Tag Archive | "Montauk"

i-Tri Girls Find Self-Empowerment Through Triathlons

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Guadalupe Rojas mentally prepares for the race in i-tri. Photo courtesy Theresa Roden.

Guadalupe Rojas mentally prepares for the race in i-tri. Photo courtesy Theresa Roden.

By Tessa Raebeck 

Theresa Roden’s motivation to run a triathlon came from a somewhat surprising source of inspiration: sitting on the beach. While visiting Block Island, Ms. Roden, who lives in Springs, saw a group of jubilant runners dart by, turned to her family and said, quite simply, “I’m going to do this next year.”

“They all looked at me like I had 25 heads,” said Ms. Roden, who not only ran, swam and biked across Block Island the following year, but also encouraged a group of some 20 East Enders to do the same. In 2010, she founded i-tri, a six-month program that uses training for a triathlon to teach local girls about health and nutrition, self-empowerment, and camaraderie.

“For me, it was the first time in my entire life that I cut myself some slack,” Ms. Roden said of her training. “I changed that inner dialogue. We all have that negative self-talk that we do to ourselves and I, for the first time, discovered I didn’t have to be so critical and if I was just a little kinder to myself, things were a lot easier. I just totally changed the way that I felt about myself and I talked about myself and to myself—and everything started to change.”

(L to R) Marissa Harry, Kaya Mulligan, Alicia Benis  finish the i-tri race. Photo courtesy Theresa Roden.

(L to R) Marissa Harry, Kaya Mulligan, Alicia Benis finish the i-tri race. Photo courtesy Theresa Roden.

Lamenting that she hadn’t changed her self-talk 20 years earlier, when her daughter Abby entered the sixth grade, Ms. Roden created i-tri for Abby and seven other girls in her class at Springs School. I-tri expanded to the Montauk School in 2012 and to Southampton last year, and on Monday, January 26, the Sag Harbor Board of Education will vote on whether to adopt the program at Pierson Middle School.

Offered free of charge to every participant, i-tri consists of triathlon-specific training of swimming, biking or running on Saturdays, weekly group lessons focused on self-esteem building and leadership skills, after-school fitness classes such as yoga and spinning, and hands-on nutrition classes, which families are welcome to attend.

The school district is asked to provide a space for i-tri to hold the in-school sessions and possibly the nighttime nutrition sessions, for support from relevant personnel such as guidance counselors, and possibly also for transportation to certain meetings. Training and classes start in March, culminating with the race in mid-July.

While training is limited to sixth, seventh and eighth grade girls, i-tri graduates often remain involved through mentorship. The eight girls who took part the first year are now juniors at East Hampton High School, and several of them started an i-tri-inspired empowerment club that meets periodically and invites successful, local women to come speak to students.

Although crossing the finish line is the most tangible reward, i-tri is at its core about empowering the girls in all aspects of their lives.

“It’s not all about training for the race,” said Maria Chavez, a freshman at East Hampton High School who started the program as a sixth grader in Springs and plans to race again this year, adding that i-tri encouraged the girls and “made us feel confident about ourselves…and we weren’t afraid to tell each other anything; we had so much support.”

“It’s all about feeling good,” said Ms. Roden. “There’s nothing more important than that I feel good, because when I feel good I have more to give the world and when I give to the world, I get back.”

Dock to Dish Opens Florida’s First Community Supported Fishery

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Dock to Dish, the first community and restaurant supported fishery program anchored in Montauk, announced last week it would open Florida’s first ever Community Supported Fishery (CSF) in Key West in February of this year. The program is being developed in conjunction with Key West restaurateur Chris Holland and the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association. According to Dock to Dish founder Sean Barrett, the goal of this new enterprise is to bring the health benefits of locally harvested fish and seafood back to local consumers while also strengthening the in-state commercial fishing industry.

“This is the first small step in what we hope will become a Florida-wide enterprise that brings commercial fisherman, consumers, and restaurant owners together in a cause that will improve the community’s health and businesses,” said Mr. Barrett. “And do so deliciously.”

Mr. Barrett said that he picked Key West to be the second Dock to Dish market for one reason—Mr. Holland.

“We get contacted regularly about all kinds of things, but when Chris reached out we immediately knew this was a special situation,” said Mr. Barrett. “He has been working in Key West on solving the same problems we are working on in Montauk, where all too often what we see on the menus and in the grocery stores comes far from our local waters. Chris is solution-driven and speaks the language of ‘fresh’ fluently.”

“Americans need to take a stand now against the large Asian and South American fish farms that are negatively impacting our commercial fishing industry and poisoning unsuspecting consumers,” said Mr. Holland, owner of the Stoned Crab Restaurant. “People think that the fish they are buying in supermarkets is safe, inspected, and healthy — when it is none of these things. In fact, nearly 90-percent of all the seafood consumed by Americans is imported and much of the fish that is imported comes from sources that are barely regulated or often completely unregulated.”

According to Mr. Barrett and Mr. Holland, the new Dock to Dish Key West Community Supported Fishery will be launched in support of and in conjunction with the Florida Keys Commercial Fishermen’s Association, under the leadership of executive director Bill Kelly.

“We are proud to be a part of this historic enterprise to bring fresh seafood back to Key West and strengthen the livelihoods of our commercial fishermen and our island economy,” said Mr. Kelly. “Seafood is a renewable natural resource and cooperative efforts between fishery managers and stakeholders have kept all key indicator species in the Florida Keys at sustainable levels. Every year, our fleet harvests responsible amounts of seafood, which allows for stocks to rebuild themselves.”

Initial plans call for Dock to Dish to launch its Community Supported Fishery memberships by June 2015 at a Dock to Dish Seafood Market that will open at the IBIS Bay Beach Resort, 3101 North Roosevelt Boulevard in Key West on February 14, Valentine’s Day.

 

Elaine Peterson

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Elaine Peterson is a gardener, an astrologer and the president of the Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons. She spoke about some upcoming events and discussed her experiences gardening on the East End.

It clearly isn’t prime gardening season, but is there anything green thumbs can do this time of year to get their gardens ready for spring?

I’d let things be at this time of year. Plan. It’s a good time for planning. Occasionally I do some pruning this time of year, I always prune on a new moon. I’m an astrologer so I garden by the moon and the planets. So always prune around the new moon, because that’s when the energy in the plants is most down in the roots, rather than up in the tips. The other thing that’s terribly important that no one really talks about, is that old farmers in Europe would never water or fertilize during the waxing of the moon, only in the waning of the moon between full moon and new moon. And that way the water sinks, and the fertilizer and whatever that is going into the ground does go into the ground instead of washing away. So the timing of those applications is very important. We’re constantly reinventing the wheel, but if you go back and look at how people used to farm before we had all these modern techniques, they were very much more in touch with the earth and the climate.

Water quality is one of the main concerns on any island. We hear a lot about nitrogen run-off from fertilizers causing all sorts of problems in local waterways. How can gardeners keep their plants healthy without causing harm to water?

Vincent Simeone, director of the Planting Fields Arboretum here on Long Island, spoke to us on Sunday about his new book “Grow More With Less: Sustainable Garden Methods”. But one of the most concerning things about sustainable garden methods is that we reduce or eliminate the amount of herbicides, pesticides, fertilizers, everything unnatural, that we put on the ground because it will come back into the water at some point. I don’t use pesticides or herbicides at all in my gardening, I’ve never had to. I don’t believe in it, I don’t think it’s good, but I also don’t see the need for it. Compost is pretty much all I use. I use some organic supplement sometimes but I’m very careful—I live on the lake! I have some weeds on my lawn, but I’m perfectly happy with them, I don’t want to live on a golf course.

We all know that the East End is home to an enormous deer population. What are some ways for gardeners to deal with the hungry herbivores?

We’ve been serious gardeners for some time, and we’ve dealt with the deer issue forever. In the 19th century and the 20th century we killed off all the animals, and then we decided that wasn’t such a good idea, so we brought them back and now they’re here. So we all got wise and said, this isn’t right, and of course the whole economical and social scene changed. Gradually, wild animals have come back, and they are here and they’re coming back more and more. And it’s just something we have to adjust to. As a gardener, I’ve learned to live with all of the animals, and if you want to grow things animals are going to be interested in, you’re just going to have to take precautions to protect them. Which means a lot more fencing, walled gardens; in some ways, we have to go back to the way it was in the Middle Ages, where if you wanted to grow something for food or for pleasure you had to protect it. So that’s what I have come around to realizing I have to do for everything—there are many plants that won’t be touched by deer but they adapt, the things that they didn’t used to eat, they now eat.

The Horticultural Alliance of the Hamptons is holding a roundtable discussion on planting a fragrant garden from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, January 17, at the Bridgehampton Community House, 2357 Montauk Highway, Bridgehampton. For more information about the organization, call (631) 537-2223. 

The Affair Takes Top Honors at The Golden Globes

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Ruth Wilson and Dominic West in “The Affair.”

Ruth Wilson and Dominic West in “The Affair.”

Showtime’s “The Affair,” a drama that takes place in and is shot on location in Montauk, took top honors during Sunday night’s Golden Globe Awards, beating out Netflix’s “House of Cards,” HBO’s “Game of Thrones,” PBS’s “Downtown Abbey,” and CBS’s “The Good Wife” for the best television drama award.

Ruth Wilson, who stars in “The Affair” alongside Dominic West, Maura Tierney and Joshua Jackson, also took home the best actress award for her portrayal of Alison, a waitress in Montauk who embarks in an affair with Brooklyn-based teacher Noah, who is summering in the hamlet with his wife’s tony family. The drama, created by Sarah Treem and Hagai Levi, tells the story of the affair—before and after a suspected murder—from the perspective of both Alison and Noah. Shot almost exclusively on location in Montauk, the show features iconic locations like The Lobster Roll, Deep Hollow Ranch and Ditch Plains. It was renewed for a second season a month after its October debut on Showtime with new episodes expected to air later this year.

Fundraising Effort for Accident Victim

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Henry Sjoman is currently in a stable but critical condition at Stony Brook University Hospital. 

The family of Montauk resident Henry Sjoman has set up a social media fundraising page on Gofundme.com to help defray the cost of his medical care.

Mr. Sjoman, 24, has been in critical condition at Stony Brook University Hospital for the past week, after he was involved in a head-on ATV accident on Sunday, December 14.

Mr. Sjoman, a commercial fisherman who attended East Hampton High School, has been described by friends and family as kind, generous and fun-loving. He suffered a traumatic brain injury and is still, according to friends, “fighting for his life.”

Mr. Sjoman’s mother passed away suddenly in February 2012. His brother and three sisters have travelled from their various homes across the country to be with their brother.

“Henry’s a type of guy who would never hesitate to give the shirt off his back to help a friend in need,” his sister-in-law Vanessa Wynn wrote on the fundraising page. “He has a huge heart and is a very loved brother, friend and uncle!”

For more information, or to donate money, visit gofundme.com/j6ktog.

“Painting the Population” Looks for Funding

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Aubrey Roemer with "Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project."

Aubrey Roemer with “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project.”

Aubrey Roemer, the Brooklyn artist behind the “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project” has launched a kickstarter campaign to further the project, and her art, as she aims to publish a book of her work, and expand the project into Nicaragua and Indonesia.

“Leviathan: The Montauk Project” was started as Ms. Roemer began painting hundreds of portraits of Montauk residents on linens forged from the town, exhibiting them in four consecutive installations.

Now, Ms. Roemer hopes to travel to Chichigalpa, the lowlands of Nicaragua, through the La Isla Foundation, and document the chronic kidney disease and chronic renal failure epidemic facing sugarcane workers in the region.

“There is a near media blackout of the issue,” said Ms. Rowmer. “And we are looking to gain global attention through the archaic yet poignant platform of art making.”

After Nicaragua, Ms. Roemer also plans to travel to Indonesia to create an anthropological portrait study of the Buginese, an ancient group of seafaring folk scattered throughout Indonesia.

Lastly, the campaign will help pay for Ms. Roemer to join an artist residency at the Vermont Studio Center prior to her travels. During that residency, she plans to finish “Leviathan: The Montauk Portrait Project,” and prep it for publication.

Ms. Roemer is hoping to raise $3,000 by November 15, and already has $2,102 in donations through kickstarter by 38 individual backers. On every funding level, Ms. Roemer offers her supporters works of art to show her appreciation.

For more information, visit kickstarter.com/projects/1227894691/leviathan-montauk-to-lombok-painting-the-populatio

Bishop, Zeldin Offer Divergent Views at Debate

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Congressman Tim Bishop addresses the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday, as his challenger, Lee Zeldin, listens. Michael Heller photo,

Congressman Tim Bishop addresses the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday, as his challenger, Lee Zeldin, listens. Michael Heller photo.

By Stephen J. Kotz

In what has become an almost daily occurrence in this year’s campaign, the two candidates for Congress in the 1st District, incumbent Democrat Tim Bishop and Republican challenger Lee Zeldin, offered up sharply differing views in a debate last Thursday, October 16.

Mr. Bishop touted his track record of providing excellent constituent service and his ability to bring the federal government “to the table to solve individual problems,” calling it “life-altering work.” He said he was recently told he had “a laser-like focus on my constituents. I took that as very high praise because that is exactly what I have done.”

Mr. Zeldin, who repeatedly attacked the size of government, wasteful spending as well as the domestic and foreign policies of President Barack Obama and said he supported term limits, said Mr. Bishop was part of the problem. “If you elected enough people like my opponent,” he said, “Nancy Pelosi would be the Speaker of the House.”

With the spread of the Ebola virus into the United States a top news story in recent weeks, both candidates said they agreed on at least one thing: that President Obama has not done enough.

“I think the president is making a mistake in not putting into place a travel ban to west Africa,” where the virus is spreading unchecked, said Mr. Bishop. He said he would support reconvening Congress before its scheduled November 12 session to deal with the problem.

Mr. Zeldin described the president’s handling of the health crisis as “terrible” and said it was time to “have maximum security procedures at our airports.”

Last week’s debate, one of some 75 joint appearances by the candidates scheduled between Labor Day and Election Day, was sponsored by the League of Women Voters of the Hamptons and held at Westhampton Beach High School. The pair also faced off at a candidates’ forum sponsored by the Concerned Citizens of Montauk on Sunday.

Both candidates spent a considerable amount of time complaining about the negative tone the campaign has taken, with political action committees on both sides filling mailboxes with literature and radio and television with ads targeting the opponent.

Mr. Zeldin said “Nancy Pelosi’s super PAC is spending seven figures targeting us, trying to scare women” into believing that if he were elected women would wind up paying more for health care coverage and lose the right to have abortions. Other campaign literature wrongly suggested he would require taxpayers to foot the bill for corporate polluters, Mr. Zeldin complained.

“You can repeat a lie over and over and over again and eventually people will be believe it,” he said.

That brought a chuckle from Mr. Bishop. “It’s pretty cheeky on the part of my opponent to talk about our end, given the scurrilous nature of the ads his side is running against us,” he said.

The incumbent Congressman said Supreme Court rulings opening campaigns to unlimited corporate and special interest financing were “fundamentally imperiling our democracy. We are now in the realm where elections are bought and sold as opposed to won or lost,” he said.

Mr. Zeldin complained that a Bishop ad campaign was trying to scare senior citizens into believing he wanted to cut Social Security payments. “I would never vote for any piece of legislation that would take one dime away from anyone who is a senior or close to retirement,” Mr. Zeldin said.

But Mr. Bishop said Mr. Zeldin has in the past supported the idea of allowing those 40 and younger to put their Social Security withholding into personal investment accounts. “That’s privatization, folks,” he said. And the result would be dramatic shortfall in funding for the Social Security trust fund, which would require a reduction in benefits paid to current retirees.

“We either tell seniors we were only kidding or we borrow,” said Mr. Bishop, adding, “My opponent obviously does not understand how the trust fund works.”

The $17.8 billion national debt is growing beyond control, according to Mr. Zeldin, who said both the Obama and George W. Bush administrations had spent too much money. “We need to pick a number…. $18 trillion? $20 trillion? $22 trillion? When is enough in regards to our nation’s debt,” he said.

“The easiest thing in the world is to say cut spending,” responded Mr. Bishop. “The hardest thing in the world is to actually do it.”

To illustrate his point, he said 48 cents of every federal dollar is earmarked for retirees, 18 cents for defense and 9 cents for interest on the national debt. That leaves only 25 cents of every federal dollar eligible for cuts, he said, adding that he was not going to be the one to cut Social Security payments, veterans’ healthcare or federal law enforcement.”

Mr. Zeldin said that more needs to be done to reduce welfare fraud and provide private sector jobs to entice people to leave the unemployment rolls.

“The incumbent is not giving you a single thing that is going to make this bloated federal government operate more efficiently,” Mr Zeldin said.

“What the incumbent Congressman has done was vote for a piece of legislation that capped the growth of domestic spending and saved $2 trillion,” Mr. Bishop shot back.

The Affordable Care Act, or Obamacare, was also a topic of contention, with Mr. Zeldin saying there were portions of the sweeping healthcare legislation that should be preserved, such as allowing children to remain on their parents’ policies until the age of 26 and the requirement that prevents insurers from refusing coverage to those with preexisting conditions. But most of the program needs to be scrapped because it has resulted in higher premiums, fewer choices for consumers and other problems,” he said.

“There should be a productive dialog between Republicans and Democrats, liberals and conservatives” to fix the healthcare system, he said.

“I suppose that conversation should begin with repeal rather than fixing,” said Mr. Bishop, pointing out that “there is no commitment on the part of the majority party to fix it,” noting that the House has voted more than 50 times, along party lines, to repeal the legislation. He described it as “a work in progress” that needs to be improved. “There are many good things that we should keep and build on and elements that we should fix,” he said.

On immigration, Mr. Zeldin said the first order of business was to tighten border security. “When you a leak, the first thing you do is shut off the faucet,” he said. “You don’t grab a mop.”

Mr. Bishop said that the Republican-controlled House has refused to recognize the need to deal with the millions of illegal immigrants who are already here. A bipartisan Senate bill offered increased border security as well as a path to citizenship, he said, but the House would not act on it. “Is it perfect?” he said. “No. But it is a way that is dealing with a problem that has no easy solutions.”

Mr. Zeldin also criticized President Obama’s leadership against the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria, saying the president’s strategy would never be successful in defeating the militants. For his part, Mr. Bishop cited the chairman of the joint chiefs of staff who told a Senate committee there was no easy way to militarily defeat ISIS. Mr. Bishop said he would not support a return of American troops to Iraq.

The candidates parted along predictable party lines on a number of other issues, with Mr. Bishop supporting an increase in the minimum wage, a woman’s right to have an abortion, and same sex marriage, while Mr. Zeldin said a minimum wage hike would backfire, that he was pro-life and that he believed marriage should be considered between a man and a woman.

Mr., Bishop said he would work for federal money to help solve some of the growing problems with Long Island’s groundwater, while Mr. Zeldin said he thought such solutions were better left at the state and local level.

Although it is a state initiative, Mr. Zeldin said he opposed Common Core, which he said was setting school children up to fail, while Mr. Bishop said he supported higher educational standards and recognized that the “rollout of Common Core was the only thing that could make the rollout of Obamacare look good.”

Benefit for Montauk Beaches This Friday, October 24

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: Surfrider Foundation members standing in the footprint of the proposed geotextile bag reinforced dune that, if built, will destroy our public beach. Juliana Duryea photo

: Surfrider Foundation members standing in the footprint of the proposed geotextile bag reinforced dune that, if built, will destroy our public beach. Juliana Duryea photo

The Eastern Long Island Chapter of the Surfrider Foundation is continuing its protest of the Army Corps of Engineers’ proposal to construct an artificial dune in downtown Montauk with a benefit concert at Amagansett’s The Stephen Talkhouse on Friday, October 24 at 7 p.m.

The event will feature acoustic groove rock music by Jettykoon, with special musical guests, as well as a detailed discussion of the Corps plans for downtown Montauk beaches. The proposed work includes placing 14,000 sand bags – each weighing 1.7 tons – along 3,100 linear feet of the ocean intertidal zone seaward of the existing motels and seaward of the natural primary dune line in that area. The bags will be covered with a layer of sand and planted with beachgrass. East Hampton Town and Suffolk County will be required to maintain the sand capping and beachgrass.

The Surfrider Foundation will also use the evening to celebrate what it views as a victory in a recent East Hampton Zoning Board of Appeals (ZBA) decision to levy a positive declaration under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) on an ocean front revetment application for a property that adjoins Shadmoor State Park.

“Surfrider Foundation’s position is that our public beach is our greatest asset and its long term protection warrants top priority,” said the organization in a press release. “Reflected wave energy from the geotextile bags and rock revetments will quickly erode the public beach.”

 

Surfrider Targets Army Corps’ Montauk Project

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Members of the Eastern Long Island chapter of the Surfrider Foundation staged a protest of the Army Corps of Engineers’ proposal to construct an artificial dune on the publicly owned beach in downtown Montauk on Thursday, October 9.

The proposed work includes placing 14,000 sand bags—each weighing 1.7 tons—along 3,100 feet of the ocean intertidal zone seaward of the existing motels and seaward of the natural primary dune line in that area. The bags will be covered with a layer of sand and planted with beachgrass, a cosmetic touch that coastal geologist Dr. Robert Young describes as “the lipstick on the pig.”

In a press release, the foundation charged that the Army Corps’ proposal flies in the face of the advice offered by three well known and respected coastal geologists who have reviewed the situation in downtown Montauk: Dr. Young, Dr. Stephen Leatherman, and Dr. Orrin Plikey. All three have stated that sand-filled geotextile bags mimic bulkheads and other hard structures in terms of their impact on beaches.

The Army Corps’ proposal prioritizes the value and protection of privately owned commercial structures over that of the public beach, the group said in a release. “Surfrider Foundation’s position is that the public beach is the East End’s greatest asset and its long term protection warrants top priority. Reflected wave energy from the geotextile bags will quickly erode the public beach.”

The foundation also said that the motels on the beach were constructed many years ago on top of the existing primary dune, destroying that natural resource. “This proposal will compound the mistakes made in the 1960s and 1970s: it will result in the destruction of the beach in addition to the already destroyed primary dune,” the group’s release stated.

Laraine Creegan

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Laraine Creegan has been the executive director of the Montauk Chamber of Commerce for the past 10 years. She discusses how Montauk businesses fared this summer and the upcoming Fall Festival, the Chamber’s biggest fundraiser of the year. 

In recent years, Montauk seems to have blown up in popularity. Streets seemed busier than ever this season, how was the summer for local businesses?

It was good, it was very good. I think the weather makes for a big difference – anytime you have good weather out here it really carries you through, particularly in the fall.

And how has the fall tourist season changed? Has that also become busier?

Oh yes. I think, again, it goes back to the weather. Fishing is always good in the fall. Through September and October, there are striped bass, people go crazy – whether they be surfcasting or taking charters, fishermen are pretty busy because the fish are running, so that’s really what it’s all about. And the fall generally has been busy because of all of the events. People come out to Montauk to relax and go out to dinner and to lay back, but they also want something to do. And so other than shuttling them off to the North Fork, we like to have events and we do pretty much try to do that. There was an event this past weekend – the archaeology festival – at the Second House Museum. And the seafood festival we had last weekend – all of those things bring people out. And also weddings, weddings have become increasingly popular out here particularly in September and October.

Have businesses been staying open longer into the season to accommodate for this change? 

A few more, I think what’s going to make a difference is keeping that Long Island Rail Road available. You know what it is, [business owners] are working so hard, to work seven days a week throughout the whole summer that it makes it difficult; they do start to take time off after Labor Day. I try to talk them into staying open, but the issue with that is finding help. That’s the toughest part.

This weekend is Montauk’s 33rd Annual Fall Festival, and with that, the annual Clam Chowder Competition on Saturday. How does that fierce competition work?

Well the chowder competition is almost an event of its own. The idea was to get people involved, we didn’t want to start voting, because people only got two tastes, how can you fairly do that? So I really insisted that we have to have judges. This will be the sixth year we’ve had a panel of judges and it really has worked out very well. We really are very cautious of how we do it: the pots are numbered so nobody knows, the judges sit behind, away from the checks. There are about five or six people on the panel, (including our very own Gavin Menu from The Sag Harbor Express.)

How else has the event evolved in your tenure?

When I first started here, ten years ago, it was pumpkin decorating, we sold hot dogs, hamburgers and sodas and we had pony rides, a wagon ride and that was about it. So we started to think of how to make it a little bit more festive. Then I was able to get the inflatable rides, from there it went to the carousel. The food tent has grown so we’re doing sausages and peppers, roasted corn, hot dogs and hamburgers, those big pretzels and beer and wine – that was added as well. The farmer’s market will also be under the tent. And this is also the third year we’ll have fireworks, that’ll be at 7 p.m. on Saturday night. We just try to make it fun and exciting – it’s really a fun family event.  It’s also a nice way for locals to get a chance to enjoy their hometown in the off-season.

The Fall Festival will take place on Saturday and Sunday, October 12 and 13, from 11 a.m. until 7 p.m. right in the heart of Montauk’s Main Street. For those craving a cup of chowder, Ms. Creegan suggests getting to the festival before 1 p.m., when the soup usually runs out. For more information about the festival, or if you’re interested in volunteering, call the Chamber of Commerce at (631) 668-2428.