Tag Archive | "Montauk"

Bridgehampton National Bank Donates $25,000 to Local Food Pantries

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The Bridgehampton National Bank (bridgenb.com) Annual Apple Campaign, which was started in 2011 to provide contributions to local food pantries, culminated Monday with the distribution of $1,000 checks to each of 23 food pantries from Montauk to Greenport to Deer Park and Melville. At a presentation and reception at the BNB Bridgehampton office, pantry representatives Bridgehampton, East Hampton, Southampton, Springs and Sag Harbor were on-hand to accept the funds.   Maureen’s Haven, which helps the homeless on the East End, also received a check for $2,000. This is only part of the $25,000 donated by bank customers, employees and the company itself.

“This is one of the community programs we are most proud,” said Kevin M. O’Connor, president and CEO of Bridgehampton National Bank.  “It is a true collaboration between the bank, its customers and employees, working together to help those most in need in our communities. It is the essence of what it means to be a community bank.”

The Apple program began nearly five years ago with a conversation initiated by the East Hampton Food Pantry. They suggested the “apple” as a means of recognizing donations. With 26 branches across Suffolk and Nassau Counties, BNB took its Apples bank wide. The program is an annual holiday tradition which runs through the end of January.  In lieu of a holiday gift, BNB donates in the name of its employees, customers enthusiastically participate and BNB matches donations and fills in any gaps to reach the goal and fund one pantry in each of its markets. In addition to the financial gift, branch staff collected non- perishable foods during the months of November, December and January, which are also distributed to local pantries.

Fish Eye View Highlights Long Island’s Life Underwater

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A photo of a seahorse by Chris Paparo.

A photo of a seahorse by Chris Paparo.

By Stephen J. Kotz

From the surface, the teeming ecosystem of an East End bay reveals itself in glimpses: a bluefish breaking the surface; a school of silversides darting through the shallows; or a spider crab moving slowly along the edge of the eelgrass.

But for Chris Paparo, who has been taking underwater photographs for more than 25 years and is better known as the Fish Guy, the view is decidedly more detailed.

This Saturday, Mr. Paparo will present a free slide show and lecture, featuring his underwater photography, “An Underwater Journey of Long Island Through the Eyes of a Fishing Biologist,” at the office of the Concerned Citizens of Montauk from 11 a.m. to 1 p.m.

CCOM executive director Jeremy Samuelson said he first learned about Mr. Paparo from his Facebook page, Fish Guy Photos, and was eventually intrigued enough to invite him to speak as part of CCOM’s environmental education outreach efforts.

“We all suffer a bit from this National Geographic thing in that we think the only beautiful things worth saving are halfway round the world,” said Mr. Samuelson, “but his photographs show you find them right here in our backyard.”

By day, Mr. Paparo, who received a degree in marine biology from Southampton College, manages the marine sciences center at the Stony Brook Southampton campus. “It’s exciting to have gone to school here as an undergrad and be back here for the next phase of the college’s life,” he said. Besides overseeing the facility’s operations, Mr. Paparo leads tours and field trips for visitors to the marine science center from local schools, museums and other community groups.

Before joining the university’s staff, he worked for four years at the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation and another 13 years at the Long Island Aquarium and Exhibition Center in Riverhead as its educational coordinator and one of its rescue techs.

“The reason I went into marine science is my dad took me fishing when I was six, and I’ve been hooked ever since,” he said.

Besides giving lectures on his underwater photography, Mr. Paparo finds time to write a naturalist column for On the Water magazine and contribute to Fisherman magazine.

Mr. Paparo, who said he was certified as a scuba diver in 1993, first took up underwater photography as hobby. In recent years, “it’s snowballed a bit” with the advent of first the internet and later Facebook. Today, he said, every chance he gets he grabs his scuba gear and his Canon underwater camera rig, to explore beneath the surface of local bays.

Those who attend his lecture will see photographs of fluke, striped bass, porgies, puffers, winter flounder, sea bass and many other fish species. “Now you are going to see it from their point of view,” he said.

“I start with all the important game catch and then show the by catch, the crabs, snails, clams and end with the exotics, the tropical fish that come up in the summer time,” he continued.

Over the years, Mr. Paparo has photographed everything from tiny seahorses, which frequent the bays—“you have to know where to look for them,” he said—to sharks out in the ocean, although the latter he photographs from the safety of a boat.

“I haven’t seen any sharks diving, but I haven’t ventured out in the ocean to do any ocean diving,” he said. But he goes out with a friend and they tag and release sharks. “One of the makos we tagged off Shinnecock in 2012 was found 2,200 miles across the Atlantic,” he said. “It’s neat when you get a recapture like that.”

But Mr. Paparo said he has seen his share of sharks close to shore. “They are very abundant around here,” he said. “I’ve seen makos in the inlet. It’s just a matter of being out there and if you are out there the amount of time I am your chances of seeing them go up.”

Last year, Mr. Paparo said he was thrilled to see a string ray he estimated at 3-feet in diameter swimming around Ponquogue Bridge in Hamptons Bays. Although he was unable to photograph the fish, he caught it on video.

“I still get excited when I find an octopus,” said Mr. Paparo, who added that he has never seen one while diving, because they are very elusive creatures. “We collected two last fall, little guys,” he said. One was in a net, another came up with the anchor. “The first one was about the size of a gum ball, and the other one was even smaller, about the size of my pinky nail. If you didn’t know what you were looking for you would have missed them.”

Mr. Paparo said many amateur photographers fail to recognize how much work goes into capturing images of wildlife. “If you only go once, you won’t necessarily get the chance,” he said. “You never know what you are going to come across. And just because you saw it doesn’t mean you are going to get the picture.”

Mr. Paparo’s talk takes place at CCOM’s office at 6 S. Elmwood Avenue in Montauk. Admission is free and reservations are not required. For more information, call CCOM at (631) 238-5720.

 

State Education Aid Increases by $1.1 Billion

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. announced Monday that the 2014-15 state budget will increase state aid to education by $1.1 billion to more than $22 billion.

“The State Legislature has improved the governor’s 2014 state budget proposal by increasing school aid from a proposed 3.9 percent to 5.3 percent across the state,” said Assemblyman Thiele. “Suffolk County’s share of aid also would increase by 5.3 percent. Suffolk had gotten its fair share of this year’s school aid increase.”

A major part of the school aid increase was the reduction of the Gap Elimination Adjustment by $602 million. The GEA was originally enacted to close a state budget deficit back in 2008-09.

Mr. Thiele said the final state budget also includes the governor’s $2 Billion Smart School Bond initiative to improve classroom technology and construct pre-kindergarten classroom space. He expressed support for the governor’s Smart School Bond Act, which must be approved by voters in November.

“The focus on improving quality education is a goal I fully support,” said Mr. Thiele. “This state aid proposal accomplishes that goal for Long Island and New York State.”

“Superintendents in my district conveyed that their priority for this year’s budget was the reduction of the GEA—a budget-balancing fiasco imposed by the Democrats in 2010 when they controlled all three branches of government.” said Senator Kenneth P. LaValle. “This year, we were successful in restoring $602 Million of the GEA money to local school districts. The state’s commitment to education is now well over $22 billion. This budget meets the needs of New York State’s children while at the same time providing property tax relief to residents who help underwrite the costs. I am pleased to have obtained increases for each school district in my area.”

Under the state budget, the Sag Harbor School District will receive $1,637,585, a 5.92-percent increase in state aid. The Bridgehampton School District will receive $656,377, a 10.9-percent increase. The East Hampton School District is set to receive $2.76 million in state aid, a 4.15-percent increase, and the Southampton School District will get $2.6 million, a 9.9-percent increase.

Sag Harbor’s Modern Day Rum Runners

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Mike McQuade and Jason Laan with their Sag Harbor Rum, photographed at Murf's Tavern in Sag Harbor on Saturday.

Mike McQuade and Jason Laan with their Sag Harbor Rum, photographed at Murf’s Tavern in Sag Harbor on Saturday.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

By Annette Hinkle; Michael Heller photography

Since its heyday as a 19th century whaling port, Sag Harbor has built a reputation as a hard-working town with a penchant for spirits — in more ways than one.

So perhaps it was inevitable in this day of micro-brews and locally sourced food stuffs that someone would produce a drink that evokes the flavor of yesterday.

Business partners Jason Cyril Laan and Michael McQuade are doing just that with Sag Harbor Rum, a decidedly 21st century twist on that most sea-faring of beverages.

The inaugural batch of Sag Harbor Rum is about six weeks from release and is now aging in old bourbon barrels, having been infused with exotic spices and fruits like ginger, black cherry, vanilla, pineapple and a touch of walnut and coffee.

Expect Sag Harbor Rum to hit the shelves of local liquor stores, bars and restaurants sometime in mid-May. A 750 ml bottle is expected to retail for $37 and a total of 6,000 bottles are being produced in this first batch of rum.

For Mr. Laan, it’s about time.

“I’ve been a life-long rum drinker and part of the Sag Harbor sailing community and I felt Sag Harbor was missing its own rum,” says Mr. Laan. “Mike and I worked at Murph’s together last summer and we wanted to do a liquor evoking the spirit of Sag Harbor with its whaling tradition — it’s perfect for an amber rum.”

“We’re not in the liquor marketing business,” he adds. “We’re bartenders who felt the East End needed its own rum.”

“We’ve been coming up with the concepts and we thought about it for a while,” says Mr. McQuade.

Laan brings a fair amount of knowledge to the distilling process, having lived in Amsterdam for six years where he ran a bar with a friend and produced a private label vodka. For Sag Harbor Rum, he and Mr. McQuade are partnering with Baiting Hollow-based Long Island Spirits and Rich Stabile, who brings 20 years of his own experience as a master distiller to the process.

While many big distillers want consistency of flavor in their spirits, Mr. Laan and Mr. McQuade are hoping for the exact opposite with Sag Harbor Rum.

“We’re doing batch numbers and we expect each to be slightly different and have its own profile,” explains Mr. Laan.

Of course, any sailor worth his sea-salt knows rum is made from sugar — not exactly a locally sourced crop. In the old days, seafarers provisioned rum when their ships called at ports in the Caribbean, storing it in whatever empty barrels were on hand. Over time, the rum naturally took on the flavor of the barrel along with whatever fruit or spices had previously been stored in it.

Mr. Laan and Mr. McQuade are using pretty much that same technique in producing Sag Harbor Rum.

“We’ve imported the rum from Trinidad,” explains Mr. Laan. “It’s distilled five times —which means you’re getting the purest rum. We import it at a large volume and put it in bourbon barrels to age here for about six months.”

Mr. Laan explains that initially, the rum doesn’t have much flavor when it arrives from Trinidad and only gains that with time.

“Most alcohols — including whisky or bourbon — get their color and flavor from the wood,” explains Mr. Laan who adds that botanicals such as spices, peppers and fruit are often added in the process. “We’re setting ourselves apart. Instead of traditional tropical flavors, we’re doing nuts, coffee and ginger.”

While there may come a day when Mr. Laan and Mr. McQuade will be able to infuse their rum with locally grown botanicals, for now, the pair are just excited about seeing their first batch of Sag Harbor Rum make it to market.

“We wanted a rum that was a great stand alone — a great sipping rum that mixes well with cocktails or tastes good on its own,” says Mr. Laan. “Because we’re doing small batches and because of the aging process, we wanted that hand-made artisanal feel, which is a bit of a trend right now.”

That feel extends to the hand-drawn label design on the bottle itself — which sports a whale, naturally.

“We’re going around doing pre-sales old school style — door to door, bar to bar — asking people if they’ll take a bottle or do a tasting at liquor stores,” says Mr. Laan. “It’s nice to see these micro industries — that’s what we want to fit into.”

“We don’t want to go outside the South Fork in the first year.”

To learn more about Sag Harbor Rum, visit sagharborrum.com or find them on Facebook.

Sag Harbor Rum Scuttlehole Special 

½ oz Vervino Vermouth – Channing Daughters Winery

2 oz Sag Harbor Rum

2 oz San Pellegrino Limonata

Splash of Bitters

The Montauk to Manhattan – a Rum Manhattan

2½ oz Sag Harbor Rum

½ oz Sweet Vermouth

2 Dashes Orange Bitters

Shake over ice and serve with a cherry of choice

 

Montauk’s Quincy Davis Wins Pro Surf Contest

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Montauk natives Tyler Maguire and Jesse Joeckel hoisting Quincy Davis after her win. Photo courtesy of Corona Extra PR.

Montauk natives Tyler Maguire and Jesse Joeckel hoisting Quincy Davis after her win. Photo courtesy of Corona Extra PR.

By Tessa Raebeck

Montauk native Quincy Davis, 18, won the women’s champion title at the Corona Extra Pro Surf Circuit contest in Rincon, Puerto Rico, taking home the trophy in her division for the third year in a row.

Ms. Davis earned $5,000 for the top prize. She graduated from East Hampton High School in June 2013, after learning on the surf circuit with help from tutor Brittany Thompson. Like many local surfers, she splits her time between Rincon and Montauk.

As a child watching her parents, Paul and Paulette Davis, and her older brother, Tyler Davis, surf, Ms. Davis grew restless and at age 7, she was brought into the family pastime and has been surfing ever since. A young newcomer on the professional circuit, she is training hard in hopes of qualifying for the Women’s World Championship Tour this year.

Chasing the Beast: Local Band The Montauk Project to Release First Full-Length Album

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The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

By Tessa Raebeck

Despite the hype surrounding Montauk as an ever-growing tourist/hipster destination and the tendency of audiences and critics alike to judge a band by its members’ hair length rather than its sound, The Montauk Project remains dedicated to one thing first and foremost: making good music.

Started as a jam band by three friends, with a few local gigs and a Facebook page, The Montauk Project has grown steadily in the three years since; this month, the homegrown band is purchasing its first tour van, releasing its first full-length album and performing at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas, one of the world’s largest music festivals.

The group formed in early 2011 when longtime friends Jasper Conroy, Matty Liot and Mark Schiavoni started jamming at Mr. Conroy’s house, a bungalow overflowing with instruments, surfboards and local vagabonds just a few blocks from Ditch Plains beach in Montauk. Chris Wood joined shortly thereafter and, when Mr. Liot left the group in 2012, The Montauk Project solidified its current line-up: Mr. Wood on bass, Mr. Conroy on drums, Mr. Schiavoni on vocals and Jack Marshall on electric guitar.

The band is decidedly homegrown. As they drive to Mr. Conroy’s house to practice, the band members can see the Montauk radar tower, where the conspiracy theorists say the government conducted secret time-travel experiments as part of the “Montauk Project.” Mr. Schiavoni, of Sag Harbor, and Mr. Conroy have been playing music together since high school. Mr. Marshall is the grandson of John Marshall, the namesake of East Hampton’s elementary school and “a local icon,” as Mr. Schiavoni puts it. Mr. Wood grew up playing in Montauk on his father’s fishing boat, the Sylvia S, which was docked nearby when the band performed at Swallow East last Friday.

After Mr. Marshall, a graduate of the Berklee College of Music, joined last year, The Montauk Project continued its evolution from a jam band to a heavier, more cohesive sound, although its sound remains in constant development.

“We still jump around a lot with our sound,” Mr. Marshall said before the show Friday. “We definitely kind of have more of an idea of what we want to do, but at the same time, we’re still kind of venturing.”

“Still developing,” adds Mr. Schiavoni, as Mr. Marshall says a song they recently wrote surprised the band with its natural departure from their other music. Having yet to decide on a name, the group simply calls the song, which they premiered on Friday, “New Jam.”

The Montauk Project will release its first full-length album, “Belly of the Beast,” on March 25. Unable to pinpoint a specific genre, the band created its own term for The Montauk Project sound: “beach grunge.”

“We have sort of this ’90s nostalgia thing, but it’s not so depressing. We don’t do heroin, you know, it’s not like we’re Nirvana,” explained Mr. Schiavoni. “So, the beach, I think, adds a little light. We’re not grunge ’cause we really aren’t grunge—Jack [Marshall] showered today. He smells like shampoo, he smells great right now.”

“Very pleasant,” added Mr. Wood.

The Montauk Project's Mark Schiavoni. Photo by Ian Cooke.

The Montauk Project’s Mark Schiavoni. Photo by Ian Cooke.

Although The Montauk Project doesn’t clearly fit into a specific genre, “our sound from the beginning to the end of a set is pretty collected, it’s solid, there’s consistency,” Mr. Schiavoni said.

“It’s boring,” the front man said of albums that have a song followed by another just like it, “and I think in a generation where everyone has what I call IPod ADD—where you have to listen to shuffle, people can’t listen to an album—I think it’s very important to have diversity in your album and in your set.”

“I think when you listen to the majority of legendary rock bands that you think about, like Led Zeppelin or even more recently, the [Red Hot] Chili Peppers, they all have that kind of thing,” added Mr. Marshall. “If you listen to different albums from any of those guys, they jump around—but they can get away with it because when you listen to any of their songs, you don’t have to question, is that this band? You know.”

The Montauk Project was invited to perform at SXSW—the largest music festival of its kind in the world—on March 12 and was able to raise enough money at the concert Friday to help the guys purchase their first tour van, which will take them to Austin.

“Everything is a new experience,” Mr. Schiavoni said. “In a way, out here, it’s definitely more comfortable. So when we go to an unfamiliar place, you never know who’s listening, so you kind of have to stay on your feet. It can be a little more unnerving. But then again, you never know who’s listening in Montauk…. So it almost doesn’t matter, you have to play on your feet wherever you are.”

“We’re also going to the biggest music festival in the world, so it’s every single major player in every music department is there, so you can get more exposure,” added Mr. Conroy.

From answering questions to crafting their songs, the group works as a collective. The creative process usually begins with an idea from one member that is then filled out by the rest in collaboration. “The Beast,” the title track to the new album, begins with the lyrics, “Fortune tells if a man is well, but the rage in his eyes shows his other self. But keep it clean, your destiny, as you go out to sea to chase the beast.”

“We have a pretty nice bond with each other where we can all kind of feel out, all right, you’re doing this, and then we all kind of seem—after a couple tries—to get something right away. It’s kind of cool to me, to have a good connection with everybody and so you [can] jump on something.”

“Yeah,” agreed Mr. Wood. “It’s like an unspoken connection. You just kind of start grooving out of nowhere and it just works.”

The Montauk Project will perform at The Stephen Talkhouse, 161 Main Street in Amagansett, on Saturday, March 8, at 8 p.m. For more information and upcoming shows, visit their website.

Arrest Made in Alleged Case of Statutory Rape in Montauk

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9567130East Hampton Police announced Tuesday the arrest of Juan J. Zhingri-Deleg, 27, of Montauk in connection with the alleged rape of a 14 year old girl.

According to a press release issued by the department Tuesday, police received information regarding the inappropriate relationship between Mr. Zhingri-Deleg and the girl, resulting in Mr. Zhingri-Deleg’s arrest on Monday. Mr. Zhingri-Deleg  has been charged with one count of rape in the second degree under the statutory rape provision for anyone over the age of 18 who engages in sexual intercourse with someone under the age of 15. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of endangering the welfare of a minor.

Mr. Shingri-Deleg is expected to be arraigned in East Hampton Town Justice Court on Tuesday.

Detectives are asking anyone with information that may assist with the investigation contact East Hampton Town Police at 537-7575. All calls will be kept confidential.

Montauk’s 7-Eleven is Highest Grossing in the Nation

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A patron enters the 7-Eleven in Montauk Thursday afternoon.

A patron enters the 7-Eleven in Montauk Thursday afternoon. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

Selling boogie boards and beer can turn quite a profit – in Montauk, that is. Opened in 2010 despite protests from vocal residents, the Montauk 7-Eleven is the chain’s top-grossing store in the United States.

Of 7,800 locations nationwide, the four most profitable are all in Suffolk County, with the East Patchogue, Southampton and Farmingville stores following behind Montauk. Sag Harbor’s 7-Eleven earned the 11th spot. Of the top 10 locations by sales in the country last year, eight were in Suffolk County, according to 7-Eleven Inc. There are 208 stores on Long Island.

“It’s a Long Island thing,” franchisee Chris Stephens, who runs the stores in Montauk and East Patchogue, told Newsday. The East Patchogue and Southampton locations have fought for the top spot in recent years, but this year, Montauk’s summer sales helped the store to secure first place.

“You really target what’s needed from the community and people who’re here,” Mr. Stephens said of his business model. The Montauk store is flush with St. Patrick’s Day gear in March and stocked with sunblock, beach umbrellas and water guns in the summer. Beer is popular year-round and animal hats are a constant.

Although the Dallas-based company declined to give an exact number, Mr. Stephens said he has annual sales in the low millions, selling about $100,000 in beer and $50,000 in coffee monthly. Last summer, the store sold 250 boogie boards.

Despite the evident popularity of Suffolk County 7-Elevens – or perhaps because of it – some year-round residents have been vocal in their opposition to the chain, first in Montauk and now in Amagansett. Plans to build a franchise in a commercial building to the east of the Amagansett IGA were delayed last week when the East Hampton Town Planning Department rescinded the project’s building permit, calling for further review.

 

Feminist Filmmaker and the Modern Woman “In Montauk”

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Production still from "In Montauk." Courtesy of Kim Cummings.

Production still from “In Montauk.” Courtesy of Kim Cummings.

By Tessa Raebeck

Not known for its excitement, winter on the East End can be an ideal time for self-discovery and reflection; off-season Montauk thus provides the perfect setting for Julie Wagner, the soul-searching protagonist of Kim Cummings’ new independent drama/romance film, “In Montauk.”

“One of 2012’s indie highlights,” according to Richard Propes of The Independent Critic, the feminist film is set in Montauk in December. It stars Nina Kaczorowski as Julie Wagner, a young artist with a successful husband and a baby on the way, who has retreated to the end of Long Island in an attempt to combat the “growing feelings of uncertainty about the impending trajectories of her life,” according to the press release.

Writer/Director Kim Cummings.

Writer/Director Kim Cummings.

“It’s powerful and beautiful, tense in its emotions, and also draining (but in a good, ‘I just went on a personal journey and I’m spent’ way). In the end, the emotional effort is worth it,” Mark Bell of Film Threat says of the film, both written and directed by Ms. Cummings.

Through her production company, Siren’s Tale Productions, Ms. Cummings releases films in line with her goal “to present three-dimensional women and girls on film in nuanced storylines outside of the typical Hollywood roles of wives, girlfriends, mothers and other less flattering types.”

“In Montauk” portrays Julie Wagner grappling with how to fulfill her duty to her career, impending motherhood and marriage while still maintaining her individual identity. Through her struggle, Ms. Cummings offers an universal story of “confronting life’s imperfect choices in the hopes of coming to grips with one through which she can be true to herself.”

After a successful rollout on the festival circuit, picking up awards at the Toronto International Film Festival, the World Music & Independent Film Festival and more, “In Montauk” was released on DVD for the first time February 18. For more information, visit here.

Local Band on the Brink: The Montauk Project at 230 Elm

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The Montauk Project at the Bowery Ballroom in New York City (Photo by Ian Cooke).

The Montauk Project at the Bowery Ballroom in New York City (Photo by Ian Cooke).

By Tessa Raebeck

On the brink of releasing their first full-length album, The Montauk Project returns home this Saturday, February 15 with a concert at 230 Down in Southampton.

Since forming three years ago, the local, all-original rock band has been busy making a name for itself, playing frequent gigs on the East End, up-island and in New York City.

With the long hair of rock and roll and the laid back attitude of local surfers, the four band members are all East End natives in their mid-twenties. Sag Harbor’s Mark Schiavoni plays vocals and guitar, Jasper Conroy of Montauk is on the drums and adds vocals and bass player Chris Wood and lead guitar/vocalist Jack Marshall both come from East Hampton.

Mark Schiavoni of the Montauk Project (Photo by Ian Cooke).

Mark Schiavoni of the Montauk Project (Photo by Ian Cooke).

According to the band’s bio on the music site ReverbNation, The Montauk Project’s music “sounds like the beating wings of an immortal hummingbird flying through a war in heaven. Powerful, loud, eclectic, rock and roll.” Their musical influences include The Black Keys, Stone Temple Pilots and Blind Melon.

On March 25, the Montauk Project will unveil their first full-length album, “Belly of the Beast,” which will feature 10 original songs recorded at their home studio in Montauk, including the already released tracks “The Beast” and “Black as Night.”

The Montauk Project will perform Saturday, February 15 at 8 p.m. at 230 Down, located at 230 Elm Street in Southampton. For more information, visit themontaukprojectmusic.com.