Tag Archive | "Shelter Island"

Southampton Town Council: It’s Bender & Glinka, Unofficially

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Southampton Town Council candidates Brad Bender, Frank Zappone, Stan Glinka and Jeff Mansfield

Southampton Town Council candidates Brad Bender, Frank Zappone, Stan Glinka and Jeff Mansfield

By Kathryn G. Menu

While the results have yet to be made official by the Suffolk County Board of Elections (BOE), according to Southampton Town Democratic Party chairman Gordon Herr, it appears that Independence Party member Brad Bender and Republican Stan Glinka have held on to their Election Day leads and will join the Southampton Town Board in January.

On Wednesday morning, an official with Suffolk County BOE chairman Anita Katz’s office declined comment on the race stating official results would not be available until later this week.

However, Herr said the counting of 879 absentee ballots was completed last Wednesday and that Bender and Glinka have secured seats on the town board.

Bender and Glinka bested Bridgehampton resident Jeff Mansfield and Southampton Town Deputy Supervisor Frank Zappone in the town board race.

“I am so very thankful to my friends, family, co-workers, colleagues, everyone who was so generous and encouraging during the campaign,” said Glinka, the town board race’s top vote getter, in a statement on Wednesday. “But more importantly I am thankful to the voters of this great town, my hometown of Southampton, for endorsing me with their vote. I look forward to continuing to listen to all the people and to working on finding balanced solutions to many crucial issues at hand.”

“As I committed to be your full time representative, I am currently winding down my workload and finishing off projects that are in progress,” said Bender, who is in the construction field. “I am excited about this next chapter in my life as a public servant. Working for you the taxpayers to solve problems and protect our community.”

“Grading” Sag Harbor Teachers: Administrators Discuss Goals Updates at Board of Education Meeting

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External Auditor Alexandria Battaglia, CPA, addresses the Sag Harbor Board of Education Monday night.

External Auditor Alexandria Battaglia, CPA, addresses the Sag Harbor Board of Education Monday night.

By Tessa Raebeck

“This has been a week of very special teams,” said Dr. Bonuso, interim superintendent for the Sag Harbor School District, congratulating the champion Lady Whalers field hockey team and the community team that helped pass the district’s two bond propositions.

Passing the bond was a key component of the district goals for the 2013/2014 school year, which Dr. Bonuso presented to a small group of people gathered Monday for the Board of Education (BOE) meeting.

Dr. Bonuso discussed the headway made on the first three of the district’s nine goals. He said progress was made on the first goal, improving academic achievement, through the resubmission and implementation of Annual Professional Performance Reviews (APPR), an evaluation system required by the state since 2012. It rates teachers as highly effective, effective, developing or ineffective, based on a 100-point scale. Half of the review relies on administrative observations, 10 percent on an “evidence binder” of components like electronic posting and 40 percent on test scores. For teachers whose students are not yet being tested regularly, that portion is determined by a project the district assigns in order to produce a score. Pierson Middle/High School Principal Jeff Nichols said the majority of Sag Harbor teachers were graded “effective.”

“We need to take a second look at this emphasis on testing, the over testing,” said Dr. Bonuso. “We need to take a second look at whether or not we have the materials and modules – let alone the mindset – to approach this in a manner where people are feeling good about what’s happening instead of anxious and discouraged.”

Susan Hewett, a parent, asked the board how teachers are rewarded or reprimanded based on their APPR performance. Dr. Bonuso replied teachers are not rewarded, but if they are determined to be “developing” or worse for two years, “we can literally remove them…even if they are tenured.”

If a teacher is rated “ineffective,” the superintendent said, “We don’t have to go through all the gyrations and all the bureaucracy that in the past we had to in order to remove you.”

The administrators reported on the progress of the newly formed shared decision-making teams, a component of the second goal: to build partnerships with the community. Two teams have met, one for the elementary school and one for Pierson. The district-wide team is looking for two replacements for members who left the committee prior to the first meeting.

Board member Mary Anne Miller questioned the inclusion of the middle and high schools in the same team, which BOE Vice President Chris Tice agreed should be revisited.

The third goal is to ensure sound fiscal operation and facilities management. The district added experienced security personnel and hours at both school, enhanced systems at school entryways and held its first lockdown drill of the year last week. External auditor Alexandria Battaglia said Monday the district is in good financial health, with an unassigned fund balance of about $1.4 million.

In other school news, BOE member David Diskin again asked the board to discuss starting to video record their meetings. Board President Theresa Samot said it was a good idea to look at further.

The next BOE meeting will be held December 2, at 7:30 p.m. in the Pierson Library.

With Something for Every Budget, In Home Helps Sag Harbor Shoppers Tackle Holiday Shopping

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David Brogna and John Scocco show their wares at In Home

David Brogna and John Scocco show their wares at In Home

By Tessa Raebeck; photography by Michael Heller

As Sag Harbor residents begin checking items off their holiday shopping lists, In Home is hosting a storewide clearance sale to ease the process, offering great deals on everything from sofas to stocking stuffers. With up to 70 percent off selected items, the sale includes regular clearance items, as well as closeouts from brand name manufacturers like Calvin Klein, Dansk and Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams.

Since 1996, In Home co-owners John Scocco and David Brogna have filled their Main Street shop with a carefully curated collection of furnishings for every room, occasion and budget. Brogna, an award winning Home Products Development Professor at the Fashion Institute of Technology (FIT), has an eye for design and a background as a buyer for companies like Macy’s. Scocco complements Brogna’s expertise with his own background in interior design and as an industrial film production manager. Together, they have built a longstanding store dedicated to both local and seasonal markets.

“We do have higher priced items,” said Scocco of In Home’s selection. “But most people don’t want to spend a lot of money these days, so we try to gear things for those shoppers.”

Brogna and Scocco have stocked their shelves with fun gift items under $25 or $50, “things that people would just come in and just want to pick up,” said Scocco.

One such item is the Corkcicle, a popular gift In Home was asked to restock after selling out last summer. For $23, the corkcicle is a long tube that resembles an icicle with a cork on top of it. After being chilled in a freezer, the corkcicle is inserted into a bottle of white or rosé wine. Unlike ice, the corkcicle won’t melt or water down your wine; instead, the bottle is both chilled and aerated upon pouring.

Another fun gift that was a hit this summer is the citrus sprayer, on sale at In Home for $15. After cutting the tip off of a lemon or lime, the citrus sprayer, which resembles the top of a spray perfume bottle, is placed on top of the fruit, allowing its owner to spray a mist of the juice directly from the lemon or lime.

“It’s really amazing,” says Scocco. “It really, really works.”

For under $20, In Home has a variety of other gift items from companies like Kate Spade and RSVP, including soap sets, candle sets, picture frames, personal care items and other home accessories. $10 can get you a chrome rabbit that doubles as a ring holder or a snow globe that’s also a ring game for children, as well as a variety of other “little fun stuff.”

“Of course, we do have a lot of other high end, more special items as well,”
said Scocco. “But our focus primarily is on the less expensive items.”

Brogna and Scocco are committed to keeping the shop stocked with reasonably priced gift items for the holidays, but they also hope to clear out the larger home furnishings in order to make room for next season’s stock.

“There’s a wide assortment of things,” said Scocco. “Some people feel intimidated, people that don’t really know us hear ‘Oh, that store’s really expensive…’ We do have a wide range and our pricing is really very, very fair and very well priced.”

The In Home team hopes to sell all the clearance furniture by January. Regularly priced at $1,980, a Stratton leather chair by Mitchell Gold + Bob Williams, modern with a dark, lightly distressed wooden frame and creamy stone leather seat, is on sale for $899. A soft, 100% Egyptian cotton king-sized blanket from Sferra’s home collection regularly priced at $250 is half off at $125. Framed mythological star maps of the astrological night sky, 23” by 23”, are marked down from $190 to $99. Also on sale are sofas, coffee tables, end tables, throw pillows and virtually anything else you need to decorate your home.

“There’s so much you can get overwhelmed with all the product that we have in our space,” Scocco said with excitement.

In Home is located at 132 Main Street in Sag Harbor. For more information, call 725-7900 or visit inhomesagharbor.com.

Sag Harbor Heroes Honored During Veterans Day Celebrations

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By Tessa Raebeck; photography by Michael Heller

In annual Veterans Day celebrations this week, Sag Harbor residents recognized that honoring village veterans is a year round duty, not a daylong event. Whether by visiting a monument, putting up a plaque or rubbing a gravestone, veterans and community members work to celebrate our heroes throughout the year, and those efforts were officially recognized with commemorative events Monday.

From Cub Scouts to World War II veterans, troops in uniform kicked off the holiday at the annual Veterans Day Parade through Sag Harbor Village Monday morning. After the parade, government officials and honored servicemen gathered outside the American Legion Chelberg and Battle Post 388 on Bay Street. Following speeches, about 40 residents headed over to the Ferry Road Cemetery in North Haven to hear village historian Joe Zaykowski present a lecture on the cemetery restoration and the lives of veterans resting there.

VFW Commander Roger King addresses the crowd at the American Legion

VFW Commander Roger King addresses the crowd at the American Legion.

At the American Legion Hall, Veterans of Foreign Wars Post 9082 Commander Roger King, who served two terms in Iraq, spoke of veterans’ “sacrifice for the common good,” and the symbolic significance of this year’s restoration of the federal holiday to November 11.

Veterans Day is always observed on November 11; however, in 2012, for example, the official federal holiday fell on November 12 because it was a Monday. King recognized the significance of the holiday returning to November 11 as it coincides with Armistice Day, which marks the settlement signed at the end of World War I on “the eleventh hour of the eleventh day of the eleventh month” of 1918.

Post Commander Marty Knab said the day’s events were intended not only to thank those who fought in battle, but also to thank and honor all who have served honorably in the military in any capacity, be it wartime or peacetime. While recognizing the ultimate sacrifice of those killed in battle, Knab hoped to also underscore the fact that all who served have made huge sacrifices for their country.

“Not all veterans have seen war,” Knab told the crowd. “But a common bond that they share is an oath in which they express their willingness to die defending this nation. Perhaps most significant in preserving our way of life are the battles that America does not have to fight, because those who wish us harm slink away in fear of the Coast Guard cutter, the Navy aircraft carrier, the Air Force Fighter Squadron, or the Army soldier on patrol.”

“Our country finds these men and women in the many small communities around our country, like our own Village of Sag Harbor,” he continued.

World War II Veteran Robert Riskin speaks in front of the American Legion

World War II Veteran Robert Riskin speaks in front of the American Legion.

Local writer and World War II veteran Robert Riskin, whose officer encouraged him to pursue a writing career, spoke of his visit in September to the World War II monument in Washington, D.C. Riskin’s trip was facilitated by the Honor Flight Network, an organization that honors veterans by transporting them to visit their memorials.

“I was not very excited about going,” admitted Riskin. “And then I thought, ‘Well, it’s free…so what the hell? I’ll try it.’”

Accompanied by Knab, Riskin enjoyed a motorcycle escort, bagpipe serenade and a welcoming reception from Naval Academy plebes on the daylong trip to Washington.

“I almost broke down, it was just such an incredible feeling of love,” he said, adding, “the memorial itself is just about one of the most fantastic things you’ll ever see … the emotions that it brings up are very, very strong.”

After the veterans’ speeches, New York State Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. presented a proclamation, “the state’s highest honor,” he noted, to Sag Harbor Village Mayor Brian Gilbride and dockmaster David Thommen commemorating Sag Harbor’s heroic moment in the War of 1812. Two hundred years ago in July 1813, British troops stationed off the Long Island coast attempted to invade and pillage the small seaside village of Sag Harbor, as they had done to countless towns across the island. Greeted by a group of residents and militiamen on shore, the British quickly retreated, recognizing that whatever goods they could plunder were not worth a battle against the spirited community.

New York State Assemblyman Fred Thiele, Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, Justice Julia Schiavoni, Sag Harbor Mayor Brian Gilbride and Sag Harbor Village Board Trustee Ed Deyermond honored David Thommen (second from right) for his work restoring the monument honoring the site of a Revolutionary War fort in Sag Harbor

Local officials honor Village Dockmaster David Thommen (second from right).

“We repelled the British. They never returned again until the British invasion of 1964,” Thiele joked, referring to The Beatles.

The assemblyman spoke of his own childhood playing around the old fort on High Street, but he never knew the story behind it.

“We all know it today and it’s because of the single-handed volunteer efforts of David Thommen,” said Thiele of the village dockmaster, who revitalized the fort – and the community’s knowledge of its own heroism — by dedicating a plaque and raising a flag there last July.

“This is about the veterans from the first militias in 1620 to the returning soldiers today,” said Thommen, accepting the proclamation.

Following the ceremony, North Haven Village Historian Joe Zaykowski gave a presentation to a crowd at the Ferry Road Cemetery on Route 114. Zaykowski successfully restored the gravestones there and, in doing so, unearthed the stories of some of North Haven’s earliest residents.

North Haven Village Historian Joe Zaykowski

North Haven Village Historian Joe Zaykowski at the grave of Revolutionary War Veteran John Payne, Sr.

Zaykowski spoke of the life and lineage of John Payne, Sr., a veteran of both the colonial French and Indian War and the Revolutionary War, who died 200 years ago in November 1813 and was laid to rest on Ferry Road. Payne’s gravestone was ineligible, cracked and scattered until Zaykowski’s restoration.

Zaykowski spoke extensively on the history of North Haven, with specific knowledge of lineages, burial techniques and even houses — several of which remain in the village today. His brother-in-law, Philip Reynolds, played period music from the Revolutionary War era on his saxophone.

In 1781, Payne received nine pounds, 19 shillings and one penny for his service in the Revolutionary War, according to Zaykowski.

“I cannot tell you that John Payne was a so-called war hero,” Zaykowski, himself a veteran of the Vietnam War, told the crowd. “That’s not important; He served his country, served it well I’m sure.”

In attendance to hear Zaykowski’s talk was Alexandra Binder, who lives on Shelter Island with her fiancé Beau Payne, a direct descendant of John Payne. Eager to learn more of her new family’s extensive local history, Binder was ecstatic to have the aid of Zaykowski, who has traced the Payne’s lineage all the way back to England prior to the colonization of America.

All for the East End Adds Avicii to August 19 Dance Party Lineup

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Nile Rodgers announces Avicii will join the All for the East End dance party this August during a press conference last Thursday at the Martha Clara Vineyards in Riverhead. 

By Tessa Raebeck

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Swedish sensation Avicii will join legendary producer and musician Nile Rodgers in an event that Rodgers is calling the “greatest dance party the East End of Long Island has ever seen.”

Presented by Bridgehampton National Bank, the Nile Rodgers Dance Party is the inaugural event of All for the East End (AFTEE), an organization formed to raise funds for local not-for-profit organizations. The concert will be held on Monday, August 19 at Martha Clara Vineyards in Riverhead and will benefit a range of East End not-for-profits.

Rodgers has produced such chart-toppers as “Like a Virgin,” “We are Family” and Daft Punk’s “Get Lucky,” which is currently the number one song in 79 countries (and counting). Along with curating the event, Rodgers will also be performing with his band, CHIC (perhaps best known for their 1978 disco hit “Le Freak”).

“Dance music unites,” said Rodgers at a press conference announcing the lineup last Thursday, June 6, at Martha Clara Vineyard. “Dance music is happy and the Nile Rodgers Dance Party will bring all ages to the dance floor.”

One of the world’s premiere acts, Avicii is the name behind such hits as “Fade into Darkness” and “Silhouettes.” Rodgers asked Avicii — with whom he is currently working — to headline because he is “a really hot young superstar that represents the next generation. That represents the continuation of music on the next level,” he said.

Rodgers plans to announce “other stars” who will be joining the festivities over the next few weeks.

The dance party will benefit a number of local not-for-profit organizations. As testament to the event’s commitment to the East End, 25 percent of all tickets sold are reserved for locals at the heavily discounted price of $50. General admission tickets are $149.

“Everybody thinks of the East End as a wealthy community and an affluent place,” said Rodgers. “But not for everybody. So, I thought this is the perfect opportunity to put together an event that’s accessible by all.”

“To have folks grace the Town of Riverhead with the presence of doing something like this is just phenomenal,” added Riverhead Town Supervisor Sean Walter.

AFTEE’s “primary purpose is to raise awareness of the role not-for-profit organizations play in making the East End of Long Island one of the most desirable places to live in the world and to establish a fund of new money that they will have access to through a grant process,” the organization said in a press release.

With over 1,075 registered not-for-profit organizations in the five East End towns — East Hampton, Riverhead, Shelter Island, Southampton and Southold — AFTEE plans to benefit a wide variety of local groups with proceeds from the show.

“What struck me is how difficult it is right now for not-for-profits to make it,” said Walter. “Many of them have failed. So, to have a group that has come together to create AFTEE is truly — you are truly doing God’s work here.”

“We are very excited about this inaugural concert,” said Myron Levine, AFTEE president and founder, in a press release issued at the event. “And we are very lucky to head out of the gate with such an amazing program produced by Nile Rodgers. We anticipate this will be the first annual AFTEE, Nile Rodgers Dance Party and the funds raised will help the not-for-profits here fulfill their missions.”

Organizers of AFTEE also note that Bridgehampton National Bank (BNB) was quick to commit as the presenting sponsor of the event.

“It’s important to us,” said Kevin O’Connor, the BNB’s president, director and CEO. “We can give back so much for everything that we’ve gotten from this community. I’m excited to be part of it.”

Rodgers has been a visitor to the East End since 1978, when he received his first large paycheck (after producing nine hit singles) and “bought a speedboat.” He now spends time in the area “every single year when I get a little break in my schedule.”

AFTEE plans to sell 5,000 tickets to the Nile Rodgers Dance Party, including the 1,000 that have been set aside for locals.

“All my friends are out here,” said Rodgers. “You know it’s going to turn into a party. We’re going to have a bunch of people up on that stage. We’ll have some of the hottest DJs, some of the hottest acts. It’s going to be crazy.”

Rodgers and Avicii have been working on several new songs that the DJ may unveil at the event.

“Back in the day, we used to write songs and we would perform them live. And based on the response of the public, we would decide what songs we wanted to put on the record,” Rodgers explained. “The fact that Avicii and I are doing things like that now in today’s world — for me, it’s so cool. It’s like, ‘We get to try this out?’ That’s like the coolest thing in the world.”

VIP, general admission, and East Ender tickets are available online at www.AFTEE.org.

Thiele: Working on Early Voting in New York

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Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele, Jr. announced he helped pass legislation that would strengthen the state’s electoral process by instituting early voting in all general, primary and special elections in New York.

“Voting is a fundamental right in our democracy, and we have to find ways to get more people involved in the process,” Assemblyman Thiele said. “Unfortunately, less than 46 percent of New York voters cast their vote on Election Day 2012. The Assembly’s legislation would provide voters with more opportunities to cast their ballots. Increasing voter participation is extremely important to me because it will make our democracy more representative.”

Under the bill, early voting would begin on the third Thursday prior to a general election and go right up until the Thursday before Election Day, providing voters with a two week time frame to cast ballots. In the case of a primary or special election, early voting would run from the second Thursday before regular voting until the Thursday prior to the actual election date, giving voters up to a week of early voting. Early voting polls would be open from 8 a.m. to 8 p.m. each weekday and 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. on weekends.

Local boards of elections would designate at least five early voting sites in each county. The local board of elections would automatically be designated as a polling place in each county. Boards of elections would also be allowed to staff early voting sites with appointed inspectors or their own employees. Early votes would be secured throughout the early voting period and the results would not be released prior to the close of polls on Election Day. In addition, the names of each early voter would be recorded to ensure that early voters are properly removed from Election Day poll books.

“This early voting reform would give disabled voters and those who work non-traditional hours more flexibility to cast their votes well ahead of

Election Day,” Thiele said, “it would also create shorter lines at the polls and give local boards of elections enough time to ensure that no one votes twice in the same election.”

If made law, New York would join 32 other states and the District of Columbia in permitting an alternative to in-person voting on Election Day, Thiele noted.

Nuzzi to Challenge Schneiderman in Suffolk County Legislature Race

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By Kathryn G. Menu

Southampton Town Councilman Chris Nuzzi announced this week he is interested in seeking the Republican nomination for Suffolk County Legislature this fall.

Nuzzi made the announcement during a screening in front of the Southampton Republican Committee Tuesday night.

If endorsed by the Republican committee, Nuzzi would be running against incumbent Jay Schneiderman, a member of the Independence Party, who is seeking his sixth and final term with the legislature.

On Wednesday, Nuzzi, a Republican, confirmed he has expressed an interest in running for county legislature and said he hoped to have the Republican Committee’s support. Their response to his interest, Nuzzi added, was “positive.”

Rumors first began swirling that Nuzzi would seek a seat on the legislature after Schneiderman was nominated by the East Hampton Republican Committee to run for supervisor, a candidacy Schneiderman ultimately turned down.

Nuzzi is prevented from seeking another term as a Southampton Town councilman due to term limits. On Wednesday, he said he believes he could bring a lot to the table as a member of the legislature and despite reaching his term limit on the town board felt his career in public service was far from over.

“I am still very interested and committed to public service,” said Nuzzi. “I would like to explore moving on to a different position with different challenges and one that expands the area that I serve.

In addition to Southampton and East Hampton towns, the county’s second legislative district extends to Shelter Island and into a portion of eastern Brookhaven town.

A resident of Southampton, Nuzzi grew up in East Hampton and said the South Fork as a whole is precious to him.

“The finances and the structure of county government is something that clearly remains a pressing issue,” said Nuzzi. “We have to ensure its financial solvency is maintained. We have made some very difficult decisions in Southampton that has caused a lot of debate but our government is working and we have not had to raise the tax levy in three years, we cut staff through attrition and we have been able to reorganize government where the community is well served through common sense solutions.”

Ensuring the county maintains its support of environmental initiatives on the South Fork, particularly with funding cuts, is critical, added Nuzzi.

On Wednesday, Schneiderman said that while no formal endorsements have been announced, he expects the support of his own party, as well as that of the Democratic Party.

Schneiderman added he would also seek the endorsement of the Working Families party. He was not asked to screen by the Republican committee.

“I will be running on my record which I believe is a strong record of achievement,” said Schneiderman, pointing to the widening of County Road 39 in Southampton, the new sidewalk on the Bridgehampton/Sag Harbor Turnpike and the creation of Sunday bus service as examples of local initiatives he championed in the legislature.

“I am in my tenth year and in 10 years I have been able to get resources for this district without increasing county property taxes,” he added.

 

 

Whalers Stomp League Rivals

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By Gavin Menu

With their floor general down, the Whalers have responded with an army 10 deep.

Jake Bennett, Patrick Sloane, Joey Butts and Forrest Loesch have played at or near the top of their games since junior point guard Ian Barrett went down with a knee injury last month. And the team’s bench continued to develop during two recent wins that pushed the Pierson boys basketball team’s record to a perfect 5-0 in League VIII play.

But the fun is just getting started and the Whalers’ gym is expected to be packed tomorrow night, January 11, as rival Bridgehampton is scheduled to travel up the turnpike for a showdown between schools with close ties and rich histories of basketball success.

The fate of the game was hanging in the balance on Wednesday, however, as the Killer Bees had to forfeit their game against Shelter Island on Tuesday with two players out for medical reasons and another two having been ruled academically ineligible. Bridgehampton head coach Carl Johnson said the two were “key” players but could not offer names under school policy. Johnson said the fate of the two players and whether they would be able to play on Friday would be determined today, January 10.

The Whalers, meanwhile, will travel to Stony Brook, the undefeated defending league champion, for what could be a showdown for first place on Tuesday, January 15.

To say this is a critical stretch of games for the Whalers is an understatement.

“I think we’ve moved on,” Pierson head coach Dan White said Tuesday night when asked about the team’s performance following the loss of Barrett, who is expected to miss another week. “But we’ll see when we play Stony Brook and Bridgehampton.”

The Whalers shutdown both Shelter Island and Southold in the last week, winning both games by large margins.  After getting off Shelter Island with a 52-38 win on January 4, Pierson came home and dominated Southold, winning 70-50 in a game where the team’s entire bench saw significant action.

Loesch led the Whalers against Southold, a strong program having a down year, with 20 points and Liam Doyle came off the bench to score 10. Sloane and Butts each chipped in with seven points as 12 different Whalers were able to score in the game.

Pierson can legitimately go 10 players deep when Barrett is in the line-up and gets scoring from across the board. Sophomore Robbie Evjen joined Loesch, Butts, Bennett and Sloane in the starting lineup on Tuesday, and Doyle led a team of reserves off the bench including regular reserves Jackson and Cooper Marienfeld and Aidan Kirrane.

During timeouts, White said he asked his players as the game turned into a blowout to work on their full-court pressure defense as well as strong ball movement on the offensive end.

“We scored 70 points, so I think they did a pretty good job,” White said.

White went on to say that to beat a team like Stony Brook, which is undefeated in the league as well and boasts a towering front line, his team would have to consistently work the ball into “the box” as he calls it, or the paint, and work to get layups instead of outside shots.

Tuesday was another high-energy game from Loesch, who had 15 points and zero fouls at halftime as the Whalers took a 43-22 lead into the break. The deceptively quick junior forward had 23 points against Shelter Island and is averaging 20 points per game in his last five games, all Pierson wins.

“He’s got an engine like you wouldn’t believe,” White said about Loesch, who spent most of the second half on Tuesday riding the bench his with his fellow starters. “Last year he was like a bull, but now he has some skill to go with that.”

Greenport AD Gulluscio Named Sag Harbor Athletic Director

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By Amanda Wyatt

Todd Gulluscio is a man used to wearing many hats. During his tenure in the Greenport School District, the Shelter Island native learned how to juggle responsibilities as its director of athletics, physical education department chair and dean of discipline.

This experience may serve Gulluscio well in January, when assumes his post as Sag Harbor’s new director of athletics, physical education, health, wellness and personnel.

Gulluscio was appointed to the position for the Sag Harbor School District at the board of education’s Monday, December 3 meeting, where he was warmly welcomed.

“This gentleman duly impressed me,” said Dr. Carl Bonuso, interim school superintendent. “He just has an enthusiasm that is infectious.”

“The lines that we received when we called for his references said, ‘You don’t have a good man. You have a great man,’” he added.

Chris Tice, vice president of the school board, said in January, the board would look for opportunities for parents and community members to meet with Gulluscio, such as at PTA and PTSA meetings. More information on times to meet with the new athletic director will appear on the school website at a later date, she said.

Gulluscio will serve a two year probationary term beginning January 2, 2013 and ending on January 2, 2015. He will earn a $90,000 salary annually.

For over seven years, Gulluscio has worked in the Greenport School District, and he has spent the past two and a half as its director of athletics. However, he said in an interview this week, teaching and playing sports have been his lifelong passions.

“Ever since I was a kid … [I knew] that’s what I wanted to do,” he said.

While attending Shelter Island High School, Gulluscio was an avid basketball and baseball fan. After graduation, Gulluscio headed to Florida Southern College in Lakeland, Florida, and while still an undergraduate, began coaching basketball, and eventually moved into coaching field hockey, soccer and other sports as well.

Gulluscio returned to the East End where he received a master’s degree in elementary education from Long Island University’s Southampton College, now Stony Brook Southampton. He also has an administration degree from Dowling College, as well as a permanent certificate in physical education.

A self-proclaimed “lifelong East Ender,” Gulluscio still lives on Shelter Island with his family. His wife, Jennifer, is a teacher in the Shelter Island school district, where his two children, Tyler and Caitlyn, attend elementary school.

Over the years, Gulluscio said he has noticed an increase in the variety of sports played at local schools.

“There are more travel leagues and more opportunities, actually, for kids than when I was growing up,” he said. “I think it’s fantastic, the amount of the opportunities there are for kids. I hope we can strengthen them.”

Gulluscio plans to do just that when assumes his new job next month. Still, he said he is aware that working in Sag Harbor will be a different ballgame than working in Greenport or even Shelter Island.

“When I get here in January, I’m really going to have to grasp hold of the Sag Harbor culture,” he said. “While they’re all small East End towns and villages, each one of them does things a little differently.”

“It may not necessarily be the biggest challenge, but it’s the first challenge,” Gulluscio said. “For me, it’s most important to assess where we are now when I come on board, and to listen to folks and see what the interests are.”

In addition to overseeing athletics, Gulluscio’s job will also involve a number of administrative duties. In this capacity, he will have to contend with new state mandates, such as Annual Professional Performance Reviews (APPR) and concussion management plans.

When asked whether he was concerned about how these new initiatives would affect his new job, Gulluscio said he wasn’t too worried.

“We’re all going through the process together, it’s not one thing on me,” he said. “For me, we’re all in this together — one big team.”

“I’m really looking forward to being here,” he added. “In January, I’m ready to hit the ground running.”

Shelter Island Farmland Preserved

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More than 57 acres of farmland was donated to the not-for-profit Sylvester Manor Educational Farm last week, a gift from Sylvester Manor owner Eben Fiske Ostby. As soon as the land was transferred to the Sylvester Manor Educational Farm, both Suffolk County and the Town of Shelter Island protected it as farmland through conservation support.

The gift brings total farmland owned by the locally governed nonprofit to over 83 acres and the total land preserved at Sylvester Manor to over 105 acres.

“Protecting a second parcel of the historic Sylvester Manor property is a remarkable achievement, both for the local and county governments and for the Sylvester Manor Educational Farm,” said Fiske-Ostby, the tenth generation proprietor of Sylvester Manor. “We now have a significant landholding preserved for future generations, and with it a crucial foundation for the Educational Farm and its mission. So many people contributed to making this effort a success, and I am both indebted to them and proud of the community that supported it.”

“We are truly thankful for the generosity of Eben Ostby and the commitment of the town and county in supporting a sustainable future for Sylvester Manor,” said the organization’s executive director, Cara Loriz. “With the help of Peconic Land Trust and our many supporters, we can now celebrate the realization of our initial preservation goals for this remarkable property.”

Sylvester Manor Educational Farm now operates on the 243 acre property, and as part of its mission is working to cultivate, preserve and explore the manor’s lands, buildings and stories, inviting new thought about the history and culture of food, both on Shelter Island and across the country.

The newly designated preserved farmland extends south along Manhanset Road from the historic farm field along the northern boundary of Sylvester Manor which was preserved in August. The new acreage is gradually being cleared of succession old field vegetation and supported cover crop and livestock this past season. The farm’s plans for the protected acreage include expanding livestock and row crop production, establishing orchards and making acreage available to lease farmers and community gardeners.