Tag Archive | "Katy Graves"

Local Leaders Accept Sag Harbor Express’s Ice Bucket Challenge

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County Legislator Jay Schneiderman and Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves accepted an ice bucket challenge issued by the Sag Harbor Express, which was dutifully administered by School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi and Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols on Friday, August 22. Photos courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

County Legislator Jay Schneiderman and Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves accepted an ice bucket challenge issued by the Sag Harbor Express, which was dutifully administered by School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi and Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols on Friday, August 22. Photos courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

By Tessa Raebeck

After being issued an ALS ice bucket challenge by the Times Review, Sag Harbor Express co-publishers Kathryn and Gavin Menu and consultant and publisher emeritus Bryan Boyhan boldly accepted the challenge on Thursday, August 21. View the video here.

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Mr. Thiele, who was allegedly out of town Friday, accepted the challenge in Marine Park on a beautiful morning Wednesday, August 27. Photo by Mara Certic.

While trying to hide their fear awaiting the buckets–aptly distributed by our intern, Sam Mason-Jones–the publishers challenged some local heavy-hitters: Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves and New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr.

At the top of Pierson Hill on Friday, August 22, Mr. Schneiderman and Ms. Graves were doused with buckets of ice water–much to the delight of their respective staffs. In the district less than a month, new School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi selflessly accepted the opportunity to dump ice on Mr. Schneiderman, while Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols soaked Ms. Graves with a smile on his face. A full video recording of that endeavor is available here.

 

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New Athletics Director for Sag Harbor a Veteran of Pierson’s Fields

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Social studies teacher Donnelly McGovern was appointed as Sag Harbor's athletics director on Monday, August 25. Photo courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

Social studies teacher Donnelly McGovern was appointed as Sag Harbor’s athletics director on Monday, August 25. Photo courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

By Tessa Raebeck

The Sag Harbor School Board appointed Sag Harbor teacher and coach Donnelly McGovern as the district’s new director of athletics, health, wellness, personnel and supervisor of physical education on Monday, August 25.

Mr. McGovern has taught middle, high school and college-level social studies classes at Pierson Middle/High School for the past 20 years. He has also worked in the past as an assistant principal and as an athletics coach for boys’ varsity soccer.

Mr. McGovern will continue as a teacher while also acting as athletics director part-time. Starting Tuesday, September 2, he will act as an athletics director for 60-percent of his work week and as a social studies teacher for the remaining 40 percent.

He is being paid at his Sag Harbor salary as a teacher, which is $130,466, with an additional stipend of $15,378. Mr. McGovern, who is certified as a school district administrator, will serve a three-year probationary term that ends September 1, 2017.

Mr. McGovern is filling the position left open by Todd Gulluscio’s resignation in May. After less than two years in the position, Mr. Gulluscio accepted an administrative post in the school district on his native Shelter Island. Since longtime athletic director Nick DeCillis left in 2007, the board has struggled to hold onto an athletic director; there have been six ,including Mr. Gulluscio, in the seven years since.

“I am extremely happy to continue working with the students and families at Pierson and Sag Harbor,” Mr. McGovern said in a press release.

“Donnelly McGovern has been an outstanding member of our faculty and we are confident that his level of character and dedication to our students will benefit everyone in our school community,” said Superintendent Katy Graves. “After an extensive search and interview process, we determined that the best candidate for the job was already a member of the Sag Harbor family.”

“The board,” added board president Theresa Samot, “is thrilled to appoint Donnelly McGovern as the district’s athletic director. Mr. McGovern’s leadership skills, as well as his wealth of experience building athletic programs, make him an excellent asset to our district.”

Also on Monday, the school board created the administrative position of director of physical education and appointed Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols to fill that position as part of his regular duties.

“What will be happening is Donnelly McGovern will be doing all the supervising of the K through 12 physical education programs” and make recommendations to Mr. Nichols on anything that has to be reported to the New York State Department of Education, Ms. Graves said Tuesday.

Although Mr. McGovern will be doing all of the supervising of the physical education programs, a person with physical education certification, which Mr. McGovern does not yet have, needs to be responsible for reporting anything to the state. Mr. Nichols volunteered to take over those duties without extra pay.

“So, Donnelly will make recommendations to him and Jeff will do all the reporting to New York State cause he has appropriate certifications,” Ms. Graves explained. “So, it was nice cooperative work on his part to make sure we got the best man on the job.”

New Superintendent Katy Graves Discusses Her Vision for Sag Harbor

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The Sag Harbor School Board welcomed the district's new superintendent at its meeting April 23. From left: Board members Daniel Hartnett and David Diskin, Superintendent Katy Graves, board member Susan Kinsella, President Theresa Samot, board member Sandi Kruel, Vice President Chris Tice and board member Mary Anne Miller. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

The Sag Harbor School Board welcomed the district’s new superintendent at its meeting April 23. From left: Board members Daniel Hartnett and David Diskin, Superintendent Katy Graves, board member Susan Kinsella, President Theresa Samot, board member Sandi Kruel, Vice President Chris Tice and board member Mary Anne Miller. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

When searching for a new job last year, Katy Graves saw more than 70 superintendent positions available, but she only applied to one: Sag Harbor.

“Absolutely what piqued my interest was the size of the community and the size of the school,” Ms. Graves said Monday.

Sag Harbor’s new superintendent of schools, who will begin a three-year contract on July 1 at an initial annual salary of $215,000, said she applied to Sag Harbor “because it’s what I know. I know small towns.”

Ms. Graves’s current district, the Stamford Central School District in the Catskill Mountains, is a small rural school district with one school building housing about 370 students in pre-k through 12th grade.

Sag Harbor is larger than Stamford, with a proposed enrollment of 1,030 for the 2014-15 school year, but offers the tight-knit community she was searching for.

“I really wanted small, because in a small district, you still have the connection with children,” she said. “And I think for real school improvement and to get every student to their personal best, you need that connection with children. You really need to have that real interaction between mom and dad and the family and be at concerts and be at ball games.”

Ms. Graves, a mother of four with one child with special needs, has served in public schools as a teacher, administrator and board member during her career in education.

Dr. Carl Bonuso, interim superintendent for the past two school years, will pass the reins to Ms. Graves and provide guidance during the transition.

“Sag Harbor obviously has been a very strong school district that has great ties to the community and what my number-one goal is is to listen and learn initially,” said Ms. Graves. “I’m going to work on getting to know the administrative team, getting to know the community, getting to know the teachers and the staff and especially getting to know the students, because you don’t ever want to go in and fix something that’s not broken. And sometimes the things that work the best in the school district aren’t seen to a new leader.”

Prior to joining the Stamford district in 2012, for four years Ms. Graves served as assistant superintendent for the Windham-Ashland-Jewett Central School District in Windham, a rural resort community upstate with a population of less than 2,000.

She was also principal of the Otego Elementary School, assistant principal and placement coordinator for ONC (Otsego Northern Catskills) BOCES and a home economics teacher for 12 years.

One school, which Ms. Graves chose not to name, had just been placed on the state education department’s Schools in Need of Improvement list and was ranked as the county’s lowest performing school when she entered the district.

“You don’t want to make radical changes,” she said, “but I worked with the staff to say, ‘Hey, we have [two years to get off the list], let’s work as a team, let’s work together—what is working and where do we see parts that are fragile?’”

By looking at where the district was doing well and building on those successes, Ms. Graves said she and her team had the school not only off of the list, but also ranked as the highest performing school in the county’s 19 districts.

Ms. Graves uses an asset-based approach, where, rather than focusing solely on the problem areas, administrators look for a school’s strengths and build upon them.

The new superintendent has a certificate of advanced graduate study in educational leadership, a master’s degree in health science education and a bachelor of science degree in home economics and clinical dietetics.

“My first week in the classroom, I just knew I loved it. It didn’t mean I was great at it right away, but I just loved it, I loved working with the kids, I loved the atmosphere,” she said.

The international baccalaureate , currently being expanded in Sag Harbor, is not offered at Stamford, but Ms. Graves said she is familiar with it.

“It’s great because it gives students a global perspective and it gives them an opportunity to think about their thinking and, of course, it also builds in the community service piece, which I really love,” she said.

“I found that students really thrived doing volunteer work and really got to ‘Velcro’ to community members and that community members got to see students in a different light,” she said of her early work as a Key Club advisor, adding that as an administrator, she always tries to ensure kids are doing volunteer work.

Of the Common Core curriculum, an issue of much debate across the state, Ms. Graves said, “It has excellent pieces, but how it was introduced was just a huge burden for our teachers and for our school districts… and it made it hard to defend… and then it was being evaluated at the same time it was being introduced, so I think that made it very, very sad.”

Under Ms. Graves’s direction, Stamford has not had to pierce the state tax cap on the property taxes a school district can levy, in part because it worked with the neighboring Jefferson Central School District.

“We’re sharing managements between the two school districts, we’re sharing teachers, we’re sharing bus runs, we’re doing a lot of sharing so that we have been able to step back from piercing the tax cap,” she said.

In addition to hosting office hours for community members to come meet her when she comes to Sag Harbor, Ms. Graves intends to go out to specific stakeholders in the community and meet with them.

“You go to the parades, you go to the events in town and you just make yourself available to talk to folks so they know who you are,” she said.

One way she makes herself visible to students is by going around to all the classrooms and introducing herself as the person who decides snow days.

“Once the kids know that you have a job, that you decide snow days, they will introduce you to their grandparents and their parents in the community,” said Ms. Graves, adding she wants everyone to feel comfortable “approaching you and talking to you and getting to know you.”

 

Katy Graves Named Sag Harbor School District Superintendent

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The new Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves will begin her term July 1.

By Tessa Raebeck & Kathryn G. Menu

Katy Graves was named the new superintendent of the Sag Harbor School District by a unanimous vote of the school board Wednesday night.

Ms. Graves, who will begin work on July 1, received a three-year contract and will be paid an annual salary of $215,000.  Ms. Graves is currently the superintendent of the Stamford Central School District near Albany.

“We were able to come up with an overwhelming decision that the candidate we’re presenting tonight is the perfect superintendent for the Sag Harbor School District,” said board president Theresa Samot while introducing Ms. Graves at Wednesday night’s meeting.

According to Ms. Samot, School Leadership—the firm hired to conduct the search for the new superintendent—brought together 150 people in focus groups, and collected 50 completed online surveys to help it define criteria in its nationwide search.

A total of 55 applications from across the country were filed with School Leadership during the search. Those candidates were screened and the field was narrowed to six finalists. Following interviews with all six candidates, Ms. Samot said the selection of Ms. Graves was unanimous by the board.

“Selecting a superintendent is one of the most important responsibilities of any board of education,” said Ms. Samot in a press release issued after Ms. Graves’s appointment. “After an extensive and thorough search, Ms. Graves was selected from among a pool of more than 55 highly competent candidates. We are extremely confident that she possesses the professional vision, administrative experience, character and interpersonal communication skills to successfully lead our school district to the next level of success.”

“During our interview process, it quickly became apparent that Katy was the clear choice as our next superintendent,” continued Ms. Samot. “Her professionalism, experience, engaging personality and enthusiasm to work with our administrators, staff, parents and community residents to ensure that all of our students reach their highest potential were important qualifications identified by our stakeholders.”

“I would like to thank the board of education for their vote of confidence,” said Ms. Graves. “I look forward to working with the administrators, staff, students and their families and community residents. Together, I am confident we can achieve an even greater level of excellence for all students. I’m also anxious to meet with students and hear about their goals for the future.”

“Thank you to Dr. [Carl] Bonuso for creating a learning environment where everyone works together for the common good of all students,” she added.

Prior to serving in her current position in Stamford, Ms. Graves was the assistant superintendent of curriculum and instruction at the Windham-Ashland-Jewett Central School District. She possesses a certificate of Advanced Graduate Study in school leadership from Massachusetts College of Liberal Arts, a master of science degree in health education from Sage Graduate School, and a bachelor of science in home economics/clinical dietetics from the State University of New York at Oneonta.

Ms. Graves will replace interim superintendent Dr. Bonuso, who has served the district for the past two years, beginning in the summer of 2012. Dr. Bonuso replaced Superintendent Dr. John Gratto, who resigned in July 2012.

According to Ms. Samot, Ms. Graves has already rented a home in Sag Harbor to become better acquainted with the community.