Tag Archive | "Montauk"

“Painting the Population” Looks for Funding

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Aubrey Roemer with "Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project."

Aubrey Roemer with “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project.”

Aubrey Roemer, the Brooklyn artist behind the “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project” has launched a kickstarter campaign to further the project, and her art, as she aims to publish a book of her work, and expand the project into Nicaragua and Indonesia.

“Leviathan: The Montauk Project” was started as Ms. Roemer began painting hundreds of portraits of Montauk residents on linens forged from the town, exhibiting them in four consecutive installations.

Now, Ms. Roemer hopes to travel to Chichigalpa, the lowlands of Nicaragua, through the La Isla Foundation, and document the chronic kidney disease and chronic renal failure epidemic facing sugarcane workers in the region.

“There is a near media blackout of the issue,” said Ms. Rowmer. “And we are looking to gain global attention through the archaic yet poignant platform of art making.”

After Nicaragua, Ms. Roemer also plans to travel to Indonesia to create an anthropological portrait study of the Buginese, an ancient group of seafaring folk scattered throughout Indonesia.

Lastly, the campaign will help pay for Ms. Roemer to join an artist residency at the Vermont Studio Center prior to her travels. During that residency, she plans to finish “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project,” and prep it for publication.

Ms. Roemer is hoping to raise $3,000 by November 15, and already has $2,102 in donations through kickstarter by 38 individual backers. On every funding level, Ms. Roemer offers her supporters works of art to show her appreciation.

For more information, visit kickstarter.com/projects/1227894691/leviathan-montauk-to-lombok-painting-the-population.

Bishop, Zeldin Offer Divergent Views at Debate

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Congressman Tim Bishop addresses the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday, as his challenger, Lee Zeldin, listens. Michael Heller photo,

Congressman Tim Bishop addresses the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday, as his challenger, Lee Zeldin, listens. Michael Heller photo.

By Stephen J. Kotz

In what has become an almost daily occurrence in this year’s campaign, the two candidates for Congress in the 1st District, incumbent Democrat Tim Bishop and Republican challenger Lee Zeldin, offered up sharply differing views in a debate last Thursday, October 16.

Mr. Bishop touted his track record of providing excellent constituent service and his ability to bring the federal government “to the table to solve individual problems,” calling it “life-altering work.” He said he was recently told he had “a laser-like focus on my constituents. I took that as very high praise because that is exactly what I have done.”

Mr. Zeldin, who repeatedly attacked the size of government, wasteful spending as well as the domestic and foreign policies of President Barack Obama and said he supported term limits, said Mr. Bishop was part of the problem. “If you elected enough people like my opponent,” he said, “Nancy Pelosi would be the Speaker of the House.”

With the spread of the Ebola virus into the United States a top news story in recent weeks, both candidates said they agreed on at least one thing: that President Obama has not done enough.

“I think the president is making a mistake in not putting into place a travel ban to west Africa,” where the virus is spreading unchecked, said Mr. Bishop. He said he would support reconvening Congress before its scheduled November 12 session to deal with the problem.

Mr. Zeldin described the president’s handling of the health crisis as “terrible” and said it was time to “have maximum security procedures at our airports.”

Last week’s debate, one of some 75 joint appearances by the candidates scheduled between Labor Day and Election Day, was sponsored by the League of Women Voters of the Hamptons and held at Westhampton Beach High School. The pair also faced off at a candidates’ forum sponsored by the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday.

Both candidates spent a considerable amount of time complaining about the negative tone the campaign has taken, with political action committees on both sides filling mailboxes with literature and radio and television with ads targeting the opponent.

Mr. Zeldin said “Nancy Pelosi’s super PAC is spending seven figures targeting us, trying to scare women” into believing that if he were elected women would wind up paying more for health care coverage and lose the right to have abortions. Other campaign literature wrongly suggested he would require taxpayers to foot the bill for corporate polluters, Mr. Zeldin complained.

“You can repeat a lie over and over and over again and eventually people will be believe it,” he said.

That brought a chuckle from Mr. Bishop. “It’s pretty cheeky on the part of my opponent to talk about our end, given the scurrilous nature of the ads his side is running against us,” he said.

The incumbent Congressman said Supreme Court rulings opening campaigns to unlimited corporate and special interest financing were “fundamentally imperiling our democracy. We are now in the realm where elections are bought and sold as opposed to won or lost,” he said.

Mr. Zeldin complained that a Bishop ad campaign was trying to scare senior citizens into believing he wanted to cut Social Security payments. “I would never vote for any piece of legislation that would take one dime away from anyone who is a senior or close to retirement,” Mr. Zeldin said.

But Mr. Bishop said Mr. Zeldin has in the past supported the idea of allowing those 40 and younger to put their Social Security withholding into personal investment accounts. “That’s privatization, folks,” he said. And the result would be dramatic shortfall in funding for the Social Security trust fund, which would require a reduction in benefits paid to current retirees.

“We either tell seniors we were only kidding or we borrow,” said Mr. Bishop, adding, “My opponent obviously does not understand how the trust fund works.”

The $17.8 billion national debt is growing beyond control, according to Mr. Zeldin, who said both the Obama and George W. Bush administrations had spent too much money. “We need to pick a number…. $18 trillion? $20 trillion? $22 trillion? When is enough in regards to our nation’s debt,” he said.

“The easiest thing in the world is to say cut spending,” responded Mr. Bishop. “The hardest thing in the world is to actually do it.”

To illustrate his point, he said 48 cents of every federal dollar is earmarked for retirees, 18 cents for defense and 9 cents for interest on the national debt. That leaves only 25 cents of every federal dollar eligible for cuts, he said, adding that he was not going to be the one to cut Social Security payments, veterans’ healthcare or federal law enforcement.”

Mr. Zeldin said that more needs to be done to reduce welfare fraud and provide private sector jobs to entice people to leave the unemployment rolls.

“The incumbent is not giving you a single thing that is going to make this bloated federal government operate more efficiently,” Mr Zeldin said.

“What the incumbent Congressman has done was vote for a piece of legislation that capped the growth of domestic spending and saved $2 trillion,” Mr. Bishop shot back.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was also a topic of contention, with Mr. Zeldin saying there were portions of the sweeping healthcare legislation that should be preserved, such as allowing children to remain on their parents’ policies until the age of 26 and the requirement that prevents insurers from refusing coverage to those with preexisting conditions. But most of the program needs to be scrapped because it has resulted in higher premiums, fewer choices for consumers and other problems,” he said.

“There should be a productive dialog between Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives” to fix the healthcare system, he said.

“I suppose that conversation should begin with repeal rather than fixing,” said Mr. Bishop, pointing out that “there is no commitment on the part of the majority party to fix it,” noting that the House has voted more than 50 times, along party lines, to repeal the legislation. He described it as “a work in progress” that needs to be improved. “There are many good things that we should keep and build on and elements that we should fix,” he said.

On immigration, Mr. Zeldin said the first order of business was to tighten border security. “When you a leak, the first thing you do is shut off the faucet,” he said. “You don’t grab a mop.”

Mr. Bishop said that the Republican-controlled House has refused to recognize the need to deal with the millions of illegal immigrants who are already here. A bipartisan Senate bill offered increased border security as well as a path to citizenship, he said, but the House would not act on it. “Is it perfect?” he said. “No. But it is a way that is dealing with a problem that has no easy solutions.”

Mr. Zeldin also criticized President Obama’s leadership against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, saying the president’s strategy would never be successful in defeating the militants. For his part, Mr. Bishop cited the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff who told a Senate committee there was no easy way to militarily defeat ISIS. Mr. Bishop said he would not support a return of American troops to Iraq.

The candidates parted along predictable party lines on a number of other issues, with Mr. Bishop supporting an increase in the minimum wage, a woman’s right to have an abortion, and same sex marriage, while Mr. Zeldin said a minimum wage hike would backfire, that he was pro-life and that he believed marriage should be considered between a man and a woman.

Mr., Bishop said he would work for federal money to help solve some of the growing problems with Long Island’s groundwater, while Mr. Zeldin said he thought such solutions were better left at the state and local level.

Although it is a state initiative, Mr. Zeldin said he opposed Common Core, which he said was setting school children up to fail, while Mr. Bishop said he supported higher educational standards and recognized that the “rollout of Common Core was the only thing that could make the rollout of Obamacare look good.”

Benefit for Montauk Beaches This Friday, October 24

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: Surfrider Foundation members standing in the footprint of the proposed geotextile bag reinforced dune that, if built, will destroy our public beach. Juliana Duryea photo

: Surfrider Foundation members standing in the footprint of the proposed geotextile bag reinforced dune that, if built, will destroy our public beach. Juliana Duryea photo

The Eastern Long Island Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is continuing its protest of the Army Corps of Engineers’ proposal to construct an artificial dune in downtown Montauk with a benefit concert at Amagansett’s The Stephen Talkhouse on Friday, October 24 at 7 p.m.

The event will feature acoustic groove rock music by Jettykoon, with special musical guests, as well as a detailed discussion of the Corps plans for downtown Montauk beaches. The proposed work includes placing 14,000 sand bags – each weighing 1.7 tons – along 3,100 linear feet of the ocean intertidal zone seaward of the existing motels and seaward of the natural primary dune line in that area. The bags will be covered with a layer of sand and planted with beachgrass. East Hampton Town and Suffolk County will be required to maintain the sand capping and beachgrass.

The Surfrider Foundation will also use the evening to celebrate what it views as a victory in a recent East Hampton Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) decision to levy a positive declaration under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) on an ocean front revetment application for a property that adjoins Shadmoor State Park.

“Surfrider Foundation’s position is that our public beach is our greatest asset and its long term protection warrants top priority,” said the organization in a press release. “Reflected wave energy from the geotextile bags and rock revetments will quickly erode the public beach.”

 

Surfrider Targets Army Corps’ Montauk Project

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DontBagOurBeach

Members of the Eastern Long Island chapter of the Surfrider Foundation staged a protest of the Army Corps of Engineers’ proposal to construct an artificial dune on the publicly owned beach in downtown Montauk on Thursday, October 9.

The proposed work includes placing 14,000 sand bags—each weighing 1.7 tons—along 3,100 feet of the ocean intertidal zone seaward of the existing motels and seaward of the natural primary dune line in that area. The bags will be covered with a layer of sand and planted with beachgrass, a cosmetic touch that coastal geologist Dr. Robert Young describes as “the lipstick on the pig.”

In a press release, the foundation charged that the Army Corps’ proposal flies in the face of the advice offered by three well known and respected coastal geologists who have reviewed the situation in downtown Montauk: Dr. Young, Dr. Stephen Leatherman, and Dr. Orrin Plikey. All three have stated that sand-filled geotextile bags mimic bulkheads and other hard structures in terms of their impact on beaches.

The Army Corps’ proposal prioritizes the value and protection of privately owned commercial structures over that of the public beach, the group said in a release. “Surfrider Foundation’s position is that the public beach is the East End’s greatest asset and its long term protection warrants top priority. Reflected wave energy from the geotextile bags will quickly erode the public beach.”

The foundation also said that the motels on the beach were constructed many years ago on top of the existing primary dune, destroying that natural resource. “This proposal will compound the mistakes made in the 1960s and 1970s: it will result in the destruction of the beach in addition to the already destroyed primary dune,” the group’s release stated.

Laraine Creegan

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Laraine Creegan has been the executive director of the Montauk Chamber of Commerce for the past 10 years. She discusses how Montauk businesses fared this summer and the upcoming Fall Festival, the Chamber’s biggest fundraiser of the year. 

In recent years, Montauk seems to have blown up in popularity. Streets seemed busier than ever this season, how was the summer for local businesses?

It was good, it was very good. I think the weather makes for a big difference – anytime you have good weather out here it really carries you through, particularly in the fall.

And how has the fall tourist season changed? Has that also become busier?

Oh yes. I think, again, it goes back to the weather. Fishing is always good in the fall. Through September and October, there are striped bass, people go crazy – whether they be surfcasting or taking charters, fishermen are pretty busy because the fish are running, so that’s really what it’s all about. And the fall generally has been busy because of all of the events. People come out to Montauk to relax and go out to dinner and to lay back, but they also want something to do. And so other than shuttling them off to the North Fork, we like to have events and we do pretty much try to do that. There was an event this past weekend – the archaeology festival – at the Second House Museum. And the seafood festival we had last weekend – all of those things bring people out. And also weddings, weddings have become increasingly popular out here particularly in September and October.

Have businesses been staying open longer into the season to accommodate for this change? 

A few more, I think what’s going to make a difference is keeping that Long Island Rail Road available. You know what it is, [business owners] are working so hard, to work seven days a week throughout the whole summer that it makes it difficult; they do start to take time off after Labor Day. I try to talk them into staying open, but the issue with that is finding help. That’s the toughest part.

This weekend is Montauk’s 33rd Annual Fall Festival, and with that, the annual Clam Chowder Competition on Saturday. How does that fierce competition work?

Well the chowder competition is almost an event of its own. The idea was to get people involved, we didn’t want to start voting, because people only got two tastes, how can you fairly do that? So I really insisted that we have to have judges. This will be the sixth year we’ve had a panel of judges and it really has worked out very well. We really are very cautious of how we do it: the pots are numbered so nobody knows, the judges sit behind, away from the checks. There are about five or six people on the panel, (including our very own Gavin Menu from The Sag Harbor Express.)

How else has the event evolved in your tenure?

When I first started here, ten years ago, it was pumpkin decorating, we sold hot dogs, hamburgers and sodas and we had pony rides, a wagon ride and that was about it. So we started to think of how to make it a little bit more festive. Then I was able to get the inflatable rides, from there it went to the carousel. The food tent has grown so we’re doing sausages and peppers, roasted corn, hot dogs and hamburgers, those big pretzels and beer and wine – that was added as well. The farmer’s market will also be under the tent. And this is also the third year we’ll have fireworks, that’ll be at 7 p.m. on Saturday night. We just try to make it fun and exciting – it’s really a fun family event.  It’s also a nice way for locals to get a chance to enjoy their hometown in the off-season.

The Fall Festival will take place on Saturday and Sunday, October 12 and 13, from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. right in the heart of Montauk’s Main Street. For those craving a cup of chowder, Ms. Creegan suggests getting to the festival before 1 p.m., when the soup usually runs out. For more information about the festival, or if you’re interested in volunteering, call the Chamber of Commerce at (631) 668-2428.

 

 

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Southampton Hospital and the Coalition for Women’s Cancers at the hospital have planned a slew of events to increase awareness and raise funds to support local breast cancer survivors, starting with the lighting of a Pink Ribbon Tree at the Southampton Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday.

Other events include a Breast Cancer Awareness Health Fair on Friday, October 3, at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in East Hampton from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.;  the fourth annual Breast Cancer Summit at The Coral House in Baldwin from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 7; the Give Where You Live Campaign Kickoff at Parrish Memorial Hall at Southampton Hospital at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 8; Look Good, Feel Better at the Hampton Bays Library on October 14 from 1 to 3 p.m. the Shelter Island 5k Run/Walk on October 18 at 11 a.m. at Crescent Beach on Shelter Island; a Birdhouse Auction at the Southampton Social Club on Elm Street at 6 p.m. on October 18; a Shopping Benefit at Calypso at 21 Newtown Lane in East Hampton on October 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.; and Free Makeovers for Breast Cancer Survivors at Macy’s in Hampton Bays on October 24 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

In addition, there will be three Charity of the Month promotions. Sabrosa Mexican Grill on Montauk Highway in Water Mill will donate the total bill amount for the 100th customer each day in October to the Coalition for Women’s Cancers. The Deborah Thompson Day Spa at the Plaza in Montauk will donate 10 percent from all treatments during the month, and Panera Bread on Montauk Highway in Hampton Bays will donate a portion of the proceeds from the sale of pink ribbon bagels to the Huntington Breast Cancer Action Coalition, the Adelphi NY Statewide Breast Cancer Hotline and Support Program and the The Breast Cancer Research Program at Cold Spring Harbor Research Laboratory during the month.

For more about the various breast cancer awareness events, call (631) 726-8715.

East Hampton Calls for Volunteers for Beach Cleanup

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The East Hampton Town Recycling and Litter Committee announced this week that it will participate in the Ocean Conservancy’s International Coastal Cleanup Day this Saturday, September 20.

The program asks volunteers to come out and clean up any local beaches while recording the types of trash found on the beaches, according to a press release from Councilwoman Sylvia Overby on September 16.

“This information will help the Conservancy collect and analyze data that will raise awareness, identify debris hotspots of unusual trash events and can help communities adopt policies that will work towards cleaner oceans,” the release read.

Garbage bags and disposable gloves will be supplied by the town of East Hampton; anyone interested in participating can pick up free bags and gloves and a data collection form from Town Hall through Friday, September 19. Volunteers can leave full trash bags by town garbage cans on Saturday and they will be picked up by the parks department.

Volunteers who document their day of cleanup on Saturday are asked to e-mail them to soverby@ehamptonny.gov so they can put on the town’s website. For more information about the Ocean Conservancy’s Coastal Cleanup Day, visit oceanconservancy.org.

 

Surfing for Autism in Montauk

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By Tessa Raebeck

With the goal of helping to foster an understanding and acceptance of autism, Surfers Healing uses the “transformative experience of surfing” to both support kids and families living with autism and show others just how much kids with autism are capable of accomplishing.5

A fundraiser for Surfers Healing will be held at Solé East Resort in Montauk on Thursday, September 11, at 6 p.m. A barbecue and live music by the Dan Bailey Tribe will be followed by the screening of “Expencive Porno Movie,” “a delightfully retro 45 minutes of experimental surf film shot entirely on Super 16mm,” according to a press release, and more music from Winston Irie and the Selective Security Band.

There will be a raffle of new gear from Montauk’s homegrown clothing company, Whalebone Creative, with proceeds going to Surfers Healing. Ales from Montauk Brewing Company will supplement the all-you-can-eat barbecue.

Over the last 15 years, Surfers Healing has made a difference in the lives of families and kids living with autism. The organization took 4,500 kids surfing last year and plans to continue growing. The camps are free and Surfers Healing hopes to add sponsorships for families who are unable to afford to travel to camp.

The Backyard at Solé East is located at 90 Second House Road in Montauk. Tickets are $25 per person for the BBQ, but entrance to the event is free. For more information, call Solé East at (631) 668-2105.

CCOM Reports Water Tests

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Now in its second year, the Concerned Citizens of Montauk in partnership with the Surfrider Foundation’s nationwide Blue Water Task Force water quality testing program has been sampling Montauk and Amagansett water bodies for the bacteria enterococcus.

Each week trained volunteers collect and test samples from Ditch Plain, Lake Montauk and Fort Pond in Montauk and Fresh Pond in Amagansett and post the results on Surfrider’s Blue Water Task Force portal.

In the most recent test results, collected during the week ending August 22, bacteria levels ranged from low to high at the 15 sites tested, with the highest levels reported at the Fort Pond launching ramp and East Creek in Lake Montauk. Medium levels of the bacteria were found on the Industrial Road side of Fort Pond and Little Reed Pond Creek near Lake Montauk, with all other tested sites showing little or no bacteria.

PSEG Gets an Earful in East Hampton

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Heller_PSEG Public Meeting 8-26-14_4568_LR

New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr., East Hampton Village Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach, Jr., and East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell listened to a presentation by Mike Voltz of PSEG and a public hearing at the East Hampton Emergency Services Building on Tuesday, August 26. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Mara Certic

There was hardly a spare seat in the house on Tuesday, August 26, for an informational session and public hearing hosted by the State Department of Public Services on PSEG Long Island’s Utility 2.0 Long-Range Plan.

PSEG Long Island, a subsidiary of New Jersey-based PSEG, submitted the plan to the DPS on July 1, and almost immediately came under fire for failing to provide specifics about it as well as its decision to install 50-to-65-foot utility poles through portions of East Hampton Village last winter.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell and East Hampton Village Mayor Paul F. Rickenbach Jr. wrote a joint letter to PSEG, asking that it hold a public meeting in East Hampton because the utility targeted the East End for major upgrades in the plan.

“We believe the Utility 2.0 Long Range Plan needs clarification, detail and public discussion, and we urge a public dialogue for this plan for the Town and Village of East Hampton,” they wrote.

“This is a time my office can hear you, your concerns and take it all into account,” said Julia Bovey, director the New York State Department of Public Services, who hosted the meeting.

And hear from people she did, with many people lining up to once again voice their objections to the installation of the poles.

“They’re an assault on our very core,” said town resident Elena Prohaska Glynn.  “We cannot afford to despoil the landscape. Remove them; bury those lines,” she said to much applause from the audience on Tuesday night.

The new poles have resulted in the creation of two organizations—Save East Hampton and Long Island Businesses For Renewable Energy, a stop-work order issued by the town and even a lawsuit.

Some wore bright orange Save East Hampton t-shirts with “Bury The Lines” written on the back. Many of the orange shirt wearers spoke not about the new plan, but about what they feel to be a more pressing issue: the danger and unsightliness of the new, taller poles in the village.

“It’s not only a matter of aesthetics, it’s a matter of life and death,” said Helen Mendez. “Be the company that you say you are, help us have green solutions. Do what’s safe, do what’s right and bury the lines.”

All three elected officials who spoke at Tuesday night’s meeting also called for the new lines to be buried, including State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr.

“They have been willing over and over again to tax themselves to protect the quality of life here,” he said of his constituents.

East Hampton Town Supervisor Larry Cantwell also called for the lines to be buried, to thunderous applause.

Jeremy Samuelson, president of the Concerned Citizens of Montauk, gave DPS and PSEG Long Island some “history.” He explained that the public meeting process prior to the installation of the taller poles left much to be desired. The process lacked any transparency or community engagement from the utility company, he said.

“You come back a year later, and you have to eat some crow,” he said to the representatives from the DPS and PSEG. “You guys got it wrong, so that’s the history.”

“The question is,” he continued, “are you going to be our partners in fixing this mess? This thing is an atrocity; I won’t sugarcoat it for you. So the question is: LIPA isn’t in charge anymore. Are you going to help us find the somewhere between $20 million and $30 million to fix this mess?” he asked.

Elected officials and environmentalists also seemed unsatisfied by the lack of consideration for the town’s existing policy. “With regard to the presentation: that is something we would like to see more of, alternatives to fossil fuels,” Mr. Thiele said.

“The town has adopted a very important and ambitious goal,” Mr. Cantwell said of East Hampton’s decision to power all of its community-wide electricity needs with renewable energy by the year 2020. “I would urge that the power sources on the South Fork be met with renewable energy sources,” he said.

Gordian Raacke, president of Renewable Energy Long Island (RELI) criticized the shortsightedness of the plan. “I know you will make sure that while PSEG may not be in the room anymore, they will hear our comments,” he said to Ms. Bovey—about 20 minutes prior to that, it had become apparent that Mike Voltz, the director of energy efficiency and renewables for PSEG Long Island, who gave an overview of the plan, had left the meeting in the middle of the hearing.

“The plan is not a 2.0 plan. At best it’s a utility 1.1. It’s more business as usual and fails to provide a vision for utility or the future,” he said. “Work with the Town of East Hampton, work with us to build a sustainable energy future and we’ll work with you.”

PSEG needs “to be a collaborator, not an opponent,” he added. “You need to propose a better plan.

The meeting kicked off with a presentation by Mr. Voltz, who tried to shed some light on the plan and presented a series of slides and bullet points.

Mr. Voltz discussed items on the five-year plan, including a call to spend approximately $60 million on energy saving steps over the next five years, including providing programmable thermostats to upward of 60,000 residential customers.

The plan also includes a four-year-long educational campaign, at a cost of $8 million, an energy efficiency expansion in the Rockaways, which was explained in great detail as well and a $15 million initiative that would aim to install 6,000 new advanced meters in hard-to-reach locations.

The information on South Fork improvements left much to be desired, according to some of those who spoke at Tuesday night’s meeting. In that section of Mr. Voltz’s presentation, he discussed plans to use solar energy, battery storage and programmable thermostats, and also discussed the need for new generators to boost electricity output during periods of peak usage in Montauk, and other places. “They’re very old,” Mr. Voltz said of the generators, “they’re getting worn out.”