Tag Archive | "Southampton Hospital"

New Hunting Permits Proposed for North Haven

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By Mara Certic

Although reportedly overrun by deer and ticks, the North Haven Village Board is proposing a local law that would require all hunters in the village to acquire special permits.

The proposal comes several months after the New York State reduced the mandatory setbacks from residences for bow hunters from 500 feet to 150 feet.

“We wanted to exercise some control over that,” Mayor Jeff Sander said at the board’s monthly meeting on Tuesday, September 2.  “We wanted to make sure they had a track record with us,” he said.

Hunters must get a homeowner’s approval to hunt on their property. Apparently North Haven homeowners have already started receiving requests from hunters to take aim at deer on their land. “It’s also a cruelty issue—you want someone who’s really competent,” said Mr. Sander.

The proposed law states, “In all events any person authorized by the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation shall also be authorized by the village and no person shall discharge any bow and arrow or similar weapon except while carrying a permit issued by the Village of North Haven.”

“To hunt in North Haven, you have to be approved by North Haven,” Mr. Sander said. A public hearing on the new law will take place at next month’s meeting on Tuesday, October 7, at 5 p.m. at the North Haven Village Hall.

Mayor Sander also gave a deer management update during Tuesday’s meeting. “We are primarily focused on reducing the herd,” he said.

He added that the village has a challenge “to continue to aggressively hunt in the season.”

The village is also still considering surgical sterilization of deer, which East Hampton Village will take part in this winter. Sterilization is an expensive process, Mr. Sander said, and costs approximately $1,000 per deer. He intends to invite White Buffalo Inc., the organization which perform the sterilizations, to North Haven and said that local volunteers could help keep the cost down.

The village is working on determining the best sites for four-poster stations, which apply insecticide to deer as they feed. The village will deploy 10 of them in early April, he said.

Trustee Thomas J. Schiavoni has been looking into Lyme disease throughout the village and will begin to do “tick drags” in the Autumn in order to measure the tick-density. Mr. Schiavoni said he has been in touch with Senator Kenneth P. LaValle’s office, to see if the state might be able to measure how many of the ticks are infected with diseases.

Mr. Schiavoni also announced the Southampton Hospital Tick Resource Center will hold an informational presentation at Bay Street Theater at 10 a.m. on Saturday, September 20.

East End Experiences Lone Star Menace

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The distinctively marked lone star tick. Photo from www.sciencedaily.com

The distinctively marked lone star tick. Photo from www.sciencedaily.com

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An increase in the number of lone star ticks poses a threat.

By Sam Mason-Jones

The summer of 2014 has witnessed a rise in the transmission of tick-borne diseases, which has coincided with the prevalence of aggressive lone star ticks. It continues a trend which has seen a 126 percent increase in cases of ehrlichiosis, a diseased caused solely by lone star ticks, in the state of New York since 2010.

Ticks have posed a long-standing problem to the people of Long Island. The East End, in particular, has suffered, with the vast majority of its residents having experienced ticks- whether through the occasional bite or by contracting one of the many tick-borne diseases, the most common being Lyme disease.

The first months of this summer, though, have seen a distinct rise in public wariness and worry about the dangers spawned by these belligerent arachnids. Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. noted,  “The extent and severity of the tick-borne disease cases on the East End has escalated to the point of a public health crisis.”

Reported cases of Lyme disease in New York state have risen from 5,589 in 2010 to 6,816 in 2013, with the incidence rates of other tick-borne diseases babesiosis and anaplasmosis both doubling in the same time frame.

This mood of raised awareness has been reflected in the decision taken by State Senator Ken LaValle to combat the problem head on. As such, it was reported earlier this month that Senator LaValle had secured $150,000 of state funding specifically for the purpose of fighting tick-borne disease in the East End.

Speaking to this end, Senator LaValle said, “With the high incidence of these tick-borne illnesses on the East End, we need to work to eradicate the diseases and end the transmission to individuals. I look forward to working with the towns and villages to monitor the planned initiatives and the results so we can better develop a long-term effective tick management strategy.”

Gerald T. Simons of Southampton Hospital’s Tick-Born Disease Resource Center explained the surge in cases of tick-borne diseases, and the resultant precautions come as a result of the recent numeral escalation of the particularly malevolent lone star tick.

“Five or six years ago, we would only see a patient with a lone star tick bite on a very rare occasion,” said Mr. Simons, “but now it seems to be the predominant type that we see people being bitten by.”

The amblyomma americanum, or lone star tick, is a species of tick that is easily identifiable by the distinctive white spot found on its back. Found most commonly in wooded areas, particularly in forests with thick underbrush or large trees, it is indigenous to much of the US, with distribution ranging from Texas to Iowa in the Midwest, and east to the coast where they can survive as far north as Maine.

Though the lone star ticks only transmit Lyme disease in extremely rare cases, they often carry the harmful ehrlichia bacteria. Ehrlichia, when transmitted to humans, can produce serious diseases like ehrlichiosis and tularemia.

Unlike Lyme disease, which can lay dormant for weeks without producing any notable symptoms, ehrlichia tends to bring out reasonably obvious symptoms within 48 hours of an infectious tick bite. These symptoms include fatigue, fever, headache, muscle pains, swollen glands and a circular rash, not dissimilar from that brought out by Lyme.

The early arrival of these symptoms often aid the swift diagnosis of diseases caused by the ehrlichia bacteria, and they can therefore be effectively treated with antibiotics. However the lone star tick also causes another, more devastating malady.

Recently there has been a number of cases in which lone star tick bites have caused meat allergies, with victims instilled with an unprecedented and total aversion to red meat. The breaching of this allergy has resulted in hives, swelling and breathing problems, with full anaphylactic shock being brought on in some cases.

This problem is the result of a sugar called alpha-gal being passed from the lone star tick to its human host, who’s immune system detects it as an invader and builds up antibodies against it. Therefore, when the alpha-gal present in red meats like beef, pork and venison comes into contact with the body, the antibodies do what they can to keep out what they believe to be harmful invaders, where the alpha-gal would have previously been broken down by the stomach.

The rising wariness of the lone star tick has been accentuated by its reputation as particularly aggressive, seeming to be more intent on latching on to a host.

“Unlike a deer tick, which will just sit on some grass and wait for a mammal to pass, the lone star tick is sensitive to the carbon dioxide given off by people, and will actively pursue that.” said Mr. Simons. “It is more than capable, for example, of moving across a yard to where it knows people are.”

Mr. Simons went on to explain that the harsher winters experienced by the east coast in recent years had actually exacerbated this problem.

“People are always asking, ‘If we have such a long, cold winter, how are these ticks surviving?’” he added. “And though we’ve seen a slight decrease in the number of tick bites being reported over the winter, the ticks that do survive are the most infectious, the most virulent, and the most angry.”

For more information about tick-borne diseases and prevention, contact the Tick-Borne Disease Resource Center at Southampton Hospital, either at (631) 726-TICK or through its website www.southamptonhospital.org/services/tick-borne-disease-resource-center.

Wright To Head Hospital Board

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Ken Wright Board Chair 071614

Southampton Hospital’s board of directors on July 12 elected Kenneth B. Wright its chairman.  He succeeds Peter Larsen who was a member of the board for 15 years and served 10 years as chairman.

A hospital board member since 2004, Mr. Wright was previously co-vice chairman along with attorney Richard J. Hiegel. He serves on the board’s executive, facilities and properties, finance and budget, and public affairs committees.

Born at Southampton Hospital, Mr. Wright is the son of the late Dr. Kenneth B. Wright, who at one time served as the hospital’s chief of surgery.

Mr. Wright is a resident of Southampton and is the founder of Wright & Company Construction Inc. in Bridgehampton.

Marathon Organizers Present Check to Southampton Hospital

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Bridgehampton Half Donation 071714

Pictured, back row, left to right, are Southampton Hospital Foundation president Steven Bernstein, hospital CEO and president Robert S. Chaloner, and Matt Linick, a partner in the Bridgehampton Half; front row, left to right, Diane Weinberger and Amanda Moszkowski, Hamptons Marathon and Bridgehampton Half organizers.

 

Organizers of the Hamptons Marathon and Bridgehampton Half presented Southampton Hospital with a donation of $10,000 representing a portion of the proceeds from their first annual half marathon, which took place on Saturday, May 10.  The organization’s eighth annual Hamptons Marathon will be held on September 27 in East Hampton. The event is sold out, but volunteers are needed. More information, visit  bridgehamptonhalf.com and hamptonsmarathon.com.

Angie’s Spa Grant Benefits Cancer Patients

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Southampton Hospital recently received a $13,500 grant from Angie’s Spa, which will help the hospital provide massage therapy for cancer patients.

Angie’s Spa, a charitable cancer foundation, funds programs to provide free therapeutic spa services to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy.

The funding will provide complimentary message therapy to cancer patients undergoing chemotherapy treatment at Eastern Long Island Hematology/Oncology. The grant will also allow expanded hours in Southampton and a new program for patients undergoing chemotherapy in the Riverhead office.

The message therapy is designed to alleviate painful side effects through relaxation to enhance traditional treatments, as well as give cancer patients a self-esteem boost. Licenses massage therapists from Southampton Hospital’s Ed and Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute will provide the services.

For more information, call 631-726-8800.

Nursing Award for Patricia Wright

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Patricia Darcey, RN, chief nursing officer and vice president of Patient Care Services at Southampton Hospital and chairwoman of the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council Nurse Executives Committee; Patricia Wright, RN, Southampton Hospital, Nurse of Excellence Award winner; Betty Commander, RN, nurse manager of Southampton Hospital’s Kathleen D. Allen Maternity Center; and Valerie Terzano RN, member of the NSHC Nurse of Excellence sub-committee and senior vice president of nursing and chief nursing officer, Winthrop-University Hospital.

By Stephen J. Kotz

Patricia Wright, RN, a nurse in Southampton Hospital’s Kathleen D. Allen Maternity Center, has been honored with the 2014 Nurse of Excellence Award by the Nassau-Suffolk Hospital Council. Ms. Wright received the award on May 21 at a ceremony hosted by the council at the Woodbury Country Club.

Each year, leading nurses from Long Island’s hospitals and nursing education programs honor their peers with the awards, with one nurse from each of its member hospitals nominated for outstanding leadership and clinical practice.

Southampton Hospital Expands Women’s Health Program

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Southampton Hospital (southamptonhospital.org) has announced an expansion of its women’s health program with the addition of Lisa Johnson, DPT, OCS, WCS, CSCS, whose practice, Women’s Health Physical Therapy, encompasses services related to the evaluation, treatment, and education of women’s health issues across the life span.

Dr. Johnson’s health program looks at issues like dysfunction in urology, pelvic floor dysfunction and pain, obstetrics, gynecology, gastroenterology, bone health, post-breast cancer surgical rehabilitation, eating disorders, menopausal symptoms, sexual health, sports medicine issues unique to women, and symptoms of abuse. Appointments for Dr. Johnson can be arranged through the hospital’s Ed & Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute at 631-726-8800.

“Dr. Johnson is one of only 10 specialists in New York certified by the American Board of Physical Therapy Specialties—there are only 154 nationwide—as a Clinical Specialist in Orthopedic Physical Therapy, as well as in Women’s Health. We are very fortunate to have her experience available to our patients,” said Dr. Fredric I. Weinbaum, the hospital’s Chief Medical Officer.

New Affordable Health Care Clinic Opens in Southampton

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Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone and HRHCare President and CEO Anne Kauffman Nolon officially opened the Kraus Family Health Center of the Hamptons at Southampton Hospital on Wednesday. Photo by Mara Certic.

 

By Mara Certic

“The face of healthcare is changing and the County of Suffolk is at the forefront of it,” said Assemblyman Fred W. Thiele Jr. at the grand opening of the Kraus Family Health Center of the Hamptons on Wednesday, May 21.

Hudson River HealthCare, a not-for-profit health care system, had an official ribbon-cutting ceremony at the new center at Southampton Hospital. Construction of the almost 10,000 square foot clinic began in October of 2013.

HRHCare’s mission is “to increase access to comprehensive primary and preventive health care and to improve the health status of our community, especially for the underserved and vulnerable.”

Its first center opened in Peekskill in July 1975; it now has 22 centers in New York, which provide care for more than 90,000 patients. English and Spanish are spoken at every site, and six other languages are spoken at specific HRHCare clinics.

Suffolk County Legislator Jay Schneiderman said that the new clinic offers “significantly more” than what the urgent care clinics in both East Hampton and Southampton previously provided.

The new center will offer affordable health care, including family medicine, behavioral health services, dental care and women’s health services.

The clinic unofficially opened its doors on March 17 to provide family medicine services. Since then nearly 800 patients have made 1,200 visits to this site, according to HRHCare President and CEO Anne Kauffman Nolon. In the first month the clinic was open, 60 percent of its patients were uninsured and 182 of them were homeless. “It’s good to know that we’re really meeting a need here,” Ms. Nolon said.

Robert Chaloner, President and CEO of Southampton Hospital, announced that the Kraus Family Health Center already has its first six resident doctors, who will start in July. “As your landlord, we promise to be kind,” he said to Ms. Nolon on Wednesday.

Suffolk County Executive Steve Bellone, the day’s keynote speaker, said that the new facility is a “major advancement” for Suffolk County and thanked Hudson River Healthcare; he said that its hard work is the “main reason” that the clinic is open today.

Mr. Bellone also thanked local government officials for their dedication in seeing this project through: “If I had one word to describe Jay it would be relentless,” he said of Mr. Schneiderman. “We wouldn’t be here today if it wasn’t for his tenacity.”

“And our great partners at the town level,” he continued. “Supervisor Anna Throne-Holst, on this issue and so many others, you’re a great leader. And all of our partners in Southampton, thank you.”

The Kraus Family Health Center of the Hamptons is located at Southampton Hospital at 330 Meeting House Lane, Southampton. For more information visit hrhcare.org or call (631) 268-1008.

 

Finney Comes Forward as $20 Million Lotto Winner

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Southampton Hospital orderly Cameron Finney, 48, of Mastic, came forward last Thursday, May 16 at the New York Lottery’s Plainview Center as the winner of a $20 million Mega Millions jackpot.

Mr. Finney, who won the jackpot in a March 25 drawing, claimed his winnings Thursday, which amounts to $7.4 million after state and tax withholdings.

According to a release issued by the New York Lottery, Mr. Finney had been out for a chicken dinner at Popeye’s the evening of the drawing when he made a last-minute decision to go next door for a lottery ticket, spending just $4. The next day, while buying breakfast, Mr. Finney swiped his ticket and saw the “Big Winner” message. The ticket was sold at a gas station in Coram.

Mr. Finney collected his winnings with his wife, Donna, and daughter, Christina.

Southampton Hospital Class Offers a Better Birthing Experience

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DSC_0127Left, Kate Westra, with her children, Aidan, left, and Simone, is teaching hypnobirthing classes at Southampton Hospital’s Ed and Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute. Kotz photo

By Stephen J. Kotz

Kate Westra’s first birth was similar to those experienced by most American women, a frightening and painful experience. “I felt completely unprepared and out of control,” she said of the birth of her son, Aidan, now six-and-a-half, in a Seattle hospital.

What’s more, she felt disconnected from the process. After a nine-month journey through her pregnancy, she felt as though she had missed the most important part: the birth.

But by the time she had her second child, Simone, three years ago in Bridgeport, Connecticut, Ms. Westra had become a devotee to hypnobirthing, a technique that uses breathing techniques, visualization, and self-hypnosis to help women have easier and more comfortable births. There was a night-and-day difference between the two experiences, she said.

“The birth of my daughter was the most beautiful, empowering birth I could have hoped for,” she said.

It was such a powerful experience that Ms. Westra gave up her career in marketing and advertising to become a hypnobirth certified educator through the Hypnobirthing Institute, and started teaching classes out of her East Quogue home shortly after moving to Southampton two years ago. Last fall, she began to offer the classes at the Ed and Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute at Southampton Hospital.

A new five-week series starts on Thursday, March 27. The classes meet from 5:30 to 8 p.m. in room. There is a $400 fee per couple.

Ms. Westra said her course is open to anyone who wants to develop skills to better manage their birth, whether they plan on having their baby at home or in the hospital. She said she would recommend that a couple take the class between the 20th and25th week of a pregnancy, “but it’s never too late and it’s never too early. Every woman can have the birth she wants.”

The five sessions cover a lot of ground, from offering basic information on how women’s bodies  have adapted to the birthing process and how they can assist that process rather than fight it, to the steps of labor and just about everything in between, including instruction in light body massage, nutrition, breathing, and self-hypnosis.

If meditation is the art of emptying one’s mind of thought, self-hypnosis is learning how to sharply focus the mind on the task at hand while remaining completely relaxed, Ms. Westra said.

“In the subconscious, all your memories are stacked” like books on a shelf, Ms. Westra said. If woman has been told over and over again that birth is a terrible experience, those are the kind of thoughts her mind will pull out of storage. If, however, she has learned that the birth experience can be a tremendously fulfilling one, she is much more likely to feel in control when she goes into labor, she said.

The most important lesson though, is for women to embrace the experience of giving birth rather than fear it. “The key is understanding what is going on,” said Ms. Westra. “Once we let the fear in, our fight or flight instinct kicks in.” And when that happens, a woman loses the benefit of the naturally incurring—and pain reducing endorphins—and instead starts producing adrenalin, which puts stress on the body rather than relaxing it.

It is better, she said, to recognize “we have no control over it, and if we can get out the way and let the birthing process happen, it will most likely result in a normal birth without complications.”

While Ms. Westra said some women are lucky enough to experience a nearly pain-free birth, she pointed out that the process is called “labor” for a reason. Giving birth is, obviously, hard work, “but it doesn’t have to be this horrible, painful experience.”

For more information about hypnobirthing classes, call the Ed and Phyllis Davis Wellness Institute at Southampton Hospital at 728-9355 or visit hamptonswellnessinstitute.org for visit Ms. Westra’s website, hbhamptons.com.