Tag Archive | "Local Business"

Jackson Dodds & Company Inc. Tree & Plant Health Care Gets Homeowners Ready for Spring

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Jackson Dodds of Jackson Dodds & Company Inc.

Jackson Dodds of Jackson Dodds & Company Inc. Photo by Steven Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

If you want to catch Jackson Dodds, the owner of the landscaping company of the same name, sitting still, you’ll have to move quickly.

After a long and tough winter, Mr. Dodds said he is anticipating a very short window this spring to prune storm-damaged trees, clean up and prepare gardens for the season, repair damage to driveways and curbs caused by snowplows, and get irrigation systems up and running, all jobs his full-service company handles.

“Everybody is going to be really busy,” he said of the trade in general during an interview in his Southampton office. “So if you want to get on the schedule, don’t wait a month because we’re going to have a really condensed season.”

Every spring seems to bring a different challenge, said Mr. Dodds. Last year, it was damage from Hurricane Sandy. This year, ‘it’s been a brutal winter, and the deer damage is obscene,” he said. “A lot of deer-resistant plant material has been completely defoliated.”

Mr. Dodds, who grew up on what today is the Wolffer Estate Vineyard in Sagaponack, said he always wanted to “work outside” and the East End was one of the few places that offered the opportunity “where you could be a landscaper and still make a living.”

“I started dragging brush right of high school,” after landing a job with Ray Smith and Associates 19 years ago, where he was soon made a partner, Mr. Dodds said, adding that he was proud that he was the youngest certified arborist in New York State at age 18 and today is the vice president of the Long Island Arboricultural Association.

Mr. Dodds attended both Alfred State College and the State University of New York at Delhi before later completing his education at Farmingdale State College, where he received degrees in landscape design and turf management with a minor in business. “Farmingdale is a great school on Long Island for horticulture,” Mr. Dodds said.

Three years ago, he made the break to form his own company. Today, Jackson Dodds and Company has 14 employees, spread over four divisions, landscape design and installation, tree pruning and removal, irrigation and lawn care and planting.

During his career, Mr. Dodd said he has seen everything, including a trend that started in the mid-1990s before pausing for a few years when the economy tanked in 2007: the removal of full-size specimen trees from one property to be planted on another property, where the homeowner wants an instantly mature landscape.

“They say, ‘the first year it sleeps, the second year it creeps and the third year it leaps,’” Mr. Dodd said about tree transplants, although he quickly added that mature trees sometimes take a couple of more years to recover. “The after-care is everything,” he said. “That is where we carve out a niche, watching the plant’s health and care, prepping the soil and feeding.”

And how big are these trees? Last year, Mr. Dodds said his crew used a 110-ton crane to move a tree that had a 108-inch root ball. “Some of my clients move trees like they move furniture,” he said. “Nothing is too big.”

Fruit orchards are another specialty. “Fruit trees require a very specific timing on when you apply fungicide to the leaves,” he said. “You have to do everything to keep the leaf healthy to keep the fruit healthy. If you miss the timing, your fruit turns into a shriveled up prune.”

Mr. Dodd smiles when asked about organic plant care. It doesn’t work on orchards, he said, and the problem with it is “it typically doesn’t give the kind of results people expect out here.”

That’s not to say he is an advocate of wholesale applications of chemical pesticides and fertilizers. Mr. Dodd said he used integrated pest management system and coordinates the applications with the temperature at which they will do the most good and the least harm. “We all have to drink the same water here,” he said, “so we’re by the book when it comes to that.”

For more information on Jackson Dodds & Company Inc., visit jacksondoddsinc.com or call 604-5693. 

Doppio East to Open Sag Harbor Spot in Former Madison & Main Location

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By Tessa Raebeck

Known for artisanal pizzas and authentic Italian cuisine, Doppio Artisan Bistro will be opening a new location in Sag Harbor this spring, at the 126 Main Street spot previously occupied by Madison & Main.

The restaurant, Doppio East, will offer a raw bar, small plates and pizzas fresh from the dining room’s new brick oven.

As roommates at Fordham University, executive chef Louis Barresi and partner Thomas Pescuma dreamed of opening a restaurant together. While Pescuma worked in financial services, Barresi and his brother Joseph founded Doppio Artisan Bistro in Greenwich, Connecticut three years ago.

Following the first restaurant’s success, the duo joined with Harry Armon, Pescuma’s partner in a financial consulting firm, to found The Timeless Hospitality Group. The group opened Doppio Huntington in April 2013 and a French bistro, Barrique Restaurant in Stamford, Connecticut, two months later. They bought a Hudson Street location in New York City in the fall and are opening Doppio NYC this month.69928x471

Their latest venture into good food, Doppio East is a casual bistro set to open as early as March. Having visited the area every summer, Pescuma “got the urge” to open a location on the East End.

After purchasing the space occupied by The Paradise last year, Madison & Main co-owners Michael Gluckman and Eric Miller performed extensive renovations to the building’s interior. Pescuma said the new owners plan to keep many of the layout changes, such as leaving the bar by the restaurant’s front entrance. A brick pizza oven will warm the room from the back left corner.

Not yet finalized, the Doppio East menu will have many of the Italian staples from the restaurant’s other locations, with added seafood options and a full raw bar. It will feature pizzas, 10 to 12 piattini (small plates), appetizers, soups, salads, Panini, meat and seafood dishes, and, of course, pastas. All Doppio East dressings, breads and pastas will be made in house.

Coming straight from the brick oven, the selection of 10 to 15 artisan pizzas will include the signature Doppio pizza: butternut squash puree, mozzarella di bufala and pancetta finished with the finest extra virgin olive oil.

Large groups at Doppio typically order several pizzas and small plates. Ranging in price from $6 to $25 at the Huntington location, the dishes include: Clams Al Doppio, top neck clams, fresh herbs and panko bread crumbs; Polenta E Funghi Al Tartufo, a mixed wild mushroom polenta with truffle oil; and Polpo Alla Griglia, a “very popular” char-grilled octopus dish with fennel, arugula and citrus.553135363

The fresh pastas are done “Carpaccio style,” Pescuma says, meaning the house made pasta is baked in tinfoil and hand rolled. In addition to classic dishes like fettuccini Bolognese and meat lasagna, Doppio offers high-end dishes such as Pappardelle al Ragu D’Agnello, or house made pappardelle with braised lamb shank ragu, and Fusilli in Cartoccio, which features hand rolled pasta, porcini mushrooms, baby heirloom tomato, truffle oil and mascarpone cheese and is “the biggest seller as far as pasta goes,” according to Pescuma.

On bread baked in house, the Fiorentina Panini has skirt steak, caramelized onions and melted Gorgonzola dolce, while the Salsiccia Panini is filled with sweet Italian sausage, broccoli rabe and fresh mozzarella.

The partners are looking forward to adding several new dishes to the Sag Harbor menu; including a new chicken Chianti and at least one lobster dish.

“The plate size, despite the name, is actually pretty big,” Pescuma says of the piattini, adding that they may scale the size down and lower the prices for the Sag Harbor spot, although nothing has been finalized.

Doppio East plans to have regular live music and nightly bar specials on drinks and small plates and is “definitely going to be open year-round,” Pescuma said, adding the venue is ideal for private events.

Doppio East is opening this spring at 126 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, visit timelesshospitalitygroup.com.

With the New Year Comes New Sales for Sag Harbor Shoppers

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Veteran shopper Mara Certic checks out the wares at Urban Zen Monday morning. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

Veteran shopper Mara Certic checks out the wares at Urban Zen Monday morning. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

By Tessa Raebeck

While most retail stores in East Hampton and Southampton board up their windows for the winter, leaving a desolate Main Street for the local population, in Sag Harbor many stores are not only staying open, they’re also offering great deals for the year round community.

The sale signs are popping up across Bay Street and Main Street, with some stores offering as much as 75 percent off select items.

“It’s just a nice way to give back to locals,” says Kim Keller, the manager at Urban Zen on Bay Street, which is offering 50 to 75 percent off select items through March.

Giving back is at the foundation of the Urban Zen business model, which is centered around a “soulful economy,” as Keller calls it.

Haitian crafted goods are for sale at the store through the Haiti Artisan Project. Started by owner Donna Karan following the earthquake that shook Haiti four years ago, the project returns 100 percent of the proceeds from the items to Haiti.

The luxury items at Urban Zen range in price from $20 for “Haiti hearts,” or handmade heart-shaped rocks, to $7,000 for a crystal chandelier handcrafted in Haiti.

In addition to the Haiti Artisan Project samplings, Urban Zen has a variety of pieces from across the world, ranging from handcrafted belts made in Brooklyn by designer Jason Ross to leather jackets made by hand using the best materials in Italy.

“Obviously,” said Keller, “this store could not survive if it weren’t for our summer clientele. Like everyone around here, that is our business.”

Keller added that about two-thirds of the store’s business is conducted from June to Labor Day, but staying open in the winter – and having sales – is Urban Zen’s way to support the local community.

Although most locals may not be stopping into Urban Zen for a $895 cashmere dress from Italy, sales make it tangible to “collect” items by buying one or two pieces a season.

“They’re beautiful,” said Keller, wearing a cashmere sweater, scarf and hat, of the clothes at Urban Zen, “they last forever and go with everything.”

The men’s and women’s stores of Flying Point Surf Boutique on Main Street are similarly thinking of Sag Harbor’s year round community this winter, with sales of 15 to 50 percent off on all summer items.

“It’s basically to bring people in during the winter and help the locals out,” said Loreto Vignapiano, manager at the Flying Point Women’s store in Sag Harbor.

Vignapiano said after realizing last season that a lot of customers were coming into the store looking for summer clothes to wear on tropical vacations this time of year, they decided to put on a winter sale.

Until the new spring gear comes in in March, all swimwear and summer clothing in the women’s store is half off and flip-flops are buy one, get one free.

At the men’s store, board shorts, Reef sandals, and “pretty much all summer clothing” is half off, according to manager Bethany Semlear. Rashguards and tee shirts are buy one, get one free. The store is also offering 25 percent off wetsuit tips, 20 percent off body and boogie boards and 15 to 20 percent off sunglasses.

A few blocks down Main Street at Satori, a women’s boutique, owner Jessica Kenny is offering 30 percent off all clothing, excluding accessories, bras, hats, scarves, gloves, jewelry and some leggings, as part of its end of the season sale.

Kris Kim, a Satori employee, said there is also an ongoing selection of items for 50 percent off in the back of the store.

Traditionally less expensive than its luxury counterparts, Flashbacks is, as usual, offering items for $10 on a sale rack displayed outside the storefront.

An end of season sale of up to 75 percent off items at luxury boutique Life’Style ended last weekend.

A winter promotion at Calypso for 60 percent off of all sale merchandise also ended Monday. With the new collection having just arrived in store, however, manager Jennifer Lucey expects another deal is just around the corner.

Sag Harbor Citarella and Bobby Flay Rumors Kiboshed

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Espresso's on Division Street in Sag Harbor Wednesday.

Espresso’s on Division Street in Sag Harbor Wednesday. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

By Tessa Raebeck

Despite rampant rumors to the contrary, Bobby Flay will not be opening a restaurant in Sag Harbor.

The New York Post’s Jennifer Gould Keil reported on December 29 that the celebrity chef had been in talks to take over the space currently occupied by Espresso’s at 184 Division Street. Flay tweeted that he would not take over the space and this Wednesday confirmed the story is false.

“The reports that I’m opening a restaurant in Sag Harbor are completely fabricated and not true,” Flay wrote in an email to the Express. “I have no idea where the assumed space in Sag Harbor is. I’ve never stepped foot in the space nor have I ever spoken to the owners.”

“Sag Harbor,” he added, “is one of my favorite places to visit in the Hamptons but I will only be dining in other people’s restaurants, not opening my own.”

A staple in Sag Harbor since 1993, Espresso Italian Market and Grill, or Espresso’s, as it’s commonly referred to, has reportedly been sold by owners Corrado Paini and Richie Camacho, but the building’s new occupants are yet unknown. Paini and Camacho bought the established store from Robin and Luigi Tagliasacchi in 2005.

Calls to Espresso were not returned as of press time.

The reaction to news that Espresso’s would stop serving its famed focaccia, and the like, after 20 years had a ripple effect throughout Sag Harbor, many residents lamenting the changes they have seen in the two-and-a-half square mile village.

“I spent many days after school hanging with friends at Espresso’s,” said Ryan Skinner, a Sag Harbor resident who graduated from Pierson High School in 2004. “It was the Pierson hangout spot, I have some fond memories there.”

“Espresso’s is a treasure,” Judi and Howard Roth wrote Monday in a letter to The Sag Harbor Express. “We hope, hope, hope that they will find someplace else to open or that they manage to renegotiate and stay just where they are.”

The Bridgehampton Citarella store Wednesday afternoon. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

The Citarella store in Bridgehampton Wednesday afternoon. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

In the same column in the Post, Keil also reported Citarella, a Manhattan-based gourmet market with local shops in East Hampton and Bridgehampton, was planning to open a Sag Harbor store. Rumors quickly circulated around town that Citarella would be leaving its East Hampton location and taking over the Schiavoni’s Market space on Main Street, which the Schiavoni family has owned and operated out of since 1941.

The owners of Citarella and Schiavoni’s Market confirmed these rumors are also unfounded.

“We are not opening in Sag Harbor,” said Citarella owner Joe Gurrera Wednesday. “Rumors start, no idea where, but we are not opening in Sag Harbor.”

Gurrera confirmed Citarella is not leaving its East Hampton location, as some had speculated, but will in fact open another store on Hampton Road in Southampton this spring.

Schiavoni's Market in Sag Harbor on Wednesday afternoon.

Customers order from the deli at Schiavoni’s Market in Sag Harbor Wednesday afternoon. (Tessa Raebeck photo).

“We’re staying,” Schiavoni’s Market owner Mike Schiavoni said Tuesday. “I have sons involved, everybody’s fourth generation, so no.”

Schiavoni reiterated Schiavoni’s Market is a multi-generational market and he plans to keep it that.

Matt Schiavoni, who shares a great grandfather with Mike, manages the store with his wife, Judy. He said Tuesday there is “no truth” to rumors the family market is leaving Sag Harbor.

Mike is committed to “continuing generational activity at the store” and keeping the market — and the building, which his mother and aunt own — in the family, he said Wednesday.

Soup to Nuts at Sag Harbor Fireplace

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Owner Mike Scanlon at the Sag Harbor Fireplace Showroom Tuesday.

Owner Mike Scanlon at the Sag Harbor Fireplace Showroom Tuesday.

By Tessa Raebeck

At the flick of a switch, Mike Scanlon can make fire come out of water. Under his direction, an ordinary pond or fountain erupts in flames in a matter of seconds, creating an equally majestic and effective outdoor fire pit.

At Sag Harbor Fireplace, which Scanlon co-owns with his wife, Allison, fireplaces and stoves are available in all shapes and styles, from a fountain fire pit to a traditional mantled hearth.

“We do pretty much everything with fireplaces and wood stoves,” Mike said Monday, “We provide maintenance, we do repairs, pretty much soup to nuts – whatever needs to be done with a fireplace, we can do it.”

In its showroom on the Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike, Sag Harbor Fireplace has wood fireplaces and stoves, gas fireplaces and stoves, gas and wood burning inserts, gas logs, fireplace doors, outdoor products, wood fired ovens, cleaning products and more.

In business for over 11 years, Allison and Mike pride themselves on being “a small company servicing a small marketplace.” Mike runs the store and manages the service crews and Allison is behind the scenes, taking care of the bookkeeping and paperwork.

By limiting their clientele to homes located between Montauk and Westhampton, the Scanlons aim to ensure all employees are experts and all fireplaces are built from the ground up, with ample input from clients.

The entire business consists of the couple and four servicemen who have been working for the company for anywhere from five to 12 years.

“So,” said Mike, “I have guys who know what they’re doing…there are so many different fireplaces and things out there, so it takes a long time to learn. So I don’t want to expand in a way that I have to continue to hire more people, because then the people I hire won’t have the expertise that’s required to go out and do the work.”

That expertise is extensive. Sometimes Sag Harbor Fireplace collaborates with designers and architects to create a fireplace, but sometimes the design, installation and maintenance is an entirely in-house effort.

A part of the business that’s grown immensely in recent years is providing efficient, “green” fireplaces.

The Sag Harbor Fireplace Showroom.

The Sag Harbor Fireplace Showroom.

The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act, passed by the federal government in 2009, includes a 30 percent consumer tax credit of up to $1500 for the purchase of 75 percent-efficient wood burning stoves. Because it is a tax credit, rather than a deduction, it either increases a consumer’s tax refund or decreases the amount of taxes they have to pay, dollar-for-dollar.

The credit has furthered an already growing interest in efficient energy sources.

“I have a number of fireplaces now that are built as fireplaces,” said Mike. “They burn looking like a fireplace, but they heat more like a wood stove. So, you’re getting the efficiencies of the wood stove, but the look of a fireplace.”

The efficiency and ease of use of these new fireplaces, Mike says, allow homeowners to be less dependent on oil. The Sag Harbor Fireplace showroom is heated with a wood or gas stove and the Scanlons’ home is heated with a wood burning fireplace and a wood stove.

“So,” said Mike, “the technology is definitely out there if they want to not be so reliant on fossil fuels.”

Outdoor fire pits are another growing trend in the hearth industry, especially gas fire pits.

“The gas fire pits,” Mike said, “give ease of use and a very large flame with no smoke.”

“And the best part about them,” he added, “is if you’re going outside and you’re going to be outside for an hour, you turn it on, it burns, you turn it off and you’re done.”

Sag Harbor Fireplace can design the burners in any shape or form, including those with flames that seemingly come out of water.

“It’s a matter of finding something that they like,” Mike says of his customers, “and there’s pretty much something for everybody who wants to burn wood and heat their house.”

The Sag Harbor Fireplace Showroom is located at 1434 Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-0636 or visit sagharborfireplace.net.

With Something for Every Budget, In Home Helps Sag Harbor Shoppers Tackle Holiday Shopping

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David Brogna and John Scocco show their wares at In Home

David Brogna and John Scocco show their wares at In Home

By Tessa Raebeck; photography by Michael Heller

As Sag Harbor residents begin checking items off their holiday shopping lists, In Home is hosting a storewide clearance sale to ease the process, offering great deals on everything from sofas to stocking stuffers. With up to 70 percent off selected items, the sale includes regular clearance items, as well as closeouts from brand name manufacturers like Calvin Klein, Dansk and Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.

Since 1996, In Home co-owners John Scocco and David Brogna have filled their Main Street shop with a carefully curated collection of furnishings for every room, occasion and budget. Brogna, an award winning Home Products Development Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), has an eye for design and a background as a buyer for companies like Macy’s. Scocco complements Brogna’s expertise with his own background in interior design and as an industrial film production manager. Together, they have built a longstanding store dedicated to both local and seasonal markets.

“We do have higher priced items,” said Scocco of In Home’s selection. “But most people don’t want to spend a lot of money these days, so we try to gear things for those shoppers.”

Brogna and Scocco have stocked their shelves with fun gift items under $25 or $50, “things that people would just come in and just want to pick up,” said Scocco.

One such item is the Corkcicle, a popular gift In Home was asked to restock after selling out last summer. For $23, the corkcicle is a long tube that resembles an icicle with a cork on top of it. After being chilled in a freezer, the corkcicle is inserted into a bottle of white or rosé wine. Unlike ice, the corkcicle won’t melt or water down your wine; instead, the bottle is both chilled and aerated upon pouring.

Another fun gift that was a hit this summer is the citrus sprayer, on sale at In Home for $15. After cutting the tip off of a lemon or lime, the citrus sprayer, which resembles the top of a spray perfume bottle, is placed on top of the fruit, allowing its owner to spray a mist of the juice directly from the lemon or lime.

“It’s really amazing,” says Scocco. “It really, really works.”

For under $20, In Home has a variety of other gift items from companies like Kate Spade and RSVP, including soap sets, candle sets, picture frames, personal care items and other home accessories. $10 can get you a chrome rabbit that doubles as a ring holder or a snow globe that’s also a ring game for children, as well as a variety of other “little fun stuff.”

“Of course, we do have a lot of other high end, more special items as well,”
said Scocco. “But our focus primarily is on the less expensive items.”

Brogna and Scocco are committed to keeping the shop stocked with reasonably priced gift items for the holidays, but they also hope to clear out the larger home furnishings in order to make room for next season’s stock.

“There’s a wide assortment of things,” said Scocco. “Some people feel intimidated, people that don’t really know us hear ‘Oh, that store’s really expensive…’ We do have a wide range and our pricing is really very, very fair and very well priced.”

The In Home team hopes to sell all the clearance furniture by January. Regularly priced at $1,980, a Stratton leather chair by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, modern with a dark, lightly distressed wooden frame and creamy stone leather seat, is on sale for $899. A soft, 100% Egyptian cotton king-sized blanket from Sferra’s home collection regularly priced at $250 is half off at $125. Framed mythological star maps of the astrological night sky, 23” by 23”, are marked down from $190 to $99. Also on sale are sofas, coffee tables, end tables, throw pillows and virtually anything else you need to decorate your home.

“There’s so much you can get overwhelmed with all the product that we have in our space,” Scocco said with excitement.

In Home is located at 132 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call 725-7900 or visit inhomesagharbor.com.

Preparing for Thanksgiving at North Sea Farms

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By Tessa Raebeck

When Richie King approaches the pen, the turkeys cannot contain their excitement. They flock towards the gate as he greets them and follow him around in a massive cluster. King appreciates the attention, but flattery can’t change the turkeys’ fate; with Thanksgiving around the corner, North Sea Farms and King’s Farm Stand in Southampton are in full preparation for the holiday season.

“A small farm with a little bit of everything,” North Sea Farms has been supplying East End families with their Thanksgiving turkeys since 1945. Richard King represents the third generation of the King family to work the land off Noyac Road, following in the footsteps of his father, Richard “Tate” King.

Brought to the farm as chicks in early July, some 700 turkeys are fully grown by mid-November. Their caretaking is fairly straightforward; the turkeys are fed and allowed to “run around outside,” according to Sam Dosch, who has been working on the farm since she was 14. Both King and Dosch maintain that the fresh feed and active lifestyle North Sea turkeys enjoy on the farm makes their taste – not to mention nutritional value – far superior to caged, mass-produced turkeys found elsewhere.

“It’s all about quality,” writes Julia King, an American College of Sports Medicine certified Health/Fitness specialist and Richie’s youngest daughter, on the farm’s blog on LocalHarvest.org. “It is time we all got back to basics with our food. By building relationships with your farmers you are building relationships with your food. And, as in any good relationship, if you take the time to nurture it, it will give back far more than ever expected.”

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The free-range, organic turkeys available on the farm range in size from 12 to 25 pounds. Some turkeys are naturally bigger, but activity and “which ones are pigs and eat more food” can also determine size, said Dosch. The main determinate of a larger sized turkey is simple: “they hang out a little longer,” according to Dosch.

With perceived cultural shifts away from eating meat and a new children’s film in theaters, “Free Bird,” about the plight of Thanksgiving Turkeys, King is wary that turkey sales will suffer this year, but Dosch is hopeful that social media outlets like the farm’s Facebook page will continue to draw new customers. If all else fails, North Sea Farms can always rely on the regulars, with countless local and visiting families returning every year.

“People kind of slowly start ordering in October,” said Dosch. “But then like a week or two before Thanksgiving, there’s a mad panic and that’s when the phone won’t stop.”

In addition to turkeys, North Sea Farms sells a wide variety of produce, fresh herbs and baked goods to fill Thanksgiving tables.

“We have everything but stuffing mix here for Thanksgiving,” said Dosch, who, while outlining the staples of a fresh and organic Thanksgiving table available in the shop, categorized the food not by type, but by the member of the King family who makes it.

Richie King’s wife, Robin, makes and sells her renowned cranberry sauce and may add homemade gravy to the line-up this season. Richie’s sister, Kathleen King, is the force behind Tate’s Bake Shop, named after her father and started out of the family farm stand when she was 11. She continues to supply King’s Farm Stand with all their baked goods, and an assortment of pies, tarts and other Thanksgiving treats are available for sale.

Most produce is grown on the farm and all of it is grown locally. Outside the shop’s entrance, wooden carts filled with colorful squash, pumpkins and other seasonal vegetables greet visitors. When families pick up their turkeys, they can explore the farm, learn about the day-to-day operations and visit the family’s two goats, Jiggy and Gilbert. Gilbert has been accompanying King to local schools and petting zoos for 13 years.

With cranberry sauce made by Robin, pumpkin pies baked by Kathleen and turkeys raised by Richie, the King family invites other families to enjoy their harvest as much as they do this holiday season.

North Sea Farms and King’s Farm Stand are located at 1060 Noyac Road in Southampton. For more information, call 283-0735 or visit their page on Facebook.