Tag Archive | "Sag Harbor"

Bay Street Theater to Make Sag Harbor Funnier this Weekend

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Joe Vecsey

Joe Vecsey, organizer of Bay Street Theater’s “All Star Comedy Show” this weekend.

By Gianna Volpe

When it comes to this weekend’s HarborFest, one “marina” in town will harbor chuckles and snickers rather than cabin cruisers and sailboats, and that is New York-based comic Marina Franklin, who will headline the first fall installation of Joe Vecsey’s “All Star Comedy Show” this Saturday, September 13, at Bay Street Theater at 8 p.m.

Ms. Franklin, a 15-year veteran of stand-up comedy, has appeared everywhere from Jay Leno to Chappelle’s Show. This weekend, she returns to Sag Harbor for her second “All Star Comedy” performance.

“I’ve also been there before working with Tom Papa, which was my first introduction to the theater,” said Ms. Franklin of her first visit to Bay Street. “Then Joe Vecsey booked me there last summer and they wanted to have me back, so I’m happy to return.”

Mr. Vecsey, another New York-based comic whose podcast “The Call Back” includes interviews with some of the industry’s brightest stars, said the upcoming event, which will take place at 8 p.m. on Saturday, reflects an expansion of the theater’s offerings.

“The person that came up with the idea was [Bay Street Theater's managing director] Gary Hygom,” Mr. Vecsey said about adding a second date to the annual “All Star Comedy Show.”

“He saw the show was getting more successful, so he said, ‘Why don’t we try one during HarborFest when people are in town and Sag Harbor’s more crowded. Then maybe you can get a DJ to incorporate music into it a little bit.’”

Mr. Hygom has long championed comedy at Bay Street Theater, according to Mr. Vecsey.

“Gary Hygom was the one who took me on when he hadn’t even seen me do comedy yet; the guy I’ve worked with from the very beginning,” Mr. Vecsey said of his creation of the show four years ago. “He really took a chance on the whole idea…I didn’t even need to rent the theater upfront, which is what you’d usually have to do for something like this.”

Mr. Vecsey, who will be the show’s least experienced comic performer at four years in the industry, said he is thrilled both with the show’s success and his ability to build a comedic bridge between Sag Harbor and the city.

“I’m really—obviously—happy that they would add a second show because it shows that it’s improving and becoming more successful,” said the 25-year-old stand-up comedian. “I’m also excited to bring comedy out there…With me being in the comedy scene in New York, I’m able to bring a very high caliber of comics…Not everyone can get certain names to come all the way out there.”

Mr. Vecsey, whose parents own a home on Shelter Island, said he initially sought to create the variety show to couple a quality venue with the rising stars of comedy in New York.

“I saw that the theater didn’t have a show for anybody who wasn’t a headliner, so I pitched them the idea,” he said. “This all star show features well-established up-and-coming comics that you may not have heard of or who are not necessarily famous just yet.”

Besides Ms. Franklin and Mr. Vecsey, comics who will perform at the theater’s variety show this Saturday at 8 p.m. include Akaash Singh and Giulio Gallarotti, comics who have both been featured on various MTV programs.

“As a kid I always wanted to try [stand-up comedy], but was too scared,” Mr. Gallarotti said of his long-standing passion for the oral art of stand-up. “Then while working in the city after I graduated from college, I signed up for a show and invited all of my friends so I couldn’t back out.”

That was five years ago. This weekend, the 28-year-old comic will perform at Bay Street Theater for his first time.

“I told Joe Vecsey I wanted to perform out there because when I was in college I used to go out to Amagansett all the time to teach tennis lessons,” he said.

Part of Bay Street Theater’s appeal to comedians lies in the mere fact that it’s a theater, according to Mr. Vecsey.?“The theater is such a cool, prestigious place to perform,” said Mr. Vecsey. “There’s not an overwhelming amount of venues that comedians like to perform at that are really nice and – obviously – Bay Street is one of them. No one who comes to the theater to perform is disappointed.”

Ms. Franklin received her master’s degree in theater from Syracuse University, which she said, makes her partial to theater-based performances, adding her career in stand-up comedy was born from a frustrating lack of theatrical outlets during her post-college move to New York City.

“I’m a person who’s always loved being on stage and I had people telling me I was really funny, so I veered off from theater and started doing stand-up,” she said.

Ms. Franklin, who has performed everywhere from South Africa to Australia, said her background in the fine arts make performances at Bay Street Theater a particular treat.

“Since it’s on a stage, usually the set is still there from the previous show, so that’s always fun because it’s not just you and a curtain,” she said. “And then the audiences that usually come to Bay Street come because they’re eager to see shows, so it’s not like in comedy clubs where people are out drinking and it may be a last-minute decision or they’re from other countries. Bay Street…is a little more localized to the Hamptons and people who are really into theater.”

Firefighters Battle House Fire in Bridgehampton

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Fire Department believe the house fire on Bridge Hill Lane on Sunday morning may have been caused by lightning. Photo by Stephen J. Kotz.

By Mara Certic

Members of the Bridgehampton Fire Department and neighboring departments spent several hours battling a house fire on Bridge Lane in Bridgehampton early Sunday morning, according to Chief Gary Horsburgh.

The chief said the department responded from an automatic fire alarm at the house on 10 Bridge Hill Lane at 1:52 a.m. Responders smelled smoke when they arrived and immediately requested assistance, he said.

The fire began in the basement and burned through the first floor, causing serious damage to the kitchen and the western side of the house, Chief Horsburgh said on Sunday morning. He added that heat and humidity made firefighting particularly taxing and tiring, and fire departments from Sag Harbor, East Hampton, Springs, North Sea, Hampton Bays and Southampton Village were all called in for mutual aid.

According to Chief Horsburgh the house is “still standing” but the western side is “pretty much gone.” No one was in the house when the fire began, Chief Horsburgh said, and there were no injuries.

The cause of the fire is still under investigation by the Southampton Town Fire Marshal, but Chief Horsburgh said he thought it could have been caused by lightning, as thunderstorms swept through the area that night.

Southampton Town Fire Marshal Brian Williams said on Wednesday that the investigation is ongoing.

 

Tommy John Schiavoni

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Tommy John Schiavoni, a social studies teacher at Center Moriches High School, who was elected North Haven Village Trustee in June and appointed to the Sag Harbor Board of Education last month, talks about his reasons for entering public service and the goals he hopes to achieve.

By Stephen J. Kotz

You were elected to the North Haven Village Board and then appointed to the Sag Harbor School Board in the space of two months. Why this surge in civic involvement?

With the retirement of [Trustee] George Butts I saw an opportunity to step into local government and try to effect some changes, but I do see them separately.

I had been considering the school board for some time. I liked the fact that there was an educator [Dan Hartnett, who resigned after selling his house in the district] on the board, and I was hoping an educator should step up. Then it became clear to me that maybe I should be the one to step, after being an educator myself for 25 years.

What are your chief goals as a member of the North Haven Village Board?

I am very concerned about tick-borne diseases. One of the first things I did was try to see what the numbers are. I wanted to have kind of baseline information in the village so we’d have what we need to move forward, so I went door to door. I surveyed 10 percent of the households, and I found that in 43 percent of those households someone had contracted some kind of tick-borne illness.

I would like the state health department to make North Haven a tick testing area, where they would do random sample surveys and tick drags in the spring and fall and test the ticks for disease. Whatever we do, hopefully we have a way of measuring the good or the bad.

 Have you had Lyme disease?

I had Rocky Mountain spotted fever when I was a kid and ehrlichiosis last summer, but never Lyme. My mom had babeciosis. I don’t think my family is different than any other family

What are some of the other issues affecting the village?

We just passed a resolution on helicopter noise, and I’m proud of that particularly. We have been showing up at the meetings, and Mayor [Jeff] Sander did a great job last week [at a public forum in East Hampton.] We’ve seen how the FAA works and we believe the airport would be best controlled by the East Hampton Town Board. We know there are a significant number of people in East Hampton who are not happy about the noise.

What are your plans for the school board?

I want to approach it from a teacher’s point of view. I don’t have an agenda. We have some real challenges with the tax cap and how to maintain and improve our programs when other things—fuel, insurance—aren’t capped.

I think it is a great school district, academically speaking. It’s on an upward trajectory. We’ve had a number of people who pay tuition to send their children to our schools. There have also been a number of people who move into the district to send their kids to Sag Harbor schools.

Will your new role in government help you in the classroom?

I teach participation in government and economics. There are going to be so many different ways that I can bring my experience to the classroom. I can help my students learn how to navigate the bureaucracies and become aware of the government that affects them most, which is their local government.

Your family runs G.F. Schiavoni Plumbing and Heating? How is it that you didn’t join your brothers in the family business?

Gettysburg. My parents took us to Gettysburg when I was about 10 years old. I was just enamored of it. It sparked something in me. My dad got one of the U.S. Parks Service guides to show us around. That experience with the Civil War was my first love of history—which by the way was a conflict over government—and that’s why I went into history.

Celebrating Maritime History in Sag Harbor

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The Joseph Labrozzi, Jr. men’s whaleboat team capsizes while racing to the finish line against the John K. Ott team during HarborFest 2013. Photo by Michael Heller.

By Stephen J. Kotz and Mara Certic

With the passage of Labor Day and the hectic summer season receding on the horizon, Sag Harbor residents can turn their attention to HarborFest, the annual celebration of its maritime heritage, which embarks on its second half century next week.

HarborFest kicks off this year with the “Whale of a Party” at the Sag Harbor Whaling and Historical Museum at 6 p.m. on Friday, September 12, and comes to a rousing conclusion on the afternoon of Sunday, September 14, with the whaleboat race finals at 3 p.m., followed by a clam shucking contest and lobster roll eating contest.

“HarborFest is the premiere event for the chamber and it’s been around the longest,” said Kelly Dodds, the president of the Sag Harbor Chamber of Commerce, which hosts the annual event. “It started out as the Whalers Festival, and at the heart of it, it celebrates Sag Harbor’s maritime heritage. Where else are you going to see whaleboat races?”

Coming as it does in mid-September, Ms. Dodds said HarborFest, besides being a draw for day trippers and weekenders, allows locals a chance to breathe a sigh of relief and after their typically busy summers and rediscover their village.

“The weather is great and local people aren’t working three jobs so they can come out enjoy what’s happening,” she said. “When you walk into HarvestFest, as you’re walking up the wharf, you hear the sounds of the whaleboat races, see the food and vendors. It’s a completely unique experience to Sag Harbor. There’s usually a nice breeze and a lot of smiles.”

Although most events are tried and true, there will be something new this year, the “Beach Blast” party and concert, which gets underway at 6:30 p.m. at Havens Beach. The event is being organized by Joe Lauro, the bassist with the group The Hoodoo Loungers, who has thrown a similar party on Shelter Island for many years. His band, which plays New Orleans style rhythm and blues and The Lone Sharks and The Forgiven, two groups that focus on roots rock and rockabilly, will perform. There is a suggested donation of $5 to help defray the cost of the event, which is being underwritten by the chamber and Mr. Lauro’s company, Historic Films.

Another new addition this year is a trolley service that will shuttle festival attendees from Havens Beach to Long Wharf and make a circuitous return trip, stopping at several historic village sites along the way, allowing passengers to take informal self-guided tours.

“It allows people to park their car for the day and get out and see the village,” Ms. Dodds said.

HarborFest Roundup

After Friday night’s party, the festival really kicks off on the morning of Saturday, September 13.

The Sag Harbor Farmers Market will be back at Bay Street on Saturday from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. offering some of the best local produce and seafood the East End has to offer. Just down the road, on Long Wharf, the U.S. Coast Guard’s Montauk station will offer tours of its cutter for those interested to learn the ins and outs of their rescue missions and day-to-day operations. Service men and women will give tours from 10 a.m. until 2 p.m. on Saturday.

For those fascinated more by recreational vessels, classic boats, from schooners to sailboats, will be on display along Long Wharf on Saturday from 10 a.m. until 4 p.m., courtesy of the East End Classic Boat Society.

But sometimes touring a docked boat just isn’t enough for some. Captain Don Heckman invites seafarers to board his tour boat American Beauty for a historic tour of local waters. The boat will leave Long Wharf at 11 a.m., 1 p.m. and 3 p.m. on Saturday, and embark on a picturesque rides, during which Capt. Heckman will discuss how Sag Harbor has evolved from the 17th century through today.

Budding historians should also make note of historical walking tours by “Sag Harbor Sidewalks” on both Saturday and Sunday. On Saturday at 10:30 a.m., a tour focusing on the Sag Harbor’s maritime history will meet at the windmill on Long Wharf. The following day, at the same time, a walking tour focusing on the women in Sag Harbor’s history will also meet on Long Wharf. Visitors will see homes of fascinating women including Betty Friedan, Sag Harbor’s benefactress Mrs. Russell Sage, as well as some of our lesser-known heroines.

There will be many opportunities over HarborFest weekend to witness fierce competitions, which begin on Saturday morning at 11 a.m. as kids go head-to-head in a corn shucking competition. Following that, the first round of eliminations in the highly anticipated Whalers Cup races will kick off at noon at Long Wharf and Windmill Beach. Teams of four—two rowers, a tiller-man and a harpoonist—race on a triangular course along the Long Wharf. The finals will be held on Sunday at 3 p.m.

Gastronomists will make note that the annual Clam Chowder Contest will be held on Sunday. Make sure to turn up on Long Wharf at noon to find out exactly who is this year’s crème de la clam.

Music, games, activities and more will take place throughout the HarborFest weekend. For a full schedule of events check out the Sag Harbor Express’s “Festival” magazine, which comes out on Thursday, September 11.

New Hunting Permits Proposed for North Haven

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By Mara Certic

Although reportedly overrun by deer and ticks, the North Haven Village Board is proposing a local law that would require all hunters in the village to acquire special permits.

The proposal comes several months after the New York State reduced the mandatory setbacks from residences for bow hunters from 500 feet to 150 feet.

“We wanted to exercise some control over that,” Mayor Jeff Sander said at the board’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 2.  “We wanted to make sure they had a track record with us,” he said.

Hunters must get a homeowner’s approval to hunt on their property. Apparently North Haven homeowners have already started receiving requests from hunters to take aim at deer on their land. “It’s also a cruelty issue—you want someone who’s really competent,” said Mr. Sander.

The proposed law states, “In all events any person authorized by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation shall also be authorized by the village and no person shall discharge any bow and arrow or similar weapon except while carrying a permit issued by the Village of North Haven.”

“To hunt in North Haven, you have to be approved by North Haven,” Mr. Sander said. A public hearing on the new law will take place at next month’s meeting on Tuesday, October 7, at 5 p.m. at the North Haven Village Hall.

Mayor Sander also gave a deer management update during Tuesday’s meeting. “We are primarily focused on reducing the herd,” he said.

He added that the village has a challenge “to continue to aggressively hunt in the season.”

The village is also still considering surgical sterilization of deer, which East Hampton Village will take part in this winter. Sterilization is an expensive process, Mr. Sander said, and costs approximately $1,000 per deer. He intends to invite White Buffalo Inc., the organization which perform the sterilizations, to North Haven and said that local volunteers could help keep the cost down.

The village is working on determining the best sites for four-poster stations, which apply insecticide to deer as they feed. The village will deploy 10 of them in early April, he said.

Trustee Thomas J. Schiavoni has been looking into Lyme disease throughout the village and will begin to do “tick drags” in the Autumn in order to measure the tick-density. Mr. Schiavoni said he has been in touch with Senator Kenneth P. LaValle’s office, to see if the state might be able to measure how many of the ticks are infected with diseases.

Mr. Schiavoni also announced the Southampton Hospital Tick Resource Center will hold an informational presentation at Bay Street Theater at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 20.

Sag Harbor Demolishes Dock

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The Village of Sag Harbor hired a private contractor to demolish the old dock at the former Remkus Fishing Station at the foot of the Sag Harbor-North Haven Bridge last month.

David Whelan Marine Construction was hired to remove the dock, which Mayor Brian Gilbride said was dilapidated and in danger of collapsing.

Mr. Gilbride said the village removed the bridge after receiving numerous reports about it being dangerous and after investigating the matter to determine that the dock was on village-owned property.

“That corner there is village property,” Mr. Gilbride said. “The old Remkus Fishing Station was built right in the middle of the old Route 114 back in the day. Everybody thought Remkus owned that beach because they had boats down there you could rent.”

The Art of Seaweed

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Samples of seaweed from Lake Montauk pressed and preserved by Dr. Larry Liddle. 

By Mara Certic

Dr. Larry Liddle initially didn’t intend for it to be art; it was science, another method for him to learn more about and document his findings. But some 50 years later, Dr. Liddle has found the beauty in seaweed by pressing the plants onto paper and turning them into works of art.

Dr. Liddle, who has studied algae for the better part of the last few decades, will give a demonstration of seaweed mounting at 2 p.m. on Saturday at the South Fork Natural History Museum in Bridgehampton.

In 1963, when Dr. Liddle was not quite a doctor yet, but a young man working on his master’s degree at the University of Chicago, he took a summer course in marine botany at Woods Hole in Massachusetts. The course involved field trips where students waded and snorkeled to collect various specimens. There, he learned how to press algae to document his trips.

The organisms had not been highly studied at that point, Dr. Liddle said in a phone interview on Friday. ascophyllumnodosum

“It was that summer; that was the reason that I got very interested in algae, and specifically seaweed, and also learned to press algae in the best way, and I’ve been doing it ever since,” he said. “So I enquired about going to graduate school for a Ph.D. to look into marine botany,” he explained.

And the rest is history. Dr. Liddle moved to Santa Barbara to continue his studies and eventually became a professor of phycology, the study of algae, at Southampton College, where he is now professor emeritus.

Dr. Liddle has collected seaweed from the Mediterranean, Japan and Thailand, to name a few of the places he has visited, and has pressed hundreds of different seaweeds from all over the world. Pressing seaweed, rather than preserving it chemically, allows scientists to test its DNA and perform species-level taxonomy. But it also creates a unique work of art.

“I like art and design quite a bit, informally,” Dr. Liddle said, “I had taken a lot of art courses in college, and so the idea of aesthetics was important to me.” He explained that in the field of biology, “how you present things is often aesthetically pleasing, in concert with being scientifically useful.”

Dr. Liddle has gone wading, snorkeling and even scuba diving to find seaweed to press, he said, but now he usually sticks to wading through water for his algal extractions. The process of pressing seaweed is lengthy but if done well, the finished product can last for decades, Dr. Liddle said.

It is important, he explained, to keep the seaweed hydrated and to give it oxygen. Dr. Liddle often brings seaweed back from the beach damp, rather than immersed but he brings fresh seawater along with him too. If the water is changed every few hours the specimens will last two or three days, but “the best thing is to start pressing them right away,” he said.

“It’s good to clean them off in the field, get rid of all the silt, and so on,” he explained. “Float them out in clean water, work them as much as you have to.” The real beauty in seaweed pressing is looking at the branching and the shapes of the plants—what in water looks like a slimy green blob can look just like a tree when pressed.

Dr. Liddle spreads seaweed out onto paper with his fingers, as much as possible, before he uses tools, which are more likely to damage delicate pieces of algae. Sometimes, he said, he doesn’t know what he has until he floats it in water, when he gets home. At a seaweed demonstration in Montauk last month, Dr. Liddle had a “green glob” that he was floating in water. “As I floated it out, it turned out it was attached to another seaweed,” he said.Dasyapedicellata

In 2010, Dr. Liddle helped create a seaweed collection for East Hampton Town’s Natural Resources Department. He retrieved all of the types of seaweed he could find in Lake Montauk and pressed them for the department; scanned versions are available on the town’s website.

More recently, Dr. Liddle took samples from Georgica Cove. “There’s an enormous floating mass of seaweed there,” he said, “it’s 25 to 40 meters wide.” Dr. Liddle said that it is green algae and “it is undoubtedly due to the run off of lawns, of nitrates and phosphates.” Dr. Liddle pressed those samples and gave one to the town for its archives. Another has been sent off for DNA testing.

Dr. Liddle has traveled the world, collected some unbelievably rare samples and preserved them for science. But, he said, “some of the most ordinary ones are just as beautiful.”

 Dr. Liddle will demonstrate seaweed mounting at 2 p.m. on Saturday, September 6, at the South Fork Natural History located at 377 Bridgehampton-Sag Harbor Turnpike in Bridgehampton. For more information visit sofo.org.

Sag Harbor Teen Excels at Local Art Program

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Sag Harbor’s Luca Vermeer learned to weave and weld at Snow Farm Summer in Williamsburg, Massachusetts. Photo courtesy of Snow Farm: The New England Craft Program. 

Sag Harbor teenager Luca Vermeer went to Williamsburg, Massachusetts, for two weeks this summer and returned with a new skill. Ms. Vermeer studied innovative mediums of arts and crafts at Snow Farm Summer, a program of The New England Craft Program.

Over the two-week program, Ms. Vermeer worked for six hours each day under the guidance of an artist. She put in additional time working in the studio. She lived with artists and other creative teenagers on a 50-acre 18th century farm and took weekend trips to Mass MOCA and the studio of renowned glass artist Josh Simpson.

During her stay, Ms. Vermeer created an extensive body of work and learned weaving and flameworking, the craft of melting glass on a tabletop torch to make small sculptures and glass beads.

East End Weekend: Labor Day Highlights

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Danielle Leef, "Flying Point Sunrise." Courtesy Southampton Artists Association.

Danielle Leef, “Flying Point Sunrise.” Courtesy Southampton Artists Association.

By Tessa Raebeck

With the East End at full capacity this Labor Day, what better way to unwind from a crazy summer than with a little party hopping? Here’s our highlights of what to check out this weekend:

 

With an opening reception on Sunday, the Southampton Artists Association Labor Day Show will show paintings, photography and sculptures by local artists.

The free reception is from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Levitas Center for the Arts in the Southampton Cultural Center, located at 25 Pond Lane in Southampton. The show runs through September 7.

 

The king of nerd humor and that stand-up comedian who doodles on television, Demetri Martin is coming to the Westhampton Beach Performing Arts Center on Sunday, August 31.

He earned an Emmy nomination as a writer on “Late Night with Conan O’Brien,” has been a correspondent on “The Daily Show with Jon Stewart,” and starred in the Ang Lee film “Taking Woodstock.” He also created and starred in the series “Important Things with Demetri Martin” on Comedy Central and wrote “This is a Book by Demetri Martin,” a New York Times bestseller.

Jeanelle Myers, "Untitled," for "Curious" at Ashawagh Hall.

Jeanelle Myers, “Untitled,” for “Curious” at Ashawagh Hall.

Mr. Martin’s performance at the will begin at 8 p.m. The PAC is located at 76 Main Street in Westhampton Beach. Tickets are $60, $75, and $90. For tickets and more information, call (631) 288-1500 or visit WHBPAC.org.

 

On Saturday at Ashawagh Hall in Springs, “Curious” exhibits a selection of contemporary artists exploring the concept of “Curious and Curiosity.”

Works include painting, sculpture, photography and mixed media. Out of 50 participating artists, five are from Sag Harbor: Ted Asnis, Barbara Freedman, Jonathan Morse, Jeanelle Myers and Pamela Topham.

The group show is curated by Ellen Dooley, a painter and mixed media artist focused on social and political commentary.

An opening reception for “Curious” will be held on Saturday, August 30, from 5 to 8 p.m. The gallery is open all weekend from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Ashawagh Hall, located at 780 Springs Fireplace Road at Old Stone Highway in East Hampton. For more information, call (631) 987-7005.

 

At the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor, Sheryl Budnik will show her work in “Turbulence II,” open from August 28 to September 18. An opening reception for the artist will be held on Saturday, August 30, from 5 to 7 p.m.

“The term ‘Lumen Naturae–the Light Within the Darkness of Nature’ refers to the Middle Age idea (Paracelsus c. 1493-1541) that knowledge springs from the Light of Nature,” Ms. Budnik said in a press release issued by the gallery.

“This light in Nature illuminates the consciousness and allows inspiration and intuition to rise from human subconscious,” the artist continued. “This is the core of my study; this is what I want to capture with my paint. Not paintings defined as ‘seascape’ or ‘landscape,’ but paintings so powerfully about nature that an open spirit responds with human emotion and an intuitive understanding of the immensity and power of Nature itself.”

The Romany Kramoris Gallery is located at 41 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call (631) 725-2499.

Sheryl Budnik, "Light at the End of the Day" will be on view at the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor.

Sheryl Budnik, “Light at the End of the Day” will be on view at the Romany Kramoris Gallery in Sag Harbor.

 

Local Leaders Accept Sag Harbor Express’s Ice Bucket Challenge

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County Legislator Jay Schneiderman and Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves accepted an ice bucket challenge issued by the Sag Harbor Express, which was dutifully administered by School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi and Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols on Friday, August 22. Photos courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

County Legislator Jay Schneiderman and Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves accepted an ice bucket challenge issued by the Sag Harbor Express, which was dutifully administered by School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi and Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols on Friday, August 22. Photos courtesy Sag Harbor School District.

By Tessa Raebeck

After being issued an ALS ice bucket challenge by the Times Review, Sag Harbor Express co-publishers Kathryn and Gavin Menu and consultant and publisher emeritus Bryan Boyhan boldly accepted the challenge on Thursday, August 21. View the video here.

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Mr. Thiele, who was allegedly out of town Friday, accepted the challenge in Marine Park on a beautiful morning Wednesday, August 27. Photo by Mara Certic.

While trying to hide their fear awaiting the buckets–aptly distributed by our intern, Sam Mason-Jones–the publishers challenged some local heavy-hitters: Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman, Sag Harbor School District Superintendent Katy Graves and New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr.

At the top of Pierson Hill on Friday, August 22, Mr. Schneiderman and Ms. Graves were doused with buckets of ice water–much to the delight of their respective staffs. In the district less than a month, new School Business Administrator Jennifer Buscemi selflessly accepted the opportunity to dump ice on Mr. Schneiderman, while Pierson Principal Jeff Nichols soaked Ms. Graves with a smile on his face. A full video recording of that endeavor is available here.

 

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