Tag Archive | "Southampton"

Breast Cancer Awareness Month

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October is National Breast Cancer Awareness Month, and Southampton Hospital and the Coalition for Women’s Cancers at the hospital have planned a slew of events to increase awareness and raise funds to support local breast cancer survivors, starting with the lighting of a Pink Ribbon Tree at the Southampton Chamber of Commerce on Wednesday.

Other events include a Breast Cancer Awareness Health Fair on Friday, October 3, at Most Holy Trinity Catholic Church in East Hampton from 11 a.m. to 2 p.m.;  the fourth annual Breast Cancer Summit at The Coral House in Baldwin from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. on Tuesday, October 7; the Give Where You Live Campaign Kickoff at Parrish Memorial Hall at Southampton Hospital at 4 p.m. on Wednesday, October 8; Look Good, Feel Better at the Hampton Bays Library on October 14 from 1 to 3 p.m. the Shelter Island 5k Run/Walk on October 18 at 11 a.m. at Crescent Beach on Shelter Island; a Birdhouse Auction at the Southampton Social Club on Elm Street at 6 p.m. on October 18; a Shopping Benefit at Calypso at 21 Newtown Lane in East Hampton on October 23 from 5 to 7 p.m.; and Free Makeovers for Breast Cancer Survivors at Macy’s in Hampton Bays on October 24 from 10 a.m. to 7 p.m.

In addition, there will be three Charity of the Month promotions. Sabrosa Mexican Grill on Montauk Highway in Water Mill will donate the total bill amount for the 100th customer each day in October to the Coalition for Women’s Cancers. The Deborah Thompson Day Spa at the Plaza in Montauk will donate 10 percent from all treatments during the month, and Panera Bread on Montauk Highway in Hampton Bays will donate 100 percent of the proceeds of the sale of pink ribbon bagels to the coalition during the month.

For more about the various breast cancer awareness events, call (631) 726-8715.

Regional Ban on Plastic Bags Could Be in Place by Earth Day

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By Mara Certic

The days of deciding between paper and plastic may be dwindling here on the East End, as local municipalities make plans to join together to enforce a regional ban on single-use plastic bags.

According to Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, the East End Supervisors and Mayors Association is considering a ban on the bags that would span from Montauk Point to beyond the Shinnecock Canal.

Southampton and East Hampton Villages both banned the bags back in 2011, but none of the local towns have managed to adopt such a law thus far. Southampton Town has considered similar legislation in the past, but those discussions were initially struck down by the former Republican town board before they could be taken to public hearing.

Dieter von Lehsten, co-chair of Southampton’s Sustainability Committee, has been one of the people spearheading the movement to ban plastic. According to Mr. von Lehsten, the single-use plastic bag is the largest consumer item in the world.

In America, 105 billion single-use plastic bags are distributed every year; 23 million of those are given out in the Town of Southampton, and it is estimated that only 3ee to 4 percent of those bags are recycled, he said.

The rest of the bags are floating around, somewhere, Mr. von Lehsten said. Many of them get buried in landfills, but a large number of them are found in our bays and oceans.

A lot of plastic pollution shows up in large slow-moving currents called gyres. A large island of plastic has built up in the North Pacific Gyre. “In the center of this gyre sits an island, imagine twice the size of Texas,” Mr. von Lehsten said. According to Greenpeace, this trash island is made up “of everything from tiny pieces of plastic debris to large ghost nets lost by the fishing industry.”

Plastic contains toxic chemicals, which then get passed on to animals when they mistake the small petrochemical particles for food. According to Greenpeace, plastic often then accumulates in animals’ digestive tracts, essentially choking them. Sometimes, animals who mistakenly ingest plastic starve and die from a lack of nutrition. And now plastic has found its way into our food chain, Mr. von Lehsten said.

Mr. von Lehsten said he has been met by overwhelming support among community members and legislators when he has discussed this ban with individuals and civic associations.

“I had meetings in Southold, Shelter Island and East Hampton and talked to all councils in these areas and they are going to vote for the ban of the bag,” Mr. von Lehsten said to the members of the Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee on September 22.

“It is now just a question, who makes the first step,” he said. “It is another one of those dances of the politicians.”

“So now we really want to force the issue,” Mr. von Lehsten said, and added he has started a letter campaign to get individuals and associations to ask the town boards to ban the bags.

The sustainability committee is suggesting the BYOB campaign—bring your own bag. One day, he would like to see a ban on all plastic and Styrofoam, he said, “but you’ve got to start somewhere, and the worst culprit is the single-use plastic bag.”

Mr. von Lehsten hinted heavily that he suspects public hearings on the matter to begin at some point in October. Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst said a public hearing will be held in the first week of December in Southampton, with the hope of implementing the law by Earth Day, April 22, 2015.

After almost 100 municipalities in the Golden State prohibited the use of the synthetic bags, California Governor Jerry Brown signed the country’s first statewide ban on single-use plastic bags last week.

“Judy Gold: 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother” Comes to Bay Street Theater

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Judy Gold; Leslie E. Bohm photo.

Judy Gold; Leslie E. Bohm photo.

By Annette Hinkle

As a stand-up comedian, Judy Gold has gotten a lot of mileage out of Jewish mothers — particularly her own.

“I’m pretty sure I’m a comedian because of her contribution,” admits Ms. Gold. “I didn’t get a lot of affection, but she’s really funny, my mother, and says things that are so outrageous I’d be a fetal position if I didn’t laugh about it.”

Yes, the image of the neurotic, overprotective, self-sacrificing Jewish mother may be fertile ground for good humor, but Ms. Gold — A Jewish mother herself to sons Henry, 18, and Ben, 13 — wondered if there might be more to the matter beyond the punch line.

That part of the story is told in “Judy Gold: 25 Questions for a Jewish Mother,” Ms. Gold’s one woman show which she brings to the Bay Street Theater in Sag Harbor on Saturday, October 11.

“It’s the story of me becoming a mother,” explains Ms. Gold, an actress and writer who took home two Emmy Awards for writing and producing “The Rosie O’Donnell Show.” “Initially, I wanted to see how I fit into that stereotypical Jewish mother role. I was always criticized by the Jewish press for promoting a stereotype. But it’s not exactly a stereotype if it’s coming out of my mother’s mouth.”

So Ms. Gold and playwright Kate Moira Ryan hit the road in an effort to meet with a cross-section of Jewish mothers to see if their philosophies, motivations and relationships were similar to her own. Over the course of five years, they traversed the country talking to 50 Jewish women about their lives and experiences as spouses and mothers.

“We interviewed women all over and they were so not like each other,” says Ms. Gold. “It was an incredible journey, I can’t even tell you.”

Ms. Gold and Ms. Ryan turned those interviews into a book titled “25 Questions for a Jewish Mother.” Ms. Gold’s monologue, based on the book, premiered Off-Broadway in 2006 at the Ars Nova Theater in New York City. In it, Ms. Gold assumes the identity of many of the women she interviewed. The show won the 2007 GLAAD award for Outstanding New York Theater and while she is well-known for her comedic abilities, Ms. Gold notes there are some seriously poignant moments in this piece.

“It’s funny, but it’s also intense,” she explains.

Among the Jewish mothers Ms. Gold and Ms. Ryan met in their travels was a group of ultra Orthodox women living in Queens. Ms. Gold recalls that the husband of one of the women stood by the stairwell all evening listening to their discussion.

“When we were leaving, he said ‘I’ve known most of these women for over 40 years, and I feel like I now know them for the first time,’” says Ms. Gold.

The reason for that was simply because no one had thought to ask them the questions before.

“I feel it wasn’t like an interview to psychoan1alyze them, but an opportunity for them to tell their side of the story,” says Ms. Gold. “I felt like for the first time in a long time, if ever, these women were being asked about their lives instead of their kids or their husbands’ lives.”

One Orthodox woman shared a story about her daughter who was dating a man she didn’t approve of.

“She was so mean to the guy they broke up,” says Ms. Gold. “From the mother’s point of view this was the best thing she could do for the daughter.”

But when Ms. Gold interviewed the daughter, she told her that she never forgave her mother for driving the man away.

Mothers insinuating themselves in their children’s relationships came up more than once in her travels, and Ms. Gold tells another story of a mother who virtually disowned her son after he married and had children with a non-Jewish woman.

“She cut it off and sat Shiva as if they were dead,” says Ms. Gold. “A few years later, the mother was waiting in a doctor’s office with another woman who had little kids with her. She commented on how well behaved the kids were. The doctor came out and yelled for Mrs. Hoffman, and they both got up.”

“She realized those were here grandkids and that woman was her daughter-in-law,” adds Ms. Gold. “She never went to that doctor again.”

And she never talked to her son and daughter-in-law or saw her grandchildren again.

While the women all had very unique and personal stories to share, Ms. Gold found there was one common denominator among them all.

“When we did the interview at a home, they always had food,” says Ms. Gold who adds that the show also includes extremely moving stories shared by Holocaust survivors and their children.

It’s hardly the sort of material one would expect from a stand-up comedian, but Ms. Gold stresses that this monologue offers audiences a much different experience.

“I love doing standup, but I have more dimensions than just telling jokes,” says Ms. Gold. “In a comedy club you have to keep them laughing every 30 seconds. But when you go in a theater, people are sitting and ready to listen.”

And with “25 Questions For A Jewish Mother,” audiences will get an earful. While the show offers an in-depth look at one very specific demographic, Ms. Gold is pleased to report that it has universal appeal.

“So many people come up to me and say ‘I’m not Jewish, but I have the same mother,” says Ms. Gold. “It doesn’t matter where you come from, it’s a story many people can relate to.”

“Judy Gold: 25 Questions For A Jewish Mother” is Saturday, October 11 at 8 p.m. at Bay Street Theater, Long Wharf, Sag Harbor. Tickets are $59 to $89. Call 724-9500 to reserve or visit baystreet.org.

Glackens & Barnes at The Parrish Art Museum

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William Glackens (American, 1870–1938) The Little Pier, 1914 Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia and Merion, PA; BF497

William Glackens (American, 1870–1938) The Little Pier, 1914 Oil on canvas 25 x 30 inches The Barnes Foundation, Philadelphia and Merion, PA; BF497

The Parrish Art Museum’s “Curator’s View” series will present an illustrated lecture about the lifelong friendship between artist William Glackens and the collector Albert C. Barnes by Judith Dolkart, The Mary Stripp and R. Crosby Kemper Director of the Addison Gallery of American Art at the Phillips Academy in Andover, Massachusetts, on Saturday, October 4 at 11 a.m.

Ms. Dolkart served at The Barnes Foundation as Gund Family Chief Curator and Deputy Director of Art and Archival Collections prior to her appointment at the Addison. In the talk, presented in conjunction with the Museum’s current special exhibition, “William Glackens,” Dolkart will share her unique perspective on the relationship between the American artist and Mr. Barnes.

Born in 1870 in Philadelphia, Mr. Glackens met Mr. Barnes when the two attended Philadelphia’s Central High School. Years later, Mr. Barnes, who amassed great wealth in chemical ventures, would send Mr. Glackens to Paris with $20,000 to purchase art by Pierre Auguste Renior and Alfred Sisley. Mr. Glackens returned with 33 paintings, prints and watercolors including work by Paul Cézanne, Vincent van Gogh, Maurice Denis, Pablo Picasso, and Camille Pissarro. This began the alliance that would create one of the most important collections of modern art in America.

The lecture compliments The Parrish Art Museums exhibition of Mr. Glacken’s own artwork, the first comprehensive survey of the artist’s work since 1966. That exhibition will be on view through October 13.

For more information, visit parrishart.org.

Raise Your Voice: Southampton African American Film Festival October 2-5

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Grammy award winning hip-hop artist and poet J. Ivy will join Charles Certain and the Certain Moves Jazz Band for an evening of spoken word and jazz at the Southampton Cultural Center as a part of the Ninth Annual Southampton African American Film Festival.

Grammy award winning hip-hop artist and poet J. Ivy will join Charles Certain and the Certain Moves Jazz Band for an evening of spoken word and jazz at the Southampton Cultural Center as a part of the Ninth Annual Southampton African American Film Festival.

The 9th Annual African American Film Festival “Raise Your Voice” presented by the Southampton African American Museum will be held October 2 through October 5 highlighting African-American filmmakers, actors, personalities, musicians and performers featuring a line-up of critically acclaimed, thought-provoking feature films, documentaries, shorts, jazz and spoken word.

Opening night will feature the film “Fruitvale Station,” a 2013 film starring Michael B. Jordan by director and screenwriter Ryan Coogler based on the events leading to the death of Oscar Grant, a young man killed by Bay Area Rapid Transit (BART) police officer Johannes Mehserle at the Fruitvale Bay Area Rapid Transit Station in Oakland, California. The film won awards at both the Sundance and Cannes film festivals and will be screened at the Southampton Arts Center at 6 p.m., followed by a panel discussion.

On Friday, October 3, from 7 to 9 p.m. the Southampton Cultural Center will host an evening of performances by Grammy award winning hip-hop artist J. Ivy and Charles Certain and his Certain Moves Jazz Band. Throughout the day on Saturday, October 4 and Sunday, October 5, films including “Trails of Muhammad Ali,” “Booker’s Place: A Mississippi Story” and “Belle” will be screened at the Southampton Arts Center.

For more information, visit southamptonafricanamericanmuseum.org.

“Still Alice” Will Close Hamptons International Film Festival

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Kristen Stewart and Julianne Moore in "Still Alice."

Kristen Stewart and Julianne Moore in “Still Alice.”

The Hamptons International Film Festival (HIFF), October 9 through October 13, announced this week the festival will close with the U.S. premiere of “Still Alice,” on Monday, October 13 at Guild Hall in East Hampton. The film stars Julianne Moore as Alice Howard, a happily married linguistics professor who is idsgnosed with early-onset Alzheimer’s. The film also stars Kristen Stewart and Alec Baldwin.

“St. Vincent” will open the festival at Guild Hall on Thursday, October 9. Starring Melissa McCarthy as Maggie, the film centers on a single moves into a new home in Brooklyn, leaving her 12 year-old son in the care of a new neighbor, Vincent, played by Bill Murray. The film is directed by Theodore Melfi and also stars Naomi Watts.

“We are really looking forward to opening our 22nd edition with Theodore Melfi’s charming “St. Vincent” starring Bill Murray in a role he was born to play. Closing our festival with the US premiere of “Still Alice” featuring a mesmerizing performance from one of the great actors of our generation, Julianne Moore, is sure to be a moving end to five days of films from around the world,” said HIFF Artistic Director David Nugent.

For more information, visit hamptonsfilmfest.org.

 

Bagging Plastic

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PIC DAVID CRUMP.TESCO PLASTIC BAGS

The Southampton Town Board will schedule a public hearing on a proposed plastic bag ban during the first week of December, Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst announced at a Bridgehampton Citizens Advisory Committee meeting on Monday.

Dieter von Lehsten, the co-chair of the Southampton Town Sustainability Committee, gave a presentation to the CAC about the proposed ban. Southampton Town uses 23 million plastic bags every year, he said, and he estimates the town only recycles about 3 million of them.

“That still leaves 20 million bags that are somewhere,” he said. Plastic bags never disintegrate entirely, he explained, but instead break down into smaller and smaller pieces. Research has shown that fish eat the tiny plastic particles, which are now a part of the food chain.

Mr. von Lehsten also said the latest research has shown there is now more plastic in the ocean than plankton.

“It is a movement which is better to do from the bottom up,” he said, adding “the politicians depend on us because we are the electorate.” In California, 78 municipalities banned the bags, he said, which has resulted in a state-wide ban.

“We want to force the issue,” he said. Mr. von Lehsten and the sustainability committee have started a letter campaign to the town board to tell it to ban the bags.

Ms. Throne-Holst said the East End Supervisors and Mayors Association are on board with a regional ban. “I think it has a lot of value if it’s done regionally,” she said of the ban.

The East Hampton Town Board has not yet set a date for an informational meeting on a potential plastic bag ban but it will be in the next few months, Supervisor Larry Cantwell said on Tuesday.

According to Ms. Throne-Holst, the plan is to have the implementation date be Earth Day, Wednesday, April 22, 2015.

Hyperlocal Plans for Harbor Market in Sag Harbor

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Proprietors Paul and Susana Del Favero in front of the soon-to-be Harbor Market and Kitchen. Michael Heller photo.

Proprietors Paul and Susana Del Favero in front of the soon-to-be Harbor Market and Kitchen. Michael Heller photo.

By Emily J. Weitz

Everybody wants to know what’s to become of the iconic little market on the corner of Division and Henry streets in Sag Harbor. Since the 1930s, this building has provided the community with an easy, casual spot to grab meals or linger over the paper. Chef Paul Del Favero and his wife Susana Plaza Del Favero want to keep that heritage alive with Harbor Market, offering a revitalized menu that takes into account the local, seasonal, and health-conscious demands of the community.

Mr. Del Favero is no stranger to the East End. After training at La Varenne Ecole de Cuisine in Paris and working in both France and New York City, he landed a job as the head chef at Nick and Toni’s in East Hampton in the early 1990s and worked  at the South Fork culinary institution for seven years. He then went on to several other endeavors out here—including serving as the executive chef at The Maidstone Arms—before his friend Bobby Flay offered him a position in his new restaurant in Las Vegas. The couple, with their two young sons in tow, moved to Las Vegas, where Mr. Del Favero settled into a whole different pace of life and business.

“It was a whole new world for me,” said Mr. Del Favero. “We had a staff of 45 in kitchen and 70 in the dining room. We got rave reviews, I got a Michelin star there, and learned a lot.”

The Del Favero family originally thought their stay in Las Vegas would be three to five years, and they ended up there for nine. But as their children got older, the family realized they missed the small town life.

“We missed that local, small town feeling,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero. “This will literally be a mom and pop market. We are excited to make it small and make it ours, and to be a part of the neighborhood and community.”

The Del Faveros know that Espresso was a treasured part of the Sag Harbor community, and they hope to maintain the clientele who have loved it, while also casting a wider net. The menu will change, of course, but the idea of offering food that you can take home to your family will not. They still plan to serve the breakfast crowd, with coffee and egg sandwiches starting at 7 a.m. They still plan to reach the after-school crowd, and the moms and dads picking up dinner for later.

But there will be some changes. They’re installing a wood-burning oven, in which they plan to do a lot of roasted vegetables and proteins.

“We want to serve healthy food,” said Mr. Del Favero, “and to keep vegetarians in mind. We want to sell fresh produce and dairy, and as much local produce as we can when it’s in season.”

In that sense, Harbor Market really intends to be a market, with lots of sundries on its shelves. They are growing their list of local farmers, and hope to offer not just local produce, but products like farm fresh eggs.

“We want to fill our shelves with local products,” said Mr. Del Favero. “And we want to offer food that is not processed. No GMOs, healthy meats, organic vegetables – we want to offer better quality that is eco-friendly.”

Of course, healthier foods come with a higher price tag, and the Del Faveros want to be mindful of keeping prices reasonable.

“We want to give people a bargain,” said Mr. Del Favero. “This is restaurant quality food that you can take home.”

Variety is a key part of the menu, with items influenced by Mr. Del Favero’s classical French training, his wife’s Spanish heritage, and the American, Italian, Mexican, and Southwest flavors he’s drawn on in his past restaurant endeavors.

The family is excited to be part of the community, hoping one day to live in the house attached to the restaurant, and maybe to send their kids to Sag Harbor schools.

“Sag Harbor is such a tight little community,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero, “and we want to be a part of it. People were so concerned about us missing the last summer season, but that’s not what we’re about. We are not a pop-up summer business. We want to be a year round local neighborhood market.”

They’re looking at a few more months of renovations, so the couple is estimating a soft opening sometime in January or February.

“We’ll probably open on a Tuesday in February during a snowstorm,” said Ms. Plaza Del Favero.

Now that’s local.

 

Watershed Weekend with The Parrish Art Museum & The Nature Conservancy

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WalkingTourAccabonac

Accabonac Harbor. Image courtesy of The Nature Conservancy. 

The Parrish Art Museum has partnered with The Nature Conservancy in two events meant to highlight one of the most pressing environmental issues facing the East End of Long Island: water quality.

On Saturday, September 27 at 11 a.m., the museum will host “Watershed: Artists, Writers, Scientists and Advocates on Our Waters” in the Lichtenstein Theatre. The PechaKucha style talk will feature eight speakers including LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) accredited architect Glynis Berry who serves on the Suffolk County Planning Commission and is with the U.S. Green Building Council; Dr. Chris Gobler, a professor at SUNY Stony Brook’s School of Atmospheric and Marine Sciences and an expert on the topic of harmful algal blooms; Nature Conservancy Long Island Executive Director Nancy Kelley, Hampton Bays bayman Ken Mades; Southampton resident and Executive Director of the Lloyd Magothy Water Trust, Thomas McAbee; Southampton Town Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst; Edwina von Gal, East Hampton-based landscape architect and President of the Azuero Earth Project whose mission is to preserve the earth’s ecosystems, protect biodiversity, and promote healthy communities; and artist and teacher at the School of Constructed Environments at Parsons the New School for Design in New York City, Allan Wexler, whose work in the fields of architecture, design, and fine art explores human activity and the built environment.

The museum will follow the discussion with a Sunday, September 28 Walking Tour of Accabonac Harbor, one of the regions most diverse tidal marsh systems. Both programs are being presented in conjunction with The Parrish Art Museum’s ongoing exhibition, “Platform: Maya Lin.”

For more information, visit parrishart.org. 

Noyac Civic Council Celebrates 60 Years With Gala to Benefit Ambulance Corps

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The Noyac Civic Council will celebrate 60 years of community services with a gala celebration on Saturday, September 27 from 6 to 10 a.m. at Harlow, 1 Long Wharf in Sag Harbor. The event, which is $90 per person with tickets available at The Whalebone General Stone, will feature cocktails and hors d’oeuvres, as well as a sit down dinner with all proceeds benefiting the Sag Harbor and Southampton Volunteer Ambulance Corps. The civic council is offering a group discount rate of $80 per person for purchases of six or more tickets at one time. For more information, email cnmn@optonline.net.