Tag Archive | "Noyac"

Noyac Farmstand Proves to be a Hit

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The Smith family, clockwise, from top left: John, Serene, Laura, Skye, and Aven, at the Serene Green Farmstand on Noyac Road. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

The Smith family, clockwise, from top left: John, Serene, Laura, Skye, and Aven, at the Serene Green Farmstand on Noyac Road. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Stephen J. Kotz

The Serene Green farmstand on Noyac Road was anything but serene and certainly not limited to green on Sunday afternoon. Like the showers that inundated the East End over the weekend, a steady stream of customers descended on the stand to pick through the produce in a rainbow of colors: red tomatoes, yellow squash, and a special variety of magenta colored eggplants.

There was freshly picked celery, string beans, peppers, basil and other herbs,  scallions, leeks and potatoes,  and, of course, mountains of sweet corn and melons. But there was also fluke and sea bass, clams and lobster, Mecox Bay Dairy cheeses, prepared sauces from the Vine Street Café on Shelter Island, North Fork potato chips, Tate’s Cookies, gourmet sorbets from Sorbabes of Sag Harbor, North Fork potato chips, and Java Nation coffee. Rounding it out were fresh-cut flowers and hanging baskets.

The farmstand, now in its fourth year, is owned by John and Laura Smith, who were the picture of perpetual motion: Mr. Smith hauling produce, Ms. Smith stocking shelves and taking orders over the phone.

The business is open from 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. seven days a week from the week before Memorial Day until it closes after selling Christmas trees and wreaths, made by Ms. Smith, for Christmas.

“It’s exhausting, but it is so rewarding because the community is so supportive,” said Ms. Smith.

Farming, she said, has always been in her husband’s blood. A descendant on his mother’s side to the Avens and Haines families, early settlers to the Hayground area, Mr. Smith grew up around his grandfather’s farm in Water Mill.

While in high school, he worked during the summer at the Other Stand, a popular farmstand closer to Sag Harbor along Noyac Road that has long since been closed. As a young man, he ran a farmstand on the south side of Montauk Highway between Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor.

For five years, the couple managed the farmstand at East Hampton’s East End Community Organic Farm. They found out about the opening when Ms. Smith, a graphic designer at the time, was consulted about the farm’s logo and informed that the farm needed a manager. At the time her husband was working as a contractor and eager to get back into agriculture.

In the meantime, they purchased their current location, and when the lease at EECO farm came up for renewal, they decided to focus on their own business.

Serene Green tries to provide local food to their customers, although Ms. Smith said she does keep things like lemon and limes on hand for the convenience of customers.

The couple grows as much food as they can in the garden behind the stand—“We grow lettuce, but we don’t have lettuce all the time,” Ms. Smith explained—but they also rely on a network of local suppliers and about a dozen farmers on both the North and South Fork to help keep their shelves stocked, she said.

“John has really great relationships with other farmers who are all specialized in what they do,” she said. “They are all generational farmers. The kids are farmers and their parents and grandparents were farmers.”

The Smiths also work with suppliers at both Shinneock and Montauk to provide a substantial amount of fresh seafood to their customers.

They are now expanding their horizons in yet another way. The couple is close to purchasing a 150-acre farm near Cooperstown, where they plan to raise grass-fed bison, following the standards of the Bison Association that requires the animals to be truly grass-fed and rotated from pasture to pasture on a regular basis.

They are also working with Southampton Town and the Peconic Land Trust to buy more local land to put into production. Like all farmers, though, they are facing the daunting task of competing with wealthy buyers, who might imagine the same land as a possible site of their private horse barn.

Fortunately, the Smiths said, the town and land trust are working on ways to ensure that farmland remains in production by working out contracts that pay a seller a higher price for development rights but extend the limitations that come with those rights, so property remains in agriculture.

The couple has three children, Serene, for whom the stand is named, Aven, and Skye. Ms. Smith said part of the reason they got into the business is to show our kids the kind of life her husband had while growing up and to teach them the value of hard work.

They are quick to point out the rewards. “We have been embraced by our community,” said Mr. Smith. “I worked at the Other Stand and I watched that go away. This is what this town needs.”

“Every day, and I’m not making this up, there is someone who comes in here and says ‘I drive by every day but I’ve never come in here before and I’m so happy I stopped,’” added Ms. Smith.

Bishop, Thiele To Meet with Noyac Civic Council

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The Noyac Civic Council has chosen a slightly larger venue than the Old Noyac Schoolhouse for its monthly meeting on Tuesday, August 12, when it welcomes U.S. Representative Tim Bishop and New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. to discuss helicopter noise.

Tuesday’s meeting will take place at the Bridgehampton Senior Nutrition Center on the Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike at 7:30 p.m.

The elected officials, along with a representative from Senator Charles Schumer’s office, will talk about the status of the changes to the northern route, which directs helicopters north over Long Island Sound, as well as discuss what additional restrictions the East Hampton Town Board can impose on the airport.

The civic council also invited Federal Aviation Administration administrator Michael Huerta to answer questions, but he did not respond to the organization’s invitation.

Verdicts Go out on Cromer’s Road Work in Noyac

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By Stephen J. Kotz

The long anticipated or dreaded—depending on one’s point of view—road work at Cromer’s Country Market in Noyac was finished this week, with many taking a wait-and-see attitude about the project.

“I like it. I just don’t like when it was done. The timing was horrendous,” said Tony Lawless, the owner of Cromer’s. “I think we’ll need a year to see how it works.”

Linda Heine, the owner of the Whalebone general store, who said she had been opposed to the project “since day one,” is trying to be positive. “Will it work? That remains to be seen,” she said. “It is definitely easier to back up as long as someone is not speeding through the parking area.”

That happened, just the other day, she said, as she and a friend were standing in front her store watching traffic pass on Noyac Road. “Everyone was being very careful and moving slowly, and some guy came through the parking area at about 60 miles per hour to try to get around everyone else,” she said. “There is no cure for stupidity.”

“They wanted to calm traffic, slow it down,” said Mr. Lawless, but the new lanes are wide open and nice and level and it seems to have made it faster for cars moving west.”

A woman, who asked that her name not be used, said she was most concerned by the sharp turn on Noyac Road just west of the small shopping district. The other day, she said, a tractor trailer heading east hit the curb as it came around the bend, and the driver struggled to keep the rig on his side of the road.

The roadwork, which was finally begun this spring after years of argument over the scope of the plans, has shifted Noyac Road to the south and provided a two-way access road to the parking lot in front of Cromer’s and the Whalebone. businesses that is separated by a median from the main road, theoretically to make it safer for patrons of the stores. There are access points on either side of the business block.

An informal poll of customers at Cromer’s on Wednesday morning found few critics. “I like it. I think it is much nicer,” said Wojciech Sobolewski, a Riverhead contractor,  who said he stops at Cromer’s regularly for breakfast. His work partner, Carlos Leonardo said he also liked the result, but suggested that diagonal parking spaces be put in next to the store to make it easier for vehicles to pull in.

Joyce Catalfamo of Westchester, who said she has been coming to the East End for 25 years, said she loved the new design. “It used to be a nightmare getting in and out,” she said.

Another woman, who would not give her name, said she was worried that there wasn’t a stop sign on the westbound exit from the parking area.

Southampton Town Highway Superintendent Alex Gregor said on Wednesday that people have to give the project time. The highway department can tweak the design if needs be, he said.

“They are all critiquing a job that was done as of yesterday,” he said of those who have criticized the work. “It needs to be given a little time.”

He thanked the public for being patient during the project, which sometimes disrupted traffic and which was completed about a month behind schedule. Mr. Gregor blamed that on a delay in shifting utility poles, which set the whole project back.

He said the visual impact of the project will be softened when landscaping is added. “We don’t want it to look like Queens Boulevard,” he said.

Mr. Gregor added that the knew he couldn’t please everyone. “Some people don’t even want a road,” there he said. “But it’s the only other alternative, to Montauk Highway, to go east.”

Helicopter Noise at an Unbearable All-Time High, According to Sag Harbor CAC

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By Mara Certic

Helicopter noise dominated the discussion at the Sag Harbor Citizens Advisory Committee meeting last week.

Southampton Town Councilwomen Bridget Fleming and Christine Scalera attracted a small crowd of non-members to the CAC’s monthly meeting on Friday, July 18, in the Pierson High School Library.

Susan Baran, a member of the CAC, announced as she briskly walked into the meeting: “This is the worst day ever.” The helicopter noise over by Long Pond had started at 6 a.m. that morning and hadn’t stopped all day, she said. Those in the room agreed with Ms. Barren that it was “the worst it had ever been.”

Rosemary Caruso added that the “all-white helicopters are the worst,” and that she and her husband see them all the time from their North Haven home.

Bob Malafronte and Barry Holden explained the current situation with helicopter routes and answered questions. Both men are members of the CAC and are the only two Southampton representatives on East Hampton Town’s helicopter noise abatement committee. Mr. Malafronte explained that East Hampton has two airport advisory committees. One of the committees is made up of helicopter and airplane proponents, he said, and is “misleading at best.” The other committee that both Mr. Malafronte and Mr. Holden sit on and which is composed of those concerned with noise issues speaks “nothing but facts and the truth,” he said.

The current problem is exacerbated by the total lack of restrictions at the airport, Mr. Malafronte said. Pilots do not follow the designated routes, he said, adding that 83 percent of the helicopters that flew in and out of East Hampton Airport over July Fourth weekend did not comply with the altitude restrictions.

The two men said that they are in the minority on the committee. “We had to force our way on,” said Mr. Malafronte. He even suggested that airport manager Jim Brundige was “targeting” Southampton Town residents. “This man Brundige has to go,” he said.

Councilwoman Scalera interjected to tell the members of the CAC that they were “very, very, very well represented” by their two Southampton reps. “Without you behind us,” Mr. Malafronte said to her, “we’d be nowhere.”

Mr. Holden said that the new East Hampton Town Board does actually seem to want to solve the problem caused by helicopter noise, unlike the previous administration. He mentioned that East Hampton Town Board member Kathee Burke-Gonzalez sits on both airport advisory committees, and Councilwoman Scalera sits on the noise abatement committee, too.

Recently, the men said, the committees have been working on letter-writing campaigns. They emphasized the importance of documenting complaints about helicopter and aircraft noise, by calling the complaint hotline or writing letters to the editor in local papers.

Their new focus, however, “is to go after the FAA not just to ask for changes but to start demanding answers.” Mr. Malafronte said. “We’re going to focus on Huerta, the man has to produce answers.”

Michael Huerta is the administrator of the FAA, who Mr. Malafronte says “has been hiding.” Mr. Malafronte’s new tactic, he said, is to go after Mr. Huerta “more aggressively.”

A meeting with Congressman Tim Bishop scheduled to take place on August 12 is the next big step, he said. The committee members hope to have at least a representative from the FAA, if not Mr. Huerta himself, present to answer questions.

The meeting will take place at the Bridgehampton Nutrition Center  at 7:30 p.m. on Tuesday, August 12.

To register an airport noise complaint call 1-800-376-4817 or visit planenoise.com/khto/

Issues of dumping on Town Line Road continue to trouble members of the Sag Harbor CAC. Several members discussed the problems, mentioning that tires and have piled up and that some people have even gone as far as to dump their mattresses there. “They go out of their way to dump there,” said CAC member Steve Schuman.

“What’s the solution, besides setting up snipers in the woods?” asked CAC member Judah Mahay. He suggested that the CAC look into the feasibility of setting up security cameras, or even looking into getting police to do surveillance at the site once a month.

“If you report it to the public, this could be enough to mitigate it,” he said.

 

East End Weekend: What to Do July 11 – 13

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Malin Abrahamsson, "Winter Lot," mixed media on canvas. Image courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

Malin Abrahamsson, “Winter Lot,” mixed media on canvas. Image courtesy Sara Nightingale Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

From shark hunting to art grazing, a carefully-curated selection of top picks to do on the East End this weekend:

Art Market Hamptons brings booths from selected modern and contemporary galleries to Bridgehampton, returning for its fourth season from Friday, July 10 through Sunday, July 13.

Scott Bluedorn of Neoteric Fine Art.

Scott Bluedorn of Neoteric Fine Art.

With 40 participating galleries, Art Market is more exclusive than other art fairs. Local galleries like Neoteric Fine Art, Sara Nightingale Gallery and Grenning Gallery will feature their artists in booths.

The fair is open from 11 a.m. to 7 p.m. Friday, July 11, and Saturday, July 12, and from 12 to 6 p.m. Sunday, July 13, at the Bridgehampton Historical Society, located at 2368 Montauk Highway in Bridgehampton.

 

The Silas Marder Gallery in Bridgehampton shows East Hampton artist Richmond Burton in an exhibition running July 12 through August 11.

“Known for his dazzling kaleidoscopic abstractions, Richmond Burton melds geometry and naturalism to usher the pictorial language of his predecessors into a contemporary context,” the gallery said in a press release. “With swift, vibrantly hued marks, Burton creates densely gridded compositions that morph into expansive waves of pattern, their overlapping rhythms at once steady and unstable.”

The exhibition will feature Mr. Burton’s last large-scale paintings created in his East Hampton studio, as well as his more recent works. An opening reception is Saturday, July 12, from 5 to 8 p.m. at the Silas Marder Gallery, located at 120 Snake Hollow Road in Bridgehampton.

 

The Shark’s Eye All-Release Tournament & Festival returns to Montauk Friday, July 11 through Sunday, July 13.

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A little girl watches a shark being tagged at the Shark’s Eye Festival and Tournament in 2012. Photo by Tessa Raebeck.

The weekend-long event is “Montauk’s only satellite tag, catch-and-release, high stakes, big game sport fishing competition combined with cutting-edge science, conservation and informative entertainment focused on saving sharks,” according to a press release.

The tournament, held in the Montauk Marine Basin, offers prize money of $10,000. In 2013, participating teams tagged and released 64 sharks, including 33 mako and 31 blue sharks. Four sharks were tagged with satellite tracking devices.

Although it may sound scary, the event offers fun for the whole family, as kids can see sharks up-close-and-personal and learn about conservation and marine wildlife. The festival is free to the public on Saturday, July 12, from 3 to 7 p.m. and on Sunday, July 13, from 2 to 6 p.m. A dock part Saturday night runs until 10 p.m.

The tournament and festival are supported by marine artist and conservationist Guy Harvey of the Guy Harvey Ocean Foundation.

“There is no other fishing tournament like Shark’s Eye,” Mr. Harvey said in the press release. “This tournament combines the thrill of shark fishing, practical conservation measures, and meaningful fisheries research and community involvement into a single event. It is truly the future of shark fishing tournaments.

The Montauk Marine Basin is located at 426 West Lake Drive in Montauk. For more information, call (631) 668-5900.

 

In its annual Sag Harbor house tour, the John Jermain Memorial Library presents five homes–one in North Haven and four in Sag Harbor Village–to the public. The houses were specially picked for their unique and personalized interior decorating and for the feeling of “home” each conveyed. For more information on the house tour: read the Express’ full article here.

East End Weekend: Highlights of June 27 – 29 Events

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Marc Dalessio, "Tina Under the Olive Tree" 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Tina Under the Olive Tree” 43 x 35 inches, Oil 2014.

By Tessa Raebeck

Marc Dalessio, "Laundry in the Wind" 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

Marc Dalessio, “Laundry in the Wind” 36 x 28 inches, Oil, 2014.

There’s a lot going on on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception Saturday from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. for a new solo show of Marc Dalessio, a regular artist at the gallery who spent the last year traveling the world looking for beauty. “Ironically, the most beautiful subject was found right at home,” gallery owner Laura Grenning said in a press release, speaking of “Tina Under the Olive Tree,” a plein air painting of his newly wed wife at his longtime farmhouse in Tuscany.

According to Ms. Grenning, Mr. Dalessio’s “humility, a rare commodity in the art world today, is sincere–just look at the paintings. These ideas, although not articulated at the time, explain my personal choice to leave the world of international finance and move to [the] East End almost 20 years ago.”

“The Grenning Gallery,” she added, “was created to provide a stable exhibition space and steady source of capital for these artists to continue their efforts to seek out and record nature’s beauty for the rest of us.”

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

Ocean the seal in rehabilitation in Riverhead.

 

A seal named Ocean will be released by the Riverhead Foundation for Marine Research and Preservation Saturday morning at 10 a.m. Ocean the seal will return to his home and namesake following two months of rehabilitation at the foundation after he was found in Montauk suffering from a broken jaw and respiratory condition.

After Oceans of Hope, the foundation’s annual fundraising event Friday, Ocean the seal will be released from under the Ponquogue Bridge in Hampton Bays.

 

 

Design Night Sag Harbor opens high-end stores for charity Saturday in an evening of shopping, wine, and fundraising for at-risk youth. Participating stores are donating 10 percent of sales to Community of Unity, a non-profit that empowers young people at risk to make good choices for their futures.

Ten Sag Harbor boutiques are participating: Urban Zen, Bloom, JanGeorge, Sylvester & Co., La Lampade, Ruby Beets, La Maisonette, Black Swan Antiques, JED and MAX ID NY. Design Night runs from 5 to 8 p.m.

 

Rounding out the weekend Sunday from 4 to 7 p.m. Sylvester & Co. At Home is hosting an opening reception for EJ Camp’s show “Faces of the Sea.” The Amagansett branch of the store, which also has a shop in Sag Harbor, will show the photographer’s photos of the East End sea, from fog over Orient Bay to the tide crashing into the jetty on Georgica Beach in East Hampton.

E.J. Camp, "Trumans Beach Sunset."

E.J. Camp, “Trumans Beach Sunset.”

 

Noyac Civic Council Grants Scholarships, Talks Traffic

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May Evjen, left, and Sara Bucking, this year’s recipients of Noyac Civic Council scholarships. Photo by Mara Certic.

By Mara Certic

Southampton Town Police Lieutenant Michael Zarro was met with traffic questions, requests and complaints from concerned citizens at a Noyac Civic Council meeting on Tuesday, June 10.

Lt. Zarro, who will celebrate his 26th year as a member of the force next month, attended the meeting, he said, to find out “what you as a community think is the problem.”

Trucks and speeding, it turns out, are the two main concerns among the residents who attended, and there is no simple solution in sight.

Several Noyackers complained about loud construction and concrete trucks barreling down the hamlet’s quiet, predominantly residential streets starting at 6 a.m. every weekday. Residents insisted that the trucks drive so much faster than the 30 mile-per-hour speed limit, that it is becoming increasingly dangerous for them to drive around their neighborhood. “You can’t get out of your driveway!” one woman said.

Lt. Zarro said that knowing what specific time to target will help with traffic calming in the area.

One resident suggested that the Southampton Town Police Department station three officers at various spots along Noyac Road at 6 a.m. every day for a month. Lt. Zarro did not think that that would be a possibility but did inform the room that Lieutenant James Kiernan, also of the town police department, will provide more traffic enforcement for the road.

Due to the closure of several bars in Hampton Bays that required police patrols, police officers who previously worked on the busy weekend night during the summer season will now have more time to enforce Noyac speed limits, said Lt. Zarro.

One resident asked if adding traffic lights would help to alleviate the situation, but Lt. Zarro said that he didn’t believe so, “I don’t think they’ll slow traffic down, either,” he said. The stopping and starting of trucks creates also more noise than their passing by, it was explained.

Ralph DiSpigna expressed concern over conflicting figures he was given about the number of traffic accidents on Noyac Road. When he asked the Southampton Town Police, he was told that there had been five accidents in five years. He was told by the Southampton Town Highway Department, however, that there had been 21 in the same time frame. Lt. Zarro said he would investigate this further and get back to him.

The lieutenant emphasized the importance of reporting accidents and instances of speeding to the police department at the time that they occur. He added that a report must be filed for the specific case to go on record.

The police officer also discussed the dangers of telephone scams warning the crowd how professional the scammers can be. A press release authorized by Detective Sergeant Lisa Costa on June 9 was handed out and described three scams to be particularly worried about: the relative in jail scam, where the caller claims to need money to bail the victim’s relative out of jail; the IRS tax warrant scam, in which the caller claims to be an agent from IRS about a past due balance; and the jury duty scam, where the caller pretends to be a police or warrant officer demanding payment of a fine.

Lt. Zarro warned everyone to stay vigilant and never to give out personal information over the phone or the Internet.

During the meeting, Bob Malafronte gave a progress report on East Hampton Airport’s Noise Abatement Committee. Mr. Malafronte is one of only two committee members from Southampton. “They are making incredible progress,” he said, despite the fact that both flights and noise complaints are up this year.

Mr. Malafronte added, “We’re going for a complete helicopter ban. Other things will come up later, but for now it’s just helicopters.” He suggested that residents call the airport every time that they are disrupted by helicopter or plane noise. “I know that your efforts have gotten us some recognition,” he told the room.

President Elena Loreto presented the 2014 scholarship winners, Sara Bucking and May Evjen, both of Pierson High School. Sara has volunteered at East End Hospice’s Camp Good Grief, the Southampton Historical Society and the Easter Bonnet Parade. She plans to attend Salve Regina University in Newport, Rhode Island, in the fall. May is a volunteers at the Southampton Presbyterian Church and the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce. She will attend American University in the fall where she will major in communications and media studies.

“She hopes to make films,” said Ms. Loreto. “I hope she makes one about the Noyac Civic Council. I’m sure it’ll be a horror film.”

Discover Old Whalers’ Day This Weekend in Sag Harbor

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The Historical Committee of the Old Whalers’ First Presbyterian Church on Union Street in Sag Harbor will sponsor a free “Discover Old Whalers’ Day” on Sunday, May 18. The tour will begin at 11:45 a.m. in the church narthex, just inside the main front doors.

A member of the committee will give a brief, informal talk about the building, built in 1844, and the sanctuary, including the trompe l’oeil mural that covers the wall behind the pulpit. The mural will soon be restored to its original design and colors by International Fine Arts Conservation Studios, with work beginning on May 26. The tour will afford one of the last opportunities to view the “before” state of the mural.

Pastor Mark Phillips will give a short talk about the historic organ built by Henry Erben in 1845. The pipes and bellows inside the organ case can be viewed, as well as the manual pumping system, which permits the organ to be played without electricity, if necessary. The tour will culminate with a climb into the tower to see the huge wooden trusses which support the sanctuary ceiling, with initials carved into beams by some of those who constructed the church.

The Old Whalers’ Church, designed by Minard Lefever, is a National Historic Landmark. This event is part of the New York Landmarks Conservancy’s annual Sacred Sites Open House weekend. The tour will conclude by 1 p.m., but the building will remain open to the public until 2 p.m.

 

Noyac Road Work Temporarily Disconnected

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Verizon workers were back on the job on Noyac Road this week.       Stephen J. Kotz

By Stephen J. Kotz

The presence of a Verizon crew on Noyac Road in front of Cromer’s Market and the Whalebone gift shop this week was a welcome, if overdue, sight to Southampton Town Highway Superintendent Alex Gregor.

The telephone company’s crews “pulled out of the job last week on Tuesday afternoon [April 22] and never had the courtesy to tell us,” said Mr. Gregor on Friday. Mr. Gregor said he had first been told Verizon would not be able to finish its work, splicing wires and moving poles, until the end of June, jeopardizing the completion this summer of a project intended to make that stretch of Noyac Road safer.

After applying pressure on the phone company, Mr. Gregor said he had since been told that crews would be able to finish their portion of the work by the end of this month, which would still cause a serious delay in the project.

“We need two months to get the job done” after the poles are moved, he said. If Verizon’s crews don’t get their part of the project done in a timely fashion, Mr. Gregor said, “we may just have to wait until fall” to repave the road. “We’re going to see what the timing is to see if we can do some of the work now and do some of the work after Labor Day,” he added.

Last month, the highway superintendent told the Noyac Civic Council that he wanted to get the project done by the end of June to avoid disrupting traffic after school lets out and mobs of summer visitors descend on the South Fork, but that that timeframe depended on the phone company completing its work by the first week of May.

“We know in July and August you don’t want to be on the main roads doing construction,” he said this week.

As it is, after Memorial Day, assuming paving crews are able to get started, work will be suspended on Fridays and Mondays to avoid creating more tie-ups as weekend traffic increases with the arrival of the summer season.

The highway superintendent said he had been told Verizon workers had been pulled from the project because their supervising engineer retired at the end of the month, but he said the real reason was because Verizon “wanted us to pay for their time and equipment,” something the town refused to do, as part of the road project.

On Tuesday, Linda Heine, the owner of the Whalebone and a long-time opponent of the project, said the work has not caused traffic problems—yet.  She said even though both the road the parking areas in front of the businesses will be widened, there will be problems because access to store parking will be limited to driveways at either end of the business block. When delivery trucks block one end of the parking area, a common occurrence, she said, traffic will be backed up.

“There’s not enough room to effect the kind of change they want,” she said. “I hope and I pray it’s going to be a nice thing, but I’m not counting on it.”

Mr. Gregor said it was time to get to work. ‘We have gone so far,” he said. “It’s time to execute the project.”

 

Sag Harbor’s Dodds & Eder – A New Venue for Local Artists

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2) James DeMartis_Bouquet-hires

Sculpture by James DeMartis

By Emily J. Weitz

As Dottie Simons and Carrie Leopold take the reins at Dodds and Eder, the expansive home furnishings stores in the back parking lot of Sag Harbor Village, they bring an appreciation of local artistic talent with them. As a result, they are diving right in with an opening this weekend for four local artists, who work in different mediums, from wood carving to painting to textiles to metal sculpture. Despite their different approaches, the artists’ work has the potential to make a statement in the home.

4) John Cino_Tome 3_

John Cino, a sculptor from Patchogue, works with wood in an organic, responsive way to create his hand-carved sculptures. Of the four pieces on display at Dodds and Eder, three are closely linked in a series called “Tome.”

“A tome is a heavy book,” explained Mr. Cino, “and they are all related to turning a book into a sculpture. The freestanding sculpture is meant to evoke a sense you get when you’re surrounded by books.”

Each of these pieces is about the size of a table top, between 11 inches wide and 19 inches tall. They are all carved from a single piece of mahogany.

Mr. Cino is patient in his work, and he clearly has a love affair with wood.

“The woods are beautiful in and of themselves,” he said, “and they get to be very seductive on their own.”

He recalls a time he was at the ocean with his son, and they encountered a giant piece of driftwood. When his son suggested he turn it into a work of art, Mr. Cino responded, “These are finished already.”

But that moment when you start to cut into the wood and reveal the grain, he says, that’s when you touch something beautiful.

1) Mari?a Scho?n _Higuerote_

Sagaponack resident Maria Schon is an oil painter who draws much of her inspiration from memories of her childhood in Venezuela. Her work is exclusively landscapes, but the landscapes often have a human quality to them.

“My landscapes can be very feminine, voluminous shapes,” said Ms. Schon, “that could be breasts or hips, the water or the ocean. There’s something very pregnant about the shapes and composition.”

Even though her work is representational, depicting mountains, water, and sky, she says she is always pushing it to the abstract level.

“It’s about shapes in the composition,” she said. “The ocean is a beautiful shape with texture. One of the qualities I try to capture within each piece is an atmospheric presence, a quality of light, all the pieces integrated into one composition.”

Even though her pieces may end up all over the world, she sees them as intimately related to one another.

“They are all interconnected,” Ms. Schon said. “Where one line ends in one painting, another will pick up. It’s a continuous motion of waves of shapes and that’s part of an unfolding narrative.”

3) Casey Dalene_bycasey_

East Hampton resident Casey Dalene is a textile painter, and on her fabrics you can actually see the texture of the brush strokes.

“I design the collection myself,” she said, “hand paint all the artwork, and have the fabrics printed with my patterns.”

She sees it as a crucial element of her work to show the artistic process and not let it get lost in the production.

“The goal with my textile designs is to show as much of the original artwork as possible. I want the hand of the artist to show in the prints,” she said.

The work she’ll show at Dodds and Eder was originally acrylic on paper that used a technique of dry brush strokes. This allows the viewer to see each individual bristle of the paint brush.

“This is just one of the ways I am working to bring the viewer closer to the artist behind the design,” Ms. Dalene said.

James DeMartis, an East Hampton-based metalworker and sculptor, will have three indoor pieces on display in this upcoming show, and then a fourth outdoor piece going up later in the summer.

The metal and glass pieces he’ll show are about 16 years old, and they come from a time when he was experimenting with the use of color and glass with wrought iron.

“The other piece is a bit more recent,” he said. “It’s an exploration of form and negative space.”

Mr. Demartis said he enjoys showing his older work, which he describes as more detailed than his newer, more minimal pieces. He was particularly happy to see how his metal and glass pieces played off the artwork of Ms. Schon.

“The pieces work beautifully together,” said M. Demartis. “The colors and forms play well together.”

He attributes this harmony to the collaboration between curator Kathy Zeiger and the new owners of Dodds and Eder.

“This is a promising collaboration,” he said, “for the space as well as for the community.”

He pointed out that, as a sculptor, it can be particularly challenging to find good venues to show his work.

“Dodds and Eder has plenty of floor space, and they welcome the work,” he said.

The show will be on display at Dodds and Eder at 11 Bridge Street in Sag Harbor until May 10, with an opening reception on Saturday, April 26, from 4 to 6 p.m.