Tag Archive | "local artists"

Alumni Artists on Display at the Ross School

Tags: , , ,


 

"Head in Hand" by Bronwyn Roe, Ross School Class of 2006.

“Head in Hand” by Bronwyn Roe, Ross School Class of 2006.

By Tessa Raebeck

Their artistic pursuits have taken them to coveted galleries, television studios and the country’s best art schools, but, working across mediums and the world, the 19 artists in this month’s Alumni Art Exhibition have one thing in common: they cultivated their creativity at the Ross School.

The exhibition highlights alumni artists working in cinematography, design, photography and more, who have graduated from the high school in the last 13 years. Keith Skretch, who designs video for live performance and installation in New York and Los Angeles, graduated in 2001, while Zac Wan of the class of 2014 is currently studying as a freshman at the School of Visual Arts.

The show features the work of 19 former Ross students at different points in their careers. New York University film major Noah Engel, ’11, and Sara Salaway, ’11, who studies photography at Bennington College, are still in the midst of their studies, while Andrina Smith, ’03, works as an actor, playwright and singer.

Despite being just over a year out of high school, the class of 2013 is well represented in the show; Aiyana Jaffe, a photographer studying at the Rhode Island School of Design, Riko Kawahara, who is studying graphic design at the Pratt Institute, and Alia Knowlan, a Savannah College of Art and Design student, are all participating.

While many of the artists returned to the East End for the show, others have forged their careers in the local community. An MFA candidate at Carnegie Mellon, Tucker Marder also works locally as an artist, curator and director. Most recently, he presented an adaptation of Kurt Vonnegut’s “Galápagos” at the Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill, a sold-out performance he co-directed with fellow Ross alum Christian Scheider.

John Messinger, ’02, has also managed to build his career in his hometown. The photographer and artist has shown locally at Guild Hall, the Romany Kramoris Gallery and the Watermill Center, as well as nationally, and will have his first one-man show in New York City this fall.

Filmmaker and cartoonist Dan Roe, ’04, is a media studies teacher at Ross. His latest film, “Weenie,” premiered at the Hamptons International Film Festival in October and will be playing at Cinema Club next month.

“At Ross, you are always given the chance to pursue what interests you,” said Mr. Roe, who will show his cartoons in the exhibit. “For me, I was able to work on countless video projects and draw cartoons all the time…. This kind of project-based learning allows students to integrate what they love and what they’re good at into their learning and not only is that fun and empowering, it also fosters a stronger engagement with the material of a given class.”

Aiyana Jaffe, Ross School Class of 2013, with her untitled piece.

Aiyana Jaffe, Ross School Class of 2013, with her untitled piece.

“It’s not simply art-infused, but fully integrated,” he added of the Ross curriculum. “This means, in a nutshell, that all domains… all fold in on one another and there is no clear division between them. What you get, when all is said and done, is an ingrained understanding of human activity as a complex, with every idea, invention, change, work of art inextricably linked to everything that goes on around it. On the most basic level, this has helped me in applying the approaches I used in filmmaking to making cartoons and vice versa.”

Photographer Alexandra Strada, ’06, Molly Weiss, ’06, MFA candidate at Columbia, independent artist and curator and cinematographer Hunter Herrick, ’03, Skidmore College senior Julian Mardoyan-Smyth, ’08, photographer Kate Petrone, ’05, SUNY Purchase graduate and Ross School house parent Ryan Duff, ’04, painter and visual artist Bronwyn Roe, ’06, and portrait artist Clarisa Skretch, ’04, will also display their work in the show, which is on display through December 18, at the Ross School Gallery, located at 18 Goodfriend Drive in East Hampton.

Bridgehampton Local Jake Patterson Making a Name for Himself in the Art World—and the Rap World, too

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , ,


A still shot of Bridgehampton native and up-and-coming performance artist Yung Jake, from his latest music video, "Look."

A still shot of Bridgehampton native and up-and-coming performance artist Yung Jake, from his latest music video, “Look.”

By Genevieve Kotz

Yung Jake, an up-and-coming artist/rapper from Bridgehampton, having recently had an exhibition of his work at Steve Turner Contemporary in Los Angeles, is quickly gaining recognition for his contributions to both the art and rap music worlds.

Yung Jake, also known as Jake Patterson from Bridgehampton High School’s class of 2008, received his BFA from CalArts in Los Angeles.

At the Steve Turner Gallery, Jake showed “Drawings,” a series of screen installations with a lone computer mouse moving on each screen.

Yung Jake also premiered his iPhone-filmed music video “Look” at the exhibition, which ran until May 31 and was featured in the Huffington Post.

In a similar theme to his visual art, Yung Jake’s music videos are internet-inspired, featuring HTML code, YouTube clips and colorful pixels.

“The young artist speaks and lives in the language of the net, telling stories as complex, multivalent, frivolous and raw as infinite material lurking in your browser,” said the Huffington Post. “Sometimes it feels like Yung Jake wasn’t born on the internet, he is the internet.”

To see more of Yung Jake’s work and videos, visit his website at yungjake.tumblr.com.

The Tonic Artspace Returns with “Phenomena” at the Kathryn Markel Gallery

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


A print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

A print by Grant Haffner. Courtesy of the artist.

By Tessa Raebeck

A contemporary art collective in constant movement, both in theory and action, the Tonic Artspace returns with “Phenomena” at Kathryn Markel Fine Arts in Brigehampton.

Springs-raised Grant Haffner founded the Tonic Artspace as a way to showcase the East End’s emerging artists and challenge the limits of the traditional art show. Through his collective, Haffner brings unique group shows to different venues, using the experience both as inspiration for his own work and as a way to spread the talent of his friends, family and neighbors.

"Portrait of Phil Haffner" by Lori Weiss, 1974. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

“Portrait of Phil Haffner” by Lori Weiss, 1974. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

An “undefined, forever evolving pop-up art promoting machine that understands no boundaries,” the Tonic Artspace returns this year with “Phenomena,” which will showcase the work of six emerging East End artists. A 1974 portrait of Philip Clark Haffner by artist Lori Weiss will also be on view in memoriam of Mr. Haffner’s father, who passed away February 6.

Color print by Arrex. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

Color print by Arrex. Courtesy of Grant Haffner.

The Tonic Artspace is an extension of Bonac Tonic, a collective of local up-and-coming artists founded in 2005 by Mr. Haffner and his twin sister Carly, who is also a painter and will exhibit her latest works in the show.

Inspired by the “phenomena” of death and severe illness in his family, the artist Arrex will show a series of screen-printed and hand cut skulls that “serve as a small reminder of our mortality and the fragility in life.”

The show also includes the work of painter and sculptor Maeve D’Arcy of Queens and Christine Lidrbauch, who uses various media and recycled objects “to communicate a melding of male and female cultures.”

The imaginative creatures and installations of Scott Gibbons, a core artist of the collective and “a creator of worlds unbeknown to conventional art circles,” will also be on display.

The “Phenomena” opening reception will be held February 22 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Kathryn Markel Fine Arts gallery, 2418 Main Street in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit here.

Holiday Show Brings Newcomers and Returning Artists to Grenning Gallery

Tags: , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , , ,


"Antique Grasshopper Weathervane" by Sarah Lamb, 2011

“Antique Grasshopper Weathervane” by Sarah Lamb, 2011

By Tessa Raebeck

Some 20 years ago, Maryann Lucas brought her two young toddlers to visit Laura Grenning at the Grenning Gallery, then located next to the Corner Bar on Sag Harbor’s Main Street.

“I’ll never forget,” said Lucas, flanked by materials and colorful oil paintings in her new studio behind the Romany Kramoris Gallery in the Carruthers Alleyway off Main Street. “When I walked into her gallery for the first time and thought, ‘Some day.’”

Over two decades later, ‘some day’ has arrived; Lucas will join seven other artists in the Holiday Show at the Grenning Gallery this Saturday. Celebrating the gallery’s most successful year since its 1997 opening, the Holiday Show features a range of carefully selected artists, coming from as far away as Sweden and as close by as Lucas’ studio. While Lucas is showing her work for the first time, headliner Sarah Lamb is returning to the gallery after years of success.

Grenning gave Lamb her first show in 1998, when the artist was in her early 20s. After showing with Grenning for a little over two years, Lamb entered into an exclusive deal with the Spanierman Gallery in New York City. The Spanierman Gallery, which is still open today and continues to show Lamb’s work, no longer has an exclusive deal with the artist, allowing her to show with Grenning once more.

“I’ve been calling her every six months for five or six years now,” Grenning said Monday. “I have clients that want her work.”

After years of waiting, Grenning is excited to exhibit ten new works by Lamb in the Holiday Show.

“What she’s doing is she does these amazing still lives,” said the gallerist. “She’s very prolific. The thing she spends most of the time on is setting them up and deciding the composition. She’s got an excellent eye for design.”

Lamb puts more time into designing her work through the composition than she does with the actual execution, which Grenning says usually takes just a day or two.

“The irony of the classical realist movement,” says Grenning, “is the classical realists paint but they don’t extract themselves to remember why they’re painting and what they’re painting. They don’t think of the composition too much – the abstract design of the painting.”

Since the early days of the gallery, when Lamb was a recent art school graduate looking for a break, she has grown tremendously as an artist. In her first show at Grenning, her works sold for $6,000 tops. This weekend, they will sell for up to $25,000.

"Wherelwork" by

“Wherelwork” by Joe Altwer, 2013

As evidenced by the Holiday Show line-up, Grenning excels at finding and mentoring new artists. She found Joe Altwer when he was an assistant to Mark Dalessio, one of her gallery’s featured artists.

“He actually came to his first opening here on a skateboard,” she recalls of the young Altwer, adding that his paintings in the show are “very beautiful, very well done, very bright light…It’s all about the light reflecting around the room, it’s not so much about describing the objects in the room.”

"River View" by Daniel Graves

“River View” by Daniel Graves, 2013

In the Holiday Show, Daniel Graves will exhibit four new landscapes “inspired by the most lyrical and relaxed tonalists.” Work by Michael Kotasek, who has been likened to the prominent realist painter Andrew Wyeth but is, according to Grenning, “a lot more refined as a painter,” will also be displayed.

The show will feature a “very beautiful” piece of a glass of beer and a musical instrument by Kevin McEvoy, paintings of farmhouses at twilight and a moonrise by Kevin Sanders and an original nocturne of Sag Harbor by Greg Horwich.

And then, of course, there’s Lucas.

“I didn’t realize all the times I was talking with her that she was an avid artist,” said Grenning. As Lucas’s talent developed, she began bringing her oil paintings to the gallery for Grenning to critique.

“I find when Laura critiques my work,” said Lucas. “I really come away with clarity of how to make it better and at the same time, she makes you feel really good about what’s right – she’s a wonderful mentor.”

"Duck Walk" by Maryann Lucas, 2013

“Duck Walk” by Maryann Lucas, 2013

“I, for whatever reason, tell people exactly what I think of their paintings,” said Grenning. “Unless you’re really open to a serious critique it can be unpleasant. She took every observation that I had and responded like an unbelievable student. She had talent but she kind of reorganized herself aesthetically. It’s kind of exciting and apparently this is a longtime goal for her.”

Apparently. After bringing her work to Grenning last spring, Lucas made some changes, landing herself a spot in the Holiday Show, her first exhibit.

“I used to say to my daughters, we would say, ‘Do you think this painting is Grenning worthy’,” said Lucas. “Being in her gallery, this is my first – I guess it’s like a wish list…I’m thrilled and excited for the opportunity.”

The opening reception for the Holiday Show will be held at the Grenning Gallery, 17 Washington Street, on Saturday, November 23 from 5:30 to 7:30 p.m. For more information, call 725-8469 or visit Grenning Gallery.