Tag Archive | "Southampton"

Trustees Talk Role in the Modern World

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By Gianna Volpe

About 50 residents and community members gathered at a forum sponsored by the League of Women Voters of the Hamptons on Monday at which representatives of the East Hampton and Southampton Town Trustees discussed their role in modern government.

The Trustees of both towns trace their authority to colonial-era patents and were once the local governing bodies when King James II was on the throne in England. They remain to this day, with a primary focus on protecting the East End’s undeveloped common lands, including beaches and the bottomlands of ponds.

The forum took place at the Hampton Library in Bridgehampton.

“The Trustees were the governing board long before there was a town board, long before there was a supervisor, long before there was a United States of America, so our patents are recognized right up ’til now,” explained Southampton Town Trustee Ed Warner Jr. “We had a lot of natural product that was here and was very important to England and that’s why they made sure we had good management practices in the colonies.”

Mr. Warner, a commercial fisherman, said this focus on protecting natural resources has led to his interest in educating the town board and others on the ways of the bays and oceans, particularly in terms of the town’s Local Waterfront Revitalization Program.

“When I first became involved in this program they didn’t even recognize sea level rise,” Mr. Warner said of Southampton’s LWRP. “One of the things that I brought to the Urban Harbor Institute is the understanding that we live on a barrier beach…that protects the mainland, and the town or the village is allowing people to build very big residences right close to the dunes…. Something that should be incorporated into this is a fallback plan. Basically, these houses should be moved back as the dunes and the beaches wash away slowly, which is inevitable.”

He said such plans should focus on things like making sure hard structures like rock abatements and bulkheads are avoided or only temporary solutions, and said care should be given to dredging projects.

“You can only dig so much sand out of the ocean, and you’re losing fish habitat,” he said of the importance of doing environmental impact studies of dredging projects. “I’m a commercial fisherman and my son is a dragger and we work in these areas every year. It’s one of the most productive squid fisheries on the East Coast. It’s a multi-million dollar fishery, and if we take away the habitat for these squid, which is a bait for larger fish like striped bass, we’re going to lose all the bigger fisheries out here.”

East Hampton Town Trustee Diane McNally stressed the importance of establishing such plans when there is not an emergency.

“The LWRP was drafted at a time when everyone was…thinking about the resources on multiple levels as they need to be protected,” she said. “When people see that water coming at them, they panic and that’s when mistakes get made.”

Southampton Town Trustee Scott Horowitz said he is interested in working respectfully alongside the town board when it comes to resolving such issues.

“I think it’s important that there is a mutual understanding and a respect that each board has an authority and a jurisdiction and if there’s a respect for that, I think we can get along and work together just fine,” he said. “The press always likes to paint that there’s a big rift or a problem. Sometimes we do disagree, but there’s a lot of things we do have common ground on, that we do have respect for each other and we work hard on, but people don’t want to write about the train running on time, they write about the train wrecks…I’m very, very happy to work with whatever department it is – federal, state, the town, the county whoever it is…. The only thing I require is a mutual respect back and forth to the fact that we’re trying to solve a problem in the best interest of the people we represent.”

That resonated with Southampton Town Board member Bridget Fleming, who said she came to the meeting because she also believes board and Trustee members should work closely with one another.

“Our coastal resources are our greatest assets, so we have to work closely with the Trustees who have so much experience,” said Ms. Fleming. “They’re out there on the bays every day, so I really admire the effort and the experience. I think it’s always best for the community when two important decision making boards are working…with mutual understanding because we do sometimes have different points of view, different interests and different constituencies protecting different parts of our coastal assets and our resources, but if we have mutual respect we can learn from experience.”

 

 

Petition Calls on Sag Harbor Village to Stem the Tide of Development

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A house on Howard Street, one of many currently under re-development in Sag Harbor. Stephen J. Kotz photo.

A house on Howard Street, one of many currently under re-development in Sag Harbor. Stephen J. Kotz photo.

By Stephen J. Kotz

A petition drive launched by the civic organization, Save Sag Harbor, which decries over-development in the village and demands local government take steps to control it and protect the village’s historic character, has already been signed by more than 750 people, according to organizers.

And they say they are heartened by the fact that approximately one-third of those signing on have taken the extra step to add their own comments to the petition, which appears on the group’s website, savesagharbor.com.

“It is going exceedingly well. We are amazed and encouraged by the outpouring,” said Jayne Young, a member of Save Sag Harbor’s board. “And the attention to this is not flagging at all. People are staying with it.”

The response, added Randy Croxton, another board member, indicates that the changes that have been occurring in the village, especially its historic district, have “really struck a nerve.”

The petition drive, which was launched in February, describes the village as at risk and cites “an unprecedented and damaging flood of development” that has resulted in the demolition of historic houses and the construction of oversized ones in their place.

It calls for village regulatory boards to take three steps to help stem the tide. The first is for the village Zoning Board of Appeals to stop granting variances “for houses which are excessively large and are incongruous in character to existing house in our historic neighborhoods.”

The petition also calls for the Board of Historic Preservation and Architectural Review to stop approving “over-sized construction and additions that are out of context in scale and placement with the neighboring environment.”

Finally, it urges the ZBA to consult with the ARB before ruling on applications to ensure that they are appropriate for the historic district.

Although the petition drive clearly seeks changes to the way business is conducted in the village, Ms. Young said she was not prepared to talk about additional steps the organization believes will need to be taken to protect the village.

Mr. Croxton said the Save Sag Harbor board would meet regularly in the coming months to work on more formal recommendations to the village, which would likely begin with asking it to hire a historic preservation consultant, as once was the case, to help the boards navigate the process.

He said the effort was not meant as an attack on the volunteer members who now serve on the village’s various review boards, who, he said are doing the best they can. But he added the changes occurring across the village are “showing where there are weaknesses in the interpretation of the code.”

He added that he hoped people who have signed the petition would take a leadership role in helping the village come up with solutions. “What we are assuming and hoping for going forward is a kind of passionate outpouring from the people who really have an interest,” he said.

Anton Hagen, the chairman of the village Zoning Board of Appeals, agreed with at least one aspect of the petition. “It really is incumbent upon us to have better communication,” he said of the ZBA and the ARB.

But he added that it is difficult for the ZBA to turn down applications for bigger houses, especially after it has previously issued variances for similar sized houses and noted that real estate investors have learned how to effectively game the system by seeking approval for the largest possible house. “You can say it kind of snuck up on Sag Harbor, this maxing out of lots,” he said. “We have to get ahead of the curve.”

He added he would like to see the village changing its code to adopt a maximum gross floor area ratio provision, as other neighboring communities, including North Haven, have already done. Such a code would limit the size of a house to the size of the given lot, as opposed to allowing a set size.

Mayor Brian Gilbride said village officials have begun looking into the possibility of adopting a floor area ratio amendment to the code, but said it was part of an ongoing process on the part of the village to correct problems in its code.

“Tonight we’ll extend the wetlands permit moratorium” he said on Tuesday, referring to that evening’s village board meeting. “Hopefully we’ll get that revised law done and we can move on. These are not quick fixes.”

The mayor suggested that Save Sag Harbor members may want to take a more active role, by appearing before the ZBA, ARB or planning board to voice their concerns.

Sag Harbor, he said, is facing the same kinds of pressures other East End communities have experienced. “It’s not a factory town anymore, it’s not a blue collar town anymore,” he said. “People are buying houses for a million dollars, knocking them down and building bigger houses.”

Mr. Croxton said there were still “a lot of people who have held on in a multi-generational way, who insist on passing down the houses they have and the community that they have.”

And Ms. Young said the village still had a vibrant future in front of it. “More people are raising their families here, more people are coming out for longer weekends, and there is a corps of people from the surrounding area who rely on it.”

PechaKucha Returns to the Parrish

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PechaKucha Hamptons circle lg

The Parrish Art Museum will present volume 11 of its popular PechaKucha Night Hamptons on Friday, March 6 at 6 p.m. with a group of speakers delivering rapid fire presentations on what it is to live creatively on the East End. Each speaker shows 20 slides for 20 seconds each, resulting in a compelling six-minute, 40-second long presentation.

PechaKucha Night Hamptons spotlights the staggering number of creative individuals who live on the East End,” said series organizer Andrea Grover, Century Arts Foundation Curator of Special Projects at the Parrish. “Their collective energy and inventiveness has made this program one of our main attractions.”

PechaKucha Night Hamptons, Vol. 11 presenters include writer and restaurateur Bruce Buschel; artist hi and lifestyle health coach and self-proclaimed “Kraut Kween” Nadia Ernestus; photographer Francine Fleischer; close-up magician and author Allan Kronzek; digital entrepreneurs Julie and Dan Resnick; artist Christine Sciulli; poet Julie Sheehan; and master beader and Shinnecock ceremonial dancer Tohanash Tarrant.

The Parrish Art Museum joins over 700 cities globally in hosting these events. Named for the sound of “chit-chat” in Japanese, PechaKucha Nights is the international, fast-paced presentation series founded in Tokyo by Astrid Klein and Mark Dytham of Klein Dytham architecture in 2003. Tickets for PechaKucha Night Hamptons Vol. 11 are currently sold out, however tickets may become available through the Parrish website (parrishart.org) this week. In addition, an in-person wait list will begin at 5pm on March 6th in the Museum lobby. Ticket prices are $10, free for members, children, and students, and include Museum admission.

 

“Clyborne Park” Opens March 12 At Hampton Theatre Company

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“Clybourne Park”—the wickedly funny and provocative play by Bruce Norris about how the different faces and shades of racism can make a straightforward real estate transaction anything but—will be the third production of the Hampton Theatre Company’s 30th anniversary season. The Pulitzer Prize and Tony Award-winning play opens on March 12 at the Quogue Community Hall and will run through March 29.

The two acts of “Clybourne Park” are in fact two separate plays set 50 years apart and spinning off Lorraine Hansberry’s landmark drama, “A Raisin in the Sun.” With a cast of seven taking on different roles in the play’s two halves, act one is set in 1959, as nervous community leaders anxiously try to stop the sale of a home to a black family. Act two is set in the same house in the present day, as the now predominantly African-American neighborhood battles to stand fast against the onslaught of gentrification.

Calling the play, which won the Olivier and Evening Standard awards for its London production, a “sharp-witted, sharp-toothed comedy of American uneasiness,” Ben Brantley wrote in The New York Times that “the very structure of ‘Clybourne Park’ posits the idea of a nation (and even a world) trapped in a societal purgatory of ineptitude and anxiety.”

The cast of “Clybourne Park” features four Hampton Theatre Company veterans and three newcomers. Matt Conlon was most recently on the Quogue stage in the fall in the role of Ellwood P. Dowd in “Harvey,” following his turn in the title role in “The Foreigner” last March. Joe Pallister, who also appeared in “The Foreigner,” was last on the Quogue stage in last spring’s production of “God of Carnage.”  Ben Schnickel is familiar to Hampton Theatre Company audiences from “The Foreigner,” as well as “The Drawer Boy,” “Becky’s New Car,” and “Rabbit Hole.” Returning to the Quogue stage for the first time since her appearance in “Desperate Affection,” Rebecca Edana first appeared with the HTC in the company’s revival of “Bedroom Farce.” Rounding out the cast and trailing extensive lists of New York and regional credits are Juanita Frederick, Shonn McCloud, and Anette Michelle Sanders. HTC Executive Director Sarah Hunnewell will direct.

“Clybourne Park” runs at the Quogue Community Hall from March 12 through 29, with shows on Thursdays and Fridays at 7 p.m., Saturdays at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2:30 p.m. Information is available at hamptontheatre.org. Tickets can also be purchased by calling 1 (866) 811-4111.

 

Almond Expands Into Tribeca

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Chef Jason Weiner.

Chef Jason Weiner.

By Gianna Volpe

Chef Jason Weiner now has another Almond to love, which brings the count up to four if one considers his lovely wife – namesake to the now three Almond restaurants owned by Mr. Weiner and partner, Eric Lemonides – as the brand-new Tribeca location had its official opening last Wednesday night.

“We had a press dinner, then four nights of friends and families,” Chef Weiner said of private events that led up to Almond Tribeca’s opening night. “Before that we had a mock service where half of our staff sat down and ate while the other half took orders and then we flipped it around. That’s part of the process, so by opening night it’s almost old hat because we’ve been doing it for more than a week.”

This is a common service tightening ritual among experienced restaurateurs and one that should not be ignored, according to Chef Weiner.

“It’s so important,” he said of practicing mock service trials before opening a new restaurant. “The last thing we want to do is charge people money when we don’t really have it together.”

Lovers of Bridgehampton and Manhattan’s Almond locations will be happy to learn the menu in Tribeca includes the restaurant’s tri-steak standard, as well as its signature Caesar salad and Brussels sprouts two ways, but may be thrilled by its new roast chicken for two and a unique duck dish Chef Weiner said is simply bursting with Long Island flavor.
He said the duck breast dish combines the Amber Waves Farm sweet potato and Long Island Mushroom Company shitake ravioli that can found at Almond Bridgehampton with a Crescent Farms duck breast that is served with house-made Sirracha at its Tribeca location and a l’orange in Manhattan.

“We’re also doing a super fantastic lobster sausage appetizer, which is delicious and getting some great feedback,” Chef Weiner said of the menu at Almond Tribeca. “I’m still keeping as local as possible, but bringing stuff from my friends on Long Island. If you know us from other places, the menu will have familiarity to you, but there are some things on there that are specific to the new space.”

That includes the décor at Almond on Tribeca’s Franklin Street, which East Enders may also be pleased to learn includes the red-back dropped zebra herd found in the signature Scalamandre wallpaper found at Almond’s Bridgehampton location.

“It has a lot of warmth to it, but is airy and Tribeca-ish in its own right; we like our places to stand on their own,” said Chef Weiner.

He added Almond Tribeca is a “pretty, cool place” that can be found “smack dab” between TriBeCa Grill and Nobu, which belongs to Myriad Restaurant Group’s Drew Nieporent.

“Eric [Lemonides] worked for him as the general manager of Della Femina 20 years ago,” Chef Weiner said of Mr. Nieporent. “We’ve been building the place since October, so he’s been popping in to give us some informal advice and wish us well. He’s a good guy…a real trailblazer. They opened TriBeCa grill 25 years ago when there really wasn’t much down there, so the guy’s a visionary, obviously.”
Chef Weiner said today the area’s unique dichotomy – where “families and commerce” set streets a-bustle by day leaving behind “ a lot of dark alleyways” by night – is one in which he and his team are excited to join.

“Tribeca is very specific” he said of the new Almond location. “We’re really psyched to be down there.”

Almond Tribeca is located at 186 Franklin Street in New York City. Almond NYC is located at 12 East 22nd Street in New York City. Almond Bridgehampton is located at One Ocean Road in Bridgehampton. For more information, visit almon

Pierson Students Earn Choral Society of the Hamptons Scholarships

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Pierson High School Senior Rebecca Dwoskin.

Pierson High School Senior Rebecca Dwoskin.

Four South Fork high school seniors have won this year’s scholarships for voice training from the Choral Society of the Hamptons, including three students from Pierson High School.

The Society established the scholarship program more than two decades ago and has awarded scholarships to several dozen students, a number of whom have gone on to professional careers in music and active participation in amateur musical organizations.

The 2014 winners were announced this week.

Rebeccsa Dwoskin, a senior at Pierson High School, has performed in a number of school musicals locally, including “A Chorus Line.” Ms. Dwoskin has studied voice with Amanda Jones of East Hampton, while also taking dance and performing as a flutist. Her musical theater roles have also included the title role in Annie. Her chorus teacher, Suzanne Nicoletti, wrote the committee that “she has the work ethic, dedication and passion” for a successful career.

Oree Livni, also a Pierson senior, is a member of the Choral Society and studies piano with Daniel Koontz. Mr. Livni has performed in middle and high school choirs as well as in the Hamptons Music Educators Association (HMEA) festival and in the New York State School Music Association (NYSMA) chorus.

“One of the most musical teenagers I have met,” said Ms. Nicoletti.

Megan Beedenbender, another Pierson senior will also receive scholarship. Since sixth grade, she has sung in choirs at HMEA and NYSMA performances, as well as in the New York State Council of Administrators of Music Education chorus. “Music is my biggest passion,” she says, and she was described by Ms. Nicoletti as “my most enthusiastic singer.” In college, she hopes to expand her knowledge of classical works in German and Italian.

Southampton High School’s Jacqueline Minogue also earned an award.

Ms. Minogue and Ms. Dwoskin won Doris and William Leese Scholarships worth $500. Mr. Livni won the Norman Dello Joio Scholarship and Ms. Beedenbender the Charlotte Rogers Smith Scholarship, each worth $250.

Parrish Recognizes 25 Young Artists

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The 2015 Student Exhibition, High School Artists Reception. Photo by Tom Kochie

The 2015 Student Exhibition, High School Artists Reception. Photo by Tom Kochie

On Saturday, February 28, the Parrish Art Museum will honor 25 young artists for their work that is on view in the 2015 Student Exhibition. Selected from more than 150 high school student participants by Neill Slaughter, a professor of Visual Art at Long Island University, C.W. Post campus, these up-and-coming artists will be celebrated at a ceremony at the museum, where Parrish Director Terrie Sultan and Mr. Slaughter will present Awards of Excellence to 19 Seniors, and “Ones to Watch” Awards to six underclassmen.

Mr. Slaughter, a practicing artist and professor for 36 years who has been the judge at several Student Exhibitions, based his selection of winners on a variety of criteria, not limited to ability nor talent.

“While I certainly value skill and technique, ultimately I look for an honesty and truth in the artwork,” he said. “Artists become inspired by something, which is … interpreted as well as communicated visually. The best art is transcendent, whereby the viewer is emotionally moved or taken to another place by the artist’s interpretation.”

The ceremony will be held from 1 to 2 p.m. with Parrish Education Director Cara Conklin-Wingfield announcing the names of the winners, who will come forward with their teacher to accept certificates. Refreshments will be served at the event, which is open to the public.

The Student Exhibition, a 60-year tradition at the Parrish Art Museum, opened this year on January 31 and is on view through March 1, featuring the work of more than 2,000 young artists from public, private, parochial, and home schools on the East End.

On the Southampton and East Hampton towns, East Hampton High School’s Claudia Fino will be honored for her drawing, “Three Spheres.” Southampton High School’s Kim Gonzalez will be awarded for her mixed media piece, “Concentration.” Pierson’s Theo Gray will be honored for his photography project, “Untitled.” East Hampton High School’s Brenden Snow and The Ross School’s Brenna Leaver are also honored for their untitled photography projects. In printmaking, Pierson’s Daniella Nolan has received honors for her piece, “Innocence;” The Ross School’s Evelyn Jiaoxue and Abby Wang will also be honored for “Untitled,” and “The Rape of Nanking,” respectively. In 3-D sculpture, Pierson’s Zoe Diskin will be honored for her “Self Portrait Assemblage.”

Southampton’s Abby Clemente and East Hampton’s Elvis Uchupaille have been named as underclassmen “One’s to Watch.”

The Parrish Art Museum is located at 279 Montauk Highway in Water Mill. For more information, call (631) 283-2118 or visit parrishart.org. 

HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show at Bay Street

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Corinne Fisher is one of several comedians that will appear at Bay Street Theater’s HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show.

Corinne Fisher is one of several comedians that will appear at Bay Street Theater’s HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show.

Bay Street Theater & Sag Harbor Center for the Arts will host the HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show, hosted by Joseph Vecsey, on Saturday, February 28 at 8 p.m. The comedy show features rising stars of comedy, including Mr. Vecsey. Other comics for the evening include Corinne Fisher (Guys We F*****), Regina DeCicco (Gotham AXS TV), and Chris Clarke (BET Comic View).

Mr. Vecsey has performed in bars, clubs, theaters, colleges, restaurants, rough urban rooms in Brooklyn and Staten Island, even a hostel on 103rd and Amsterdam. He opened for Jim Breuer and Susie Essman at Bay Street Theater in 2013. Since the beginning of his show at Bay Street Theater he has hosted various shows in New York City and popular clubs like the Laff House in Philadelphia and Jokers Wild in New Haven.

Ms. Fisher is a stand-up comedian, writer and actor originally from Union, New Jersey. She first made a splash with her debut one-woman show Corinne Fisher: I STALK YOU, which had a run at The Peoples Improv Theater (The PIT) in the Summer of 2010 and was featured in Time Out New York. Since then, she has been a regular on the stand-up scene playing anything from dive bars to world-famous comedy clubs like Stand Up NY, New York Comedy Club, Caroline’s, Upright Citizens Brigade Theatre, Broadway Comedy Club, Comix, Laugh Boston, The Stress Factory & Gotham. Perhaps most notable is her duo show with Krystyna Hutchinson. In December 2013, the duo launched Guys We F*%!@*!: The Anti Slut-Shaming Podcast that now boasts over half a million subscribers.

Ms. DeCicco became the winner of the Ladies of Laughter competition (2012), which was held at various clubs all over Manhattan-with participants from all over the country. She was accepted into the 2013 Laughing Skull Festival in Atlanta, Georgia. She has performed at various comedy clubs and bars.

Mr. Clarke has appeared on BET’s 106th Park, the Las Vegas Comedy Festival, and was The Runner up in New England’s Funniest Comic Competition. Mr. Clarke has also appeared on BET Comic View.

Tickets to the HarborFrost All Star Comedy Show at Bay Street Theater, 2 Bay Street, Sag Harbor are $20 and are available online at baystreet.org or by calling the Bay Street Theater Box Office at (631) 725-9500.

 

Parrish Announces Chuck Close Photographs Exhibit

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Chuck Close (American, born 1940). Self-Portrait/Composite/Nine Parts, 1979. 9 Polaroids, 83 x 69 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Gift of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz.

Chuck Close (American, born 1940). Self-Portrait/Composite/Nine Parts, 1979. 9 Polaroids, 83 x 69 inches. Whitney Museum of American Art, New York, Gift of Barbara and Eugene Schwartz.

The Parrish Art Museum in Water Mill announced last week that it has organized Chuck Close Photographs, the first comprehensive survey of the photographic work of the renowned American artist. The exhibit will be on view May 10 through July 26 and will feature some 90 images from 1964 to the present, from early black and white manquettes to composite Polaroids to intimately scaled daguerreotypes and the most recent Polaroid nudes. The exhibition explores how Mr. Close, one of the most important figures in contemporary art, has stretched the boundaries of photographic means, methods, and approaches.

“The photographic origin of each Close painting is well known; however, Close’s exploration of the medium itself extends far beyond the use of photographs as a programmatic tool,” said Parrish Art Museum Director and exhibition co-organizer Terrie Sultan. “Whether he uses a photographic image as source material or as an end in and of itself, everything he creates begins with a photograph. Chuck Close Photographs provides an in-depth look at photography as the foundation of Close’s creative process.”

The exhibition builds on the Parrish Art Museum’s long history of working with Close, as Sultan also organized Chuck Close Prints: Process and Collaboration, which has travelled to nearly 20 venues worldwide since 2003. Chuck Close Photographs, co-organized by Sultan and Colin Westerbeck, independent curator and photography scholar, traces Close’s use of the camera throughout his more than 45-year career and features a variety of photographic media.

Madoo Talks Lecture Series Opens with Lindsey Taylor

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Lindsey Taylor.

Lindsey Taylor.

The Madoo Conservancy in Sagaponack will host its Madoo Talks Winter Lecture series in February and March, opening with Lindsey Taylor, one of the authors of “The Gardener’s Garden,” a book that explores gardens from around the world and throughout the ages meant to serve as an inspiration to the modern-day gardener. Ms. Taylor, who will speak on Sunday, February 22, will use examples such as

Hollister House, Dawn Ridge, Les Quatre Vents, Prospect Cottage and other personal idiosyncratic gardens featured in “The Gardener’s Garden,” to discuss the need for a garden to have a soul, passion and individual vision to be truly successful. A book signing will follow the discussion.

Madoo Talks will continue on Sunday, March 8 with Sagaponack farmer, artist and writer, Marilee Foster. Ms. Foster, whose family settled in Sagaponack during the mid-1700s, will take a realistic yet humorous look at development on the East End along with the difficulties of farming in the 21st century and the success at her wildly popular Sagg Main farmstand.

Stephen Orr, author of “The New American Herbal,” will join Madoo Talks on March 29, examining the long tradition of herbals while adding new layers of information based on a multicultural look at the herbs we use in our homes and gardens.

Maddo Talks: Lindsey Taylor will be held on Sunday, February 22 at noon at the Madoo Conservancy summer house studio, 618 Sagg Main Road in Sagaponack. Tickets are $25 for members; $30 for non-members and a reception, sponsored by The Topping Rose House, will follow. To reserve your seat, email info@madoo.org or call (631) 537-8200.