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Flying Point Opens a Location for Women and Kids

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by Emily J. Weitz

Surf. Skate. Snow. Flying Point has taken care of all things boarding since Mark Zucchero first opened his doors in 1996 in Southampton. In 2007, he and his wife Shannon took the business to Main Street in Sag Harbor. Last year, they opened a second location in Southampton, and now they’re following suit with a spacious new Sag Harbor store devoted to the boarding needs of women and children.

It was always on Shannon’s mind to open a women’s store, says Kelly Flaherty, manager of the new space and Shannon’s sister.

“My brother-in-law focused more on menswear, and when Shannon came on board she always dreamt of having a women’s store,” said Flaherty. “In Southampton, she opened the women’s and kids’ store, and it was really successful. Now the merchandise gets the proper attention and space. This is a much larger space, but we’re following the same model.”

The lessons and outings and boards that Flying Point has always offered are still available through either location. But this new space will sell everything that goes with them, specifically for women and kids.

Flaherty says that her brother in law “always says you’re selling the lifestyle. Everybody wants the clothes that go along with it. You sell a handful of boards but a ton of apparel and footwear and stuff like that.”

It’s the apparel and footwear and stuff like that that has taken over the bright new space a few stores up from the original Flying Point. With the edge of the adventurer’s lifestyle at its roots, it’s more of a boutique than anything else. But it’s one of the biggest boutiques in Sag Harbor, with a massive range of offerings.

“We carry everything from Roxy all the way up to Melissa Odabash,” says Flaherty. “We sell everything from a $16 T-shirt  to a $350 cover-up.”

The merchandise also ranges from infant onesies to yoga clothes and apparel with cuts for mature women.

“A lot of surf companies only offer junior cuts,” explains Flaherty. “Now we’ve been filling in the gaps for women’s cuts. It’s not so junior: real women can wear the clothes. We have Hardtail, Free People, Super Dry and lots of other brands that women are looking for.”

One of the brands Flying Point has carried from the start, which has exploded into a hugely successful company, is Tom’s Shoes. Designed to be super simple and comfortable, Tom’s has always operated under a one-for-one philosophy: For every pair of Tom’s you buy, the company gives a pair of shoes to a child in need.

“We are one of the biggest retailers on the East Coast for Tom’s,” says Flaherty. “We got involved with the company early, and this is one of the only places you can get them out here. Now Tom’s has expanded to offer different styles, like wedges, and they’ll be coming out with ballet flats in the spring.”

They’ve also expanded to sell sunglasses, and for every pair you buy, a pair of glasses or an eye exam is given to a person in need.

“Any time we see something that is socially conscious we get more excited about it,” says Flaherty. “In Sag Harbor a lot of people support that kind of business.”

Other socially conscious brands they’ll be carrying in the store include Histoire, whose baby onesies say things like “I Will Make a Difference” and “Read to Me.” When you buy one, a book is donated to a child.

“We also have Bobbles,” says Flaherty, “which are BPA free and help reduce plastics.”

A lot of what Flaherty and her sister and brother-in-law hope to do is fill a void on Main Street.

“There isn’t a lot of kids’ clothing or footwear available in Sag Harbor,” says Flaherty. “Whatever we see that the customer needs or what’s lacking, we’re investing there.”

Flaherty got involved with the family business about four years ago, working as a manager. She believes that the family-oriented mentality of the owners is at the heart of the business.

“Everybody who works here feels like family,” she says. “We fly everybody including the high school kids who work here down to Florida for the trade show. We want to keep it a family business.”