Tag Archive | "Sag Harbor"

Sag Harbor Village Board Revokes Page at 63 Main Outdoor Dining License

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Waiters remove chairs from Page at 63 Main Friday afternoon after the Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees revoked the restaurant’s outdoor dining license. 

By Stephen J. Kotz

The Sag Harbor Village Board of Trustees on Friday, July 18, revoked the outdoor dining license of Page at 63 Main restaurant. The village board took the action, Mayor Brian Gilbride said, primarily because of ongoing code compliance issues with the restaurant’s new Back Page café, which opened earlier this year.

It did so after attorney Dennis Downes—who told the board the outdoor dining on Main Street earned the restaurant between $7,500 and $10,000 a day—said its owners would shut down the Back Page café immediately until zoning code violations were resolved and a site plan was issued if the village would allow it to keep its outdoor dining license.

Minutes after the village issued its order, at about 5 p.m., waiters were busy removing the tables and chairs that had graced the front of the restaurant next door to the Municipal Building.

The restaurant found itself in hot water when village officials said it made improvements to the property without first obtaining building permits. Village officials also said the restaurant created an outdoor dining area with a slate patio, when the village Planning Board had intended for it to be used simply as a waiting area for patrons who wanted to dine in the main restaurant.

Village officials also said a refrigerated Dumpster enclosure that was built behind the Back Page posed a fire hazard because it was wired for electricity, a charge the restaurant’s representatives denied.

The village also charged that Page did not remove the same number of seats from inside the restaurant as it offered outside, as it had agreed to do when applying for the license.

Last week, the village building inspector suspended the Main Street dining license, pending the restaurant’s appearance next week in village Justice Court. In the meantime, said Mayor Gilbride, the restaurant’s owners “thumbed their nose” at the village.

“We’re here talking because when there was a suspension… the right thing would have been to remove the tables and chairs and let’s get to the bottom of this,” the mayor said.

Mr. Downes sought to prevent the village board from taking action, saying the outdoor dining right was “a valuable property right” that the village could not revoke without “due process.”

Village attorney Fred W. Thiele Jr. called those charges “ludicrous,” adding that the village only charged $100 for a license and said if outdoor seats were as valuable as Mr. Downes said they were, the village should be charging more. “It’s a privilege to use public property for a private use,” Mr. Thiele said.

Mr. Downes conceded that mistake had been made, but said the restaurant had been held up during the planning process and had to do the work to be ready for the summer season.

“Without those seats, there is a lot of money being lost,” said Mr. Downes of the outdoor dining. “It could be the difference between being able to stay alive in the winter where there are less people out here.”

East End Weekend: Highlights of July 18 to 20

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"Calabrone" by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

“Calabrone” by Ramiro. Courtesy Grenning Gallery.

By Tessa Raebeck

Summer is in full swing and there’s plenty to choose from to do on the East End this weekend. Here are some highlights:

 

The Grenning Gallery in Sag Harbor is hosting an opening reception for Ramiro’s Solo Show on Saturday, July 19, from 6 to 8 p.m.

“Ramiro solo show this year steps forward into a more mystical and hopeful realm,” owner Laura Grenning wrote in a press release.

“Anchoring the exhibit is a suite of four substantial figurative works, with each painting representing a season of the soul.  Although well known for his expert likenesses in portraiture and grand figurative work, Ramiro’s distinguishing characteristic is, ironically, his ability to let go of the discreet reality of the eyes when necessary.  With this, he infuses his narrative compositions with mystery that allows the paintings to endure the critical test of time,” added Ms. Grenning.

The Grenning Gallery is located at 17 Washington Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-8469.

 

Water Mill’s  Parrish Art Museum is hosting its second edition of Gesture Jam, an adult figure drawing class in which artists sketch live models in a high-energy environment, Friday, July 18 at 6 p.m.

Facilitated by local artist and educator Andrea Cote, this year’s Gesture Jam will be held outdoors on the museum’s terrace and include live musicians Nicolas Letman-Burtanovic on bass and Sean Sonderegger on saxaphone. Local dancers Adam and Gail Baranello are the models.

“Imagine going home with drawings that look like you’ve been to some sort of psychedelic cabaret, and feeling that way too. Andrea Cote’s Gesture Jam classes have just that effect,” Parrish Curator of Special Projects Andrea Grover said in a press release.

The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call (631) 283-2118.

 

Celebrities are coming to Bridgehampton for CMEE’s 6th Annual Family Fair on Saturday, July 19 from 10:30 a.m. to 1:30 p.m. The Children’s Museum of the East End‘s largest fundraiser, this year the fair will have a magical theme.

George Stephanopoulos, Dan Abrams, Jane Krakowski, Joy Behar, Julie Bowen, Molly Sims and Tiffani Thiessen (of Saved by the Bell fame) are some of the CMEE supporters expected to be in attendance.

Children and their families can enjoy magical arts and crafts, water slides, games and entertainment, music, food, and CMEE’s brand new nine-hole miniature golf course.

CMEE is located at 376 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike on the Bridgehampton side. For more information, call (631) 537-8250.

 

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

A painting by Georges Desarmes. Courtesy Christ Episcopal Church.

Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor is hosting its fourth Haitian Art & Handcraft Sale all weekend, July 18 to 20, to benefit the village of Chermaître in partnership with the Vassar Haiti Project.

An opening reception will be held from 5 to 8 p.m. Friday and the sale will continue in the Upper Parish Hall on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Two hundred original paintings and a large assortment of unique and affordable gifts, including silk scarves, jewely and iron sculpture, will be on sale.

Many women in the village, Chermaître in northwestern Haiti, are struggling to start small businesses to support their families by selling the crafts they create and the coffee they grow. Proceeds from the church sale will go toward building a community center in the village to support those women.

For more information on the charity, call (970) 946-7614 or visit haitiproject.org. The Christ Episcopal Church is located at the corner of East Union and Hampton Street (Route 114) in Sag Harbor. For more information, call the church at (631) 725-0128.

 

The gallery at Sag Harbor’s Canio Books is hosting artists Ron Focarino and Jeanelle Myers, with her latest assemblage series, Plains Reverie, with an opening reception Friday, July 18 from 5 to 7 p.m.

“Myers work reflects the influence of her Nebraska roots, echoing the work of Wright Morris and Joseph Cornell,” the gallery said in a press release. “Myers incorporates a diverse array of found objects including old letters, metals, writing implements, fabric and many other materials into her compelling assemblages.”

"Golden Scarab" enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio's Books.

“Golden Scarab” enamel sculpture by Ron Focarino. Courtesy Canio’s Books.

Artist Ron Focarino will also be exhibiting, showing his “creature creations, delightful enamel sculptures of insects, including a dragonfly, crane fly, scarab and others,” according to Canio’s.

The exhibit runs July 11 through August 5 at Canio’s Books, 290 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-4926.

The Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor presents the artwork of Anna De Mauro and Thomas Condon, with an opening reception Saturday, July 19 from 4:30 to 6 p.m.

Sculptor and painter Anna De Mauro is a figurative artist working from the live model.

“Her work process includes observation from life to record instinctual responses to the subject, passage of time and impressions of the metaphysical and the human condition,” the gallery said in a press release.

Thomas Condon lives part-time in East Hampton and focuses on the local landscape here on the East End, as well as the urban scenes of New York City.

The show runs July 17 through August 7 at the Romany Kramoris Gallery, 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-2499.

A Mural for Masons in Sag Harbor

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John Capello working on a mural in the Masonic Temple in Sag Harbor. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Mara Certic

Aesthetes, historians and wanderers drop into the Sag Harbor Whaling Museum to learn about the village’s history and admire art shows curated by well-known East Enders. The majority of them are unaware that as they absorb the exhibits on the first floor, artist John Capello is just one story above them, balancing on a chair on top of scaffolding, listening to opera and painting Sag Harbor’s own Sistine ceiling.

“I just cannot abide a blank wall,” said Mr. Capello, a mural artist from Brooklyn who has lived in Sag Harbor for the past 25 years. Six years ago he joined the Wamponamon Lodge, Sag Harbor’s Freemasons. Since his first meeting in the Masonic Temple—located on the second floor of the Whaling Museum—Mr. Capello has been “pestering” the other masons in the organization to allow him to create a mural for the blank wall and curved ceiling in the back of the meeting room.

After presenting the group with a basic pencil-drawn sketch, he got the okay to get started and in June he began creating a surreal water- and skyscape sprinkled with traditional Masonic symbols.

“I started on Friday, June 13,” he said. “And I did that on purpose.” The number 13 has traditionally been associated with bad luck in many cultures. Scholars of the masonic tradition (and the occasional conspiracy theorist) have referred to the number 13 as a masonic “signature,” noting that it appears in some way or another in strange and mysterious places, including on the $1 bill: 13 leaves in the olive branches, 13 arrows and 13 stars in the crest above the eagle, among many other “mysterious” uses of the number.

One of the main focal features of Mr. Capello’s work in progress also appears on the $1 bill: the all-seeing eye atop a pyramid, which is featured on the left side of the mural. “One of the most amazing achievements of early man was the pyramids, it’s perfect,” he said. The all-seeing eye dates back thousands of years, since the creation of a “sky god,” the artist explained. On the opposite wall is the square and compass, perhaps the most identifiable emblem of the Freemasons.

The painted pyramid and the square and compass both sit upon a checkered floor in Mr. Capello’s mural, reminiscent of a chessboard. “Supposedly, this room represents a replica of the bottom floor of Solomon’s Temple,” Mr. Capello said of the masonic meeting room. As legend goes, before Nebuchadnezzar II destroyed the building during the Siege of Jerusalem in 587 BC, it featured a checkered floor in one of the many rooms.

“Also, I’ve always been a surrealist,” he said. “And in surrealism, the chessboard is always the game of life.” His background in surrealism allows for interesting and unusual combinations of symbols throughout his mural. A six-pointed star hovers over the sea that bridges the two sides of the mural as a Bible floats over the water and a man canoes nearby—a nod to the Native American name of the Sag Harbor Lodge.

The sky spanning over the mural moves from night to day as you look across the piece of art. Mr. Capello explained that he wanted to represent the entire day, and that his decision to include many stars and certain planets is a nod to the importance of astronomy.

He almost lost his footing for a second on Tuesday, as he shaded in Mars while consulting a volume of “Hubble’s Universe,” about 15 feet off the ground.

“When I was 19, I was doing this 60 feet up in churches,” the artist said. “I guess there’s a big difference between being 19 and 60.” When he was 16 years old, Mr. Capello began a summer apprenticeship doing ecclesiastical restoration, which was his first venture into the art world. A few years later he joined the Navy.

He told a story of when he was stationed in Greece, and how he observed an old man sketching pictures of visiting sailors for spare change. While watching this, a uniformed Mr. Capello found himself sketching pictures on napkins with the only drawing tools he had—burnt matches. The older Greek man came over, he said, looked at his handiwork and said to him “No, no, don’t be an artist, you make no money. Be a photographer, you can make a few dollars.”

But Mr. Capello did not heed that advice and eventually became a mural painter based out of Brooklyn. “I did a lot of work with the Brooklyn Arts Council, and we would work with Brooklyn College and art students,” he said. As graffiti took over New York City, “we would approach people with walls.”

“I said ‘Look, we’ll paint the wall, you just pay for the materials.’” It’s a payment plan that Mr. Capello is recycling for his current project, his first ever mural in Sag Harbor. Mr. Capello expects to finish the Masonic mural in the next month. Until then, he will spend four hours of every day balancing on a chair, touching up waves in the sea and adding stars to the sky.

 

Sag Harbor Yacht Yard Told to Shove Off

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By Stephen J. Kotz

Sag Harbor Village this week gave Lou Grignon, the owner of the Sag Harbor Yacht Yard, 30 days to vacate a parcel of village-owned waterfront land has used for the past 20 years as a boat storage area.

The village issued the eviction notice after negotiations to reach a new lease agreement failed. The yacht yard’s 20-year lease for the property ended on May 31.

On Wednesday, Mr. Grignon, who owns the buildings adjacent to the village property he has been leasing, said the village’s decision would effectively put him out of business.

“If I don’t have room to store boats, I don’t have room to be a boatyard,” he said, adding that he typically stores about 130 boats on the property each winter.

He said he had hired attorney Dennis Downes to represent him as he seeks to stay at the site.

“Mr. Grignon had an opportunity” to sign a new lease, said Mayor Brian Gilbride. “It’s time for the village to move forward and get that property back.”

Mr. Gilbride said the village had options for the property, which could range from using it as a park, for a parking lot or a place to expand the Sag Harbor farmers market, but he said nothing had been decided yet.

Mr. Grignon said he had been paying $15,592 a year for the boat storage area in the last year of his lease. He said the village told him an appraisal found the property should be rented for $20,000 a year.

“So I put forth an offer of $20,000 a year for the first year, which is roughly a 25-percent increase,” he said. Mr. Grignon added that he sought a 10-year lease with a 10-year option to renew with annual increases of 2.3 percent.

“That was right on par with cost-of-living increases and everything,” Mr. Grignon said. “Not to mention that we just went through the worst recession in history.”

The village countered with an offer for a five-year lease, with the first year at $22,500 and annual increases of 5 percent, he said.

“This is a dollar and cents issue,” he continued. “For them to raise the rent 33 percent and then 5 percent more a year doesn’t make sense. We’d have to power wash a lot of boats to make it work.”

The property, which was once used by the Mobil Corporation to store fuel oil, was contaminated by leaks from storage tanks. It was turned over to the village for a nominal fee under an agreement that there would be no buildings constructed at the site.

Mr. Grignon said the site had been used as boatyard dating to 1797 and is the only boatyard outside the Sag Harbor-North Haven Bridge.

Harbor Committee Chairman Bruce Tait said the village’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Plan requires that the village try to maintain water-related uses and businesses. He said it would not be suitable for parking because that is not a waterfront use and it is too far from the business district.

“This village is a maritime village. The last thing you want to get rid of is the boatyard,” said Dr. Tom Halton, a committee member at Monday’s meeting.

“What’s in the best interest of the people of Sag Harbor?” asked Mr. Grignon. “Do they need more parking or do they want a boatyard?”

Sag Harbor Wants To Revoke Page’s Outdoor Dining License

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By Stephen J. Kotz

The Sag Harbor Village Board will hold a special meeting at 3 p.m. on Friday, July 18, to discuss revoking the outdoor dining license it issued to the restaurant Page at 63 Main Street because of a number of alleged fire code and zoning code violations at the establishment.

“That license has been suspended by the building inspector,” said Mayor Brian Gilbride, “and he has thumbed his nose at the village and continued to serve alcohol and food outside, which is a violation,” referring to Gerard Wawryk, one of the business’s owners.

“They have been written up on multiple charges of fire code violations,” said assistant village attorney Denise Schoen.

Village attorney Fred. W. Thiele Jr. said if the restaurant did not answer the charges in a timely fashion in village Justice Court, the village could seek a restraining order against the business in state Supreme Court.

“In my experience as a town attorney and village attorney health or safety violations are more likely to get relief” than simple code violations, he said.

Mr. Wawryk was not available for comment on Wednesday.

Ms. Schoen said a Dumpster that is enclosed in a refrigerated wooden structure and abuts a fence next to Murph’s Tavern on Division Street is a fire hazard.

In addition, she said the restaurant had undertaken improvements to the rear of its property to open up the Back Page café without obtaining a building permit.

She also said that the original idea for the Back Page was to provide a “waiting area” with tables and some food service for restaurant patrons waiting to be served. But the outdoor dining area that has been constructed “is not the intended use” that the Planning Board approved.

On Tuesday night, even as a notice announcing the village action against his restaurant was posted on the front door of the Municipal Building, Mr. Wawryk sat in the audience, waiting for the village Zoning Board of Appeals to make a decision on Page’s application to obtain a variance for the placement of the Dumpster.

But after hearing that the Planning Board had not intended for it to be placed in that location, the ZBA took the unusual step of reopening its hearing on the matter and would ask the planning board for its opinion.

Sag Harbor Acupuncturist Arrested on Charges of Sexual Abuse Against Patient

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By Tessa Raebeck

Southampton Town Police arrested a Sag Harbor acupuncturist Saturday, July 12, on charges that he sexually abused a female patient he was treating.

Michael P. Gohring, 64, a resident of Sag Harbor since 1987, was arrested at his Noyac Road business in the village. A patient told police that the licensed acupuncturist sexually abused her during an appointment.

Mr. Gohring was charged with Aggravated Sexual Abuse in the second degree, a Class C Felony. He was held overnight at Southampton Town Police Headquarters in Hampton Bays and arraigned Sunday, July 13, at Southampton Town Justice Court, then remanded to Suffolk County Jail in lieu of $20,000 bail, police said in a press release issued Wednesday, July 16.

Mr. Gohring offers acupuncture and comprehensive oriental medicine and was voted “Best of the Best” Acupuncturist in the Hamptons by Dan’s Papers’ Readers’ Poll in 2013. According to police, he uses the first name Mikal for his business.

Police ask that anyone with related information call the Southampton Town Detective Unit at (631) 702-2230.

Sag Harbor to Weigh Moratorium

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By Stephen J. Kotz

The Sag Harbor Village Board will be asked to consider a moratorium on most developments requiring setback relief from wetlands, pending a revision of its wetlands law.

Denise Schoen, the assistant village attorney who represents the village’s Harbor Committee and other regulatory boards, requested that a moratorium be considered when the village board held a work session on Thursday, July 10, to consider a series of revisions to its zoning code while building inspector Tim Platt, who left his position this week, was still with the village.

Village attorney Fred W. Thiele Jr. said this week he would present a draft of a possible moratorium to the village board at its August 12 meeting.

“There have been issues cropping up more and more frequently,” said Mayor Brian Gilbride, “and we probably need to put on the brakes.”

“I think the changes are gong to be pretty comprehensive,” said Ms. Schoen. “Instead of reviewing the applications, we should be going through the wetlands code to see how we need to rewrite it.”

Richard Warren, the village’s planning consultant, said about a dozen applications  requiring relief from wetlands law setbacks are currently in the pipeline and would have to be put on hold during a moratorium.

The idea for the moratorium was first suggested by Harbor Committee chairman Bruce Tait in June. In a soliloquy before that board began its regular meeting last month, Mr. Tait expressed frustration that his committee was often being asked to weigh in on applications that had already received variances from the village Zoning Board of Appeals, rendering his committee’s input moot.

He also criticized the village for failing to enforce Harbor Committee decisions and said applicants have on occasion ignored the committee’s conditions for approvals.

At that time, Ms. Schoen said there were so many problems with the wetlands law as written that the village might be better off scraping the current law and writing a new one. A key goal, she said, would be to clearly define which applications should go before the Harbor Committee first and which ones should go before the Zoning Board of Appeals.

Besides confusion over where applications should go first, Ms. Schoen said there was a major problem with a provision allowing the Harbor Committee to reduce its own setback requirements “on lots that are so undersized that the applicant can’t possibly build without having that relief.”

The problem, she added, is that provision has “been interpreted by applicants and their attorneys that they automatically qualify for that relief. That’s not true. It’s a decision the Harbor Committee has to make.”

Mr. Warren recommended that the village simply remove the language describing undersized lots. “Right now the burden is on the Harbor Committee,” he said.

“Applications are coming in bigger and bigger,” he said. They want more and more swimming pools 20 feet from the bluff and on 10,000- square-foot lots 6,700-square-foot houses.”

The board also discussed changing the formula for determining how many parking spaces are required for restaurants from one space per three seats to one space per four spaces.

Although Mr. Platt said he thought the change would trigger requests from more restaurants for an increase in seats, others said the change would only bring restaurants into closer conformity with the state fire code—and besides, there are no parking spots anyway.

“You can put in 3,00 more seats and you aren’t going to get any more cars,” said Trustee Robby Stein. “It’s almost self-regulating.”

Trustee Ken O’Donnell, the owner LaSuperica restaurant, agreed. “I can put 200 more seats in, but if have a weekend like this when long Wharf is going to be covered with a tent, my backroom is going to be light.”

“I don’t know what to do with parking variances, I don’t know what to tell the board,” said Ms. Schoen. “I don’t know how we are supposed to enforce them. There are no parking spots so the analysis, legally, doesn’t work.”

Mayor Gilbride said he was concerned that if a restaurant were overcrowded, “and some bad event happens then people are going to be reaching out to find out who is liable.”

But Mr. Platt said if someone violates the fire code “the judge is going to take that much more seriously” than if they simply get slapped with a zoning code violation.

Update: Sag Harbor School Board Member Daniel Hartnett Resigns

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Sag Harbor School Board member Daniel Hartnett resigned Monday.

Sag Harbor School Board member Daniel Hartnett resigned Monday.

Originally published July 14, 2014 8:47 p.m.

By Tessa Raebeck 

Daniel Hartnett resigned from the Sag Harbor School District Board of Education Monday, July 14, after selling his house in the district two weeks ago.

Elected in May 2013, Mr. Hartnett entered the second year of his three-year term this month. He also served two terms on the board from 2005 to 2011.

Mr. Hartnett, a social worker and counselor at East Hampton High School, was the frontrunner in the school board in 2013, receiving the most votes from among a group of six candidates. The only educator on the board, he is one of its most vocal members.

“I have come tonight to very painfully, with enormous regret, ask you to accept my resignation from the board of education,” Mr. Hartnett told the board at Monday’s meeting. “I sold my house two weeks ago and have been unable to find affordable or appropriate housing in the district that would allow me to stay on the board. So, I’ve moved out of the district. I’ve signed a lease and need to resign.”

After listing his house in March, Mr. Hartnett said the sale went through much faster than he had anticipated. He was unable to find suitable housing in Sag Harbor and has rented a house in Springs. New York State Law requires all school board members to live in the district and the duration of Mr. Hartnett’s lease in Springs required that he resign.

While waiting for Monday’s meeting to start, Mr. Hartnett told several parents he was saddened by his unplanned resignation and had been looking forward to working with the district’s new superintendent, Katy Graves, who he helped to recruit.

“There’s not a lot of joy being on the school board,” Mr. Hartnett said from the podium during public input Monday. “Except for the fact that you know you’re doing something really amazing for the children of the district.”

“I would walk out of the house at night and say, ‘I’m going out tonight for you and if I can bring some of your friends with me, I will.’ And that’s really what it’s about: it’s about doing what’s best for the kids and it has been a privilege for me to bring whatever knowledge and experience I have to this table,” he added.

Mr. Hartnett thanked his fellow school board members and the administrators, superintendents and principals he has worked with “for the collegial relationships and collaboration that we’ve shared together on behalf of the children of this district” and thanked the community for giving him the opportunity to serve.

Mr. Hartnett also offered his services and said he was more than willing to continue to help and serve in whatever way he could. His son, who lives part-time with his mother in Sag Harbor, will continue to attend school in the district.

Chris Tice, vice president of the board, thanked Mr. Harnett for giving the board a heads-up when he first realized he might have to resign. As a real estate agent, she said she understood the challenge of finding suitable year-round housing in Sag Harbor. Ms. Tice said the board consulted with school attorney Thomas Volz to see if there was any way Mr. Hartnett could legally remain on the board “because everyone on the board was hoping you could stay on the board because you’re such an asset.”

Board President Theresa Samot recalled being first elected to the board the same year as Mr. Hartnett in 2005.

“We went through many great times and, as you said, some difficult times, and it made it much easier for me knowing that you were a colleague and that we were there working through these issues together,” she said.

“The great thing about a board,” said David Diskin, who was elected last year alongside Mr. Hartnett, “is that you have diversity of opinion and diversity of expertise and you add a huge piece of both of those to us and it’s going to be tough not having you there to share your mind.”

“I’m going to miss you as my friend,” said Sandi Kruel, a board member who has known Mr. Hartnett personally for many years. “But I have to tell you that having an educator on the board with such immense passion for children was just amazing to have next to me.”

“I’ve served with you quite often as well,” added board member Susan Kinsella, “and I have to say—although I don’t always agree with you—your knowledge as an administrator, a social worker, your willingness to advocate for the children of this district and for improvements in education—it’s going to be sorely missed, because you come with a welcomed knowledge that’s going to be hard to replace.”

In the wake of Mr. Hartnett’s resignation, the school board has several options: It can appoint someone immediately to fill the remainder of Mr. Hartnett’s term, which expires June 30, 2016; it can appoint someone to fill the position for this school year until the elections in May 2015; it can hold a special election for a new board member immediately; or it can continue with just six board members until the elections in May 2015. No decision was made Monday.

Haitian Art Benefit at Christ Church

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Christ Episcopal Church in Sag Harbor will host its fourth Haitian Art & Handcraft Sale this weekend, July 18 to 20, to benefit the village of Chermaitre in partnership with the Vassar Haiti Project.  The event will take place in the Upper Parish Hall on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 4 pm and Sunday from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m. with an opening reception on Friday from 5 to 8 p.m.

The sale will feature 200 original paintings as well as a wide assortment of unique and affordable gifts, including silk scarves, jewelry, and iron sculpture.

The event is free and open to the public, with handcrafts starting from $5 and paintings from $50. All sales are 50-percent tax deductible.

The Vassar Haiti Project is a registered non-profit organization, based at Vassar College, in Poughkeepsie. For the past 13 years it has been supporting education, health and sustainable development in the village of Chermaître in mountainous northwestern Haiti. This is Christ Church’s fourth partnership with the Vassar Haiti Project and the previous sales hosted in Sag Harbor have been a tremendous success.

In 2008 the church’s sale raised over $30,000 to complete the building of a seven-classroom school. The second sale, in 2010, raised $26,000 toward the construction of a medical center, which has since opened and offers health care to thousands of Haitians in Chermaitre and neighboring villages. The 2012 sale, which again yielded more than $20,000, helped pay for a new kindergarten.

Proceeds from the 2014 sale will go toward building a community center that will support the women of the village who desperately want to support their families by creating small businesses from the crafts they will create and the coffee they are growing.

For more information, call (970) 946-7614 or visit the haitiproject.org.

Saddling Up for Soldier Ride

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Last year’s Soldier Ride. Photo by Michael Heller.

Soldier Ride The Hamptons, encompassing both 5-kilometer walks and a 30-mile bike ride, will return this Saturday, July 19, to the East End.

The annual fundraiser project for the Wounded Warrior Project is held in honor of U.S. Marine Lance Cpl. Jordan C. Haerter who was killed in Iraq in 2008.

The 30-mile bicycle ride to North Haven will set off from Ocean View Farm in Amagansett at 9 a.m. A pair of 5-kilometer walks will leave from Ocean View Farm and Marine Park on Bay Street in Sag Harbor at the same time.

Soldier Ride had its beginnings when Chris Carney, an East Hampton fitness instructor, rode his bicycle from Montauk to California to raise money for wounded soldiers. The fundraising idea was soon adopted by the Wounded Warrior Project.

Registration for this year’s event begins at 7 a.m., with  kick-off celebration at Ocean View Farm taking place at 8:30. There will be  tribute to Lance Cpl. Haerter at 10:30 in Sag Harbor, followed by the Lap of Heroes at 11. The day’s events will culminate with  picnic at Ocean View Farm at noon.

The fee to participate in the bike ride is $60. There is a $25 fee for walker. Participants in the bike ride are asked to raise a minimum of $75 for the Wounded Warrior Project. Those who raise at least $250 will receive a Wounded Warrior Project license plate cover. All participants will receive a commemorative t-shirt.

Donations can also be sent to Wounded Warrior Project, Attn.: Nicole Gordon/Soldier Ride Hamptons, 4899 Belfort Road, Suite 300, Jacksonville, Florida 32256.

For more information about signing up, visit the Soldier Ride the Hamptons website.