Tag Archive | "north haven village"

North Haven Village Tax Sale

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By Marissa Maier

The North Haven Village Board is getting ready to hold their annual tax sale, when potential investors are allowed to bid on delinquent taxes on properties in the village. Georgia Welch, the village clerk, noted at Tuesday’s board of trustees meeting that two parcels fit this bill. One tax bill is for around $530, while the other is roughly $650, pointed out Welch.
“It is an annual thing that every municipality that collects taxes does. Any time there are lien taxes that run almost a whole year late by law a municipality can sell the taxes that are due to anyone who wants to buy them,” explained village mayor Laura Nolan.
The tax sale business can be extremely profitable as the investor who pays the taxes then owns an interest in the property. The investor also must be paid back their initial investment plus one percent interest for every month the debt goes unpaid.
“It is a type of investment,” noted Nolan. However, those in the tax sale business often buy bundles of delinquent taxes in larger areas and earn thousands, whereas in North Haven one would make only a few dollars, remarked Welch.
“It isn’t worth the effort,” said Welch. “In other townships, people will buy them all up and make a nice tight profit.”
Trustee Jeff Sander wondered how the village would sell the delinquent taxes. Welch answered they would be sold on a first come first served basis, but added the delinquent taxes have never been sold. Apparently, a man in the tax sale business visited the village last year to check out the delinquent properties but quickly lost interest when he saw how marginal the tax bills were. Notice of the tax sale must be published three times, with the last date being March 11.Welch noted that the actual tax sale will be held on Tuesday, March 16.

North Haven Elections Uncontested

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As election day nears, the mayoral and village trustee race in Sag Harbor Village is heating up, but over in neighboring North Haven Village, this year’s election season promises to be quiet as current trustees Jeff Sander and Russell “Jim” Smyth are running unopposed. Sander, a local business owner, is currently wrapping up his first term as trustee and was named as village deputy mayor in 2008. Smyth is a 47-year resident of the village and is entering his third term as trustee. Before becoming a trustee, Smyth served for eight years on the village planning board.
In the coming years, Sander would like to see the village acquire more property for open space preservation. He pointed out that the village recently purchased a 2.2 acre plot of land.
“I hope we continue to use whatever funds are available to buy parcels. This is one of the most important [projects] for the village,” noted Sander.
Although Sander has taken a keen interest in acquiring additional open space for the village, he added that it’s imperative for the village to remain fiscally conservative as the East End faces an uncertain economic future.
“One of our biggest challenges right now is continuing to manage our funds in a responsible way,” explained Sander. “All villages including ours are being impacted by the economy. Revenues are down in part because of decreases in the fees collected for building permits and other permits, though our costs continue to rise. This year we had to replace the heating system in village hall.”
Smyth concurred on the need to preserve open space and practice fiscal responsibility, but added that the board needs to continue keeping the village’s deer population at bay and beautifying various points in the village, similar to the recent round-about beautification project. Over his last term, Smyth said the village has worked on updating its website and improving office operations, and will continue to do so over the next couple years.
“I don’t foresee anything new confronting the village,” reported Smyth. “We just want to continue the work we have been doing. Most of the village projects are things we have been continuing for years and years.”
“The deer is always something in the back of our minds and we are always dealing with waterfront and dock issues,” continued Smyth, who added that the village is relatively small and primarily residential with only one commercial business in North Haven.
Overall, Smyth noted that the current North Haven village board has established a certain rhythm that he would like to see continue in the future.
“We have a strong group of people on the board who have been working together for a while,” said Smyth.
“I can provide some expertise and some good judgment to village politics. I enjoy working on the board,” added Sander of his forthcoming candidacy.
“They are great trustees. I am glad they are rerunning,” said current village mayor Laura Nolan. “They have certainly been an asset in helping me on the board and I am happy there isn’t a contested election this year.”
In fact, the Village of North Haven hasn’t seen a contested election since 2007.

North Haven Fed-Up With Abandoned Boats

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On Tuesday, June 2, The North Haven Village Board of Trustees presented a draft for a local law pertaining to boat storage. Once the summer season ends, residents often abandon their kayaks, sailboats, hobie-cats, canoes and dinghies at the end of Sunset Beach Road.
The draft law stipulates that the village will grant boat permits for the storage of boats on village beaches. Once a permit is granted, the boat owner will be given a registration sticker to be placed on the boat. The boat must be removed from beaches by October 31. Boats left on the beach after this date will be considered abandoned and the village will have the right to sell these boats or destroy them.
The village will hold a public hearing on the law on Tuesday, July 7, at 5 p.m.
In addition to legislation on abandoned boats, John Jermain Memorial Library Director Cathy Creedon visited the board to present plans for the library’s expansion, which will be up for a referendum vote on June 29.
Trustee James Morrissey, a self-proclaimed regular patron of the library, asked why the library couldn’t build on the Union Street side of the property to add additional space. Creedeon responded by saying the small stretch of greenery by Union Street is the best position for the library’s cesspool.
Morrissey went on to raise concerns about a lack of parking, especially when the library hosts group meetings and special events. Creedon said a parking analysis revealed there are almost 65 spaces within a block and a half radius of the building. She added that patrons are often more concerned with safely crossing the street — as the library lies at a busy intersection — than finding parking.
Trustee Jeff Sander asked if the library was exploring other sources of funding in addition to taxpayer money. Creedon said she was actively pursuing private donations and grant money.
“A lot of people are waiting until after the referendum [to commit funding],” Creedon said of private donors.
The board appeared receptive to the building plans and referendum.