Tag Archive | "Noyac"

Buyers Push Demand for New Construction on the South Fork

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Completed and sold in 2013, this Glover Street residence was built by DeMarco Development. A second new home is currently under construction, also on Sag Harbor’s Glover Street. Photo courtesy of Douglas Elliman. 

By Amanda Wyatt

Historic homes have long been part of the fabric of Sag Harbor, a village celebrated for its old-fashioned charm. But newly constructed houses, rather than repaired or renovated historical houses, are beginning to dot this landscape—perhaps heralding the dawn of a new era for the village.

“What we’re talking about is the economy more than anything,” explained Leslie Reingold, an agent with Sotheby’s International Realty. “The building going on is sort of a synchronicity of factors. One, the economy picked up. Two, Sag Harbor became very hot and still is…It’s like Sag Harbor has come into its own.”

“Because of the publicity of the Bulova Watch[case] condos, so many more people are becoming familiar with Sag Harbor. Sag Harbor has always been one of the most beautiful and authentic seaside villages. When I finally found a piece of property in the village I was determined to build a Federal style home in keeping with the history of Sag Harbor,” said Toni Curto of Curto, Curto and Curto, LLC

As the village enters into a new era of growth and expansion, the real estate market will likely continue to reflect these changes.

“New construction is a very active segment of today’s market and most older homes purchased are being renovated so extensively they are like new,” agreed Gioia DiPaolo, office manager and broker with the Sag Harbor branch of Douglas Elliman.

As she explained, the trend of building brand new, yet traditional-looking homes has been around for over a decade, although it’s undoubtedly picked up recently.

“In the Village of Sag Harbor, [builder] Bob Tortora started a trend over 10 years ago creating new homes that reflected period architecture but offered all the interior proportions and amenities of a new home—the best of both worlds,” DiPaolo pointed out. “DeMarco Development has brought this concept of ‘the new old house’ forward, now completing the second of three historically referenced new homes on Glover Street. These homes incorporate reclaimed wood for flooring, antique lighting fixtures and moldings, and, for the most part, Greek Revival architectural design.”

“On the fringes of the historic village we’re seeing new construction by developers well known throughout the Hamptons, but new to Sag Harbor, for traditional homes offering large square footage and lots of amenities,” DiPaolo noted.

As some realtors noted, the trend of new construction is not so much a shift away from historic homes as it is a practical response to finding space in an ever-growing village. Historic houses, particularly the architectural gems on Main Street, are somewhat hard to come by, and what does exist can be pricy.

Besides, restoring or renovating an older home often comes with unforeseen challenges and difficulties. Buyers may “not know what they’re going to find” once they begin renovating or restoring, Mala Sander, a broker with the Corcoran Group’s Sag Harbor office, pointed out.

“I always call it the ‘you might as well’ factor. Once you get to a certain point, if you’re going to change the floor here, we might as well change the floor there…and then we might as well change the cabinetry and get new appliances, you might as well [tear down the structure],” she said, adding: “When you have homes that aren’t architecturally significant or that interesting there’s no real point to renovating those. It’s best just to take those down. So developers are seeing an opportunity in that, either in open space or tear downs and putting up what today’s buyer wants.”

Curto added that one “of the advantages in building a new home is that we can influence the design and finished product, although it is always still exciting to renovate an older structure.”

However, some agents noted that the market for new homes is usually entirely separate from the market for historic homes.

“I think people that want houses want new houses and people who want historic want historic. I don’t think that it’s really the same buyer. People who want something beautiful and historic will want to do the renovation, and they’ll do it with love and care because they really value the history aspect of the older home. The person that’s buying the new house wants the simplicity of not having to deal with the unknown; they value different things,” said Sander.

“It’s hard to even put the two together in the same sentence,” Reingold agreed. “It’s a whole other animal.”

For those interested in a historic home, renovation and repair is a true labor of love.

“If you’re renovating something that’s beautiful and worth renovating or restoring, yes, it can be very costly to [do so], as opposed to starting from scratch,” Sander said.

“There’s not much of it and what you’re getting is very expensive. 900 square feet for, let’s say, a million, and you’d have to put in [hundreds of thousands of dollars] in maintenance,” said Reingold.

“Not only is it maybe 400 dollars per square foot more to renovate a historic home,” she estimated, “there are very few highly skilled craftsmen and artisans around. A lot of the details [on historic homes] were handcrafted. In all honesty, if you could replicate a historical home for a reasonable amount of money, I’m sure you’d have more people doing it.”

As Reingold pointed out, many people—particularly those with families or those who own multiple homes—simply do not have the time to constantly renovate a house. It can take four times as long to renovate a house as it would to put up a new structure, she said.

Furthermore, many buyers come to Sag Harbor with the intent of having a spacious home, with plenty of room to entertain friends and family. At the same time, “people want to be closer to town” than in previous times, and this presents a problem. Lots in the village tend to be small, and aside from a few of the grand historical homes, many historic structures are tiny by contemporary standards.

It isn’t uncommon for a historic house to have 150 square foot bedrooms, with only one bathroom down the hall, Reingold explained. Even if a buyer decided to gut the house, it may not accommodate the number of bedrooms and bathrooms—as well as amenities and technological extras—that many buyers desire.

“One new thing everybody seems to want now is a downstairs master bedroom. Most of the older structures don’t even have downstairs master suites,” said Sander.

Buyers often prefer homes with an “open flow, open floor plan…[especially] the open kitchen, which people use today as gathering rooms. And then you have the convenience factor, some people out there like laundry rooms on multiple levels, and I’m not even getting into the appliance and amenity factor, just high end kitchen appliances and all that,” she added.

DiPaolo echoed Sander’s comments: “Lifestyle preferences have evolved to a more casual style, with a focus on the kitchen as the place people gather, and floor plan, flow and proportion of rooms now need to be more open with higher ceilings in order to appeal to today’s buyer. The amenities in a new home are, of course, a big draw whereas the time and expense of a renovation project is a proposition many buyers don’t want to endure.  However, for those buyers who value history, renovating a historic home can be a real labor of love.”

While Reingold agreed “size is a huge factor,” she pointed out that “[in the past], construction loans were impossible to get, so that also meant there was no inventory when people were coming out to buy.” She also added that keeping historic structures up to code is also a challenge. There is more leeway with new homes, since the village is less concerned with preserving their architectural integrity.

Another reason why buyers are opting for new construction is that “they’re more energy efficient, they’re less maintenance intensive, it’s going to be more of what you want and less of a compromise, when you’re renovating an older house there’s always compromise between what you really want to have and what exists,” said Sander.

At the same time, DiPaolo pointed out, “Selling a new home that is under construction can be challenging especially when the buyer wants to customize everything. It just takes much longer to bring a deal to closing. However, new construction does come with warranties which is very comforting to a buyer.”

Of course, for those who desire the feel of an older home with all of the modern conveniences, there is the option of using an old architectural plan while building a new home. Some new constructions are being designed with traditional architectural elements, which may help bridge the gap between new construction and historic buildings.

Curto said that she selected an architect for one of her Sag Harbor building projects because he was “very familiar with historic homes and has a passion for them. Once you find your team they will work with you on designing a Federal style home but offer you all the amenities such as a chef’s kitchen, old world moldings, (custom cabinetry built-ins) and beautiful floors.”

Still, as the village itself rapidly grows and changes, architecture will undoubtedly reflect these shifts. But with so many new structures being erected, could Sag Harbor lose a little bit of its old-fashioned charm?

“Yes,” Reingold answered. At the same time, she predicted the village would never entirely lose its historical appeal. Sag Harbor’s rich local history and charm will continue to be a draw for prospective buyers of both new and older homes.

“People are still going to keep coming here because of the historic charm and the quaintness, and more importantly, the vibrancy of Main Street,” she added.

 

Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team Rescue Retriever From Icy Waters

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As fire department and ambulance members render aid, member Stephen Hesler holds and comforts a dog that was rescued by the Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team after it had fallen through the ice off of Bayview Court in North Haven on Saturday.

By Michael Heller

Members of the Sag Harbor Fire Department Dive Team braved cold temperatures last weekend to save a two-year-old golden retriever that was struggling in the icy water of Noyac Bay off North Haven.

On Saturday, the dive team was called to Bayview Court after receiving a report that a dog had fallen through the ice. First responders found the retriever with only his head above water roughly 50 yards offshore, barking and crying as he struggled to stay afloat.

A boat was dispatched into the bay with dive team members Alex Smith and Scott Fordham aboard, with dive team member Rich Simmons swimming ahead, breaking the ice by hand so that the boat could proceed.

Mr. Simmons soon reached the canine. After loading him into the boat, the team brought him to shore and into the waiting arms of Sag Harbor Volunteer Ambulance Corps personnel, who warmed the dog before turning him over to the Southampton Town Animal Control office.

The dog was taken to the East End Veterinary Emergency Center In Riverhead for further treatment.

Attending veterinarian Dr. Gal Vatash reported that the dog, Morgan, was close to death after having been in the frigid water for roughly 45 minutes, and was suffering from petechiae—a low blood platelet count—and hypothermia, with a body temperature below 90 degrees.

“He was definitely looking at the light at the end of the tunnel,” said Dr. Vatash.

After an overnight treatment of plasma and warm fluids, however, Morgan was released to his owners the following afternoon, and “…went home wagging his tail.”

Dr. Vatash credited the members of the Sag Harbor Fire Department and Ambulance Corps with saving the dog’s life, as well as simple good luck: He was spotted out on the ice when a family just happened to come down to the shoreline to take some photos and spied the animal in distress. He also credited the use of a microchip embedded in Morgan’s skin for enabling his office to locate and reunite him with his owner.

Dr. Vatash said he would encourage all pet owners to microchip their animals as a protective measure.

Oddone Enters Not Guilty Plea in New Trial for Southampton Killing

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By Stephen J. Kotz

As expected, Anthony Oddone, whose 2009 conviction in the death of a bouncer in a Southampton bar was overturned last year, pleaded not guilty on Thursday, February 6, to a new felony charge of first-degree manslaughter in the case.

State Supreme Court Justice C. Randall Hinrichs, who presided over Mr. Oddone’s appearance in Suffolk County Criminal Court in Riverside, allowed the defendant to remain free on $500,000 cash bail at his arraignment on the new indictment, according to Robert Clifford, a spokesman for Suffolk County District Attorney Thomas Spota.

Mr. Oddone is due back on court on February 19, according to his attorney, Serita Kedia of New York, and is only allowed to remain in New York City or travel to Orange County, where his mother lives, as well as Suffolk County for court appearances.

Mr. Oddone had been serving a 17-year sentence for first-degree manslaughter in the 2008 death of Andrew Reister, 40, when the state’s highest court, the Court of Appeals, overturned his conviction in December, setting the stage for a new trial.

The case revolved around an altercation at the Southampton Publick House between Mr. Oddone and Mr. Reister, a Suffolk County corrections officer who was moonlighting as a bouncer at the bar.

Mr. Reister lost consciousness after Mr. Oddone put him in a headlock, and later died from a lack of oxygen to his brain. An autopsy found that Mr. Reister’s death was caused when his neck was compressed and pressure put on the carotid artery, reducing the flow of blood to his brain and causing his heart to stop.

The Appeals Court overturned the conviction, also presided over by Justice Hinrichs, after Mr. Oddone’s defense argued that witnesses had provided conflicting accounts of the length of time Mr. Oddone held Mr. Reister in the headlock.

Specifically, the court ruled that defense attorneys should have been allowed to refresh the memory of Meagan Flynn, a waitress at the bar, who testified that the headlock could have lasted a minute or so but who in an earlier statement said it could have lasted for as short as six to 10 seconds.

At his first trial, a jury acquitted Mr. Oddone of second-degree murder, which could have carried a life sentence, but instead found him guilty of manslaughter.

Mr. Oddone, a former caddy at The Bridge golf club in Noyac, has been free on bail since shortly before Christmas.

At Sag Harbor CAC Meeting, Four in Attendance Focus on Recruitment

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By Tessa Raebeck

With just four people in attendance, the discussion at Friday’s meeting of the Sag Harbor Citizens Advisory Committee (CAC) centered on recruitment.

CAC Chairman John Linder was joined by members Susan Baran, Eric Cohen and Bob Malafronte in expressing the need for better visibility and outreach in efforts to enlist new members for the all-volunteer group.

During the 1980s, the Town of Southampton organized ten CACs, volunteer branches of government designed for the town’s hamlet areas, in order to more effectively address localized issues and concerns.

In Bridgehampton, the CAC is a driving force on local policy that has dozens of members. With no elected government in Bridgehampton, the CAC largely operates as the hamlet’s vocal leadership.

Sag Harbor’s CAC, however, has enacted few legislative actions over the past several years and has seen its numbers dwindle. The town’s website lists eight active members of the CAC, but meetings this year have seen only four or five in attendance.

In cards designed by Malafronte to solicit new members, the CAC asks for those who are concerned, caring and committed to the Sag Harbor community to join. The cards outline the CAC’s primary areas of focus as the East Hampton Airport, water quality, pollution of the bays, over development and traffic.

“I would say our history – at least in terms of intention – is legislative,” Linder said at the meeting Friday evening. “We do want to see legislative changes.”

The group discussed bringing town board members Brad Bender and Bridget Fleming to future meetings as guests, in order to both let them know of the group’s goals and to draw in interested attendees.

A goal for the New Year is developing a community email list that would include the members of similar local groups, such as Save Sag Harbor, to expedite communication with like-minded individuals.

The CAC also contemplated visiting Pierson Middle/High School to educate students on the different avenues of government and how such grassroots organizations work.

“I’m always amazed at what people don’t know about that affects their property values,” said Linder. “If people know what outlets they have to participate in their community, they don’t have to participate, but maybe one day they will. Or they’ll tell their friends and neighbors – or somebody.”

“If we could just get two or three [members],” he added, “that would be fine, we don’t need a landslide here.”

The next meeting of the Sag Harbor CAC will be held January 10 at 5:30 p.m. in the Pierson Middle/High School library. For information, call 725-6067.

Immigration Reform Rally in Southampton on Sunday

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The East End Immigrant Advocates (EEIA), a local outreach and advocacy organization celebrating its first anniversary, is hosting a rally for Comprehensive Immigration Reform on Sunday, December 8. Speakers at the rally will include Anita Halasz, Executive Director of L.I. Jobs with Justice, and Ana Martinez, an attorney, member of the Brentwood School board and community organizer. The rally will be held next Sunday, December 8 at 1:30 pm at Lola Prentiss Park, 151 Windmill Lane (opposite Waldbaum’s grocery), in Southampton Village. EEIA invites immigrants, neighbors, and friends to show support for this national cause and send a message to Speaker John Boehner to allow H.R. Bill 15 on Comprehensive Immigration Reform (CIR) to come up for a vote.

The Senate passed its CIR bill by a large majority in June. The bi-partisan bill was introduced by New York Senator Charles Schumer, along with Arizona Senator John McCain, South Carolina Senator Lindsay Graham and other senators from both parties. The Senate and House CIR bills both include a path to citizenship for adults that would likely take as long as 13 years. Dreamers, young undocumented immigrants who came to the United States as children, would be able to earn green cards in five years, as would some agricultural workers. The bills also call for increases in border security and an E-Verify system to prevent businesses from hiring unauthorized workers. The Congressional Budget Office has estimated that CIR would reduce the deficit by as much as $900 million.

Speaker Boehner has declined to let the bill come to the floor for a vote.

“We are all immigrants,” says Sister Mary Beth Moore, of Sisters of Charity, and a founder of EEIA, one of the sponsors of the December 8 Southampton rally. “Seventy-one percent of Americans support a pathway to citizenship for immigrants, an expanded visa program and legal status for immigrants. We want immigrants to know this and draw hope and faith from our rally.”

From Clara to the Snow Queen, a Ballerina Grows Up

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Rose Kelly as the Snow Queen in the 2012 performance of the Nutcracker.

Rose Kelly as the Snow Queen in the 2012 performance of the Nutcracker.

By Tessa Raebeck

The beautiful swan dances across the stage, slowly succumbing to a graceful death as the ballerina’s performance brings the audience to tears. When the curtain is called, the room whispers its wonder over where the Hampton Ballet Theatre School (HBTS) found such a talented professional. As she bows, the ballerina smiles; it appears this professional has braces.

Just 14 years old and in her freshman year of high school, Rose Kelly has been dancing with Sara Jo Strickland, affectionately called Miss Sara by her dancers at HBTS, since she was a toddler.

“I feel very special,” said Miss Sara, surrounded by young dancers in her Bridgehampton studio, “because I’ve developed her for years and to see it pay off…it’s happening.”

Before she could read or write, Rose could dance. As she grew, so did her dedication.

Throughout the years, Rose’s mother, Rachel Kelly, would ask her time and again, “Do you want to do ballet?”

“Of course I want to do ballet,” her daughter would respond. “Are you kidding me?”

When Miss Sara decided to open her own school, HBTS, in 2007, the Kelly’s followed her there.

“I’ve done it with her my whole life,” Rose says of Miss Sara. “So she is very special to me. A very special person and teacher and I feel like I have a connection with her.”

That connection was forged over the years through countless hours of studio time. Rose is in Miss Sara’s studio almost every day. She takes four ballet classes and one point class each week, in addition to rehearsal time for a spring show, “Peter and the Wolf” in the summer and “The Nutcracker” each holiday season.

When HBTS did its inaugural Nutcracker performance in 2009, Rose, about 10 at the time, was the school’s first Clara.

“That was fun for me to give her that role,” says Miss Sara, smiling at her pupil. “It’s a great memory,” adds Rose.

Next weekend, HBTS will present its fifth annual production of Tchaikovsky’s holiday classic. It is the company’s biggest performance yet, with a cast of over 100 dancers. This year, Rose has advanced to play the Snow Queen, Marzipan and the Dew Drop Princess.

A younger Rose Kelly as Clara.

A younger Rose Kelly as Clara.

“I’m very excited,” said Miss Sara, “because I see all those years from two and a half up are now coming to fruition.”

Rose will dance the Dew Drop number with her longtime dance partner Vincenzo James Harty, who has also been dancing with Miss Sara since he was a toddler. Along with Rose and Harty, three other girls, Maggie Swan and twins Caitlin and Abigail Hubbell, form a group of veteran HBTS dancers Miss Sara considers the leaders of her school.

“When you watch them in class dancing together,” said Miss Sara. “It’s like they are the same people…they have the same style.”

Last year was the first time the group danced timed on point (on the very tips of their toes) and this year their technique has “jumped two levels,” their teacher said.

“Their training has brought them to a new level, so I’m just excited to see them step on stage with renewed confidence,” said Miss Sara, beaming with pride. “So not only do I have this great older group, all the younger kids are following them…they really set a great example.”

In preparation for “The Nutcracker,” Miss Sara’s group of leaders have attended rehearsals, which can last up to three hours, every Friday evening, Saturday and Sunday – in addition to the five classes they take each week.

One would think Rose, who is in the studio every day, would revel in her rare time off, but she misses ballet on the days she doesn’t dance.

“When we have a break and we don’t have ballet,” Rose said, “I feel kind of like there’s nothing to do.”

When asked what her favorite part of ballet is, she cannot pin down one answer.

Rose Kelly as the Swan in the Carnival of Animals last spring.

Rose Kelly as the Swan in the Carnival of Animals last spring.

“I love the music and I love the dances and just how you move to it,” she said, adding, “I just love everything about dance.”

That love has been evident since the beginning.

“There are certain kids that have personalities that kind of relate to ballet,” explained Miss Sara. “She just had that calmness and the regimen didn’t bother her. She could pay attention at a young age…She just took to it – the music, the training – it just came really naturally to her…She just loves it, as you can tell.”

The love of dance is fundamental to HBTS and Miss Sara’s teaching philosophy. Her signature style, which focuses on freely dancing from the heart rather than being bound by strict technique, is well represented in her pupils.

The HBTS style was epitomized by Rose’s performance as the swan in last year’s spring show, “Carnival of Animals.”

“Talk about…using her technique to create something beautiful,” said Miss Sara.

“Watching her grow up has been amazing.”

The Hampton Ballet Theatre School will present Tchaikovsky’s “The Nutcracker” on Friday, December 13 at 7 p.m., Saturday, December 14 at 1 p.m. and 7 p.m. and Sunday, December 15 at 2 p.m. at the John Drew Theater at Guild Hall, 158 Main Street, East Hampton. Tickets can be reserved by calling 1-888-933-4287 or visiting hamptonballettheatreschool.com.

Split East Hampton Town Board Adopts Airport Capital Improvement Plan

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By Kathryn G. Menu

The East Hampton Town Board adopted a capital improvement plan for the East Hampton Airport during a work session Tuesday — a roadmap for $5.26 million in repairs and improvements consultants suggest be made to airport facilities over the course of the next five years.

Originally, the capital improvement plan (CIP) — unveiled just before a November 21 public hearing on the proposals — called for $10.45 million in airport repairs and projects over a five-year period. The adopted CIP was cut to $5.26 million with 15 proposed projects removed from the plan as they were not a part of the town board approved Airport Master Plan or Airport Layout Plan, both of which were vetted through environmental review.

The CIP was approved by the outgoing Republican majority of the town board. Airport liaison Dominick Stanzione, Supervisor Bill Wilkinson and Councilwoman Theresa Quigley voted in support of the plan, with Democrats Sylvia Overby and Peter Van Scoyoc voting against adopting the CIP.

East Hampton Airport manager Jim Brundige said the CIP is meant to highlight what projects are necessary at the airport. Quigley also noted that approving the CIP does not mean the board is approving any of the projects laid out in plan, or how has made a decision about how they will be funded. Rather she called the approval a “first step” in moving towards improvements at the airport first identified in the town’s airport master plan.

However, both Overby and Van Scoyoc expressed concerns about a footnote in the document that references Federal Aviation Administration (FAA) funding. The CIP, according to testimony given by town aviation consultant Dennis Yap at the November 21 public hearing on the plan, will be submitted to the FAA. Van Scoyoc said he was concerned submitting the plan to the FAA was the first step towards securing additional grants from that agency for airport projects.

“It’s not a necessary step for us to send it to the FAA unless we are pursuing funding from the FAA,” he said.

For several years now, a number of residents and members of the Quiet Skies Coalition have encouraged the town board not to accept FAA funding as they believe when grant assurances expire in December of 2014 the town has the ability to gain greater control of the airport, including the potential to impose curfews or restrict certain aircraft.

Sag Harbor Planning Board Reviews Proposal for Aquaponic Farm at Page at 63 Main

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By Kathryn G. Menu

The farm-to-table movement has flourished on the East End for decades, many restaurants boasting kitchen gardens to supply fresh, seasonal produce to diner’s plates. For Gerard Wawryk, an owner of Page at 63 Main, while a traditional kitchen garden is out of reach for the Main Street, Sag Harbor space, he has proposed a greenhouse that would employ aquaponic farming on the second and third floor of the restaurant building.

Aquaponics is farming that combines hydroponics — cultivating plants in water — with aquaculture — raising aquatic animals, in this case fish — in a symbiotic environment where the water from the aquaculture system is fed into the hydroponic system. Nitrates and nitrites created by fish by-products serve as a nutrient for the growing plants.

According to attorney Dennis Downes, representing Wawryk at a Sag Harbor Planning Board work session on Tuesday, November 26, this concept is something Wawryk has been exploring since 2006. It is only now, said Downes, that Wawryk finds himself in the financial position to move forward with the plan, which he has been developing with the help of the Town of Southampton’s Sustainability Committee.

As a result of the project, the footprint of the building will not change, but will remain at 3,860 square feet. The proposal aims to add 835 square feet of space to the existing second floor (which does not meet the full footprint of the building) for a seeding area and construct a 481 square foot greenhouse on the rear portion of the third floor. The second story of the building will also serve as a roof garden for the restaurant.

The number of seats in the restaurant is not increasing, nor is the existing apartment, noted Downes, meaning the project does not need additional parking or wastewater treatment to move forward.

“The vegetables that will be grown will be used on the site,” added Downes. “This is not where he is going to be growing vegetables and selling them on the open market.”

Because the project will push the building size over 4,000 square-feet it will have to be reviewed under the State Environmental Quality Review Act (SEQRA) as a type one action, meaning the planning board will have to assess whether or not the project carries the potential to cause a significant adverse environmental impact.

The Southampton Town Sustainability Committee, added Downes, is in favor of the project and has hopes other restaurants will be able to look at sustainable food systems like aquaponics to cultivate produce.

According to Terry Chappel, a consultant working on the project, the aquaponic system is closed loop, and is considered a low-density system or one that uses a minimal amount of fish to produce the nitrites and nitrates needed for the vegetables.

“We are essentially using the fish to start a biological cycle, a nitrification cycle, and it’s a very sustainable way of doing this because we are not having to import salt based chemicals from Morocco, which is normally the case,” he said.

“It’s very easy, low labor, simple and clean,” added Chappel.

The restaurant, he added, will be limited in what it can grow in the aquaponic system and will focus primarily on leafy greens. Seasonal beds are planned for the second floor and more conventional vegetables like tomatoes will also be grown in season.

“From a use perspective, nothing jumps out at me other than what if any are the implications of providing additional space of this size,” said planning board chairman Neil Slevin. “That is what we should probably think about.”

Board member Larry Perrine, the CEO and a partner at Channing Daughters Winery, asked how often the system would need to be flushed and what kind of additional wastewater would that produce.

Chappel said once the biology in the system working properly, it would maintain itself, but if something did occur the system would need to be flushed which would create wastewater.

Sag Harbor Village Environmental Planning Consultant Richard Warren suggested the board be furnished with pictures of an existing system to better understand how it works.

John Jermain Memorial Library Accepts Vast Collection of Native American Research Books

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Mac Griswold, Richard Buckley and Catherine Creedon pose with books from Buckley's collection at the library's storage unit.

Sag Harbor Historian Mac Griswold, Collector Richard Buckley and JJML Director Catherine Creedon pose with books from Buckley’s collection at the library’s storage unit November 12.

By Tessa Raebeck

As a child growing up in Little Falls, New York, Richard Buckley was eager to learn about the Native American tribes that lived nearby, but the materials he could find were minimal, ill advised and uninformed.

“It didn’t seem right to me the way they were describing it,” explained Buckley, who, rather than settling for subpar information, spent the next 40 years compiling an extensive collection of books, journals and other research on — and by — Native Americans.

On November 13, Buckley and his wife, former United States Ambassador Prudence Bushnell, packed his entire collection of 23 boxes into the back of their pick-up truck and drove from their home in Northern Virginia to Despatch Self Storage in Bridgehampton, where Catherine Creedon excitedly awaited their arrival.Richard Buckley

After a deliberate screening process of potential libraries in New York State, Buckley decided to donate his collection to the John Jermain Memorial Library (JJML) in Sag Harbor, where Creedon is director, because he knew they would be appreciated, complemented and, most importantly, used.

Buckley, who worked as a lawyer before concentrating primarily on his research and academic lecturing, estimates his collection includes some 350 materials. The most historically significant part of the collection is the inclusion of four journals on Native American history, to which Buckley has subscribed since their respective inceptions.

He began subscribing to the American Indian Culture and Research Journal when it was first published in 1979, and the journals now fill four boxes.

The journals “give an incredible amount of new history,” said Buckley. “History that had never been written from the viewpoint of American Indians.”

“These journals,” he continued, “have covered everything from the history to the current preservation of Native American tribes throughout the ‘70s, ‘80s, ‘90s, 2000s. If someone were to read those journals, they could write a thesis.”

The collection also includes 15 boxes of books on Native Americans, separated by topics such as women, Iroquois and “Excellent/General Overviews.”

In compiling his collection, Buckley first tackled the Native American history of New York State, moving on to the entire continental United States and eventually to Alaska and Latin America. The collection also includes extensive documentation of the present condition of Native Americans.

“That is probably the underlying value of the collection,” explained Buckley, “to have that approach of — both historically and currently — the ongoing evolution of American Indian history…. The collection’s value is to show that American Indians are not only here, but they’re living out their history, they’re living out their story.”

Once his collection was complete with an extensive variety of viewpoints from both men and women across different regions, tribes and cultures, Buckley faced the daunting task of deciding where his work belonged.

“What I did was,” he explained, “because I didn’t want these to go anywhere, I wanted them to be in a certain library — when I contacted [the libraries], I’d then know whether it was the right fit.”

Former Ambassador Prudence Bushnell, JJML Director Catherine Creedon and Richard Buckley in the midst of delivering the collection November 12.

Former Ambassador Prudence Bushnell, JJML Director Catherine Creedon and Richard Buckley in the midst of delivering the collection November 12.

At first, Buckley put a notice in the regional library system of central New York, where he grew up. Without any quick responses, he sent the notice to the statewide system.

Within a few days, he was on the phone with Cathy Creedon.

“By the initial interest,” he said, “I could see that she was really interested and they were looking for something to complement the new renovation and the newly restored old beautiful building.”

Since JJML opened in 1910, the History Room has been an integral part of the library. It started with rare materials from the personal library of William Wallace Tooker, a Sag Harbor pharmacist who was also an ethnographer with an interest in Algonquin history. Tooker’s collection in JJML includes the Eliot Indian Bible, a bible in the Algonquin language that was the first bible printed in the colonies.

After unloading the 23 boxes into a storage unit, Creedon gave Buckley a tour of the new building, including the history room, which once completed will be climate-controlled, humidity-controlled and temperature-controlled.

“The tour of the library was the final proof that my donation will ‘fit’ with the future use of the library — particularly the special research room,” said Buckley. “The primary reason for donating the collection to [JJML] is Cathy. She will ensure that the collection is used in the most effective manner.”

In a message to Creedon, Buckley envisioned his collection in Sag Harbor.

“I imagined,” he wrote, “that you would have at the opening of your beautiful library — a researcher would be reserving the special room and using the American Indian collection. She will complete a new powerful book about the contributions of Indian women.”

“I thought that was a real tribute to the role of a public library,” said Creedon.

Costs Rise for Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum Restoration Projects

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By Tessa Raebeck

With the first phase of a three-part plan to renovate and restore the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum nearly complete, necessary additional repairs — and fundraising efforts — are on the rise.

Following complaints about the museum’s exterior appearance voiced to building inspector Tim Platt last May, restoration of the historic 1845 building, also the home of the Waponamon Lodge No. 437 Free Masons, began September 15.

“We can certainly say the scope of the project has grown,” Barbara Lobosco, president of the museum board, said Tuesday. “Like most planned undertakings, things crop up during the course of the project.”

The first phase of the plan covers the repairs and painting of the building exterior, including removal of 10 layers of paint — the last being lead.

The contractor, Ince Painting Professional of Westhampton Beach, which has worked on historic buildings like the Hannibal French House in Sag Harbor and the Topping Rose House in Bridgehampton, originally estimated the first phase of the project would cost $180,000.

More product removal was required than was originally allotted for and, at this point, the estimated cost for the first phase is closer to $260,000.

“With any project,” Lobosco said Tuesday, “what happens is you underestimate budgets and so on and so forth, other things open up that need to be fixed as well. When you work with an historic building of this age, new doors open up to new repairs.”

The actual application of the new paint is almost entirely completed. The museum is now in the midst of repairs to the porches and gutters, as well as partial repairs to the capital tops of the building columns.

The finials on the roof, which resemble blubber spades and whale teeth, are also undergoing restoration.

The building’s interior is covered by the second phase of the restoration project, which is not expected to begin for a year or so. Several issues have already materialized that necessitate projects the museum had planned to address in the future to be confronted within the next few months.

“We’d rather replace the pipes before they burst,” said Lobosco, referring to deteriorating, galvanized pipes in the basement that need to be restored.

Additionally, the entire basement must be cleaned.

“As we get inside the building,” said Lobosco. “We’ll need more [repairs] as well.”

The third phase of the capital campaign addresses repairs to the building grounds and will likely be implemented prior to the second phase of interior renovations.

“We want to finish the outside first so that it’s cohesive,” said Lobosco.

The museum plans to landscape the property before the summer, fix the front and back porches and repair the exterior fencing.

“The fence is going to be another big issue,” said Lobosco. “We’ve cleaned it up now, but it’s going to cost at least $60,000 just to repair.”

With continuous costs and essential repairs yet to be determined, the museum’s fundraising for the capital campaign is ongoing. Close to $180,000 in funding has been raised so far. The total cost is at present around $260,000, which will only cover the cost of painting. More funding is essential for the museum to move forward with the rest of the restoration process.

Last March, the museum’s fundraising efforts for the capital campaign kicked off with a $50,000 matching grant from the Century Arts Foundation earmarked towards the repair work. The Whaling Museum plans to host three fundraising events this holiday season, exhibit several beneficiary shows this spring and continually solicit private donations throughout the course of the project, according to Lobosco.

This Friday, the museum is hosting an auction at the Peter Marcelle Gallery in Bridgehampton. Available items include a 200-year-old woven basket, gift certificates to a variety of restaurants in Bridgehampton and Sag Harbor, donations from In Home and other local stores, and framed film posters from the 1960s and 1970s donated by the notable filmmaking couple Chris Hegedus and D. A. Pennebaker, who live down the street from the Whaling Museum. Value of auction items range from $50 to $1,000.

“We’ve been getting local donations which have been great,” said Lobosco. “The community’s been terrific, especially with the auction items. The merchants in town have been very supportive of the museum and our efforts to move forward.”

On December 23, the museum will raffle off a brand new 2013 Fiat 500 Cabrio Pop from Brown’s Fiat in Patchogue. The sleek, black convertible has red and ivory seats and an ivory and black interior. Just 350 tickets are for sale at $100 a piece.

To further aid with fundraising, BookHampton is sponsoring a holiday book sale on the museum’s front lawn on weekends throughout the holiday season. The store will match money raised “dollar for dollar,” said Lobosco.

With its interior closed for the winter, the museum plans to reopen for the season on Earth Day with a show by local artist and Pierson Middle/High School art teacher Peter Solow, with sales from his work also earmarked for the capital campaign.

At the official opening on Memorial Day, “a whale show” is going to be on display. Proceeds from the paintings will be split 50/50 between the artists and the restoration project. Funds raised via three additional shows during Summer 2014 will also go towards the restoration efforts. The exact content of the shows is unannounced at this point, but Lobosco said one show will consist of only Sag Harbor artists.

In addition to special events, the museum continues to raise funds through its mail drive and individual donations. Lobosco is also hopeful for another matching grant.

“It will be ongoing for years,” she said of the restoration projects, “so the fundraising efforts will continue.”