Tag Archive | "Montauk"

Chasing the Beast: Local Band The Montauk Project to Release First Full-Length Album

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The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

The Montauk Project, Chris Wood, Mark Schiavoni, Jasper Conroy and Jack Marshall, performs at Swallow East in Montauk on Friday, February 28. Photo by Ian Cooke.

By Tessa Raebeck

Despite the hype surrounding Montauk as an ever-growing tourist/hipster destination and the tendency of audiences and critics alike to judge a band by its members’ hair length rather than its sound, The Montauk Project remains dedicated to one thing first and foremost: making good music.

Started as a jam band by three friends, with a few local gigs and a Facebook page, The Montauk Project has grown steadily in the three years since; this month, the homegrown band is purchasing its first tour van, releasing its first full-length album and performing at South by Southwest (SXSW) in Austin, Texas, one of the world’s largest music festivals.

The group formed in early 2011 when longtime friends Jasper Conroy, Matty Liot and Mark Schiavoni started jamming at Mr. Conroy’s house, a bungalow overflowing with instruments, surfboards and local vagabonds just a few blocks from Ditch Plains beach in Montauk. Chris Wood joined shortly thereafter and, when Mr. Liot left the group in 2012, The Montauk Project solidified its current line-up: Mr. Wood on bass, Mr. Conroy on drums, Mr. Schiavoni on vocals and Jack Marshall on electric guitar.

The band is decidedly homegrown. As they drive to Mr. Conroy’s house to practice, the band members can see the Montauk radar tower, where the conspiracy theorists say the government conducted secret time-travel experiments as part of the “Montauk Project.” Mr. Schiavoni, of Sag Harbor, and Mr. Conroy have been playing music together since high school. Mr. Marshall is the grandson of John Marshall, the namesake of East Hampton’s elementary school and “a local icon,” as Mr. Schiavoni puts it. Mr. Wood grew up playing in Montauk on his father’s fishing boat, the Sylvia S, which was docked nearby when the band performed at Swallow East last Friday.

After Mr. Marshall, a graduate of the Berklee College of Music, joined last year, The Montauk Project continued its evolution from a jam band to a heavier, more cohesive sound, although its sound remains in constant development.

“We still jump around a lot with our sound,” Mr. Marshall said before the show Friday. “We definitely kind of have more of an idea of what we want to do, but at the same time, we’re still kind of venturing.”

“Still developing,” adds Mr. Schiavoni, as Mr. Marshall says a song they recently wrote surprised the band with its natural departure from their other music. Having yet to decide on a name, the group simply calls the song, which they premiered on Friday, “New Jam.”

The Montauk Project will release its first full-length album, “Belly of the Beast,” on March 25. Unable to pinpoint a specific genre, the band created its own term for The Montauk Project sound: “beach grunge.”

“We have sort of this ’90s nostalgia thing, but it’s not so depressing. We don’t do heroin, you know, it’s not like we’re Nirvana,” explained Mr. Schiavoni. “So, the beach, I think, adds a little light. We’re not grunge ’cause we really aren’t grunge—Jack [Marshall] showered today. He smells like shampoo, he smells great right now.”

“Very pleasant,” added Mr. Wood.

The Montauk Project's Mark Schiavoni. Photo by Ian Cooke.

The Montauk Project’s Mark Schiavoni. Photo by Ian Cooke.

Although The Montauk Project doesn’t clearly fit into a specific genre, “our sound from the beginning to the end of a set is pretty collected, it’s solid, there’s consistency,” Mr. Schiavoni said.

“It’s boring,” the front man said of albums that have a song followed by another just like it, “and I think in a generation where everyone has what I call IPod ADD—where you have to listen to shuffle, people can’t listen to an album—I think it’s very important to have diversity in your album and in your set.”

“I think when you listen to the majority of legendary rock bands that you think about, like Led Zeppelin or even more recently, the [Red Hot] Chili Peppers, they all have that kind of thing,” added Mr. Marshall. “If you listen to different albums from any of those guys, they jump around—but they can get away with it because when you listen to any of their songs, you don’t have to question, is that this band? You know.”

The Montauk Project was invited to perform at SXSW—the largest music festival of its kind in the world—on March 12 and was able to raise enough money at the concert Friday to help the guys purchase their first tour van, which will take them to Austin.

“Everything is a new experience,” Mr. Schiavoni said. “In a way, out here, it’s definitely more comfortable. So when we go to an unfamiliar place, you never know who’s listening, so you kind of have to stay on your feet. It can be a little more unnerving. But then again, you never know who’s listening in Montauk…. So it almost doesn’t matter, you have to play on your feet wherever you are.”

“We’re also going to the biggest music festival in the world, so it’s every single major player in every music department is there, so you can get more exposure,” added Mr. Conroy.

From answering questions to crafting their songs, the group works as a collective. The creative process usually begins with an idea from one member that is then filled out by the rest in collaboration. “The Beast,” the title track to the new album, begins with the lyrics, “Fortune tells if a man is well, but the rage in his eyes shows his other self. But keep it clean, your destiny, as you go out to sea to chase the beast.”

“We have a pretty nice bond with each other where we can all kind of feel out, all right, you’re doing this, and then we all kind of seem—after a couple tries—to get something right away. It’s kind of cool to me, to have a good connection with everybody and so you [can] jump on something.”

“Yeah,” agreed Mr. Wood. “It’s like an unspoken connection. You just kind of start grooving out of nowhere and it just works.”

The Montauk Project will perform at The Stephen Talkhouse, 161 Main Street in Amagansett, on Saturday, March 8, at 8 p.m. For more information and upcoming shows, visit their website.

Arrest Made in Alleged Case of Statutory Rape in Montauk

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9567130East Hampton Police announced Tuesday the arrest of Juan J. Zhingri-Deleg, 27, of Montauk in connection with the alleged rape of a 14 year old girl.

According to a press release issued by the department Tuesday, police received information regarding the inappropriate relationship between Mr. Zhingri-Deleg and the girl, resulting in Mr. Zhingri-Deleg’s arrest on Monday. Mr. Zhingri-Deleg  has been charged with one count of rape in the second degree under the statutory rape provision for anyone over the age of 18 who engages in sexual intercourse with someone under the age of 15. He also faces a misdemeanor charge of endangering the welfare of a minor.

Mr. Shingri-Deleg is expected to be arraigned in East Hampton Town Justice Court on Tuesday.

Detectives are asking anyone with information that may assist with the investigation contact East Hampton Town Police at 537-7575. All calls will be kept confidential.

Montauk’s 7-Eleven is Highest Grossing in the Nation

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A patron enters the 7-Eleven in Montauk Thursday afternoon.

A patron enters the 7-Eleven in Montauk Thursday afternoon. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

By Tessa Raebeck

Selling boogie boards and beer can turn quite a profit – in Montauk, that is. Opened in 2010 despite protests from vocal residents, the Montauk 7-Eleven is the chain’s top-grossing store in the United States.

Of 7,800 locations nationwide, the four most profitable are all in Suffolk County, with the East Patchogue, Southampton and Farmingville stores following behind Montauk. Sag Harbor’s 7-Eleven earned the 11th spot. Of the top 10 locations by sales in the country last year, eight were in Suffolk County, according to 7-Eleven Inc. There are 208 stores on Long Island.

“It’s a Long Island thing,” franchisee Chris Stephens, who runs the stores in Montauk and East Patchogue, told Newsday. The East Patchogue and Southampton locations have fought for the top spot in recent years, but this year, Montauk’s summer sales helped the store to secure first place.

“You really target what’s needed from the community and people who’re here,” Mr. Stephens said of his business model. The Montauk store is flush with St. Patrick’s Day gear in March and stocked with sunblock, beach umbrellas and water guns in the summer. Beer is popular year-round and animal hats are a constant.

Although the Dallas-based company declined to give an exact number, Mr. Stephens said he has annual sales in the low millions, selling about $100,000 in beer and $50,000 in coffee monthly. Last summer, the store sold 250 boogie boards.

Despite the evident popularity of Suffolk County 7-Elevens – or perhaps because of it – some year-round residents have been vocal in their opposition to the chain, first in Montauk and now in Amagansett. Plans to build a franchise in a commercial building to the east of the Amagansett IGA were delayed last week when the East Hampton Town Planning Department rescinded the project’s building permit, calling for further review.

 

Feminist Filmmaker and the Modern Woman “In Montauk”

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Production still from "In Montauk." Courtesy of Kim Cummings.

Production still from “In Montauk.” Courtesy of Kim Cummings.

By Tessa Raebeck

Not known for its excitement, winter on the East End can be an ideal time for self-discovery and reflection; off-season Montauk thus provides the perfect setting for Julie Wagner, the soul-searching protagonist of Kim Cummings’ new independent drama/romance film, “In Montauk.”

“One of 2012’s indie highlights,” according to Richard Propes of The Independent Critic, the feminist film is set in Montauk in December. It stars Nina Kaczorowski as Julie Wagner, a young artist with a successful husband and a baby on the way, who has retreated to the end of Long Island in an attempt to combat the “growing feelings of uncertainty about the impending trajectories of her life,” according to the press release.

Writer/Director Kim Cummings.

Writer/Director Kim Cummings.

“It’s powerful and beautiful, tense in its emotions, and also draining (but in a good, ‘I just went on a personal journey and I’m spent’ way). In the end, the emotional effort is worth it,” Mark Bell of Film Threat says of the film, both written and directed by Ms. Cummings.

Through her production company, Siren’s Tale Productions, Ms. Cummings releases films in line with her goal “to present three-dimensional women and girls on film in nuanced storylines outside of the typical Hollywood roles of wives, girlfriends, mothers and other less flattering types.”

“In Montauk” portrays Julie Wagner grappling with how to fulfill her duty to her career, impending motherhood and marriage while still maintaining her individual identity. Through her struggle, Ms. Cummings offers an universal story of “confronting life’s imperfect choices in the hopes of coming to grips with one through which she can be true to herself.”

After a successful rollout on the festival circuit, picking up awards at the Toronto International Film Festival, the World Music & Independent Film Festival and more, “In Montauk” was released on DVD for the first time February 18. For more information, visit here.

Local Band on the Brink: The Montauk Project at 230 Elm

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The Montauk Project at the Bowery Ballroom in New York City (Photo by Ian Cooke).

The Montauk Project at the Bowery Ballroom in New York City (Photo by Ian Cooke).

By Tessa Raebeck

On the brink of releasing their first full-length album, The Montauk Project returns home this Saturday, February 15 with a concert at 230 Down in Southampton.

Since forming three years ago, the local, all-original rock band has been busy making a name for itself, playing frequent gigs on the East End, up-island and in New York City.

With the long hair of rock and roll and the laid back attitude of local surfers, the four band members are all East End natives in their mid-twenties. Sag Harbor’s Mark Schiavoni plays vocals and guitar, Jasper Conroy of Montauk is on the drums and adds vocals and bass player Chris Wood and lead guitar/vocalist Jack Marshall both come from East Hampton.

Mark Schiavoni of the Montauk Project (Photo by Ian Cooke).

Mark Schiavoni of the Montauk Project (Photo by Ian Cooke).

According to the band’s bio on the music site ReverbNation, The Montauk Project’s music “sounds like the beating wings of an immortal hummingbird flying through a war in heaven. Powerful, loud, eclectic, rock and roll.” Their musical influences include The Black Keys, Stone Temple Pilots and Blind Melon.

On March 25, the Montauk Project will unveil their first full-length album, “Belly of the Beast,” which will feature 10 original songs recorded at their home studio in Montauk, including the already released tracks “The Beast” and “Black as Night.”

The Montauk Project will perform Saturday, February 15 at 8 p.m. at 230 Down, located at 230 Elm Street in Southampton. For more information, visit themontaukprojectmusic.com.

Schneiderman Elected Deputy Presiding Officer of the Suffolk County Legislature

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PO and DPO

The Suffolk County Legislature’s majority caucus, which holds 12 out of 18 seats, voted unanimously to select Legislator DuWayne Gregory (D-Amityville; pictured standing left) as Presiding Officer and Legislator Jay Schneiderman (I-Montauk; pictured, standing right) as the next Deputy Presiding Officer at its meeting on Friday December 20.

The 12-member caucus met to decide on a replacement for former Presiding Officer Wayne Horsley of Babylon, who has left the legislature to become the regional director of Long Island State Parks. The final vote for these leadership positions took place at the Suffolk County Legislature’s Organizational Meeting on January 2, 2014.

Among the many powers and duties of the presiding officer, the officer chairs all meetings of the full legislature, preserves order and determines when to recess meetings. The presiding officer also establishes independent committees, boards and commissions and designates a chairperson to a specific committee. In the event of an absence from a legislative meeting of the presiding officer, the deputy presiding officer assumes those powers and duties.

Legislator Schneiderman will be the first member of the Independence Party to hold a leadership position at the county level.

“I would like to thank my colleagues for this great opportunity,” said Schneiderman. “I look forward to working with Presiding Officer DuWayne Gregory and the County Executive towards a proactive agenda and to be a strong voice for Suffolk County.”

Schneiderman said he plans to work on mental health issues, poverty, public transportation and the fiscal issues facing Suffolk County’s budget as he enters his final term on the legislature. Schneiderman also plans to move forward with environmental issues such as improving water quality and reducing the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

 

Barking and Basking, The Seals Return to Montauk for the Winter

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A harbor seal sunning on the jetty at Georgica Beach in East Hampton. (Photo by Tessa Raebeck).

A harbor seal sunning on the jetty at Georgica Beach in East Hampton. (Photo by Tessa Raebeck).

By Tessa Raebeck

While most visitors to Montauk’s beaches come only in the summer months, at least one group prefers to spend the off-season basking in the sun. Harbor seals, once hunted as bounty and nearly depleted in the Northeast, are now abundant on the East End each winter.

Most of the seals in local waters are harbor seals, but grey, hooded, ringed and harp seals have also been spotted. The East Hampton Trails Preservation Society hopes to see at least one type of seal this Saturday, at a guided two and a half mile hike that weaves through a wooded trail along the bluffs in Montauk and ends, ideally, with a display of seals sunning themselves by the shore.

Several Northeast states enacted seal bounty programs in the late 1800s, and substantial catching and hunting contributed to a severe depletion of the seal population in local waters. A bounty program in Massachusetts existed until 1962.

Ten years later in 1972, the U.S. Marine Mammal Protection Act largely prohibited the “take” of marine mammals in U.S. waters or by U.S. citizens anywhere.

The seal population began to recover following its passage, according to Gordon Waring, who leads the seal program at NOAA’s (National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration) Northeast Fisheries Science Center in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

The number of seals on the Long Island shore has continued to rise.

Dr. Arthur Kopelman, field biologist and president of the Coastal Research and Education Society of Long Island (CRESLI), has tracked changes in seal species, abundance and distribution in the Long Island Sound since 1995.

“What I’ve seen is a dramatic increase in population of harbor seals,” Kopelman said last week.

Harbor seals, Dr. Kopelman said, come down to New York from areas further North and usually stay from September to May, with the population generally peaking in late March in Westhampton Beach, his current area of research.

They have a cute, dog-like appearance and when flared, their nostrils resemble a cartoon heart. About six feet long, harbor seals are various shades of blue-gray, white or brown and covered in speckled spots.

If you’ve seen a seal on the East End, chances are it was a harbor seal.

They represent 95 percent of local seals. Dr. Kopelman counted 55 seals in Westhampton just last week, the vast majority of which were harbor seals.

Montauk has more grey seals than Westhampton, the population ecologist said, although the majority are still harbor seals. He has seen the rocks in Montauk filled with hundreds of barking seals in the past.

If harbor seals look like dogs, grey seals look like horses. Grey seals, larger and more aggressive with long faces and large snouts, account for four percent of the local seal population.

Adult males can weigh as much as 700 pounds; double the size of adult male harbor seals.

Dr. Kopelman said according to anecdotal evidence, the grey seal population in local waters is increasing. Typically classified as seasonal visitors like harbor seals, it appears grey seals – like many before them – have become attached to the area and are staying on the East End year round.

“In fact,” Dr. Kopelman said, “there are some folks who seem to indicate that there’s a year round presence of grey seals out here. Although, again, that’s somewhat anecdotal – but probably correct.”

The Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation has rescued and rehabilitated many newborn seals recently, but it is not officially confirmed the pups were born in the area.

According to Dr. Kopelman, female harbor seals are often pregnant while here but typically head back North before giving birth to their pups, which can swim minutes after being born. It is “likely,” however, that grey seals are giving birth locally.

The remaining one percent of local seals – harp, hooded and ringed seals – come from as far north as the Arctic.

“They are less frequently encountered,” said Dr. Kopelman, “but they are encountered.”

The Seal Haul Out Hike will take place on Saturday, December 28 at 10 a.m. at Camp Hero Road in Montauk. For more information, contact Eva Moore at the East Hampton Trails Preservation Society at (631) 238-5134 or sharstat@yahoo.com.

Suit Filed Over Deer Cull in East Hampton

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By Kathryn G. Menu

Two not-for-profit wildlife organizations and a group of individuals have banded together and filed a lawsuit seeking to prevent a regional plan to cull deer with federal sharpshooters beginning this winter.

The Montauk-based East Hampton Group for the Wildlife and the Evelyn Alexander Wildlife Rescue Center of the Hamptons in Hampton Bays, along with 15 residents, filed suit in Supreme Court Thursday against East Hampton Town, East Hampton Village and the East Hampton Town Trustees. In the suit, they ask for a temporary restraining order against the town’s comprehensive deer management plan, and specifically any proposal within that plan that calls for the organized culling of the whitetail deer.

While the lawsuit was served on the town last Thursday and the village on Friday, that same day, the East Hampton Village Board moved forward by passing a resolution to join the Long Island Farm Bureau’s (LIFB) proposal to bring in federal sharpshooters to cull deer herds in municipalities across the East End.

The LIFB’s plan, which it is coordinating with the New York Department of Environmental Conservation (NYSDEC), entails bringing United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) sharpshooters to the East End to cull the herd. The program will be funded by the LIFB through $200,000 in funding through the 2013 state budget.

The Farm Bureau has asked East End villages and towns to sign onto the program by committing $15,000 to $25,000, respectively, to have federal riflemen come to their municipalities. The cull will take place in a four or five week window beginning in February, timing Farm Bureau Executive Director Joe Gergela noted was designed to give local hunters a chance to cull the herd themselves during deer season, which runs through late January.

The goal, said Gergela in an interview earlier this month, is to cull 1,000 to 2,000 deer from across the East End. The meat from the culled deer will go to Island Harvest to feed the hungry on Long Island.

The USDA sharpshooters use suppressed rifles and depending on terrain, either trap deer with a drop net, work as a mobile team with a driver, spotter and shooter, or shoot from tree stands. The Farm Bureau will coordinate efforts with municipalities that sign onto the program to identify areas deer herds tend to populate the most.

East Hampton Village has agreed to pay $15,000 into the program and joins East Hampton and Southold town, who have both agreed to provide $25,000 in funding.  Southampton Town has yet to decide on whether or not it will join the regional cull, and Sagaponack officials have said that village would wait until both towns sign on before making its own commitment. The Village of North Haven is pursuing its own organized cull.

While supporters of the plan point to the incidences of tick borne illnesses on the East End, public safety concerns connected to deer and motor vehicle accidents, as well as the financial impact on farms and on private landscaping, critics contend there has been little information provided to show the cull is truly necessary. Local hunters have also opposed the cull, arguing if New York State, and the towns and villages, opened up hunting restrictions, they could thin the deer population themselves.

“There is not enough proof that there is the kind of population that would warrant this,” said Virginia Frati, the Executive Director and Founder of the Evelyn Alexander Wildlife Rescue Center. “How can we do this without proof of that?”

“We are not convinced there is an overpopulation of deer,” she continued. “Where is the proof that an overwhelming majority of residents are even for this? Even the hunters are not in favor of this.”

South Fork Gas Prices Drop

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New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr.  announced late last week his most recent survey of gasoline prices. According to that survey, South Fork prices have declined $0.08 since the last survey late in October.

Long Island prices have increased by $0.09 cents during the same period. South Fork prices are now $0.03 cents above the state and Long Island average. South Fork gas prices were $0.20 cents higher than the Long Island average in October. That differential has decreased by $0.17 cents since October when it was $0.20 cents.

The Automobile Association of America (AAA) provides for a regional survey on New York State gasoline prices. However, there is no survey solely for the South Fork. Thiele’s survey also includes prices in western Southampton along Montauk Highway.

“The average price for East Hampton and Southampton along Montauk Highway excluding Amagansett and Montauk is now $3.69,” said Thiele.  “The average price for Amagansett and Montauk is $4.09. A gallon of gas on the North Fork is now about $3.59. The LI average is $3.66 and the State average is $3.66.”

Sag Harbor Village Board: Ambulance Corps Looks Towards Paid Help

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By Kathryn G. Menu

For Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps President Ed Downes each passing year is a record breaker, as emergency service calls increase and volunteers scramble to ensure the community has an ambulance corps it not only can count on, but one it can be proud of.

And they are certainly not alone.

Since last spring, the East End Ambulance Coalition — a group of representatives from volunteer ambulance companies from Sag Harbor, Bridgehampton, Amagansett, East Hampton, Springs and Montauk — have been working together towards a paid first responder program, which they hope will launch in the summer of 2014.

Starting this past June, the Montauk Fire District Board of Fire Commissioners approved a pilot program for this past summer, providing for one paid EMT 24 hours a day, seven days a week through mid-September.

Many departments on Long Island, including Southampton, have moved towards having at least partially paid paramedics and first responders who work with local volunteers, improving response times as a result.

During a Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees meeting last Wednesday, trustee Ed Deyermond noted with the increase in call volumes, considering a paid emergency medical technician (EMT) is something that should be considered within Sag Harbor’s fire district.

According to Downes, the company will likely seek to work cooperatively with the East End Ambulance Coalition, which was set to meet again Friday, towards a regional paid first responder program before seeking to fund a program for Sag Harbor alone.

Downes said if implemented, the coalition would have a team of three to as many as five paid responders on duty, available to respond along with one of the coalition companies to any emergency service situation from Bridgehampton to Montauk.

“The biggest problem is funding,” said Downes of the coalition’s efforts. Working with both East Hampton and Southampton towns for funding is being considered, he added, with the coalition waiting for newly elected town boards to take office before making any formal proposals.

No matter what program is implemented, Downes said all the fire districts will still rely heavily on volunteers. Working together, for example through the implementation of a daytime duty crew — a program established by coalition companies this July — is critical, he added. Downes said he expects the daytime duty crew is something the coalition will continue next summer.

A duty crew made up a volunteers from one of the coalition companies was on call Monday through Saturday to respond to any ambulance call, along with the home company the call originated from. The program gave the all-volunteer ambulance companies a back-up team to rely on.

For Downes, and the 29 members of the Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps, while having paid first responders on-call in a regional capacity would be a welcome help as calls continue to increase, the volunteer force will always be essential.

“Everyone gives what they can and all that they can,” he said.

In other emergency service news, last Wednesday Deyermond once again brought up the need for a helipad for medevac purposes in Sag Harbor. Last month, Deyermond suggested it could be something constructed near Havens Beach. Last Wednesday, he noted it would have to support a 24 ton military helicopter.

“Maybe we can get a ballpark figure and see if this is going to fly,” said Deyermond.

The village board also passed a resolution made by Deyermond to purchase 16 new air packs for the Sag Harbor Volunteer Fire Department at a cost not to exceed more than $70,000 out of the excess budget available through the fire department, and the remainder to be funded through the village’s contingency fund.

Deyermond said the village was also looking at the cost of purchasing two new dry suits for the Sag Harbor Volunteer Fire Department Dive Team.

Last month, the fire department reported that 17 of its 60 air packs had to be replaced with newer models as they were now rated as “substandard.” Two of the dive team’s three dry suits, critical for water rescues, have been in and out of repairs.

In other village news, the board introduced two new local laws last Wednesday that will be up for public hearing at its January 14 meeting.

First is a local law amending the zoning code to require a certificate of appropriateness from the Sag Harbor Historic Preservation & Architectural Review Board (ARB) for any exterior “alteration, restoration, construction, reconstruction, demolition or material change in the appearance of such a property that is visible from an adjacent street or adjacent property.” A certificate of appropriateness would not be required for interior renovations alone.

The board will also hold a public hearing for a change to the building code, requiring sediment control during the course of a building project to protect natural vegetation and topography by requiring a project-limiting fence, mesh, straw bales, or similar devices during construction and any clearing or grading of land.

“First of all, this is usually done as a matter of course in most projects anyway but this will give the building inspector the right to enforce it,” said village attorney Fred W. Thiele, Jr.

The board was also unanimous in renewing its agreement with the Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club, which will be able to continue its program at Cove Park, a small public park near Redwood Causeway.

The not-for-profit Sag Harbor Community Rowing Club has been rowing off Cove Park since its founding in 2008. In addition to competitive rowing for middle and high school students, the organization also has adult programming and camp offerings in the summer. For more information, visit rowsagharbor.org.

The board did table a request by Martin Monteith to run a sailboat charter from outside the breakwater for the 2014 summer season. Monteith was asking the board for permission to load and unload passengers from the village docks.

Thiele cautioned the board that if it was going to allow the use of its dock space it would have to charge a fee.

The board asked Harbor Master Bob Bori to weigh in on the matter before making a decision.

The board also denied a request by Susan Mead of the not for profit Serve Sag Harbor to host a fundraising event on Long Wharf June 28 and June 29.

“I am happy to entertain it at a different venue or on a different day, but it’s just that this is Long Wharf we are talking about,” said board member Robby Stein.