Tag Archive | "Ken O’Donnell"

Trustees Want to Squeeze in More Parking Spaces

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A boat on a trailer, taking up more than two spaces, was stored in the Sag Harbor long-term parking lot on Bridge Street recently. Photo by Ken O’Donnell. 

By Stephen J. Kotz

As summer approaches, parking spaces in Sag Harbor Village become about as esay to find as an affordable rental. Cars wait for spaces to open on Main Street, forcing traffic to back up for a block or more. Or they circle various municipal lots in a futile search for an opening, while traffic control officers, their chalk sticks and ticket books at the ready, wait.

Sag Harbor Village Trustee Robby Stein, whose office looks out from above the Yoga Shanti over the main municipal lot behind Meadow and Bridge streets, said about two years ago, he began ruminating on ways to increase the number of parking spaces in the limited area available in the business district.

Recently, he joined forces with Trustee Ken O’Donnell to examine whether the long-term lot, sometimes called the Gas Ball lot, could be turned over to a private parking company that would post an attendant there and try to maximize parking by charging a $5 fee for 24-hour parking.

“If we’re not aware of it today, everyone will be aware of it in two weeks when the kids get out of school that the village has a parking problem,” Mr. O’Donnell said this week.

Mr. Stein said the two trustees spoke to Advance Parking, which manages parking lots and runs event parking, and it suggested leaving one row of the gas ball lot for resident 24-hour parking and allowing it to “stack” cars into spaces as a way to maximize the number of cars that could be fit in.

Mr. Stein said the company thinks it could squeeze another 40 to 60 vehicles into the lot, and because it would turn over $1 for every $5 it earns, the village could earn “several thousands of dollars a week” at the peak season.

“I pass the gas ball every day on my way to work,” said Mr. O’Donnell, and it is not being properly used.” He reported seeing an RV parked in the lot for months last winter, and more recently photographed a boat on a trailer that had been left there.

But the plan, which the trustees brought before the village board on June 10, received a lukewarm reception at best, with Mayor Brian Gilbride saying the village would have to write up an official request for proposals before it could even begin thinking about implementing the idea.

Then, he said, it would have to clear the idea with National Grid, which leases the property for a pittance to the village on a year-to-year basis.

Nada Barry, a regular at board meetings and an owner of the Wharf Shop toy store on Main Street, said the proposal would cause a nightmare for employees who struggle as it is to find parking.

“I like them thinking out of the box,” she said on Wednesday, “but I don’t think that’s the solution.”

Although the trustees raised the idea of providing village businesses with a set number of parking passes, Ms. Barry said that would not be feasible for a business like hers that has a large staff of part-time employees coming and going.

Besides, she said, she doubted the village would make much money out of the arrangement.

What the village should do, she said, is better spread the gravel and mark the individual spaces in the gas ball lot, which would make it a more efficient use of space.

Mr. Stein said he is not giving up on the idea and was waiting for village attorney Fred W. Thiele Jr. to find out from National Grid what it would think of the village turning the lot into a revenue generator.

“It’s just one idea,” he said, adding that “Sag Harbor has always had a parking problem” and he was not ready to throw in the towel.

In the meantime, he said, he would continue to search for ways to maximize parking in the village lot, including the lot outside his window. By rearranging the configuration, to allow separate stalls for small cars and motorcycles, Mr. Stein said he believed another 40 spaces could be found in that lot

In Sag Harbor, A Priority of Public Projects for 2014

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By Kathryn G. Menu

In its last meeting for 2013, the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees met in special session Thursday afternoon to talk about a list of village projects that are coming into focus for 2014.

Repairs to Long Wharf, upgrading the Municipal Building with an elevator that would allow access to the long-vacant third and fourth floors of that Main Street building, and constructing a helipad at Havens Beach for emergency service use were three projects village board members debated Thursday.

At the close of the session, board members passed a resolution to get estimates on the cost of all three projects.

While board members agreed all three projects were worth looking at, at the start of the session, with just Mayor Brian Gilbride, Trustee Ken O’Donnell and Trustee Robby Stein in attendance, there was division on how a project like Long Wharf — a project that likely comes with a hefty price tag — should be funded.

“My feeling is we should bond it and do it all at once,” said O’Donnell.

Stein agreed, noting that village treasurer Eileen Tuohy has advised trustees interest rates are historically low, making it desirable to bond for a project of this size.

And sizable it will likely be.

While the village board will now await an updated survey detailing the repair and maintenance needs of Long Wharf, it has been several years since anything outside of annual maintenance performed by village crews has been completed on the aging facility.

In 2010, part of the impetus for Suffolk County to look to Sag Harbor Village as a means of ridding itself of ownership of Long Wharf was a report from the Suffolk County Department of Public Works, outlining over $600,000 in immediate repairs necessary to keep the wharf in working order. While the transfer of Long Wharf to Sag Harbor Village — an over two-year process — did go through, neither the county nor the village ever completed that list of repairs.

In March of this year, village engineer Paul Grosser compiled a schedule of repairs over a 10-year period. The village board discussed funding those repairs — at a total cost of $1 million — with $100,000 annually earmarked annually. Last month, Tuohy suggested it might be fiscally prudent to consider bonding instead.

Gilbride, who has staunchly opposed bonding for the repairs, noted the reserve repair fund has $1.2 million and while the village has paid for the Havens Beach remediation, it is expecting close to $300,000 back from the county and the state for that water quality project.

“I think we have to get a closer handle on what Long Wharf needs,” said Gilbride.

Stein agreed.

“Once we know about the cost, then we should talk about how to pay for it,” he said. “I am not so worried about bonding. I just don’t want to do piecemeal for this project.”

A longtime goal of Gilbride has been to see the village open up the third and fourth floors of the Municipal Building through the construction of an elevator. The village currently has a lift, which provides access from the first to the second floor including the meeting room, building department and justice court for the disabled. However, noted Gilbride, that lift has begun to falter and rather than replace it, he would like the board to consider installing an elevator that would enable the village to make use of the third floor for office space and the fourth floor for storage.

“It’s a key element to getting into the third floor and moving the building department up there,” he said, noting making the fourth floor usable in terms of office space is a larger — and pricier — challenge than he would like to take on this coming year.

According to Gilbride, installing an elevator would cost the village about $165,000.

A 2012 report detailing the cost of Municipal Building repairs and upgrades, including the elevator, estimated $1.8 million in funding would be necessary, which would include sprinkler system for the third floor and the extension of fire escapes to all floors in the building.

On Thursday, the board agreed to look into the cost of just installing the elevator, sprinkler system, and fire escapes — all necessary if the village wants to legally do business on the third floor.

The board also signed off, with little debate, on having an estimate drawn up for the creation of a helipad on Havens Beach. The helipad would specifically be for emergency service providers to use in the instance where a medevac is required out of Sag Harbor.

The next Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees meeting is scheduled for January 14 at 6 p.m.