved area – to lease to an organic farmer.

During the time of the town purchase, Ms. Cahill was serving as a town justice. She served on the bench for 20 years before retiring from the position last year.

In September 2005, Mr. Hyman closed the sale with the town, without his partner’s knowledge, according to Mr. Gerard’s suit. He deposited the money into the LLC’s bank account and then “drew a check on the Buckskill Farm account for virtually the entire amount of the sale proceeds, payable to himself, which he alone signed, and then deposited into a joint account he maintained with his wife, Catherine Cahill,” the suit states.

Shortly before his death, Mr. Hyman testified that he had thought, based on the operating agreement, that he was to receive all of the proceeds “because the operating agreement provided for him to receive the reserve area in a five or four-lot subdivision.”

The court ruled, however, that Mr. Hyman had adopted a “self-serving interpretation of the agreement.”

When Mr. Hyman died in 2005, Ms. Cahill inherited the case along with her husband’s estate. During a sworn deposition she invoked spousal privilege when asked questions about her husband’s business agreements, later waiving that right in trial. The court agreed with Mr. Gerard that “it is improper for a party to obstruct discovery by the assertion of a privilege at a deposition only to waive it and subject the opponent to surprise testimony at trial.”

The court found both Ms. Cahill’s deposition and trial testimonies “as a whole to be not credible,” in particular, her stated ignorance regarding certain matters “fully within the comprehension of any lawyer or judge.”

Ms. Cahill has been ordered pay Mr. Gerard 9 percent interest on the $1,045,400. Her attorney, Stephen Angel, of Riverhead, could not be reached for comment by this paper’s deadline.