Tag Archive | "Sag Harbor ARB"

Adams to Weigh in on Sag Harbor Historic Preservation Regulations Next Monday

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Julian Adams, the director of the Bureau of Community Preservation Services with the New York State Office of Parks, Recreation & Historic Preservation, will attend next Monday’s Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board meeting to discuss historic preservation regulations, and specifically materials that should be allowed for reconstruction or renovation projects in the historic district.

That meeting will begin at 5 p.m.

Last Thursday, the ARB met to review several residential applications, including two applications for the Lighthouse Landing subdivision. Both properties, located at 18 Washington Avenue and 10 Lighthouse Lane, are proposed to have a single-family residence and an in-ground swimming pool. The ARB approved both homes, but tabled its approval for the swimming pools pending landscape plans and details about where pool equipment will be stored. Those applications will be revisited next Monday.

In other news, Susan Aminoff received approval for a gunite swimming pool and fence on Franklin Avenue; Deborah and Kevin O’Brien received approval for the removal of an existing chain link fence and the construction of a new wood fence on Joels Lane. The ARB also approved Thomas DiPrete’s plans for a cellar on Archibald Way and Shaun Woodward’s application for an addition on Suffolk Street.

Historic Family Compound Seeks Generator, Renovations

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By Kathryn G. Menu

For Cee Scott Brown, an application for a generator at a family compound that includes homes dating back to the 18th and 19th centuries was certainly uncharted territory.

However, noted Brown, chair of the Sag Harbor Village Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board (ARB), in the aftermath of Hurricane Sandy which left many on the East End without power for a week or longer, it’s an application he expects his board will see more of leading into the 2013 hurricane season.

On Monday, the ARB heard an application for Michael Graff and Carol Ostrow, who last year were approved to combine two Division Street properties — one with a two-story captain’s manse built in the 1700s, and a second property that holds the Rysam-Sleight House, built in 1820.

Architect Katherine “Kitty” McCoy proposed changes to the couple’s existing building permit to allow for the location of a generator near the pool house, to replace an existing railing on the second floor deck on the east side of the captain’s manse, to remove an existing exterior basement access from the south side of the house and to replace the existing front door, sidelights and transom in kind.

“The deeper we get into this, the more details there are and it is a big property,” said McCoy, adding her application for this evening is for what she considers minor amendments.

The generator, which would not service the whole house system but would provide for heat and refrigeration, would be placed on a three-by-six-foot pad, said McCoy, and would be housed in an insulated shed that comes with the generator.

McCoy said typically, the generator will run once a week for one hour, and that could be programmed to happen mid-day and mid-week to reduce the impact on neighbors.

Brown said his concern was for neighboring property owners.

“I get the need for a generator, but if it is a self-charging thing, I think it would need to be set on a schedule that is mutually agreed on by everyone,” he said.

The applicants were approved for the generator and for the other improvements, including the replacement of the door, which McCoy said would be done in kind with historic glass.

The ARB also approved Lynn Park Charveriat’s request for two signs at the Main Street property known as the Gingerbread House, which she and her husband are transforming into their store La Maisonette.

However, the board panned a proposal to construct a sign at the top of the stairs entering the property, which people would walk under to enter the store.

“I think the consensus here is the western approach to signage might be more appropriate in Massachusetts, but not here,” said Brown.

In other news, Pierre Sussman was approved to demolish and rebuild an existing garage at 128 Jermain Avenue as well as for a proposed porch. 17 Madison Restoration, LLC, was approved for new window space at 17 Madison Street.

Caroline and Christina Hribar were approved for a cellar under the rear section of their existing house at 15 Garden Street, as well as for a second story addition above the existing kitchen, although Brown abstained from voting in favor of the project.

Brown had suggested architect Carl Hribar make the addition look less like the original house, in order to pay homage to the existing saltbox style of architecture, however Hribar said he tried but that it looked contrived.

“It will look fine,” said Brown. “It just won’t be a saltbox anymore.”

The Corner Bar to Offer Outdoor Dining

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corner bar for web

In Sag Harbor, outdoor dining was once a luxury reserved for places 
like The American Hotel, Sen Japanese Restaurant, B. Smiths and The 
Dockside Bar & Grill. These are restaurants that have their own patio 
spaces where patrons can sip a cocktail and enjoy a meal while 
admiring a bustling Main Street, or boats pulling into the village’s 
marinas and yacht clubs. 

However, in the last three years, village government has embraced the 
concept of allowing virtually all restaurants use of sidewalk space to 
promote outdoor dining in an effort to support local businesses. Now, 
after a meeting with the village’s historic preservation and 
architectural review board (ARB) and receiving approval from the State 
of New York, residents and visitors alike will enjoy the same 
privilege at one of the village’s oldest and most celebrated places to 
grab a burger and a beer — The Corner Bar. 

On Thursday, July 14, Sag Harbor attorney Miles Anderson presented The 
Corner Bar’s concept to the Sag Harbor Village ARB. The seating, which 
will be located on the Route 114 side of the building, facing Bay 
Street Theatre and Long Wharf, is located on New York State-owned 
sidewalk. According to Anderson, Corner Bar owner Jim Smyth has 
already received approval from the New York State Department of 
Transportation for the outdoor dining area, which will feature four 
tables and 12 seats. 

“More outdoor dining,” said Sag Harbor ARB Chairman Cee Scott Brown. 
“That is great.”

Smyth was unanimously approved for the seating and now will await 
approval from the New York State Liquor Authority before following 
through with the plan. 

In other ARB news, the Sunseeker Club, a firm that rents luxury yachts 
and motorboats, was approved for a sign at SGI Marinas at 50 West 
Water Street. The owners of a 20 Hamilton Street residence were also 
approved for the renovation of that house, as well as a 15 x 40 foot 
swimming pool. Robert Smithson, of 32 Eastville Road, was approved for 
a 16 x 32 foot pool in the rear of his lot. 

Lastly, Ann Castaldo, who lives on Jefferson Street directly behind 
the John Jermain Memorial Library, approached the ARB with tentative 
plans to replace the siding of her home, which currently does not have 
insulation. 

Castaldo was interested in using Hardiplank, a type of siding 
engineered to look like wood, but was informed by the board that in 
the historic district of Sag Harbor the ARB requires all homes use 
real wood siding like cedar clapboard. 

Castaldo said she would return with a formal application once she was 
ready to fund the project, which will be completed in phases, she said. 

The next meeting of the Sag Harbor ARB will be held on Monday, July 25 
at 5 p.m.

125 Main Street is Eyed for Demolition

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By Kathryn G. Menu


Last week, a Sag Harbor developer and his architect approached the Village of Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board to test the waters on if that board would approve demolition and reconstruction, in kind, of a historic Main Street, Sag Harbor building dating back to the 1750s.

It has been about a year since local developer James Giorgio received approval by the Village of Sag Harbor to raise his commercial building at 125 Main Street, next to The Latham House. That approval was seen as a part of a restoration project designed to shore-up the building through a new foundation, but also add a new commercial space on the street level in what is now a crawl space.

However, according to Giorgio and his architect, Charles Thomas, once contractors began taking a closer look at the actual structure, they quickly realized that following through with their plans, and bringing the building up to building code and meet safety requirements, was far from possible.

“I am here to see to what level we could basically, I don’t want to say demolish, but remove the building and reconstruct it in the same proportions using materials we would present to you,” said Thomas at a Sag Harbor ARB meeting last Thursday. “But before we got into that I felt we needed to have this conversation.”

“At the end of the day, it will be the same building,” he added.

“You are talking about taking the entire building down,” asked ARB chairman Cee Scott Brown.

“We are talking about taking the entire building down,” confirmed Thomas.

According to Giorgio, one of the biggest problems his team has encountered is that the structure itself is simply in bad shape. From the ceiling separating the first and second floors, part of which is held together by tree limbs still clad in bark, but not in good shape, said Giorgio, to “a tremendous amount of rot in the walls,” Giorgio said the best bet would be to deconstruct the building and attempt to salvage as many materials as possible for the reconstruction.

The east wall of the building, added Thomas, is completely rotted out with decay, added Thomas.

“The building will look the same, but we don’t think we can salvage all of what is there,” he said. “We are trying to make this code compliant and safe for the public and it is almost impossible. I am actually not going to say ‘almost,’ it is impossible and the building is so deteriorated we don’t know where to go with anything.”

“We can start making temporary repairs to the building,” he added. “But that is all we can do at this point.”

For Giorgio, whose personal hobby is to rebuild antique motorcycles, it is not in his nature to tear something down only to replace it with something new, he noted.

“I will spend years looking for a part before I replace it,” he said, noting he believes this is the best way to salvage some of the characteristics of the building and keep the historic aesthetic of the house intact.

Brown wondered what options Giorgio and Thomas would have if the Sag Harbor ARB flatly rejected the concept.

“Are you telling me the building is in such bad shape that safety wise and even structurally it is a precarious situation,” he asked.

“I don’t know if it would withstand the renovations without a high level of risk while we are taking it apart,” said Giorgio, later adding that once certain portions of the house were removed for reconstruction, he believes the house “would fall down.”

Giorgio said if he was allowed to move forward with this plan, which would still need formal approval from the village’s ARB and planning boards, instead of raising the building and adding the commercial space in the crawl space, he would try and lower the building by 18-inches to make stairways to the existing two retail spaces on the first floor a little more accessible.

“I would not want this building to end up with all new windows, all new everything where it looks like a new building done a la 1700,” said Brown, stressing that if the ARB ultimately agreed to the plan he would like to see as much of the original building used to preserve the historic feel of the structure.

Board members Tom Horn, Sr. and Diane Schiavoni asked Giorgio and Thomas to come back to the board with formal plans for the project at the board’s next meeting, on May 23 at 5 p.m.

“It’s a big decision,” said Schiavoni. “I want to see more.”

In other ARB news, Pia Ferraris was approved for an addition at her 67 Suffolk Street home, Far Away Peace LLC at 186 Main Street was given permission to remove one spruce tree from its property, add plantings to the property and repair a driveway and fence in kind. Gail Schoentag Street was approved for a new sign announcing the “Josef Schoeffmann Gallery” at 112 Hampton Street and Thomas Iorio was approved for a new sign, “Tommy’s GLC Barber Shop” at 66 Main Street.

The next meeting of the Sag Harbor ARB is on Monday, May 23 at 5 p.m.

Sag Harbor Village Concerned Over Care of Historic Homes

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Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board Chairman Cee Scott Brown has watched over the years as historic homes in the village have been altered, without a permit, their owners either oblivious to the responsibility inherent when owning a residence in the historic district of Sag Harbor, or trying avoid the often costly nature of historic preservation by trying to skirt regulation.

And he has had enough.

Faced with yet another example of a historic home altered for the worse, at a Sag Harbor ARB meeting this week, Brown called on the village board of trustees to increase the village fines for constructing work without a permit, and said he would like to see the village take on an educational role with residents and service providers to ensure historic homes are protected in the future.

On Monday, August 23 Brown raised the discussion after being made aware by Sag Harbor Building Inspector Tim Platt that Melanie Fleishman had replaced a wood shingled roof on her historic Atlantic Avenue home with an asphalt roof. Platt told Fleishman she will need a permit for the new roof, and she will likely appear before the board at its September 9 meeting to address the situation, said Brown. However, Brown raised the issue this week with fellow board memebrs as a jumping off point to discuss the board’s inability to enforce and educate the necessity of historic preservation in Sag Harbor.

Fleishman’s contractor has cited other asphalt roofs in her neighborhood as part of the application to make the new roof legal. While Brown acknowledged there are historic homes with asphalt roofs, Fleischman’s home has traditionally had wood shingles, and should have remained that way.

“It’s about educating the homeowners,” said board member Diane Schiavoni. “And I don’t know how we do that.”

“Basically, there has to be more teeth in what we are doing here, because this is a flagrant flaunting of all we stand for,” said Brown. “If it was asphalt replaced by asphalt, no problem, but it’s not.”

“It also makes me think as board members, why are we doing this and with fines of $50 or $100 why get a permit,” he continued.

Brown added the only other recourse the village has is litigation, where often a judge could look at the cost involved with historic preservation of a home and side with the defendant.

“I think we as a board should go to the mayor and let him know we feel there should be more sting in the penalties that will be incurred if someone violates the law,” said Brown. “Number two, sometimes people just don’t know about the law and we have to get the word out.”

Board member Bethany Deyermond suggested using real estate agents as the front lines for information on the responsibility of owning a historic home. As with any residence in the village, any change to the exterior of a building must be approved by the ARB, which in the case of historic homes has the authority to demand the historic character is maintained, whether through ensuring the roofline is not altered, windows remain antique and siding and paint colors replaced in kind.

Brown added service providers could also be included in the discussion, as they are the ones performing the work on these structures; although he added often companies not from Sag Harbor secure those services.

However, said Brown, the Sag Harbor Historic Society has produced a number of pamphlets, available in the village building department, that detail the village code, requirements for historic preservation, and how to ensure renovations are in keeping with the historic character of Sag Harbor. Should fines be increased for breaches of the village code, Brown suggested that money could be funneled into a mass mailing of these pamphlets to homeowners, contractors and real estate agents alike.

“If you buy a historic home, you have a responsibility to keep it historic,” said Schiavoni.

In other news, the board approved a second story addition at Daniel De Simone and Angela Scott’s Spring Street residence.

Stella Maris is Good to Go Solar in Historic District

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Recently students at the Stella Maris Regional School in Sag Harbor began drafting letters to village officials reasoning why solar panels should be allowed at the Catholic school, located in the heart of the village’s historic district. After this week, Stella Maris Principal Janie said they will likely become thank you letters.

After three years of planning, and struggle to gain village approval, the Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board (ARB) on Monday night approved the school’s plan to erect 800 square-feet of solar panels on an angled, south-facing roof visible from Route 114. They are the first visible panels approved in Sag Harbor’s historic district. The ARB has approved two previous applications for solar panels in the district, but has maintained a longstanding requirement that they not be visible in an effort to protect the village’s historic status under state and federal guidelines.

Attorney John Tarbet, representing the school, argued on Monday that placing the panels on a flat roof would counter the school’s efforts towards efficiency, particularly in the winter months with the accumulation of snow.

“In the summer, I don’t believe it will be visible at all,” he said, noting in the winter drivers coming around the bend and into the village on Route 114 will be able to see the panels.

“In our favor, this is not a historic building,” said Tarbet. “It was built in 1966.”

He added it was likely debatable which view would be worse – that of an asphalt roof or of solar panels.

Sag Harbor ARB Chairman Cee Scott Brown did express concern about the neighbors, and in particular if the glare of solar panels would become a nuisance.

Anthony Wilbert, a representative with Go Solar, the company that has agreed to donate their labor in the installation of the panels at Stella Maris, said in his experience, unless panels were curved or installed vertically, on a skyscraper for example, glare has not been an issue. For the residence near the school, he said trees will block any reflection they may experience.

“It doesn’t want to reflect it, it wants to absorb it,” said ARB board member Bethany Deyermond, a teacher in the Sag Harbor School District. “That is the science teacher in me.”

“This is interesting territory for all of us and I think the inclination is, at least mine is, that we have to get with the program,” said Brown.

“It’s a great tester for this area because it is right in the middle of the historic district,” added ARB member Tom Horn.

ARB member Diane Schiavoni made the motion for the board to approve the panels, with Horn seconding and the board unanimously approving the application.

Stella Maris has already collected $17,000 through fundraising for the installation of the panels with LIPA agreeing to uphold a now three-year-old rebate contract to foot $45,000 of the bill. Go Solar will donate their services in installing the panels. According to Tarbet, the school will save $3000 a year in energy costs.

“For us, that is huge,” said Peters. “Also, the kids are so excited about it. It will be a wonderful educational tool.”

On Tuesday, Peters said the school was experiencing renewed excitement about the project, children busily researching the impact of solar energy and the school collectively celebrating the occasion. Next, she said, electrical work will begin and it is her hope the panels will be unveiled at a celebration on April 22 – Earth Day.

“I come from a very environmentally conscious family, so this is very special for me,” said Peters.

And, she added, all members of the ARB will be personally invited to celebrate with the school on Earth Day.

“What I love about the children here is the ownership they feel for our school,” said Peters. “They really think, this is my school, this is my building, this is my Earth.”

In other ARB news, the board approved John and Miki Herrick’s application for an addition at their 5 Hempstead Street residence. They also approved renovations to Paul Alter and Gloria Stern’s 116 Bay Street home, to an additional studio and for the construction of a pool. Lastly, Brown Harris Stevens was given permission for a new sign at their 96 Main Street address, as were Tiffany Scalato and Beth Baldwin for their law practice, Scarlato & Baldwin on Division Street.

Old Maple May Get Ax

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A maple tree at 30 High Street may get the ax after the Village of Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board (ARB) approved its removal on Thursday, August 13.

At a previous meeting, the board — not often prone to approving the removal of trees in the historic district — tabled the application asking the applicants, Ellen Vandoran and Robert Reid, to explain why they wished permission to remove the tree.

On Thursday, landscape architect Jack Delashmet approached the board on behalf of the homeowners, explaining the removal of the maple would not be aesthetically in the best interest of his clients, but in order to preserve an older, more significant oak, may be necessary.

“We are in no hurry to do it,” said Delashmet.

Last fall, when doing necessary pruning to the ailing maple, Delashmet said the cavity was such that experts from CW Arborists recommended its removal in order to preserve the adjacent oak. Delashmet said his clients would try and keep the tree for as long as possible, but wanted the approval just in case this fall arborists demand its removal.

“My feeling is the town and the trees, in particular the oak, would be better served by removing the maple,” said Delashmet.

According to Delashmet the applicants would replace the maple with a seven-inch caliper specimen.

“It is not a historic tree that has a presence,” noted ARB chairman Cee Scott Brown.

The board agreed to give the applicants permission to remove the tree in the next year under the requirement that it be replaced within two months.

Two additional trees, at the rear of James Giorgio’s 125 Main Street property, were also approved for removal.

In other ARB news, Carol Major was approved for a new sign at 11 Madison Street, as was Biana Stepanian who will be opening the new business Sag Harbor Salvage Co. on Long Wharf. Agawam Realty was also granted permission for a sign at their new location at 76 Main Street in the village.

Lastly, Sharon Kay was approved for alterations at her 136 Jermain Avenue residence, although the board was not amenable to allowing Kay to replace a deteriorating wood fence with one made of PVC, despite the fact Kay had already purchased the material. Kay said she would seek a refund, and was also approved for new shutters.




Changing Face of Main Street

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web 125 Main C

As the architect for Sag Harbor commercial property owner James Giorgio, Chuck Thomas has changed the face of Bridge Street, taking the once infamous Havens bar and nightclub, and turning the one-story building into a brand new two-story retail and apartment space that draws women with yoga mats rather than late night revelers.

On Monday, July 27, Thomas approached the Village of Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board (ARB) with a plan to revamp another classic Sag Harbor space – 125 Main Street, which currently houses The Gallery, and was once home to longtime photography business, Chelsea Crossing.

According to Thomas, the building at 125 Main Street is in dire need of repairs, and major repairs at that, including a completely new foundation for the whole of the structure.

“Three-quarters of the house, right now the joists are on dirt,” said Thomas adding there is a very small cellar-like space, not much larger than the table the ARB sits at, that one can peer at the dilapidated foundation from.

Thomas said what Giorgio would like to do is lift the entire building and construct a new foundation. The design of the building, he said, can go one of two ways. He wants to rebuild and restore the building entirely, said Thomas, however, he would like to make use of a basement type space for retail if the ARB was inclined to allow such a change.

The building is zoned for first floor retail and one second story residential use, said Thomas, but the entrance to the retail portion of the building has traditionally been reached by stairway – not quite inviting for passing shoppers, he said.

“It’s perfect for a home, but for retail it is hard to get people from the sidewalk up,” said Thomas.

Giorgio intends to refinish the entire interior, “a gut redo,” said Thomas, and one idea the architect said he liked was converting the existing basement into retail use by leaving a stone wall at the street level and excavating behind the wall to create the space.

ARB Chairman Cee Scott Brown said he believed this would be a larger issue than one the ARB should be looking at first.

“I don’t think I am going to do myself any favors going to the planning board without coming here first,” said Thomas. “One of the first things they will ask me is what the ARB thinks.”

“The first thing I want to ask you is what the planning board thinks,” responded Brown.

Thomas cautioned he has no intentions of expanding the square footage of either the retail or residential portions of the building and if new retail space is created at the basement level, they would remove the square footage from additions that have been tacked on the rear of the building.

Thomas added if the board was opposed to the idea of basement retail, he would seek to reconstruct the space as is.

“It’s an interesting concept and done well it could be very nice,” said board member Michael Mensch.

“It is treacherous getting up there,” agreed board member Diane Schiavoni, who said she liked the concept.

“Our primary concern is we would like to see something done to stop deterioration from happening,” added Brown. Brown later added he was sure the applicant would have “some challenging times ahead” despite the board’s support.

In other ARB news, arborist Michael Gaines wrote the board asking for permission to take down a maple at Franklin and High Streets, although the board was unconvinced.

“I am exhibiting signs of needing to be taken away, but I have some concerns about what they want here,” joked Brown, adding he would like to have the board hear this request from Gaines in person.

“It looks fairly young, actually,” noted Mensch. “The caliper is not that great.”

Former board member Robert Tortora was approved for changes in his building permit for an Oakland Avenue residence to add dormer windows on the second story. Scott Landau was also approved for alterations at his Suffolk Street home and Nicole Seligman was also approved for an addition at her Suffolk Street residence.

Ferry Road Condo Plan Changes Gears

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The Sag Harbor Village attorney had sharp words for a proposed condo project at 1, 3 and 5 Ferry Road at a Tuesday planning board work session, the night after the developers of the plan presented new architectural renderings for the 18-unit project.

On Monday night, East End Ventures, the firm proposing the luxury condo project with accessory docks on Sag Harbor’s waterfront presented new architectural rendering to the historic preservation and architectural review board.

The concept, developed by architect Katherine Fee, revolves around the industrial, row house character of historic waterfront communities as its inspiration. Fee presented the board with a cluster of five townhouses separated by streets. Fee said the canal-style streets were implemented as a design feature intended to reduce the overall mass of the proposed buildings. A parking garage is located under a green roof – a grass covered expanse – adjacent to the condo development. The parking garage is proposed to house roughly 20 vehicles, said Fee, over half the parking proposed for the site.

By and large, the ARB was impressed with the concept, although they did suggest Fee vary the height of the buildings, even if a variance was necessary to create the sense that these structures were built over time, instead of in one development. They also suggested looking at finding a way to get all of the parking underground, instead of just about half.

While ARB Chairman Cee Scott Brown called the presentation “helpful,” he added the developers should wait to come back to the board until they have reached the phase where the village boards, save the planning board, can get involved.

Which was one of the problems village attorney Anthony Tohill had with the presentation. The plan presented to the ARB on Monday night varied greatly from the plan the village’s planning board is in the midst of reviewing under the state environmental quality review (SEQR). The project under review by the planning board presents a single 43,040 square-foot building with 18 accessory dock slips and 36 above-ground parking spaces, while the design presented by Fee is vastly different with five buildings, underground parking and a green roof shown as aspects of the new design.

According to Tohill, if a plan changes drastically in the midst of this review, the whole process must start from scratch as the planning board has been evaluating the potential impacts of the original design, not this new incarnation. New designs are generally reserved for the alternatives section of an environmental review.

Another problem, according to Sag Harbor Mayor Greg Ferraris, is that while the application was originally slated for the Monday, October 27 meeting, the applicant’s attorney pulled it from the meeting agenda on October 6. Only hours before the ARB meeting on Monday was set to commence did the attorney ask it be put back on the agenda, without meeting the deadline for submission and without the village attorney or village planner being notified by the village building department.

Both were absent from the ARB meeting as a result.

“Trustee [Tiffany] Scarlato has reviewed the board policies and procedures that need to be followed,” said Ferraris on Wednesday. “This will be rectified and will not happen again moving forward.”

On Tuesday night, prior to the board’s regular meeting, Tohill discussed the situation with the planning board in a work session, stating it needs to be clear that submissions cannot be made at the “last minute,” essentially introducing “complete chaos” to a state regulated review process.

Tohill said the developer’s move to show the ARB a new design could weaken the whole process for both the applicant and the village.

“There are no excuses for it,” he said, adding if another design is shown again the environmental review may have to start from the very beginning.

The project’s attorney Dennis Downes disagreed with Tohill saying he would address the issue during the regular meeting.

“I have to comment about a problem we have been having with this application in the past but it became a bit more acute last night when architects showed up at the ARB with a set of plans this board has not seen and was not aware of,” said board chairman Neil Slevin during the regular meeting. “That, we believe, was inappropriate at best.”

Slevin then questioned a fence that has been put up at the project site by National Grid, which is using the space for staging for a brief period while it performs a nearby remediation of coal tar. Downes explained the situation regarding National Grid, and in reference to the ARB meeting, said it was impossible for the applicants to do their job without being able to discuss the project with interested agencies like the ARB.

Tohill disagreed and cut the conversation short.

In other Ferry Road news, the board adopted a list of potential impacts East End Ventures must explore in the next phase of this review. The ball is now in the developer’s court, as they must provide responses to the litany of questions the planning board has asked.

 Top photo: Architect Katherine Fee presidents the Sag Harbor ARB a new design for proposed luxury condos at 1, 3 and 5 Ferry Road Monday night. 

 

Fixing House’s “Eyes” On ARB Agenda

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The replacement of a column and windows at a historic Suffolk Street home is on hold, following a discussion in front of the Sag Harbor Historic Preservation and Architectural Review Board on Monday, October 27 where the board encouraged owner Howard Kanovitz to look into restoring the windows of the residence rather than replace them.

Kanovitz approached the board about the project, which entails replacing a rotting front column in kind, which will be custom made. He was also interested in replacing the windows of the residence with the same style of window, he said, in a version created by the Anderson window company.

“The original windows are single pane and are in terrible condition,” he explained, adding they were irreparable.

“Generally, those are the eyes of the house and they can be restored,” said board member Robert Tortora.

Kanovitz said he thought the version Anderson created were both well constructed and looked identical to what was in the home currently, but Tortora disagreed, going as far to say that Kanovitz would be devaluing the home if he moved forward with this kind of replacement.

“I think the window issue is one this board has been very sensitive too,” agreed board chairman Cee Scott Brown, adding that because the home was historic and in the historic district, the board would like to see Kanovitz explore the idea of restoration.

Board member Michael Mensch did note that it would be difficult to try and recreate the narrow muttons for the window with any energy conservation, to which Brown replied storm windows can help achieve that goal.

Kanovitz said he was specifically trying to avoid using storm windows as they hide the classic look of the window.

“The very eyes you are talking about get shut,” he said.

Mensch provided Kanovitz with the names of professionals who handle window restoration and the board said they were amenable to approving the custom column replacement and paint, but Kanovitz said he would rather wait.

“I have got to do the whole thing at once,” he said.