Tag Archive | "mary wilson"

Public Dissent on Dark Skies

Tags: , , , , , , , , , ,


When the “Dark Skies” legislation was first proposed by Southampton Town Councilwoman Nancy Graboski, it appeared to be praised by members of the public. Local citizen advisory groups, including the Sag Harbor CAC, had long asked the town for laws impeding light pollution to be put on the books.
Oddly enough, at the first public hearing held on Tuesday, the “Dark Skies” law was met with both outrage and congratulations from local residents.
Richard Warren, the village’s planning consultant, spoke against the draft law on behalf of the Southampton Business Alliance.
“This will incur significant costs for [residents] personally. I know from my own experience an electrician can cost $250 just to come to your house,” said Warren, who is the president of the alliance. He added that the legislation should apply to only new construction or a homeowner building a new addition. Warren believes the town should create incentives for people with pre-existing outdoor lighting to adopt “Dark Skies” lighting. In the current version of the law, all pre-existing outdoor lighting must be brought into compliance within 10 years of the legislation becoming effective.
Some supporters of the law, including a representative from the Group for the East End, suggested town residents be given only five years to become compliant.
Bob Schepps, president of the Southampton Chamber of Commerce, said the legislation would essentially over regulate town residents.
Assistant town attorney Joe Burke said the intent of the law was to reduce light pollution, to cut down on electricity waste and to prevent the glare or “sky glow” which can infringe on the night sky vista.
“We don’t regulate lighting at all right now,” reported supervisor Linda Kabot. “What Nancy is trying to do is put a comprehensive lighting code on the books.”
Graboski adjourned the hearing and carried it over to the June 23 town board meeting at 6 p.m.

Young Vets Get Benefits of Affordable Housing
In a previous Southampton Town board meeting, the resolution giving military veterans of Iraq and Afghanistan first priority on certain affordable housing properties received criticism from the public. Some said it was unfair to single out one particular group of veterans to benefit from the program, though councilman Christopher Nuzzi, who sponsored the legislation, said all income-eligible veterans are included in the general lottery. During Tuesday’s board meeting, however, town residents came out in support of the legislation.
“This law was inspired by several non-profit housing organizations looking to do something good for returning veterans. These young people who go off to war often have to delay a career,” said former town supervisor Patrick “Skip” Heaney, the current county economic development and workforce housing commissioner. Heaney added that the law piggybacks a similar one passed by the county.
“This is aimed at first time home buyers,” continued Heaney.
Daniel Stebbins, a 43-year-old veteran, said housing prices in the town are prohibitively expensive for young residents, forcing them to move elsewhere.
“It would be a shame if in 50 years, there were no vets here,” noted Stebbins.
The board passed the legislation becoming the first town within the county to do so.
“It is great to have Southampton be the model. We hope other towns will meld this into their own code,” remarked Kabot.

Town to Buy Pike Farm, Waiting for County
In a partnership with the county, the town plans to buy the development rights to a 7.4 acre farm on Sagg Main Street in Sagaponack, where the Pike Farm Stand operates. The rights will be purchased from the Peconic Land Trust for around $6.4 million. Suffolk County has promised to pay 70 percent of the purchase price.
“This is a community treasure — that is why you see the county stepping up to the plate,” said Kabot, but added that the purchase was contingent on the county partnership.
Mary Wilson, the town’s community preservation fund manager, wasn’t sure if the county’s recent plan to use their main open space funding source to abate county property taxes would affect the purchase of the development rights. During a later interview, county legislator Jay Schneiderman said open space projects are now on hold until the county votes on this legislation, which is expected to be up for a vote in the coming weeks.

Kabot Wants to Create “Lock Box” For CPF

Tags: , , , , , , , , ,


In light of Southampton Town’s troubled finances and decreased revenues, supervisor Linda Kabot asked the town board to consider “lock boxing” money for the Community Preservation Fund (CPF). Kabot says the plan would allow the town to continue paying off the CPF’s annual debt without relying on the general fund to cover any shortfalls from decreases in transfer taxes, which is the CPF’s main revenue source.
“You would do this in your own home. If you had a mortgage and you lost your job, you would want a savings account to pay for your obligation,” explained Kabot. “We have a mortgage on the CPF program that is over $100 million.”
Over the past 10 years the town spent around $400 million on land purchases, continued Kabot, but only received $300 million in transfer tax revenue. The remainder of this expense was procured through bonding. This year the town will pay around $9 million towards the principal and interest on these bonds, though next year these payments will increase to roughly $10 million. Kabot said the town should be “judicious” when deciding whether to purchase a piece of property in the future as the town will most likely have to bond for future purchases.
“If we are getting $1 million a month in revenue that is $12 million for the year, minus $10 million which is spoken for for debt services, leaving us with $2 million if we are giving certain school districts and other eligible districts PILOTs [Payment In Lieu of Taxes],” explained Kabot. “If you’re going to be paying for land and you aren’t doing it on a pay as you go basis, you may be borrowing and that will increase your debt services.”
Based on recommendations made by former town comptroller Steve Brautigam, Kabot’s plan, which is in the form of a resolution, calls for the creation of a $1.2 million preliminary cushion fund. This money is already in CPF coffers and was transferred there at the end of 2008, when it was ascertained that the CPF fund paid too much into the town’s debt clearing fund.
CPF manager Mary Wilson said the second part of the resolution would “designate a portion of future monthly revenues” which would go into this rainy day or debt reserve fund. For the next six months of 2009, Brautigam proposed that $250,000 in CPF revenue be segregated for this fund. In 2010, the town would increase the allotted savings to $350,000 per month.
“The goal is to get up to a point where there is at least $11 million in this reserve fund or at least one year’s debt services,” said Wilson.
Current town comptroller Tamara Wright said the town’s projections of receiving around $1 million a month in revenue wasn’t conservative. She added that last month, the town received only slightly over $1 million, but in the prior months, received under $1 million.
“If we were planning conservatively, by my estimation, you would be almost $3 million short of being able to reserve adequately,” said Wright. “If the revenue streams stay where they are, paying for properties out of cash is going to be very difficult for the next 18 to 24 months.”
“The dilemma is that this is an unprecedented opportunity to stockpile open spaces at prices that aren’t going to stay at this level in our lifetime,” observed councilwoman Anna Throne-Holst. “We need to look at the bigger picture. It is estimated that for every $1 of land that is developed rather than preserved $1.30 is needed to provide services for the infrastructure that goes with that.”
Kabot said she hoped the board would come to a consensus vote at the next town board meeting on Tuesday, June 9.

Board Sets Costs For Managing CPF for Southampton

Tags: , , , ,


Two weeks ago, the town of Southampton was able to use the Community Preservation Fund (CPF) to protect 22 acres near Bullshead Bay in Southampton owned by the Corwin family. At a public hearing on Friday afternoon, the CPF was discussed at the same meeting in which the town board talked about their tentative budget for 2009.

At the town’s work session last Friday, Mary Wilson, Community Preservation Fund Manager for the town presented a management and stewardship plan as required by the state. In July the state’s enabling legislation was amended to require a plan prior to the expenditure of CPF revenue for management and stewardship projects. This Stewardship and Management Plan is compiled to provide a description and estimated cost for each project to be expensed to the fund over a three-year period.

Wilson said that the projected management and stewardship costs for the next three years in Southampton is $1.8 million.

“We put in $500,000 for this year’s budget and $630,000 for 2010 and 2011,” said Wilson who stressed those numbers were only an estimate.

According to Wilson, the day-to-day expenses in taking care of properties purchased through CPF must also be presented in the plan, including the maintenance of properties, bicycle paths, security lighting, among other things.

At Friday’s work session, Councilman Chris Nuzzi asked Wilson, “Can we still pay for the staff out of CPF?”

Supervisor Linda Kabot replied, “We can pay for some staff but we don’t pay for groundskeepers and other prohibited expenses include elected official salaries, that was done at the state level in response to what happened in East Hampton Town.”

Last winter it was discovered that in East Hampton, CPF monies were borrowed to cover other expenses in town.

In the proposal there are four staff members considered as part of this plan. The management and stewardship plan specifically outlines which projects may benefit from the budget — it includes only those projects that promote the protection or enhancement of the natural, scenic and open space character of the property. The plan also outlines the nine areas that will be targeted as the highest priority for preservation such as the Long Pond Green Belt area of the Sag Harbor/Bridgehampton. 

The hearing was closed but left open with a 10 day written comment period. Kabot said the board would need to table it until November 12, for the next board meeting.