Tag Archive | "North Haven"

Suffolk County to Create Tick Advisory Committee

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At its March 4 meeting, the Suffolk County Legislature unanimously passed a resolution sponsored by County Legislator Jay Schneiderman to create a tick control advisory committee. The committee will advise the county’s Division of Vector Control on developing a plan to reduce tick-borne illnesses in the county.

The committee will consist of 12 members, including a person knowledgeable in the area of tick control designated by the commissioner of the Suffolk County Department of Health Services who will serve as the chair. Mr. Schneiderman will also be on the committee, as will County Executive Steve Bellone, Presiding Officer DuWayne Gregory, Legislator Al Krupski, the chair of the Legislature’s Public Works Committee; Legislator William Spencer, the chair of the Legislature’s Health Committee, Commissioner Greg Dawson of Suffolk County Parks, a representative of an environmental advocacy group, a public health professional, a representative of the East End Supervisors and Mayors Association and a representative of the Cornell Cooperative Extension.

In 2013, Legislator Schneiderman sponsored a resolution that requires the division of Suffolk County Vector Control to submit a yearly plan to reduce the incidence of Lyme disease and other tick-borne illnesses.

The federal Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports 300,000 yearly cases of Lyme disease. There are 1,000 cases of West Nile per year, making it 300 times more likely that a Suffolk County resident will contract Lyme disease than West Nile virus, said Legislator Schneiderman.

“A primary function of government is to protect the health and welfare of residents of Suffolk County,” he said. “This committee will help Vector Control develop a plan to reduce the incidence of tick borne illnesses.”

North Haven Woman Charged in Serial Burglary Case

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By Kathryn G. Menu

A North Haven resident was arrested last week and charged in connection with a string of burglaries in East Hampton in 2013.

On Monday, March 3, Erin Reiser, 32, turned herself into East Hampton Town Police, Captain Chris Anderson confirmed on Wednesday. Ms. Reiser was charged with three counts of criminal possession of stolen property in the third degree, a felony crime, as well as a felony count of possession of stolen property in the fourth degree and two counts of possession of stolen property in the fifth degree, a misdemeanor.

According to police, Ms. Reiser was the girlfriend of Justin Bennett, a resident of Springs who was arrested in October and charged in connection with a rash of burglaries on the South Fork. On Wednesday, Capt. Anderson confirmed that Ms. Reiser was in a 2003 Toyota sedan occupied by Mr. Bennett when detectives pulled the vehicle over on Route 114 in October.

“We recovered from the interior of the vehicle jewelry, with some electronics, and that is what these charges are connected too,” said Capt. Anderson.

In November, Mr. Bennett pled not guilty to 25 counts of burglary in the second degree, one count of attempted burglary in the second degree and one count of attempted burglary in the third degree, all felony crimes. According to police, beginning in January of 2013, Mr. Bennett burglarized 25 homes in East Hampton, Sag Harbor and Southampton.

The thefts totaled over $126,000 in cash, jewelry and prescription medications, according to the indictment. Mr. Bennett admitted to police that he suffered from a severe heroin addiction, which led him to commit the crimes.

He has been held in lieu of $200,000 cash bail or a $400,000 bond, at Suffolk County Jail in Yaphank.

The charges Ms. Reiser faces in connection to the case are directly tied to the evidence police recovered from the Toyota in October, said Capt. Anderson, adding that Ms. Reiser’s arrest was delayed as a result of the ongoing investigation.

Ms. Reiser was arraigned on March 3 before East Hampton Town Justice Steven Tekulsky, and posted $2,500 bail at the Suffolk County Jail in Riverside.

 

 

Mum’s the Word on Status of North Haven Deer Cull

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By Stephen J. Kotz

A veil of silence has fallen over North Haven, where village officials last month gave Mayor Jeffrey Sander the green light to negotiate a contract with a private firm to cull the deer herd.

Reached at home on Wednesday morning, Mr. Sander was decidedly tight-lipped.

“There is no status update other than what was discussed at the last meeting,” Mr. Sander said, apparently referring to a vote taken by the board on February 4 authorizing him to negotiate a contract with White Buffalo Inc., a Connecticut firm that specializes in controlling the white-tail deer population in suburban communities.

“I really can’t tell you anything other than that,” Mr. Sander said, when asked if he still expected to have the contract finalized in time to undertake the cull this spring.

Asked if he was not willing to talk because of concerns the village would face a lawsuit over its deer culling plans, Mr. Sander replied, “It’s not anything I’m going to talk about.”

Earlier this year, East Hampton town and village dropped out of a separate plan to cull their deer herds, one backed by the Long Island Farm Bureau that would bring in sharpshooters hired by the United States Department of Agriculture’s Wildlife Services, when they were sued by animal rights activists.

Last week, a lawsuit filed againsts Southold Town, by the Wildlife Preservation Coalition of Eastern Long Island, which consists of animal rights groups and hunters, was tossed out, allowing the deer cull to proceed in that town.

USDA sharpshooters have also reportedly been invited onto private property on South Fork residents as well.

This week, Wendy Chamberlin of the Wildlife Preservation Coalition, said her group was trying to obtain an injunction preventing the state Department of Environmental Conservation from issuing nuisance permits on Long Island until a scientific rationale is advanced for the deer cull.

“This isn’t being done scientifically. This is being done emotionally and anecdotally,” said Ms. Chamberlin, who said she would support hunting if other measures were inadequate to control the deer herd.

She said it was “shocking” for village officials to refuse to discuss the cull. “Officials who behave like this and do not attend to the opinions and desires of their constituents should resign,” she said.

Last month, Mr. Sander said he expected the village to spend about $15,000 this year to start the deer culling, and added that the process could take several years to complete. At that time he estimated that the village had about 200 to 250 deer and would like to reduce that number to approximately 100.

At Tuesday’s meeting, the board handled other routine business and did not discuss the deer situation at all. Mr. Sander said he comfortable declining to discuss a public project that involves the spending of tax money, the threat of lawsuits and an invitation to allow hunters to shoot deer with shotguns.

“Nope,” he said, when asked if he had any additional comments.

 

Arrests Made in Corner Closet Case

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Police respond to the scene of an armed robbery at The Corner Closet in November. 

By Kathryn G. Menu; Michael Heller photograph

Two individuals have been arrested in connection with the November armed robbery of the Corner Closet in Sag Harbor, according to Sag Harbor Village Police Detective Jeffrey Proctor, although he would not provide details in what has become a federal case.

“Two people are in custody with the U.S. Attorney’s Office and have been remanded without bail,” said Det. Proctor on Monday. Det. Proctor would not name the individuals or the charges they face, citing an ongoing federal investigation. Calls to U.S. Attorney Raymond Tierney, with New York’s eastern district office, were not returned as of press time.

Det. Proctor did allow that one of the arrests occurred in early January and involved a male suspect. After speaking with officials at the U.S. Attorney’s Office about the case, Det. Proctor said village police believed there could be a connection to the Corner Closet case.

“After putting that individual in a photo spread, the victim was able to positively identify the male subject,” he said.

Det. Proctor remained mum on details about the second arrest made by federal authorities in connection to the case, including the gender of the individual.

Seena Stromberg, the owner of the Corner Closet—a high-end vintage consignment clothing and jewelry store—reported on November 19 that a man and a female accomplice entered her store around 5:50 p.m. and the man held a gun to her head before dragging her to the back of the store and restraining her arms and legs. The couple, described as Hispanic and in their late 20s to early 30s, stole clothing and jewelry from the store, according to police, before fleeing in what police believe was a domestic four-door white sedan.

Ms. Stromberg was able to free herself, and around 6:25 p.m., she asked a pedestrian on Main Street to contact police.

In addition to the male and female Ms. Stromberg reported as being responsible for restraining her and stealing numerous goods from the store, police also sought another suspect—described as a Hispanic male, 25 to 35 years old—who police said entered Illusions jewelry store on Main Street, making similar statements as those made to Ms. Stromberg by the other couple. No goods were reported taken from the Illusions jewelry store.

“I am glad this case has come to a close,” said Det. Proctor. “I hope this puts any doubts to rest and eases the minds of business owners on Main Street.”

Buyers Push Demand for New Construction on the South Fork

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Completed and sold in 2013, this Glover Street residence was built by DeMarco Development. A second new home is currently under construction, also on Sag Harbor’s Glover Street. Photo courtesy of Douglas Elliman. 

By Amanda Wyatt

Historic homes have long been part of the fabric of Sag Harbor, a village celebrated for its old-fashioned charm. But newly constructed houses, rather than repaired or renovated historical houses, are beginning to dot this landscape—perhaps heralding the dawn of a new era for the village.

“What we’re talking about is the economy more than anything,” explained Leslie Reingold, an agent with Sotheby’s International Realty. “The building going on is sort of a synchronicity of factors. One, the economy picked up. Two, Sag Harbor became very hot and still is…It’s like Sag Harbor has come into its own.”

“Because of the publicity of the Bulova Watch[case] condos, so many more people are becoming familiar with Sag Harbor. Sag Harbor has always been one of the most beautiful and authentic seaside villages. When I finally found a piece of property in the village I was determined to build a Federal style home in keeping with the history of Sag Harbor,” said Toni Curto of Curto, Curto and Curto, LLC

As the village enters into a new era of growth and expansion, the real estate market will likely continue to reflect these changes.

“New construction is a very active segment of today’s market and most older homes purchased are being renovated so extensively they are like new,” agreed Gioia DiPaolo, office manager and broker with the Sag Harbor branch of Douglas Elliman.

As she explained, the trend of building brand new, yet traditional-looking homes has been around for over a decade, although it’s undoubtedly picked up recently.

“In the Village of Sag Harbor, [builder] Bob Tortora started a trend over 10 years ago creating new homes that reflected period architecture but offered all the interior proportions and amenities of a new home—the best of both worlds,” DiPaolo pointed out. “DeMarco Development has brought this concept of ‘the new old house’ forward, now completing the second of three historically referenced new homes on Glover Street. These homes incorporate reclaimed wood for flooring, antique lighting fixtures and moldings, and, for the most part, Greek Revival architectural design.”

“On the fringes of the historic village we’re seeing new construction by developers well known throughout the Hamptons, but new to Sag Harbor, for traditional homes offering large square footage and lots of amenities,” DiPaolo noted.

As some realtors noted, the trend of new construction is not so much a shift away from historic homes as it is a practical response to finding space in an ever-growing village. Historic houses, particularly the architectural gems on Main Street, are somewhat hard to come by, and what does exist can be pricy.

Besides, restoring or renovating an older home often comes with unforeseen challenges and difficulties. Buyers may “not know what they’re going to find” once they begin renovating or restoring, Mala Sander, a broker with the Corcoran Group’s Sag Harbor office, pointed out.

“I always call it the ‘you might as well’ factor. Once you get to a certain point, if you’re going to change the floor here, we might as well change the floor there…and then we might as well change the cabinetry and get new appliances, you might as well [tear down the structure],” she said, adding: “When you have homes that aren’t architecturally significant or that interesting there’s no real point to renovating those. It’s best just to take those down. So developers are seeing an opportunity in that, either in open space or tear downs and putting up what today’s buyer wants.”

Curto added that one “of the advantages in building a new home is that we can influence the design and finished product, although it is always still exciting to renovate an older structure.”

However, some agents noted that the market for new homes is usually entirely separate from the market for historic homes.

“I think people that want houses want new houses and people who want historic want historic. I don’t think that it’s really the same buyer. People who want something beautiful and historic will want to do the renovation, and they’ll do it with love and care because they really value the history aspect of the older home. The person that’s buying the new house wants the simplicity of not having to deal with the unknown; they value different things,” said Sander.

“It’s hard to even put the two together in the same sentence,” Reingold agreed. “It’s a whole other animal.”

For those interested in a historic home, renovation and repair is a true labor of love.

“If you’re renovating something that’s beautiful and worth renovating or restoring, yes, it can be very costly to [do so], as opposed to starting from scratch,” Sander said.

“There’s not much of it and what you’re getting is very expensive. 900 square feet for, let’s say, a million, and you’d have to put in [hundreds of thousands of dollars] in maintenance,” said Reingold.

“Not only is it maybe 400 dollars per square foot more to renovate a historic home,” she estimated, “there are very few highly skilled craftsmen and artisans around. A lot of the details [on historic homes] were handcrafted. In all honesty, if you could replicate a historical home for a reasonable amount of money, I’m sure you’d have more people doing it.”

As Reingold pointed out, many people—particularly those with families or those who own multiple homes—simply do not have the time to constantly renovate a house. It can take four times as long to renovate a house as it would to put up a new structure, she said.

Furthermore, many buyers come to Sag Harbor with the intent of having a spacious home, with plenty of room to entertain friends and family. At the same time, “people want to be closer to town” than in previous times, and this presents a problem. Lots in the village tend to be small, and aside from a few of the grand historical homes, many historic structures are tiny by contemporary standards.

It isn’t uncommon for a historic house to have 150 square foot bedrooms, with only one bathroom down the hall, Reingold explained. Even if a buyer decided to gut the house, it may not accommodate the number of bedrooms and bathrooms—as well as amenities and technological extras—that many buyers desire.

“One new thing everybody seems to want now is a downstairs master bedroom. Most of the older structures don’t even have downstairs master suites,” said Sander.

Buyers often prefer homes with an “open flow, open floor plan…[especially] the open kitchen, which people use today as gathering rooms. And then you have the convenience factor, some people out there like laundry rooms on multiple levels, and I’m not even getting into the appliance and amenity factor, just high end kitchen appliances and all that,” she added.

DiPaolo echoed Sander’s comments: “Lifestyle preferences have evolved to a more casual style, with a focus on the kitchen as the place people gather, and floor plan, flow and proportion of rooms now need to be more open with higher ceilings in order to appeal to today’s buyer. The amenities in a new home are, of course, a big draw whereas the time and expense of a renovation project is a proposition many buyers don’t want to endure.  However, for those buyers who value history, renovating a historic home can be a real labor of love.”

While Reingold agreed “size is a huge factor,” she pointed out that “[in the past], construction loans were impossible to get, so that also meant there was no inventory when people were coming out to buy.” She also added that keeping historic structures up to code is also a challenge. There is more leeway with new homes, since the village is less concerned with preserving their architectural integrity.

Another reason why buyers are opting for new construction is that “they’re more energy efficient, they’re less maintenance intensive, it’s going to be more of what you want and less of a compromise, when you’re renovating an older house there’s always compromise between what you really want to have and what exists,” said Sander.

At the same time, DiPaolo pointed out, “Selling a new home that is under construction can be challenging especially when the buyer wants to customize everything. It just takes much longer to bring a deal to closing. However, new construction does come with warranties which is very comforting to a buyer.”

Of course, for those who desire the feel of an older home with all of the modern conveniences, there is the option of using an old architectural plan while building a new home. Some new constructions are being designed with traditional architectural elements, which may help bridge the gap between new construction and historic buildings.

Curto said that she selected an architect for one of her Sag Harbor building projects because he was “very familiar with historic homes and has a passion for them. Once you find your team they will work with you on designing a Federal style home but offer you all the amenities such as a chef’s kitchen, old world moldings, (custom cabinetry built-ins) and beautiful floors.”

Still, as the village itself rapidly grows and changes, architecture will undoubtedly reflect these shifts. But with so many new structures being erected, could Sag Harbor lose a little bit of its old-fashioned charm?

“Yes,” Reingold answered. At the same time, she predicted the village would never entirely lose its historical appeal. Sag Harbor’s rich local history and charm will continue to be a draw for prospective buyers of both new and older homes.

“People are still going to keep coming here because of the historic charm and the quaintness, and more importantly, the vibrancy of Main Street,” she added.

 

Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team Rescue Retriever From Icy Waters

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As fire department and ambulance members render aid, member Stephen Hesler holds and comforts a dog that was rescued by the Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team after it had fallen through the ice off of Bayview Court in North Haven on Saturday.

By Michael Heller

Members of the Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team braved cold temperatures last weekend to save a two-year-old golden retriever that was struggling in the icy water of Noyac Bay off North Haven.

On Saturday, the dive team was called to Bayview Court after receiving a report that a dog had fallen through the ice. First responders found the retriever with only his head above water roughly 50 yards offshore, barking and crying as he struggled to stay afloat.

A boat was dispatched into the bay with dive team members Alex Smith and Scott Fordham aboard, with dive team member Rich Simmons swimming ahead, breaking the ice by hand so that the boat could proceed.

Mr. Simmons soon reached the canine. After loading him into the boat, the team brought him to shore and into the waiting arms of Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps personnel, who warmed the dog before turning him over to the Southampton Town Animal Control office.

The dog was taken to the East End Veterinary Emergency Center In Riverhead for further treatment.

Attending veterinarian Dr. Gal Vatash reported that the dog, Morgan, was close to death after having been in the frigid water for roughly 45 minutes, and was suffering from petechiae—a low blood platelet count—and hypothermia, with a body temperature below 90 degrees.

“He was definitely looking at the light at the end of the tunnel,” said Dr. Vatash.

After an overnight treatment of plasma and warm fluids, however, Morgan was released to his owners the following afternoon, and “…went home wagging his tail.”

Dr. Vatash credited the members of the Sag Harbor Fire Department and Ambulance Corps with saving the dog’s life, as well as simple good luck: He was spotted out on the ice when a family just happened to come down to the shoreline to take some photos and spied the animal in distress. He also credited the use of a microchip embedded in Morgan’s skin for enabling his office to locate and reunite him with his owner.

Dr. Vatash said he would encourage all pet owners to microchip their animals as a protective measure.

North Haven Village Agrees to Fund Peconic Estuary Program

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By Kathryn G. Menu

North Haven Village has become the eighth municipality on the East End to sign an inter-municipal agreement with the Peconic Estuary Program. With that move, the village joins a growing list of local governments committed to helping fund the program’s work in aiding a critical natural resource and economic driver.

The village board passed a unanimous resolution Tuesday night to sign the agreement. North Haven Village will provide the program with $1,000 in funding for the remainder of this fiscal year, which ends June 31, according to Mayor Jeff Sander. Sander committed to finding $3,000 to fund the program in the 2014-2015 budget, which the board will start to workshop next month.

While the combined funding from participating municipalities is critical to the program’s success, at root in the agreement is the concept of East End governments working collaboratively through the program to improve water quality by sharing research, resources, coordinating regulation and enforcement and launching education initiatives aimed at teaching the public how they can have a hand in protecting the Peconic Estuary. Looking at improving septic system technology, enhancing tidal wetlands and looking at legislation to protect water quality are some of the larger goals of the coalition.

Once fully formed, the coalition will work together through a committee of representatives. The towns of Brookhaven, East Hampton, Riverhead, Shelter Island, Southampton and Southold have already passed resolutions agreeing to join the coalition, as has the Village of Greenport. The program also hopes to count the villages of Sag Harbor and Dering Harbor as coalition members, although neither municipality has formally agreed to fund the program as of yet.

The program was originally funded through Suffolk County, which will also be a coalition member, as will the State of New York.

“Out here on the East End, we live and die by the bays and personally I don’t think we can spend enough to make sure that it is taken care of,” said Sander.

“I think we couldn’t spend our money any better way than protecting our waters,” agreed North Haven Deputy Mayor Diane Skilbred.

At Sag Harbor CAC Meeting, Four in Attendance Focus on Recruitment

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By Tessa Raebeck

With just four people in attendance, the discussion at Friday’s meeting of the Sag Harbor Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) centered on recruitment.

CAC Chairman John Linder was joined by members Susan Baran, Eric Cohen and Bob Malafronte in expressing the need for better visibility and outreach in efforts to enlist new members for the all-volunteer group.

During the 1980s, the Town of Southampton organized ten CACs, volunteer branches of government designed for the town’s hamlet areas, in order to more effectively address localized issues and concerns.

In Bridgehampton, the CAC is a driving force on local policy that has dozens of members. With no elected government in Bridgehampton, the CAC largely operates as the hamlet’s vocal leadership.

Sag Harbor’s CAC, however, has enacted few legislative actions over the past several years and has seen its numbers dwindle. The town’s website lists eight active members of the CAC, but meetings this year have seen only four or five in attendance.

In cards designed by Malafronte to solicit new members, the CAC asks for those who are concerned, caring and committed to the Sag Harbor community to join. The cards outline the CAC’s primary areas of focus as the East Hampton Airport, water quality, pollution of the bays, over development and traffic.

“I would say our history – at least in terms of intention – is legislative,” Linder said at the meeting Friday evening. “We do want to see legislative changes.”

The group discussed bringing town board members Brad Bender and Bridget Fleming to future meetings as guests, in order to both let them know of the group’s goals and to draw in interested attendees.

A goal for the New Year is developing a community email list that would include the members of similar local groups, such as Save Sag Harbor, to expedite communication with like-minded individuals.

The CAC also contemplated visiting Pierson Middle/High School to educate students on the different avenues of government and how such grassroots organizations work.

“I’m always amazed at what people don’t know about that affects their property values,” said Linder. “If people know what outlets they have to participate in their community, they don’t have to participate, but maybe one day they will. Or they’ll tell their friends and neighbors – or somebody.”

“If we could just get two or three [members],” he added, “that would be fine, we don’t need a landslide here.”

The next meeting of the Sag Harbor CAC will be held January 10 at 5:30 p.m. in the Pierson Middle/High School library. For information, call 725-6067.

Immigration Reform Rally in Southampton on Sunday

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The East End Immigrant Advocates (EEIA), a local outreach and advocacy organization celebrating its first anniversary, is hosting a rally for Comprehensive Immigration Reform on Sunday, December 8. Speakers at the rally will include Anita Halasz, Executive Director of L.I. Jobs with Justice, and Ana Martinez, an attorney, member of the Brentwood School board and community organizer. The rally will be held next Sunday, December 8 at 1:30 pm at Lola Prentiss Park, 151 Windmill Lane (opposite Waldbaum’s grocery), in Southampton Village. EEIA invites immigrants, neighbors, and friends to show support for this national cause and send a message to Speaker John Boehner to allow H.R. Bill 15 on Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) to come up for a vote.

The Senate passed its CIR bill by a large majority in June. The bi-partisan bill was introduced by New York Senator Charles Schumer, along with Arizona Senator John McCain, South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham and other senators from both parties. The Senate and House CIR bills both include a path to citizenship for adults that would likely take as long as 13 years. Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children, would be able to earn green cards in five years, as would some agricultural workers. The bills also call for increases in border security and an E-Verify system to prevent businesses from hiring unauthorized workers. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that CIR would reduce the deficit by as much as $900 million.

Speaker Boehner has declined to let the bill come to the floor for a vote.

“We are all immigrants,” says Sister Mary Beth Moore, of Sisters of Charity, and a founder of EEIA, one of the sponsors of the December 8 Southampton rally. “Seventy-one percent of Americans support a pathway to citizenship for immigrants, an expanded visa program and legal status for immigrants. We want immigrants to know this and draw hope and faith from our rally.”

Split East Hampton Town Board Adopts Airport Capital Improvement Plan

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By Kathryn G. Menu

The East Hampton Town Board adopted a capital improvement plan for the East Hampton Airport during a work session Tuesday — a roadmap for $5.26 million in repairs and improvements consultants suggest be made to airport facilities over the course of the next five years.

Originally, the capital improvement plan (CIP) — unveiled just before a November 21 public hearing on the proposals — called for $10.45 million in airport repairs and projects over a five-year period. The adopted CIP was cut to $5.26 million with 15 proposed projects removed from the plan as they were not a part of the town board approved Airport Master Plan or Airport Layout Plan, both of which were vetted through environmental review.

The CIP was approved by the outgoing Republican majority of the town board. Airport liaison Dominick Stanzione, Supervisor Bill Wilkinson and Councilwoman Theresa Quigley voted in support of the plan, with Democrats Sylvia Overby and Peter Van Scoyoc voting against adopting the CIP.

East Hampton Airport manager Jim Brundige said the CIP is meant to highlight what projects are necessary at the airport. Quigley also noted that approving the CIP does not mean the board is approving any of the projects laid out in plan, or how has made a decision about how they will be funded. Rather she called the approval a “first step” in moving towards improvements at the airport first identified in the town’s airport master plan.

However, both Overby and Van Scoyoc expressed concerns about a footnote in the document that references Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding. The CIP, according to testimony given by town aviation consultant Dennis Yap at the November 21 public hearing on the plan, will be submitted to the FAA. Van Scoyoc said he was concerned submitting the plan to the FAA was the first step towards securing additional grants from that agency for airport projects.

“It’s not a necessary step for us to send it to the FAA unless we are pursuing funding from the FAA,” he said.

For several years now, a number of residents and members of the Quiet Skies Coalition have encouraged the town board not to accept FAA funding as they believe when grant assurances expire in December of 2014 the town has the ability to gain greater control of the airport, including the potential to impose curfews or restrict certain aircraft.