Tag Archive | "Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan"

Plans for Waterfront Park in Sag Harbor Move Forward

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Sag Harbor Cove Park

The latest draft of a proposal for a waterfront park in Sag Harbor. Courtesy of Edmund Hollander.

By Mara Certic

After the discussion was reopened last year, a plan to develop a waterfront park under the Lance Corporal Jordan C. Haerter Veterans Memorial Bridge is moving forward.

The original proposal for a waterfront park in the area dates back to 1996, but was resurrected around this time last year. This summer, landscape architects Edmund Hollander and Mary Anne Connelly have been working with an intern, Rachel Jawin, a student at Cornell University, on adapting Mr. Hollander’s original plans from the 90s into what could become the new Sag Harbor Cove Park.

Sag Harbor Mayor Brian Gilbride brought Mr. Hollander’s latest mock-ups to a special meeting of the Sag Harbor Village Trustees on Monday morning to show his colleagues the progress that has been made on the proposal, which he described as “absolutely beautiful.”

According to Mr. Hollander, there are three goals this project is attempting to meet. The first is to open up a piece of waterfront to the community. The property in question is currently derelict, or as Mr. Hollander described it, “an amalgamation of abandoned buildings and debris.”

The second aim is to build the park in an ecologically friendly way, Mr. Hollander said in a phone interview on Wednesday. “What we’re trying to do is build the park using as many recycled materials as we can from other construction sites,” he said. Mr. Hollander hopes to recycle local plants from nearby areas, which he said would create a natural buffer. Mr. Gilbride said this was also a way to “save the village some money.”

The third goal is to connect some of Sag Harbor’s waterfront amenities together, creating a boardwalk under the bridge and theoretically around Long Wharf.

“It’s just a great project,” Mr. Gilbride said on Wednesday. “It certainly has the potential to tie the entire waterfront of the village in.”

“I cannot thank Mr. Hollander enough,” he added, several times. The plan is a “continual evolution,” Mr. Hollander said, and there are remain many questions that need to be answered before the proposal can move forward.

“There are questions about docks: should there be one? Two? Three? Should there be a fishing pier?” Mr. Hollander said.  Mr. Gilbride said he has been considering the dock project “phase two” of the park, as it could be quite expensive.

“Before that could be productive we need to get [the area] cleaned up,” he said.

According to Mr. Hollander, the organization Serve Sag Harbor has shown interest in hosting a fundraiser to help support the project, but, if the proposal continues to go forward, the village will also be very much involved in funding the new park.

“It has the makings of a great welcome as you’re coming in over the bridge,” he added. Mr. Hollander will present the current proposal to the Sag Harbor Village Board at their next meeting on Tuesday, October 14 at 6 p.m.

Also on Monday morning, the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees decided to raise the price of memorial benches from $575 to $1000. The price of benches, Mr. Gilbride said, had not gone up in some time, and the new price seemed to reasonably represent how much material and labor cost to install the seats.

Trustees Ed Deyermond said he would support this but only if it were to replace or repair existing benches. Mr. Deyermond believes there are already too many benches in the village, he said, and suggested memorial trees might be more appropriate and appreciated.

The trustees also voted to allow members of the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce to have their tri-annual sidewalk sale this weekend, Saturday and Sunday, October 11 and 12.

Waterfront Plan Seeks Public Involvement

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By Claire Walla


Do you have any thoughts or opinions about local waterways in the town of Southampton? The vitality of marine life? Public access to town-owned beaches? The quality of water in this coastal region?

As the town of Southampton is in the process of developing its Waterfront Protection Plan (WPP), now’s the time to make them known. And, with its new website created specifically to address issues of water safety and environmental sustainability, the town of Southampton is making that task very easy for you.

As part of its much greater effort to develop a WPP, members of the WPP steering committee — planning and development administrator Jefferson Murphree, assistant planning and development administrator Freda Eisenberg, chief environmental analyst Marty Shea, town trustee Ed Warner and councilwoman Bridget Fleming — helped launch the website www.waterfrontprotectionsouthampton.org.

While it’s certainly an effort to share information with the public, it is also important for culling information from the public as the town continues to pursue drafting this plan to protect its waterways, according to Eisenberg.

As she explained to Southampton Town board members at a meeting last Friday, December 16, the website is part of an agreement the town made with the state one year ago when it accepted grant money to create a Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan (LWRP).

“One of the components of our contract with the state is to have a community outreach program,” Eisenberg explained.

Since it launched nearly two months ago, Eisenberg said the site has seen several hundred hits a month and has generated several comments from the public. Many of the issues raised on the website are being addressed by members of the town’s consulting agency, the Urban Harbors Institute at the University of Massachusetts.

While individual questions may not necessarily get answered directly, Eisenberg said the consultants will search comments for common themes and address overarching issues.

The website also includes research and information, such as the town’s current Peconic Estuary Plan and Regional Plan. And it further clarifies information, such as explaining why the town decided to develop a Waterfront Protection Plan — the town’s own terminology — rather than a Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan, or LWRP.

An LWRP — a common method of putting plans in place to protect local waterways that many local municipalities (including Sag Harbor) have already adopted — is technically what the state’s grant money is earmarked for.

However, Eisenberg explained, “the reason why it’s ‘waterfront protection,’ not LWRP, is that … the term ‘revitalization’ has connotations of redevelopment that aren’t particularly consistent with what we want to do in Southampton. The emphasis here is on protection and preservation enhancement.”

The website, she added, is important for getting information to the public in a more timely and efficient fashion.

“Instead of waiting until we have a complete plan at the end of the project to come out for a public hearing, we’re going to post material as it becomes available,” she said.

In January, Eisenberg said the committee plans to upload a research report submitted by the project consultants.

“They admitted they were a little overwhelmed by the amount of information Southampton has out there,” she added. “But, we’re still pretty comfortable in keeping to the finish date.”

The town is only one year into its two-year contract with the state.

East End Digest – November 20

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Pierson Takes The Challenge

(Left to right) Pierson academic advisor Frank Atkinson-Barnes, with students Andrew Mitchell, Amanda Holder, “The Challenge” host Scott Feldman, students Zachary Fischman, Celia Gianis and Devan Stachecki during a break while filming Cablevision’s “The Challenge,” which will air at 6:30 p.m. and 9:30 p.m. on Sunday, November 16 on News 12.

All-star student scholars from Pierson High School will challenge Cold Spring Harbor High School in the first round of the 12th season of Cablevision’s “The Challenge,” an academic quiz show designed to test students’ knowledge in a Jeopardy-style format. Hosted by News 12 Long Island anchor Scott Feldman, the show can be viewed on Sunday November 12 or anytime via video on demand (VOD) through News 12 Interactive, located on iO TV channel 612.

In its 12th season, “The Challenge” includes students from the Bronx and Brooklyn, Long Island, the Westchester/Hudson Valley region, New Jersey and Connecticut. More than 900 students representing 184 tri-state area high schools are participating this season.

As this season of “The Challenge” progresses, schools will vie each week to continue on in the competition, which ultimately results in the best teams from each region facing off against each other next spring. Regional champions will then compete for the ultimate title, Tri-State Challenge Champion. The winning team in each region will receive $2,500 and go on to compete for $10,000 in the Tri-State Championship. Each student participating in the championship match will receive $500.

Southampton Town: Completing An LWRP

Southampton supervisor Linda Kabot announced today that the Town of Southampton has been named the recipient of a $100,000 New York State grant to finance a number of plans to stimulate community projects relating to economic, environmental, and recreational improvements.

As part of that process, town staff will prepare a Harbor Management Plan and Intermunicipal Waterbody Management Plan, while consultants integrate them into a full Local Waterfront Revitalization Program (LWRP).

“Whether it has been fishermen seeking abundance, beachgoers looking for an unspoiled ribbon of paradise, or someone looking to build a dream house, the waterfront has been the center of our economic and cultural life,” said Kabot. New York’s waterfronts extend more than 5,000 miles, including the Town of Southampton’s 320 miles of bay and ocean coastline.

According to the office of New York State Governor David Paterson, the grant will be part of a $23.3 million funding package from the State Environmental Protection Fund’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program. In total, it will include funding for 88 undertakings across New York State, and cover a variety of planning, design, and construction projects. The grants are awarded on a 50-50 matching basis, and administered by the Department of State’s Division of Coastal Resources.

To date, 76 local governments in New York have completed Local Waterfront Revitalization Programs designed to protect and enhance these valuable resources, added Governor Paterson. Working with the state, they will “plan and develop projects that provide public waterfront access, protect and develop coastal resources, and improve quality of life,” he concluded.

Bridgehampton: Wrap a Box of Kindness

Today, Thursday, November 13, the Bridgehampton Parent Teacher Organization will hold its first annual “Wrap a Box of Kindness” event. This event is in conjunction with Operation Christmas Child’s campaign where shoeboxes are filled with items for children.  Items range from pencils, pads, small toys and novelty items to washcloths and toothbrushes. Children and adults are encouraged to come together to donate items, money and time. Participants are also urged to bring a shoebox already decorated and stuffed to the Bridgehampton School for drop off if they are unable to attend. The PTO is asking that liquids not be included in the boxes.

As a part of the event, this year an estimated eight million shoeboxes will be hand-delivered to children in over 100 countries. The kids-helping-kids project has collected more than 61 million shoebox gifts and hand-delivered them to needy children in 130 countries since 1993. Every United States President since Ronald Reagan has packed an Operation Christmas Child shoebox gift.

Community and schools members alike are invited to the school for the event at 6:30 p.m. in the gymnasium.

Peconic Land Trust: Bridge Gardens Donated

John v.H. Halsey, President of the Peconic Land Trust, announced the donation of Bridge Gardens, a five-acre garden on Mitchell’s Lane in Bridgehampton, by founders Jim Kilpatric and Harry Neyens. Kilpatric and Neyens founded Bridge Gardens over 20 years ago, and the donation represents a generous gift by them to the Trust as well as to residents and visitors of the East End.

“We believe the stewardship of the Peconic Land Trust will significantly guide Bridge Gardens into the future,” Kilpatric said.

“Gardens are living creations and must undergo change over time; to survive, they must change,” Neyens added.

In accepting the donation Halsey said, “Bridge Gardens is truly a wonderful sanctuary here on the East End, and we are very honored that Jim and Harry have put their trust in us to steward this property. We intend to keep Jim and Harry engaged with us as the garden evolves and we work to expand public access to this hidden treasure. We expect to introduce more educational programming related to gardening and conservation in general. Bridge Gardens is a refuge for people to meet and experience the handiwork that Jim and Harry have created over the years.”

The garden, which has been open to the public from Memorial Day weekend through September, will reopen again in the spring under the auspices of the trust. The trust has appointed Rick Bogusch, master gardener and landscape architect, as Garden Manager.  He will be responsible for managing and maintaining the garden and residence/education center. Prior to joining the trust, Bogusch held landscape design and gardening positions with Rockland Farm in Canaan, The Old Chatham Sheepherding Company, and Cornell University where he also received his Masters in Landscape Architecture. 

Bogusch will work with members of the trust staff to coordinate educational programs and tours at the Gardens, as well as special events and related fundraising activities. An advisory committee has also been established – including members of the trust board, staff, garden experts and local residents – to work with Bogusch on future evolution of the garden.

Bridge Gardens was established in 1988 by Neyens and Kilpatric, who designed and installed the gardens over the ensuing 10 years. In 1997, Bridge Gardens Trust was created as a charitable corporation to maintain and preserve the gardens.

Bridge Gardens will be open to the public from Memorial Day weekend through September. Days, hours and other information regarding visiting the Gardens will be announced in early spring, including membership options.

Southampton Hospital: Diabetes Awareness

Southampton, Hospital will present a free panel discussion “Diabetes: Awareness and Treatment” with a seven person panel of experts in the field that including George Keckeisen, MD, Medical Director of the hospital’s wound care center, Alan Goldenberg, MD, endocrinologist; Joshua Feiner, MD, endocrinologist, Judy O’Connell, Nurse Practioner (NP), certified diabetes educator, Pat Vonatski, registered dietician and certified diabetes educator and Peggy Kraus, MA registered clinical exercise physiologist.

Diabetes affects over 24 million children and adults in the United States, contributes to the deaths of over 220,000 Americans each year and costs our nation more than $174 billion annually. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not produce or properly use insulin. Insulin is a hormone that is needed to convert sugar, starches and other food into energy for life. The cause of diabetes continues to be a mystery, although genetics and environmental factors such as diet, obesity and lack of exercise appear to play roles. 

This comprehensive program is designed for people who already have diabetes, those whose family history puts them at risk and those who have a diabetic spouse, partner, relative or friend. It is free and open to the public and will take place on Thursday, November 20 at 5 p.m. in Parrish Memorial Hall, corner of Lewis Street and Herrick Road. In addition, Southampton Hospital offers expert counseling services with a board certified diabetes nurse educator and diabetes support group that meets every month.

The program will provide an in-depth view of diabetes prevention, management and treatment in an informative, interactive panel discussion. Dr. Keckeisen will report on the huge success the hospital’s Center for Advanced Wound Healing, the only location on the East End offering the latest innovations for healing chronic wounds that frequently afflicts diabetics; much of this success is accomplished by using the Center’s state-of-the-art hyperbaric chambers which infuse chronic wounds with oxygen for faster, better results.  Patients, who have suffered from wounds for months, even years, are routinely restored to health in less time ever thought possible. Dr. Goldenberg, who is board certified in endocrinology and diabetes, along with his new partner, Dr. Joshua Feiner, also an endocrinologist, will review and evaluate the latest advances in medications to control diabetes.  Ms. O’Connell, creator and director of the hospital’s program, “Diabetes: Basics and Beyond” will discuss steps to avoid prevent diabetes as well as comprehensive treatment plans for those with diabetes.  Ms. Vonatski will outline nutritional plans for maximum health, both as a prevention and treatment. Ms. Kraus will make recommendations for glucose monitoring and exercise for diabetics. The panel will conclude with a question-and-answer session, there will be a raffle and giveaways for those attending.

This free program is very popular and space fill up quickly. Call 726-8700, extension 8 between 9 a.m. and 5 p.m. Monday through Friday to register or email dcraven@southamptonhospital.org.