Tag Archive | "permits"

North Haven Fed-Up With Abandoned Boats

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On Tuesday, June 2, The North Haven Village Board of Trustees presented a draft for a local law pertaining to boat storage. Once the summer season ends, residents often abandon their kayaks, sailboats, hobie-cats, canoes and dinghies at the end of Sunset Beach Road.
The draft law stipulates that the village will grant boat permits for the storage of boats on village beaches. Once a permit is granted, the boat owner will be given a registration sticker to be placed on the boat. The boat must be removed from beaches by October 31. Boats left on the beach after this date will be considered abandoned and the village will have the right to sell these boats or destroy them.
The village will hold a public hearing on the law on Tuesday, July 7, at 5 p.m.
In addition to legislation on abandoned boats, John Jermain Memorial Library Director Cathy Creedon visited the board to present plans for the library’s expansion, which will be up for a referendum vote on June 29.
Trustee James Morrissey, a self-proclaimed regular patron of the library, asked why the library couldn’t build on the Union Street side of the property to add additional space. Creedeon responded by saying the small stretch of greenery by Union Street is the best position for the library’s cesspool.
Morrissey went on to raise concerns about a lack of parking, especially when the library hosts group meetings and special events. Creedon said a parking analysis revealed there are almost 65 spaces within a block and a half radius of the building. She added that patrons are often more concerned with safely crossing the street — as the library lies at a busy intersection — than finding parking.
Trustee Jeff Sander asked if the library was exploring other sources of funding in addition to taxpayer money. Creedon said she was actively pursuing private donations and grant money.
“A lot of people are waiting until after the referendum [to commit funding],” Creedon said of private donors.
The board appeared receptive to the building plans and referendum.

Sagaponack Feeling Left Out

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At Sagaponack Village’s board meeting on Tuesday, village trustees and mayor Don Louchheim expressed frustration with both East Hampton and Southampton towns for leaving Sagaponack out of dialogue pertaining to changes to Poxabogue Golf Course.

Last week at an East Hampton Town Board meeting, council members voted in favor of $1.1 million worth of capital improvements to the course. Because the golf course is owned by both towns, Southampton Town also has to agree to the expenditure.

“We were not even informed of the expansion of the restaurant and pro shop,” said Louchheim who also talked about the possibility of a miniature golf course. “And I’m not sure we are getting away from night activity.”

“Talk about arrogance,” added Louchheim, expressing irritation that the town has left the village out on these talks. “We need to ask our attorney what authority we have over this.”

Trustee and parks and recreation liaison, Alfred Kelman said that there was a lot of controversy about the idea of nighttime activity and a miniature golf course at Poxabogue from various citizens advisory committees.

“Let me find out and I will get us in the loop,” Kelman said.

“I’m sure there is going to be a lot of community opposition,” Louchheim said. 

Trustee Joy Seiger said that she wouldn’t mind a miniature golf course, and it would be something that would add value to the community.

“I would be there playing,” she said.

But according to Ed Wankel, of Long Island Golf Management, who represented the golf course at the East Hampton meeting, the first phase of the Poxabogue plan involves moving the driving range tee line up and adding safety fencing around the course. There will also be improvements to the irrigation system, he said, and two additional sheds are proposed to house ball-dispensing machines.

In an interview Wednesday, Wankel said that plans for a miniature golf course had been discussed, but are not included in this initial phase. He added that if plans for a miniature golf course go ahead, it will be proposed without lighting. He also notes that phase one of the project does not include any changes to the parking, pro shop or restaurant.

Special Events

Sagaponack Village officials are asking for more changes to their local laws. In July of last year, the village created a new local law requiring a permit for outdoor special events that include 50 or more people. A letter of intent is to be sent to the village at least 180 days prior to the event, which makes this crunch time for any events to be held in June 2009.

So far the village has received four letters of intent for outdoor assembly permits and on this week’s agenda, three of them were up for discussion.

The village board didn’t have any problems with one of the events, scheduled for July 25 at the Wolffer Estate when the James Beard Foundation will host an event expected to entertain 600 or so guests.

Mayor Louchheim did, however, express concern over another event to be held on the same grounds. The Group for the East End has submitted a request for an event on June 20, but the letter of intent does not include the number of people expected to attend.

“If we are giving them the tentative green light — do we have any other requirements?” Louchheim asked rhetorically, “We should, to get an idea of the size.”

He requested that the current local law be changed to include the projected size of the event.

Friends of the Long Pond Greenbelt showed up for Tuesday’s meeting, to make sure they have complied with the village’s requirements for a fundraising party on June 13 at Tee and Charles Addams Foundation on Sagaponack Road. Their letter of intent includes the size of the party, which is estimated at 150 people, but the board was more concerned about the parking.

“Where would you be able to park?” Louchheim asked party planners, “You have to make arrangements … a lot has changed since the incorporation [of the village].”

“We have a quarter mile long driveway, that’s the problem,” said Kevin Miserocchi, executive director of the Tee and Charles Addams Foundation, who noted the driveway is too narrow for parking. He asked the board if parking would be allowed in front of the property along Sagaponack Road.

“We try to discourage it,” said deputy mayor Lee Foster.

“That corner has had so many accidents over the years,” trustee Lisa Duryea Thayer said.

“But I think there is enough room to get off the road and onto the shoulder,” Louchheim added.

Miserocchi said that he would be willing to hire a valet company for the event.

“We will work with the valet company,” Sieger said representing the town, “it really works out very well.